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    New York (CNN Business)The obituaries for the shooting victims of Robb Elementary took up three full pages in the Uvalde Leader-News on Thursday. The rest of the paper contains haunting questions about why they died. The newest edition of the paper makes clear that many Uvalde-area officials are steadfastly declining to comment, even to the local reporters they know best.Journalists from both local and national news outlets are hitting the same walls as public officials dodge questions and defer to ongoing investigations.At first the officials shared what we're now told was incorrect information about everything from the gunman being first confronted by a school officer (he wasn't, they've since said) to a teacher propping open a door (the latest version is it wasn't propped open when the gunman entered).Now the officials aren't sharing much of anything at all. The press briefings have stopped, with the last one held last Friday. The interviews have dwindled. "We are going to reserve comment until all state and federal agencies have completed their review," the Uvalde Consolidated Independent School District said in a statement...
    The June primary will host the first competitive race for Santa Clara County District Attorney in 12 years, with incumbent Jeff Rosen facing challengers after running uncontested in his last two re-election bids. As Rosen, career public defender Sajid Khan and Daniel Chung, a prosecutor who recently worked under Rosen, move closer to election day, they have presented three distinct visions for the top law-enforcement position in the South Bay. Incumbent Jeff Rosen is running for Santa Clara County District Attorney in the June elections. (Randy Vazquez/ Bay Area News Group Archive)  Jeff Rosen How he defines himself: Rosen was first elected in 2010 and is positioning himself as the only candidate with the established ability to lead the state’s second-largest district attorney’s office. He also touts himself as the only candidate who has worked with law enforcement in investigations, in contrast to his opponents, whom Rosen points out do not have meaningful experience trying cases. “The choice comes down to proven leadership of complex and important issues, and whether people want a balanced approach,” Rosen said in an interview....
    A teenager who married a 61-year-old dad-of-two says her parents have now welcomed him to the family despite calling the police the first time they met him. Military police officer Audrey Cheyenne-Smiley Moon, 19, first met husband Kevin, 61, on dating site Badoo, on January 9, 2020. Despite a 42-year age gap between them, she was initially attracted by his bio saying he too was a veteran who had worked for the military police. Within a few months of chatting online, they were officially a couple and had both said 'I love you'. In July 2020, Audrey and Kevin, from Modesto, California, officially met up in person and shared their first kiss. Unconventional: 19-year-old military officer Audrey Cheyenne-Smiley Moon has opened up about her age-gap romance with husband Kevin, who is 42 years her senior  Overcoming obstacles: Audrey and Kevin, 61, from Modesto, California, met on dating website Badoo in January 2020 and they quickly fell for one another 'Love at first sight': They spent six months talking online before meeting up in person for the...
    Most Americans in major cities are more worried about crime than defunding the police - as a new poll shows about 90% of Detroit residents actually want more cops. A new poll from USA TODAY and the Detroit Free Press conducted with Suffolk University found that Detroit residents overwhelmingly agree that they would feel safer with more cops on the street. Detroit was not alone, as a poll from WNBC, Telemundo 47 and Politico conducted with Marist last month shows that 70% of black Democrats want more cops patrolling the Big Apple. In that poll, 21% of likely Democratic voters even want the return of the plainclothes anti-crime police in some neighborhoods.  And in Chicago, another poll last month from the MacArthur Foundation found that 79% of residents in the Windy City said they feel safer when they see police in their neighborhoods. Those polls echo dozens of others conducted after the murder of George Floyd last May sparked loud calls to 'defund the police' - a barrage of public opinion showing most Americans do not actually want less cops.  DETROIT: A protester...
    America watched as hordes of rioters broke into the U.S. Capitol on January 6 — crushing through windows, pressing up stairways, and sending lawmakers and law enforcement running for their lives. The flood of protesters who streamed into the Capitol that day left federal authorities with an equally immense task: finding and charging those responsible. Federal prosecutors have now charged at least 312 people in connection with the events of January 6, according to court documents, and the government said in a court filing March 12 that around 100 more are still expected to be charged. "The Capitol Attack is likely the most complex investigation ever prosecuted by the Department of Justice," the filing read. Acting Deputy Attorney General John Carlin said last month, "The investigation into those responsible is moving at a speed and scale that's unprecedented, and rightly so. Those responsible must be held to account, and they will be." As law enforcement continues to round up alleged attackers, here's what CBS News has learned about the people who were arrested: How many have been charged?At least...
    On Monday night, alleged news anchor Don Lemon brought actor Terry Crews onto his program to lecture him for expressing unauthorized view points. Crews, who is black, has argued that Black Lives Matter should have more to say about black-on-black violence. Lemon explained that Black Lives Matter does not mean “all black lives,” but specifically that small minority of lives that are taken in police shootings. According to Lemon, BLM has an intentionally narrow focus, and that focus simply cannot make room for the thousands of black lives lost every year due to black-on-black violence. Even if this were true, it would be a paltry defense. If police brutality is all that Black Lives Matter cares about, then it should be called Police Brutality Matters. And even if it was called Police Brutality Matters, and it did stay on that topic, valid criticisms could be made about the choice to focus on a problem that is relatively small in comparison to all of the other dangers faced by the average black person, especially in the inner city. But as it...
    Theodore Roosevelt's equestrian statue has stood in front of the Museum of Natural History since 1940. It will soon be removed.Vanessa Carvalho/ZUMA For indispensable reporting on the coronavirus crisis and more, subscribe to Mother Jones' newsletters.The uprisings sparked by George Floyd’s death are, ostensibly, about the war on Black lives. Protesters demand that we say the names of the deceased, that their murderers be brought to justice, that the institution of policing be re-thought, defunded, dismantled. Yet as the anger and grief simmer, a deeper purpose has crystalized: dismantling white supremacy in all its various forms. Days after Floyd’s death, protesters defaced Confederate memorials and torched buildings connected to slavery. Within another week, more than a dozen racist statues were toppled, removed, or beheaded, sometimes with municipal support. Collective consciousness evolved in a frenzy; long-resisted changes suddenly felt like no-brainers. The Marines banned displays of Confederate flags on their bases, while brands raced to retire dated symbols. It’s been nothing short of a reckoning—and not just for Aunt Jemima and Robert E. Lee.  In Boston, Richmond, and St. Paul, it was Christopher...
    On Wednesday, the Fulton County, Georgia district attorney, Paul Howard Jr., charged former Atlanta police officer Garrett Rolfe with murder in addition to 10 other criminal charges. If convicted, Rolfe faces execution. JUDGE NAPOLITANO ON RAYSHARD BROOKS CASE: MURDER CHARGE AGAINST ATLANTA OFFICER IS 'CATASTROPHIC MISTAKE' The alleged crime at the heart of it is the shooting of a suspect called Rayshard Brooks. Last Friday, Rayshard Brooks passed out drunk in the drive-thru lane of a Wendy's in Atlanta. Brooks's car was blocking traffic, so restaurant employees called the police. They arrived -- Rolfe and his partner. They woke Brooks and they asked him if he had been drinking. Brooks admitted that he had had been. Officers then move forward with a textbook DUI arrest. Nothing unusual. But when they tried to take Brooks into custody, Brooks started swinging. He fought the officers to the ground and then snatched a Taser from one of them and tried to use it against Officer Rolfe. CLICK HERE TO GET THE OPINION NEWSLETTER When Brooks raised the Taser to fire, Rolfe shot and...
    (CNN)Digital support for Black Lives Matter is at an all-time high: Millions of people are using the hashtag daily. Recent polling suggests Americans' views of police and the current protests against police brutality are changing offline, too. The use of the Black Lives Matter hashtag peaked three days after George Floyd died in police custody, a Pew Research Center analysis published this week shows. #BlackLivesMatter was tweeted 8.8 million times that day, according to Pew. For the following 2 weeks, users tweeted #BlackLivesMatter an average of nearly 3.7 million times per day, Pew reported. The phrase "Black Lives Matter" emerged first in 2013 after George Zimmerman was acquitted for the killing of Trayvon Martin. It was recognized more widely during the protests against police brutality in Ferguson, Missouri, after 18-year-old Michael Brown was shot to death by police in 2014. One of the movement's guiding principles is ending "state-sanctioned violence," which includes killings by police. Recent polling suggests many Americans see this view -- and the recent protests against police brutality -- as legitimate. A Monmouth University poll released last...
    Republican political consultant Raynard Jackson ripped “radical liberal journalists” Joy Reid and Don Lemon during a White House roundtable Wednesday on race relations. “I wish they would quit lying about what you’ve done, specifically to the black community,” Jackson told President Donald Trump. “You got radical liberal journalists like Joy Reid from MSNBC, Don Lemon from CNN, Roland Martin, who are putting more poison into the black community than any drug dealer, who are killing more black folks than any white person with a sheet over their face.” Jackson continued to attack the media, saying they were “spreading these lies” about the state of the economy. (RELATED: Georgia Democratic Rep To Introduce Bill Classifying Attacks On Trump Supporters As Hate Crimes) “Spreading these lies about the economy you had, Mr. President, before the virus was a continuation of Obama,” Jackson said. “That’s just factually not true. I have a degree in accounting. I keep up with the economy. They’re lying.” “To all these folks on MSNBC, CNN, Roland Martin, what’re you afraid to have real black Republicans who know what...
    As both peaceful protests and violent rioting continue to unfold across much of the country following the May 25 death of George Floyd while in Minneapolis police custody, an extensive social media assessment has found that the unrest has been significantly amplified by the monthslong coronavirus lockdown and that more than half the online narrative is being driven by fraudulent accounts and bots. "The extent of these activities being greater in magnitude than previous events of this nature due to unresolved grievances centered around perceived social injustices, wealth work, and income inequality that were accelerated by the negative impacts of the Coronavirus crisis (such as unemployment, isolation, and social distancing)," the report, formulated by ENODO Global, a Virginia-based security and risk analytics firm, stated. "Underlying social tensions buttressed by anxiety and fear dominate online discussions and illustrate how George Floyd's death became a catalyst for unresolved grievances to manifest into violence." CREATING CHAOS: HOW ANTIFA AND OTHER EXTREMISTS DRIVE DISCORD ONLINE Key findings in the assessment, in which ENODO analysts conducted topic modeling and measured public sentiment from 902,678 Instagram posts, 878,137 Twitter...
    Your daily look at nonvirus stories in the news: 1. AMERICA RATTLED BY VIOLENCE, PANDEMIC With cities reeling by days of violent unrest, the U.S. heads into a new week with neighborhoods in shambles, urban streets on lockdown and confidence shaken in its leadership. 2. POLICE CRITICIZED FOR USE OF FORCE IN PROTESTS Some are questioning whether tough police tactics against demonstrators are making the violence worse rather than quelling it. TOP STORIES Rep. Ilhan Omar: Protesters feeling terrorized by National Guard troops, militarized police George Soros, 89, is still on a quest to destroy America Chattanooga police chief tells officers OK with George Floyd death to turn in badges 3. WHAT’S GETTING RENEWED FOCUS Pressure on Joe Biden to pick a black woman as his running mate after the police killing of George Floyd and the civil and political unrest that’s followed. 4. ‘NO KNOCK’ WARRANTS FACE SCRUTINY More than two months after police fatally shot Breonna Taylor, Louisville’s mayor suspends warrants that allow officers to enter a home without announcing their presence.
    Your daily look at nonvirus stories in the news: 1. AMERICA RATTLED BY VIOLENCE, PANDEMIC With cities reeling by days of violent unrest, the U.S. heads into a new week with neighborhoods in shambles, urban streets on lockdown and confidence shaken in its leadership. 2. POLICE CRITICIZED FOR USE OF FORCE IN PROTESTS Some are questioning whether tough police tactics against demonstrators are making the violence worse rather than quelling it. 3. WHAT’S GETTING RENEWED FOCUS Pressure on Joe Biden to pick a black woman as his running mate after the police killing of George Floyd and the civil and political unrest that’s followed. 4. ‘NO KNOCK’ WARRANTS FACE SCRUTINY More than two months after police fatally shot Breonna Taylor, Louisville’s mayor suspends warrants that allow officers to enter a home without announcing their presence. 5. UN FORCED TO CUT AID TO YEMEN Some 75% of the world body’s programs in the war-torn nation have had to shut their doors or reduce operations, affecting food and health services. Copyright © 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not...
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