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    The project aims to provide educators with a new grading approach that addresses "the systemic inequitable" aspects of current grading methods and promotes "more equitable learning environments for students broadly." Momsen, a professor and the Biological Sciences Director at NDSU, has extensively researched alternative grading approaches to create "equitable" courses. In a recent presentation titled, "Creating Equitable Courses Through Alternative Grading Approaches," Momsen argued that traditional grading methods can be "inaccurate," "biased," and "demotivating." The professor's presentation stated that grades do not always accurately represent a student's knowledge or learning process. Momsen detailed changes she made to her classroom, including allowing exams to be retaken, implementing self-graded assignments, and suggesting due dates. In addition, the professor stated that she no longer penalizes late work, puts a number or letter grade on assignments, or uses a mean to calculate final grades for students. In an August 2020 blog post, Momsen explained how she determines a final letter grade for students since it is a university requirement. "I did not adopt the usual 50% is an F (meaning a student...
    by Madison Rehbeh   Yale University’s Computer Science Department recently announced a $1 million donation given to them from the Bungie Foundation for a research project that fights against racist hair graphics in video games. “It is widely assumed that the algorithms used to generate virtual humans are based in biological underpinnings that accurately reflect all races and ethnicities,” the announcement reads. “In reality, however, these algorithms are deeply biased and based on predominantly European features.” The project will be led by Theodore Kim, Associate Professor of Computer Science at Yale. According to Kim, the project will “serve as an example of how to identify the products of systemic racism in computer graphics and demonstrate how to take concrete steps to ameliorate their harm.” Kim believes that this racial bias in video game hair stems from Computer Graphics Researchers that have “historically favored the simulation and rendering of straight hair, which is racially coded as European or Caucasian hair.” As stated on Kim’s admin page, “[h]e researches topics in physics-based animation, which include the simulation of fire, water, muscles, skin, and virtual humans.” In 2015, Pew Research Center conducted a...
    The University of Minnesota and two other universities will be researching how the media portrays health equity and how frequently it covers the topic. Cornell University, Wesleyan University, and the University of Minnesota School of Public Health have been awarded a grant to track media content and examine its impact on attitudes, values and behavior. The project, Collaborative on Media and Messaging, will also connect with journalists, public health officials, affected communities and advocacy organizations to apply the research findings to advance race and health equity. The $5 million grant from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation runs through August of 2025. The universities will split the research into three parts: Wesleyan will monitor news coverage and political commercials to identify developing social safety net issues and messaging that have racial equity implications; Cornell will conduct surveys and experiments to determine if the messaging is effective for promoting health and racial equity; and the University of Minnesota will conduct interviews and listening sessions with stakeholders in health equity advocacy, community organizing, public health practice and journalism to identify the problem areas in...
    By Jason Gale | Bloomberg Brain and nerve conditions like Alzheimer’s disease and stroke are significantly more common among Covid-19 survivors than those who’ve never had the disease, according to a study of millions of patient records that raises alarms about the pandemic’s devastating aftereffects. Former Covid patients had a 42% increased risk of neurologic problems a year after testing positive, the study published Thursday in the journal Nature Medicine showed. That translates to an extra seven cases of impaired cognition, memory disorders, Parkinson’s-like disease and dozens of other brain-related conditions for every 100 people who caught the coronavirus, according to scientists led by Ziyad Al-Aly, chief of research and development at the Veterans Affairs St. Louis Health Care System. “We’re seeing the early warning signals of the toll the pandemic will leave in its wake — waves of disease and disability that clinicians and governments need to pay attention to,” said Al-Aly, who’s also a clinical epidemiologist at Washington University. “Some of the effects are life-threatening and have the potential to literally change people’s lives forever.” The findings add...
    Researchers at Vanderbilt University are leading the development of an artificial intelligence algorithm that can track and count monkeypox lesions, the university recently announced in a press release. Monkeypox is defined by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) as “a rare disease caused by infection with the monkeypox virus.” The CDC adds that the monkeypox virus is part of the same family of viruses as variola virus, the virus that causes smallpox. The research team is being led by Dr. Eric Tkaczyk and Benoit Dawant. Tkaczyk is the director of the Vanderbilt Dermatology Translational Research Clinic, an assistant professor of dermatology and biomedical engineering, and VA staff physician. Dawant is a Cornelius Vanderbilt Professor of Engineering and director of the Vanderbilt Institute for Surgery and Engineering. The Vanderbilt researchers are also “spearheading the effort to develop lesion classification guidelines, which will be used when evaluating the potential use of tecovirimat, an antiviral that is FDA-approved against smallpox, as a therapy for monkeypox,” the press release further states. Vanderbilt researchers are leading the development of an artificial intelligence algorithm...
    Georgia Southern University Professor of Educational Research Meca Williams-Johnson, Ph.D. / GSU Georgia Southern University Professor of Educational Research Meca Williams-Johnson, Ph.D., has been selected to serve as a member of the Governor’s Teaching Fellows (GTF) 2022-2023 cohort. “I am enthusiastic about the program opportunity,” said Williams-Johnson. “It will allow me time to ask more questions, dig deeper and measure progress in something I’ve been involved in for a long time at Georgia Southern.” Williams-Johnson is a 16-year professor in Georgia Southern’s College of Education (COE), and has served as a member of the University Honors Council and mentor to honors students for more than 14 years. “Since 2008, I’ve worked with the University’s Honors Program, and now Honors College, in facilitating research projects with our preservice teachers,” she noted. “I am happy to see it grow and develop with the inclusion of our undergraduate research courses for our special education undergraduate majors. It is with renewed hope and energy that we will continue to chart more ways to infuse...
    UNIVERSITIES are dishing out £4million for bizarre studies into sex and porn — partly funded by the taxpayer. The research grants pay students to look into topics from porno video games and selling sex on OnlyFans to fetishism in robots. 1A Sun investigation reveals at least 40 eyebrow-raising studies on odd topicsCredit: Getty One English student at Birmingham University is even looking at how dwarves’ sexuality is portrayed in the Lord of the Rings books. Another at Queen Mary University, London, is looking at Brexit’s impact on LGBT sex. A Sun investigation reveals at least 40 eyebrow-raising studies. Taxpayers are part-funding research into the sexual experiences of women who have just had kids, dementia patients, and homosexual Japanese men on social media. READ MORE ON UNIVERSITIESUNI BAN Woke uni chiefs ban terms mankind and manpower over fears of offending students One Cambridge student is taking a deep dive into “racialised and gendered sex robots”. Funding for the studies is dished out by UK Research and Innovation — a non-government organisation which gets £8billion a year in public cash from the...
    The result was an article entitled "I am not alone — we are all alone: Using masturbation as an ethnographic method in research on shota subculture in Japan." In it, Andersson describes in graphic detail his masturbation processes and his assessment of their supposedly salutary benefits. "I experienced a sense of self-care, which I also call the 'spa effect,' since I often felt so relaxed after these [shota] sessions that it reminded of going to a spa, or why not an onsen, a Japanese hot spring," Andersson wrote, adding: "While my previous masturbation habits had been rather routine, masturbating to shota became more of a ritual: carefully choosing a [comic] (what am I in the mood for today?), creating a comfortable position in the bed, dozing off a bit afterwards – it was all part of the ritual." Because shota fantasy explicitly depicts "young boys" in various sexual encounters, many countries have outlawed it, including Canada, Australia, and the U.K., where the University of Manchester is located. The university has received so many complaints since the article was published in...
    IT can be a challenge to keep to a tight schedule and know exactly what you should be doing when. But research has revealed the hour-by-hour best times to do everything you need to during your day. 5Young beautiful blonde woman lying in bed suffering from alarm clock sound covering head and ears with pillow making unpleasant face. Early wake up, not getting enough sleep, going work conceptCredit: Getty It includes when to eat, when to workout and, importantly, when to take a well-earned nap. Wake up an hour earlier than normal A study last year by researchers from  the University of Colorado, Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard University found a 23 per cent fall in the risk of depression when people wake up an hour earlier than usual. 7.11am - breakfast This is the ideal time to start eating, the University of Murcia found. Although the exact time of when to eat will of course be dependent on what time you get up. READ MORE DAILY ROUTINESBURGER ME! Minute by minute - what eating McDonald’s...
    You may have taught your dog to sit or tutored your cat to respond to their name.  But this pales into insignificance when compared with some of the skills other animals are learning in order to improve human health. Recently, Good Health revealed how scientists have trained bees to play football as part of work to help us understand how human memories work. The bees had to move a little ball to a goal, for which they got a reward (a drop of nectar); in this way the bees learned to commit the skill to memory. But they aren’t the only clever creatures being trained to perform tasks that will ultimately help our health...Cancer-sniffing ants In March, researchers in France published a trial in the journal iScience, revealing they had trained ants to detect cancerous cells. ‘Cells are like tiny factories: they need fuel and they produce waste. Ants have an impressive sense of smell and can detect the specific waste given off by cancer cells,’ explains Professor Baptiste Piqueret, a researcher of animal behaviour and the trial’s lead author. The...
    The data behind the most influential theory of what causes Alzheimer's disease may have been 'manipulated', a damning scientific probe has claimed. Experts fear the allegedly falsified results have misled research over the last 16 years, potentially wasting billions of pounds of funding. A six-month investigation by Science, considered one of the world's most respected research journals, uncovered 'shockingly blatant' tampering of results in the seminal 2006 University of Minnesota study. The paper pointed to a particular protein — known as amyloid beta — as the driving force behind Alzheimer's. It was the first substance in brain tissue ever identified that seemed to be behind the condition's memory-robbing effects. Published in rival journal Nature, the study became one of the most cited articles on Alzheimer's ever published. Around £1.3billion ($1.6billion) of funding for studies mentioning amyloids was spent by the US Government over the last year alone. It made up half of the country's total Alzheimer's research funding. But images from the study, which involved injecting mice with the protein, appear to be doctored to 'better fit a hypothesis', according to Dr...
    CONCORD, N.H. (AP) — Dartmouth College has named its first female president in the private Ivy League university’s over 250-year history. Sian Leah Beilock, 46, the current president of Barnard College and a leading expert on the brain science behind “choking under pressure,” will become Dartmouth’s president July 1, 2023, succeeding Philip J. Hanlon. Beilock, who will be Dartmouth’s 19th president, said she’s excited to bring all the different facets of herself to Dartmouth. “I imagine a lot of people will ask me what it means to be Dartmouth’s first female president, and for some, they might think that I should not talk about that, I should just talk about being a president,” she said in a video statement Thursday. “But my research as a psychologist, and my colleagues have really shown that having multiple identities — I am a researcher, I am a president, I am a teacher, I’m a mother — all of those things actually impact what we bring to the table, how we can think across differences, and having those multiple identities I’m confident...
    A group of colleges and universities in the D.C. area are putting their research together to find ways to reduce gun violence. “Every university president worries that the next mass shooting event is going to occur on their campus,” said Gregory Washington, president of George Mason University in Fairfax, Virginia. “Historically, universities have been targets of violence.” Washington said that’s what prompted GMU to join the University of Maryland in launching a group of colleges and universities in the D.C. region called the 120 Initiative, named for the more than 120 people who die on average each day from gun violence. More Local News More Education News The initiative is organized by the Consortium of Universities of the Washington Metropolitan Area. “The goal was to really move away from the political realm, and to really focus on things that academics focus on really well,” Washington said. “The social economic issues related to gun violence, technology issues related to gun violence, the whole criminology, law and society piece and aspect of it as well.” The group includes researchers and...
    by Terrance Kible   Academics recently applauded a Social Psychology Quarterly study purporting to show a disparity in the time dogs were adopted based on racial associations with the animals’ names. “White” names, according to the study, resulted in shorter adoption times compared to “Black” names. The correlations were largely concentrated around pit bulls, “a breed that is stereotyped as dangerous and racialized as Black,” according to the study. Below are examples of academics’ reactions to the study. Temple University Timothy Welbeck, director of the Center for Anti-Racism Research and an assistant professor of instruction, retweeted the story, posing the rhetorical question “WhY iS EveRyTHingG aBOuT rACE?” “WhY iS EveRyTHinG aBOuT rACE?” Because everything is about race… https://t.co/T2t7LrTcWP — Timothy N. Welbeck, Esq. (@timothywelbeck) June 7, 2022 He answers his own question with, “Because everything is about race…” Welbeck told Campus Reform that “something as seemingly as [sic] innocuous as dog adoption can have lasting racial implications.” University of Texas at Austin Assistant Professor of Sociology Chantal Hailey commented in a now-deleted tweet obtained by Campus Reform, “Anti-blackness is so pervasive it even expands to dog names.”...
    BALTIMORE (AP) — After securing a new state permit, a Johns Hopkins University researcher will be allowed to continue medical experiments on barn owls that have been criticized by a leading animal rights group. People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals has campaigned for years to end the researcher’s experiments it calls “cruel” and “worthless,” The Baltimore Sun reported Sunday. The group has lodged complaints with state regulators about the legality of Hopkins’ testing practices. READ MORE: Maryland Weather: Sunday Sunny SkiesThe Maryland Department of Natural Resources last month issued Hopkins a new permit that allows the experiments to continue. READ MORE: Unique Baltimore Mentoring Program Encourages Kids To Paint New City MuralThe university has defended the experiments, saying associate professor Shreesh Mysore’s work could yield critical insight into medical conditions, including ADHD, autism and schizophrenia. The experiments involve the placement of electrodes into the brains of the owls. The electrodes do not hurt or damage the birds, though the owls are ultimately euthanized, Eric Hutchinson, director of the university’s Research Animal Resources, told the newspaper. MORE NEWS: Man, Woman Found Fatally...
    (CNN)Dolly Parton has donated $1 million to pediatric infectious disease research at Vanderbilt University Medical Center's Division of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Vanderbilt said Wednesday."I love all children. No child should ever have to suffer, and I'm willing to do my part to try and keep as many of them as I can as healthy and safe as possible," Parton was quoted in a press release from Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC).According to the press release, Vanderbilt's division of pediatric infectious diseases conducts research into how viruses and bacteria cause disease, resistance to antibiotics, preventing and treating infections in children with cancer and "research to define the impact of childhood infections throughout the world.""Dolly's previous support to infectious disease research, and also our pediatric cancer program, has already saved countless lives," Dr. Jeff Balser, president and CEO of VUMC and dean of the Vanderbilt University School of Medicine said in the press release. "This new gift will bolster our defenses against future threats to the safety of this region and society as a whole. It speaks volumes about her passion for...
    NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Dolly Parton is donating $1 million to pediatric infectious disease research at Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville, the organization announced on Wednesday. The new gift is one of several Parton has made to the center over the years, including a $1 million gift in April 2020 for COVID vaccine research. That gift helped Vanderbilt researchers test an array of drugs aimed at reducing the life-threatening symptoms associated with COVID-19, the center said in a news release. Researchers are also looking at entirely new therapies to both treat COVID-19 and prevent infection. Parton’s new gift will support a variety of ongoing research at the medical center, including understanding how viruses and bacteria cause disease, understanding and preventing antibiotic resistance, preventing and treating infections, diagnosing and treating infections in children with cancer, and gauging the impact of childhood infections throughout the world, according to the news release. “Dolly’s previous support to infectious disease research, and also our pediatric cancer program, has already saved countless lives,” said Dr. Jeff Balser, president and CEO of Vanderbilt University...
    PORTSMOUTH — Presenting earlier this month at the Beta Beta Beta National Convention in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, Shawnee State University junior Hanna Tackett (Hometown: Lucasville, Ohio) had the opportunity to present her research “The Warburg Effect in Acute Myeloid Leukemia” on a national stage. “Although it was nerve-wracking, I really did enjoy the opportunity to present, because it was the first time I’ve officially presented my research in person,” she said. “I also liked learning about the people I was around. There is so much cool research being done, and everyone I met was from somewhere different. So being able to learn about their lives and experiences, while still having commonalities was awesome.” Earlier in the spring semester, Tackett received the Frank G. Brooks Award for her research project presentation at the Tri-Beta District Meeting that brings together Ohio, Indiana, and Michigan undergraduate Tri-Beta members. The award recognizes excellence in undergraduate research for presentations given at a district or national meeting. “This was a wonderful opportunity for Hanna,” said Dr. Jennifer Napper, SSU Associate Professor of Biology who served as...
    Does it take a specific type of brain to experience paranormal anomalies. Some scientists think so—but that can go two ways. On the one hand, researchers specialized in parapsychology—the psychological study of the paranormal—have spent decades studying whether and how these anomalies exist in nature, outside of the human body, and how some people might be more prone to experiencing them. More specifically, they want to know if some people have unique “abilities” that allow them to, say, see ghosts, spirits, and any other entities that might exist outside of the person experiencing it (i.e. not in their mind). On the other hand, skeptical scholars from the field of neuroscience and cognitive psychology have been trying to show that it’s more about how some people process reality, subjectively, in their brain. Some people might just be wired to produce these experiences in their mind, even though they may not be real. “We need parapsychology because if there were telepathy, clairvoyant, psychokinesis, precognition, ghosts, any of these things, then science has to be radically overthrown.”— Susan Blackmore, University of Plymouth While...
    PORTSMOUTH — Shawnee State University has announced the 2022 Faculty Awards. As part of this year’s presentation, the recipient of the Faculty Research Award is Dr. Thomas Bunting. An Associate Professor of Political Science, Dr. Bunting has been with the university’s Department of Social Science since 2017. In the past five years, Dr. Bunting has served as the Coordinator of the Political Science major in the Department of Social Sciences. At SSU, he is a Fellow for the GEP Assessment Committee, a University Faculty Senate Representative for the Social Sciences Department and serves on several committees including those for General Education Advisory, Research & Scholarly Affairs, Social Science Library, and the Digital Appalachian Conference. His published work includes several articles and his recent book Democracy at the Ballpark: Sport, Spectatorship, and Politics published by SUNY Press in October 2021. “I am very proud of my research record and honored to receive the Faculty Research Award,” he said. “I am especially proud of involving SSU students in my work and showing the value of liberal education and study through research.” Dr....
    British and European Union universities and academics have collaborated on thousands of joint projects with institutions tied to the military of Communist China, an investigation has claimed. A collaborative investigation between 11 European newsrooms, the Dutch investigative outlet Follow the Money, and German nonprofit CORRECTIV has identified nearly 3,000 scientific publications that were produced by European Union universities and military-tied institutions in China. According to a report from the German public broadcaster Deutsche Welle — one of the news outlets involved in the investigation — the scientific projects included research on emerging technologies such as artificial intelligence, robotics, quantum computing, and drone technology. One of the main Chinese collaborators identified in the investigation was the National University of Defence Technology (NUDT), which not only trains elite military personnel in China but also plays a central role in developing military technology, including hypersonic and nuclear weapons and quantum supercomputers. The top school is run directly by the Communist Party’s Central Military Commission. The investigators claim that nearly half of the identified Sino-European scientific studies were published by people connected to the NUDT, alongside...
    Memories are not only essential for our day- to-day ability to function, they are key to our relationships and signposts to events in our lives. Now scientists have found that the memories — specifically, the type of memories our brain chooses to store — can influence our risk of developing certain conditions. For instance, it is thought that the brains of people with anxiety and depression have a bias towards storing negative memories over positive ones. 'And this can be a vicious circle because if your focus is on negative aspects then that exacerbates your depression,' says Robert Logie, a professor of human cognitive neuroscience at Edinburgh University and an authority in the field of memory. This, in turn, has a significant impact, as highlighted in recent research by King's College London and Exeter University. This found that people over the age of 50 who were anxious or depressed at the peak of the pandemic experienced a drop in memory function that was equivalent to the effects of six years of ageing. 'We think of memory being a problem in...
    NORFOLK, Va. — A university professor whose pedophilia research created a stir at Old Dominion University in Virginia has landed a new job with Johns Hopkins University’s Moore Center for the Prevention of Child Sexual Abuse. Allyn Walker stepped down from ODU in November after their use of “minor-attracted person” instead of the word pedophile in research led to an outcry on campus and social media, as well as threats of violence. The Virginian-Pilot reports that The Moore Center announced that Walker — who uses the pronoun they — would be joining the center as a postdoctoral fellow. Copyright © 2022 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.
    A San Jose State anthropology professor has lost her legal attempt to regain access to the university’s collection of Native American remains after she was caught up in a cultural firestorm over her tweeted photo smiling with an indigenous skull. In a showdown over academic freedom, tenured professor Elizabeth Weiss argued in a lawsuit filed in February that the university retaliated against her and violated her First Amendment rights when it closed off the collection for research. But this week, U.S. District Court Judge Beth Labson Freeman dismissed Weiss’s request for a temporary injunction on the university’s ban. The judge also pointed out that Weiss cannot use the First Amendment as a “shield and a sword” to protect her own controversial statements and to silence the First Amendment rights of those who disagree. Elizabeth Weiss, PhD Professor of Anthropology at San Jose State University holds a skull in the curation facility. (Photo Courtesy Elizabeth Weiss)  Weiss, a professor at San Jose State since 2004, had claimed she was the target of a “woke activist mob” for the backlash she suffered...
    Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore has hired a criminal justice academic who previously made comments sympathetic to pedophiles, months after the professor resigned from a job at the Virginia-based Old Dominion University. The Moore Center for the Prevention of Child Sex Abuse at Johns Hopkins University announced Thursday that Allyn Walker would work as a postdoctoral fellow beginning on May 25. Walker had previously held a position as an assistant professor of sociology at Old Dominion University in Virginia, but resigned after a video went viral online of a Zoom discussion in which Walker claimed it wasn't obvious that being sexually attracted to minors was immoral. UNIVERSITY PROFESSOR SAYS SEXUAL ATTRACTION TO MINORS ISN'T IMMORAL "I want to be extremely clear that child sex abuse is never ever OK,” Walker said in the video. “But having an attraction to minors doesn’t mean the person having those attractions is doing something wrong.” The Moore Center, which says it works to "change the way the world thinks about child sexual abuse, from inevitable to preventable," said it...
    The trans Old Dominion professor who was forced to resign after they defended pedophiles by saying society should refer to them as 'Minor Attracted Persons' has been hired Johns Hopkins University. According to the college, the professor, 34-year-old Allyn Walker, will start work as a postdoctoral fellow for the Baltimore school on May 24 - at a center aimed at preventing child sexual abuse. 'We are excited to share that Allyn Walker, PhD, will be joining the Moore Center as a postdoctoral fellow on May 25,' the Moore Center for Prevention of Child Sexual Abuse said Thursday. The center, created in 2012, describes itself on its website as 'a research center that  creates, through rigorous science, a public health approach to preventing child sexual abuse.'  Walker, who uses they/them pronouns, was forced out of Virginia's Old Dominion last November, after more than 15,000 outraged onlookers signed a petition to have them removed for the contentious remarks made by the professor that were expanded on in the 2021 book 'Long Dark Shadow: Minor Attracted People.'  Dr. Ally Walker, the trans Old Dominion professor...
    BALTIMORE (WJZ) — Bowie State University will receive $4 million in funding from Congress for its innovation center and for the development of a new laboratory for hydroponics research. Sen. Ben Cardin (D-Md.) and Sen. Chris Van Hollen (D-Md.) on Monday touted their ability to secure $3 million for the Bowie Business Innovation Center (BIC) and $1 million for the university to spend on the Bowie State University Laboratory for Hydroponics Research. READ MORE: Reward Announced For Information In Jan. Death Of Woman Shot In Catonsville Parking LotCardin is the chairman of the U.S. Senate Committee on Small Business & Entrepreneurship and Van Hollen is the chairman of the U.S. Senate Appropriations Financial Services and General Government Subcommittee U.S. Senate Appropriations Financial Services and General Government Subcommittee. Bowie State University is the oldest Historically Black College and University in Maryland.  The senators heard from graduates of Bowie BIC’s 8(a) Accelerator Program, who informed the senators about their experience navigating the federal contracting process, according to congressional staff. READ MORE: Vacants and Violence: Neighbors Call For Action After Body With Gunshot...
    The University of Waterloo has an opening for a tenure track position in geography, earth science, environmental science, or sustainability - but white men need not apply. According to a listing posted by the Canadian University last month, the position is only available to women, or 'qualified individuals who self-identify as women, transgender, non-binary, or two-spirit' - a gender-variant derived from Native American culture.     Men, meanwhile, will not be considered, the school says - especially if they are white. The successful applicant would join the school's Natural Science and Engineering Research division in an Assistant Professor's role - a position that would pay between $90,000 and $120,000 a year, according to the ad. 'Negotiations beyond this salary range will be considered for exceptionally qualified candidates,' the post then notes. According to the listing posted by the Canadian University, the position is only available to women, or 'qualified individuals who self-identify as women, transgender, non-binary, or two-spirit' - a gender-variant derived from Native American culture Men will not be considered for the Assistant Professor position the school says - especially if they are white  In the...
    Emory University, Georgia’s largest private college, has decided to drop the honorific names of two of its alumni, citing racism. “Emory University President Gregory L. Fenves will rename campus spaces and professorships honoring Robert Yerkes, a psychologist who vigorously supported eugenics, and L.Q.C. Lamar, who was a staunch defender of slavery,” a statement from the school said. “The Yerkes National Primate Research Center will be known as the Emory National Primate Research Center, effective June 1. Professorships in the Emory School of Law named after Lamar will become the Emory School of Law Distinguished Professors.” Emory declined to comment Friday, instead directing The Georgia Star News to the press release. “Since joining Emory in 2020, I’ve engaged in many discussions about the history of our university. Our knowledge of who we are as an institution comes from questioning and learning,” Fenves said in the statement. “Each generation brings new meaning to a narrative that is continually being evaluated and written.” Yerkes, described by the school as a eugenicist, was the first director of the Yerkes National Primary Research Center, the oldest scientific...
    Looking forward to an afternoon nap this Easter Monday? Try squeezing your muscles first to increase the benefits of your snooze. People who intentionally tensed and then relaxed their large muscle groups before they drifted off had 125 per cent more deep sleep and an improved sleep pattern in their nap compared with those who had instead listened to relaxing music, researchers found. The team, from the University of California, Irvine and Princeton University in the US, studied 50 people as they lay down for a 1pm nap.  People who intentionally tensed and then relaxed their large muscle groups before they drifted off had 125 per cent more deep sleep. File image  Half followed a ten-minute recording of progressive muscle relaxation (PMR). The other half listened to ten minutes of Mozart music. Researchers found the two groups showed different sleeping brain rhythm patterns. Lead author Dr Katharine Simon said: ‘We found that those who engaged in PMR prior to sleep showed greater right-sided sleeping brain rhythm activity from the start – which we expect to see in more well-rested individuals.’ The...
    Beloved Sparta High School graduate and Johns Hopkins research technologist Erin Julia Beebe died unexpectedly on Monday, April 4. She was 26. Erin attended Reverend George A. Brown Memorial School and Pope John XXIII High School before graduating from Sparta High School in 2014, her obituary says. She then used her love of science to pursue higher education at Muhlenberg College, where she graduated with a Neuroscience degree in 2018. Erin went on to earn employment as a Laboratory Research Assistant in the Department of Neurology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine at the University of Maryland in Baltimore. She had recently been accepted into a PhD program with the University of Wisconsin and was scheduled to start her classes in the Fall. In addition to her academic feats, Erin was remembered for her unlimited kindness and compassion for others, as well as her love for animals. “Although short in years, Erin lived a substantial and notable life,” reads her memorial. “She was compassionate and deeply empathetic, dedicating her free time and energy to an array of...
    Researchers identified over 5,500 new viruses in the ocean, including a missing link in viral evolution There are even more types of viruses in the ocean than researchers once thought. newannyart/iStock via Getty Images Plus Guillermo Dominguez Huerta, The Ohio State University; Ahmed Zayed, The Ohio State University; James Wainaina, The Ohio State University, and Matthew Sullivan, The Ohio State University The Research Brief is a short take about interesting academic work.The big idea Diagram of the biological classification system, showing phylum is a broad grouping. VectorMine/iStock via Getty Images Plus An analysis of the genetic material in the ocean has identified thousands of previously unknown RNA viruses and doubled the number of phyla, or biological groups, of viruses thought to exist, according to a new study our team of researchers has published in the journal Science. RNA viruses are best known for the diseases they cause in people, ranging from the common cold to COVID-19. They also infect plants and animals important to people. These viruses carry their genetic information in...
    A former professor was convicted of failing to disclose ties to China while conducting U.S.-funded research, the Justice Department said. Feng Tao, 50, was convicted on three counts of wire fraud and one count of false statements after he "deliberately concealed" his status as a full-time employee at Fuzhou University in China while accepting government funding for research at the University of Kansas, the department said Thursday. As a faculty member at KU, Tao conducted research under contracts between the university and two U.S. government agencies and caused the two agencies to submit hundreds of thousands of dollars in reimbursement requests for associated expenses, the department said. SHANGHAI RESIDENTS FACING FOOD SHORTAGES AMID COVID-19 LOCKDOWN "Tao repeatedly certified electronic documents indicating he read and understood the federal government and KU’s policies and that he had made all necessary disclosures," the Justice Department's press release read. The Kansas Board of Regents required faculty to file reports detailing outside employment that could impact duties as a conflict of interest, which Tao did not complete, officials added. ...
    A researcher was convicted on Thursday of illegally concealing work he was doing for China while employed at the University of Kansas. But U.S. District Judge Julie Robinson continues to weigh a defense motion to dismiss the case against Feng “Franklin” Tao of Lawrence, Kansas. Robinson on Monday asked the attorneys to submit their arguments in writing, with the trial to proceed while she weighs the issue. Jurors found him guilty of three counts of wire fraud and one count of false statements for not disclosing on conflict of interest forms that he had been named to a Chinese talent program, the Changjiang Professorship, on grant applications. As part of that program he traveled to China to set up a laboratory and recruit staff for Fuzhou University, telling the University of Kansas he was in Germany instead. Prosecutor Adam Barry described it as “an elaborate lie” to defraud the university, the U.S. Department of Energy and the National Science Foundation. But Defense attorney Peter Zeidenberg argued that Tao was merely “moonlighting” and stressed throughout the trial that Tao remained such...
    Georgia Southern University President Kyle Marrero; Billy Crider Jr.; Bill Crider III; Allen E. Paulson College of Engineering and Computing Dean Mohammad Davoud; and Director of Industrial Relations, Assessment and Accreditation Reinhold Gerbsch. / GSU Georgia Southern’s Allen E. Paulson College of Engineering and Computing received a $1 million gift to develop the Advanced Processing Research Network (APRN) from Crider, Inc. of Stillmore, Georgia, a global processor of shelf-stable and fully cooked protein products. Father and son, Billy Crider Jr. and Bill Crider III (‘96) made their gift announcement at the Engineering Research Building on the Statesboro Campus surrounded by robots and robotic imaging devices. As the Criders have seen their business grow through automation technology, the need for talented engineers to program and maintain that technology is growing with it. They believe Georgia Southern holds a local opportunity to find the talent they need. “We wanted to help develop a program that will produce more of the fantastic engineering talent we’ve already been getting from Georgia Southern and help...
    BALTIMORE (WJZ) — Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan on Wednesday announced a new initiative that would expand cancer screening, prevention, treatment and research in the state. Maryland is committing $216 million in investments to the Maryland Cancer Moonshot to jumpstart the program. It would bring comprehensive cancer centers to the state, starting with one in Prince George’s County. READ MORE: Lamar Jackson Hasn't Signed An Extension Yet, But He Says He Loves The Ravens And Isn't Thinking About LeavingGovernor Hogan, who is a cancer survivor, said the program will save lives. “The reality is that cancer is a disease that has touched nearly every one of us, through family or loved ones,” he said. “On the day I found out I was cancer-free, I pledged that as long as I am governor and long after, I will stand with all those who are fighting this terrible disease. That is why today, I am announcing the Maryland Cancer Moonshot, to dramatically accelerate all of our efforts to detect, prevent, treat, and find a cure for cancer, so that more lives can be...
    The University of Washington School of Medicine is reportedly keeping aborted human fetuses and organs in rows of labeled boxes and paper bags in a walk-in freezer. The grim discovery was made earlier this month by the Progressive Anti-Abortion Uprising, a left-wing organization, alongside members of several other anti-abortion groups that located the freezer at the university's Birth Defects Research Laboratory. The activists found the freezer by following a paper trail of invoices that recorded the purchase of various fetal body parts by universities and research labs across the country. NOEM BANS TELEMEDICINE ABORTION AND TARGETS ATTEMPTS TO COERCE PROCEDURE Images of the inside of the freezer, with rows of paper bags and boxes, were shared on Twitter by PAAU, which claimed that the university maintained "the largest and most active fetal organ bank in the nation." ???????????? ???????????????????????????????????? ????????????????????????????: Pro-Life Groups Discover Freezer of Human Fetuses at the University of WashingtonOn March 9th at 6:30pm, Anti-Abortion activists from groups including PAAU, @TheSurvivors , @prolifesf, & @RehumanizeIntl gained access to the largest & pic.twitter.com/CQM4Sakuri—...
    Screening rates for cervical cancer are low for first-generation American Somali women in Minnesota, with only about 25 – 30 percent of Somali patients participating in cervical cancer screenings in most urban clinics. That’s significantly lower than the national average of 79.9 percent.  These low human papillomavirus (HPV) screening rates make Somali women at high risk for cervical cancer. Rebekah Pratt, an assistant professor in the Department of Family Medicine and Community Health at the University of Minnesota, is working on an HPV self-sampling method to address the low rates. She is collaborating with certified nursing midwife Nimo Ahmed.  “Cervical cancer is something that is preventable. At the same time, it affects minority women at a high level,” said Ahmed. “It’s the lack of screening that, you know, makes (Somali women) high risk.” The National Cancer Institute awarded the team, which includes Pratt, Ahmed, other members of the medical school and the University of Washington School of Public Health, $2.9 million for the project. What’s behind the disparity? The screening disparity can be attributed to several things, including recent anti-vax...
    KANSAS CITY, Kan. (AP) — Federal prosecutors alleged Tuesday that a Kansas researcher illegally kept his work with a Chinese university secret, while the defense countered that he was merely “moonlighting.” The conflicting portrayals came during opening statements in the trial of Feng “Franklin” Tao in U.S. District Court in Kansas City, Kansas, on charges of wire and program fraud. He is accused of not disclosing on conflict-of-interest forms the work he was doing for China while employed at the University of Kansas — something federal prosecutors contend is a scheme to defraud the university, the U.S. Department of Energy and the National Science Foundation. Tao’s case was part of what the Justice Department called its China Initiative, an effort created in 2018 to crack down on trade secret theft and economic espionage. The department last month ended the initiative following public criticism and failed prosecutions, though officials say they still intend to pursue the threat from China. Tao, who was born in China and moved to the U.S. in 2002, began working in August 2014 at the University of...
    Yale University has defended receiving millions of dollars from a Russia-linked billionaire with ties to the country’s oligarchs. The Ivy League school has copped criticism from members of its own faculty for accepting funds from billionaire Len Blavatnik—who has close relationships with Russian oligarchs Victor Vekselberg and Oleg Deripaska, both of whom have been sanctioned by the U.S. government. Blavatnik, who was born in Odessa in what was then the Soviet republic of Ukraine and is now a U.S. and a U.K. citizen, made his wealth from the sale of state-owned aluminum and oil assets following the collapse of the Soviet Union. He has helped fund the Blavatnik Fund for Innovation, as well as the Blavatnik Fellowship, at Yale since the fund was first established in 2016 with a grant of $10 million. Aaron Ring, an assistant professor of immunology at the Yale School of Medicine, is a former recipient of a monetary award from the Blavatnik Fund. In a series of tweets last week, Ring called on Yale to suspend or cancel the Blavatnik Fund and said he...
    Courtesy of the Minnesota Historical SocietyLaura Linton, ca. 1896.In 1879, scientists at the University of Minnesota asked chemistry student Laura Linton to analyze rock samples that had been collected along the North Shore of Lake Superior. Her research identified a previously unknown mineral, which her professors named “lintonite” in recognition of her work. Linton went on to become a chemistry and physics teacher, a research chemist, and, after earning a medical degree at the age of forty-seven, the supervising physician of the women’s ward at Rochester State Hospital. Born in 1853, Laura Alberta Linton was the daughter of Christiana and Joseph Linton. Her parents raised her on farms in Ohio, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania before moving the family in 1868 to a site on the Zumbro River in Minnesota’s Wabasha County. Linton graduated from the Winona Normal School in 1872 and taught at the Cook’s Valley school before enrolling in at the University of Minnesota, where she majored in science. During Linton’s senior year of college, two of her professors, Samuel F. Peckham and Christopher W. Hall, recognized Linton’s proficiency...
    A Washington-based advocacy group has just petitioned the government to seize the patent covering the prostate cancer drug Xtandi so generic manufacturers can copy the medication. The group behind this petition has issued similar calls in the past. But both Democratic and Republican administrations have rejected such petitions on the grounds that they misconstrue current law, as the current administration should likewise recognize. The government contributed approximately $500,000 to research at UCLA that served as the foundation for Xtandi. The university’s findings were eventually licensed by Astellas — which, after more than $1.4 billion of investments and years of research and development, created the medication. Since the government funded early-stage research underpinning Xtandi, the petitioners argue, federal officials should forcefully lower its price by licensing the medication to generic manufacturers. Of course, that’s not warranted by the law that took the medication from bench to bedside: the Bayh-Dole Act. Prior to 1980, America had an innovation problem. The government funded basic research at university and non-profit labs and retained the patents resulting from the research. Inventors had no incentive to...
    BOULDER, Colo. (CBS4) – The University of Colorado system will liquidate their “limited assets” in Russia, as they stand in support of Ukraine. The CU Foundation previously had less than 0.1% of its $2.6 billion Long-Term Investment Pool in publicly-traded Russian companies. The university also has invested in mutual funds with holdings in Russia. The total is roughly $3.5 million, and university system management has requested those mutual funds exit the holdings as early as possible. (file photo credit: iStock/Getty Images Plus) “Like so many others, we have watched in horror as this invasion has brought senseless violence and aggression to the region,” CU President Todd Saliman said in a statement on Wednesday. “We are looking for ways to show our support for the people of Ukraine and believe that cutting our investments is the right thing to do.” Faculty across CU’s four campuses are currently not conducting any research funded by Russian entities, and are not sending funds to any Russian groups as part of any research project. “These are small but important steps we can take as a...
    MALE entrepreneurs are more likely to have a symmetrical face and high cheekbones, researchers say. A new study conducted by experts from the University of Cyprus found that a man's facial features may be linked to leadership skills. 3A new study conducted by researchers from the University of Cyprus found that facial features may be linked to leadership skills. The study titled "What’s in a face? Facial appearance associated with emergence but not success in entrepreneurship" was recently published in The Leadership Quarterly. "Facial appearance has been associated with leader selection in domains where effective leadership is considered crucial, such as politics, business, and the military," the study's authors noted in the article. The team used facial analysis software to assess three key features in men's faces: facial symmetry, cheekbone prominence, and facial width-to-height ratio. The subjects for this study consisted largely of white males (both entrepreneurs and non-entrepreneurs) who reside in the United States.   The research revealed that men with more prominent cheekbones and a symmetrical face were more likely to be entrepreneurs (i.e. Elon Musk...
    CAMBRIDGE (CBS/AP) — The Massachusetts Institute of Technology is severing ties with a research university it helped establish more than a decade ago in Russia, citing the country’s “unacceptable military actions” in invading Ukraine. The Cambridge university said it notified the Skolkovo Institute of Science and Technology in Moscow on Friday that it was exercising its right to terminate the MIT Skoltech Program. Federal law enforcement officials and foreign policy experts have long voiced concerns about the potential for espionage and technology theft arising from MIT’s partnership with the school, which has close ties to Russian President Vladimir Putin’s government, GBH News reported. “This step is a rejection of the actions of the Russian government in Ukraine,” MIT said in a statement posted on the program website. “We take it with deep regret because of our great respect for the Russian people and our profound appreciation for the contributions of the many extraordinary Russian colleagues we have worked with.” The statement said that despite ending the relationship, MIT is proud of its work with Skoltech and the research it has produced over...
    CAMBRIDGE, Mass. (AP) — The Massachusetts Institute of Technology is severing ties with a research university it helped establish more than a decade ago in Russia, citing the country’s “unacceptable military actions” in invading Ukraine. The Cambridge university said it notified the Skolkovo Institute of Science and Technology in Moscow on Friday that it was exercising its right to terminate the MIT Skoltech Program. Federal law enforcement officials and foreign policy experts have long voiced concerns about the potential for espionage and technology theft arising from MIT’s partnership with the school, which has close ties to Russian President Vladimir Putin’s government, GBH News reported. “This step is a rejection of the actions of the Russian government in Ukraine,” MIT said in a statement posted on the program website. “We take it with deep regret because of our great respect for the Russian people and our profound appreciation for the contributions of the many extraordinary Russian colleagues we have worked with.” The university said it is working with MIT researchers leading Skoltech projects to make sure students can complete their...
    Harvard University will revive research into psychedelic drugs sixty years after its former professor Timothy Leary was banished from academia for his investigations into them. Academics at the university will investigate the world of psychedelic drugs amid increasing evidence that they could be an effective form of treatment for depression, anxiety, trauma, addiction and PTSD. The move comes decades after Harvard psychologist Timothy Leary, who became known for his phrase 'turn on, tune in, drop out', was dismissed from the university for his controversial investigations into 'conscious expanding' drugs. Jerry Rosenbaum, Harvard psychiatrist and director of Massachusetts General Hospital's Center for the Neuroscience of Psychedelics, said psychedelics were 'remarkably safe' and the discovery of their psycho active properties 'goes far back'. Sixty years ago Timothy Leary (pictured) was banished from academia for his investigations into psychedelic drugs Harvard University will now investigate the properties of the drugs amid increasing evidence that they could be an effective form of treatment for depression, anxiety, trauma, addiction and PTSD He told the Ask a Harvard Professor podcast: 'There was a fair amount of research going on...
    Mother Jones illustration; Oliver Contreras/SIPA USA/AP, Tomasso DeRosa/AP Fight disinformation. Get a daily recap of the facts that matter. Sign up for the free Mother Jones newsletter.Last year, fresh from serving a full term as the Secretary of Agriculture during the Trump administration, Sonny Perdue began angling for another plum post: leadership of the University System of Georgia. An agribusiness tycoon, Perdue is best known for his political work as a former two-term Georgia governor during which he urged on pay cuts for school teachers; expressed nostalgia for the Confederacy; pioneered voter-suppression laws; responded to a brutal drought by holding a public ceremony to “pray for rain”; and promoted policies that made life miserable for immigrants. While helming the USDA, he denied climate change (including taking time to bury publicly funded research on it); gutted a key federal agricultural-economic research institution; attempted to limit food aid; and cut farm worker wages at the height of the pandemic. Why would he would be qualified to head one of the nation’s premier public higher education systems? His career highlights don’t include anything related to university administration. Beyond Georgia, his tenure at...