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    Cassey Ho edited her own body to represent how the beauty standards for women have changed through different eras. In a viral video Cassey, 35, from Los Angeles, California, used an editing software to show how women's bodies have become 'trends' throughout time. The CEO and head designer of the fitness brand Popflex and blogger of Blogilates showed her over three million followers what women's body types looked like in different eras, including the 1400 through the 1700s, 1950s, 1990s, 2000s, 2010s and 2020s. Cassey Ho, 35, from California, edited her body to show how the beauty standards for women have changed and showed the drastic difference in what it means to have the 'perfect' body RELATED ARTICLES Previous 1 Next Can standing naked in front of a mirror make you like your... Cyclist, 50, who was self-conscious of her 'saggy' knees... Share this article Share 1400s through 1700s: The age of the full figure  During the Renaissance, the ideal woman had a full figure to show financial success  Cassey depicted the Italian Renaissance...
    Halfpoint Images | Moment | Getty Images When Priya and her husband discovered they were infertile, it cost them $20,000 and years of intrusive treatment to conceive their daughter. A couple of years later when they had their son, it was free and relatively painless — thanks in large part to her employer who footed the bill and helped arrange the procedure. "The entire experience, between what we went through before ... and after, was night and day," said Priya, a Seattle-based senior program manager whose company introduced a fertility treatment program after the birth of her first child. "Being infertile is something you can never plan for," she continued. "Having power over your own decision, when most of being infertile means you don't have any, is a game-changer." It may sound a step beyond the realms of employer responsibility, but Priya's experience is not unique. She is one of a growing number of employees benefiting from the latest category of workplace perk: fertility benefits. From egg freezing to in vitro fertilization (IVF) and surrogacy, employees are increasingly enjoying a...
    While many feel pressure to achieve and maintain the 'perfect body', the ideal shape for woman has evolved almost as frequently as fashion trends throughout the decades.   From accentuated curves in the 1950s to 2000s washboard abs and 'heroin chic' in the early 90s - there have been variously ludicrous expectations of the feminine image throughout history.   In some cases, the definition of the 'perfect woman' reveals a lot about popular culture at the time, with women from the 1940s idealising stronger, broader look - while fitness fads means a super sporty look was preferred  in the 1980s   Speaking to FEMAIL, Hagen Schumacher, a leading consultant plastic surgeon at Adore Life, and Andre Fournier, the co-founder of cosmetic devices company Deleo, revealed how the ideal body standard has changed over the last 100 years.  They predicted that 2022 will see the return of more 'natural' beauty, however one where nutrition and exercise are both considered as beneficial to a healthy and attractive body.  1910s: Hourglass figure with cinched waist  Danish-born actress Camille Clifford was a famous model for the 'Gibson Girl' illustrations...
    (CNN)The vast majority of bees feed on pollen and nectar, but certain species have evolved to feast on meat, substituting dead animal carcasses for flower meadows.To better understand this extreme shift in diet, scientists at the University of California-Riverside, Columbia University and Cornell University studied the gut bacteria or microbiome of the so-called vulture bees in Costa Rica. The researchers found that the bees' guts are rich in acid-loving bacteria similar to those found in vultures, hyenas and other animals that feed on carrion. Their study was released on Tuesday in the journal mBio, published by the American Society for MicrobiologyOnly three species of bee in the world -- all vulture bees -- have evolved to get their protein exclusively from dead meat, and they live only in tropical rainforests. However, there are other bee species that will consume fresh animal carcasses when available but also forage for pollen and nectar, according to the study. Honeybees make a chilling warning noise when attacked by hive-destroying murder hornets Bees and gut bacteriaRead MoreThe guts of honeybees, bumblebees and stingless bees are...
    Genes linked to same-sex sexual behaviour are also found in straight people — where they are associated with having more sexual partners, a study has found. Such a mating advantage could outweigh the 'loss' of reproduction among gay individuals and explain the persistence of these genes throughout human evolution. This is the conclusion of researchers led from the University of Queensland, who studied the genomes of 477,522 people from both the UK and the US. However, they cautioned, further research will be needed to confirm the findings, given the small size of the genetic differences studied and the limited sample range. Genes linked to same-sex sexual behaviour (pictured) are also found in straight people — where they are associated with having more sexual partners, a study has found (stock image) Researchers led from the University of Queensland, who studied the genomes of 477,522 people from both the UK and the US using data from both the UK Biobank and 23andMeOTHER THEORIES The new hypothesis put forward by Professor Zietsch and colleagues is the not the only one to offer an explanation...
    Female giraffes have evolved to go through the menopause early so they can help care for their grandchildren, a new study reveals.  Elegant females spend up to 30 per cent of their lives in a 'post-reproductive state' to help raise successive generations of offspring in later life and ensure the preservation of their genes, the authors claim.  This evolutionary trait is known as the 'grandmother hypothesis' and has been used to explain why humans live such a comparatively long time after reproduction.  The authors also say 30 per cent is comparable to elephants and killer whales, which spend 23 per cent and 35 per cent of their lives in a post-reproductive state, respectively. Scientists at the University of Bristol have discovered evidence that giraffes are a highly socially complex species - more so than previously thought - because females help care for their offspring's offspring. Pictured, a other Rothschild's giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis rothschildi, a giraffe sub-species) tending to her baby. The photo was taken in Soysambu Conservancy, in the Rift Valley region of Kenya THE GRANDMOTHER HYPOTHESIS The grandmother hypothesis,...
    Here are a few tips if you see cicadas Mortgage interest rates as of May 19, 2021: Rates move upward Greg Schiano has discovered that the minor details that once gnawed at the 34-year-old Rutgers coach no longer trouble the 54-year-old Rutgers coach, who has adopted more of a widescreen approach as he heads into the second year of his second tenure with the Scarlet Knights. Amazing Device Lights Up Countertops And Fixes Dark Kitchens Ad Microsoft Knee Surgeons Are Losing It Over These Knee Sleeves (Here's Why) Ad Microsoft Refinance rates at 2.06% APR. Calculate your rate now. Ad Microsoft ...
    Women have evolved to have wider hips than men because our primitive ancestors used to lay eggs, new research claims. For years it was thought that the reason women have a wider pelvis is that human females have 'child bearing hips' to allow the passage of big-brained babies. The heads of human babies are the widest part of their bodies, and the pelvis needs to be wider in ladies to accommodate this. But the new findings – which will give new meaning to the phrase 'being broody' – say wide female hips go back much further than that. Women have evolved to have wider hips than men because our primitive ancestors used to lay eggs, new research claims (stock image) BIG HIPS Chimpanzees, our nearest ape ancestors, have enviably trouble-free labours and pelvises that do not obstruct the birth of babies, but females still have wider hips than males, suggesting that big hips began many years earlier. Analysis of reptiles also show that females have relatively wider hips too – and this may be key. Wider pelvises in females make...
    Spitting cobra species first evolved the ability to spray venom from their fangs in order to defend themselves — rather than to attack prey — a study has found. Researchers from Wales found that instantly painful venoms these snakes spit was evolved from different components not once, but on three separate occasions. The venom — which can cause blistering and, if introduced to the eye, blindness — may even have developed in response to the threat of early humans, the team said.  This long-distance targeting of sensory tissues plays no role in prey capture, they added, suggesting it must have been developed as a defence mechanism. The finding contradicts previous studies which suggested that the development of venom in snakes is principally driven by dietary variations.   Scroll down for videos Spitting cobra species first evolved the ability to spray venom from their fangs (as pictured) in order to defend themselves — rather than to attack prey — a study has found In their study, the researchers analysed spitting cobras from three different approaches — by function, genetics and protein...
    D. Watkins October 17, 2020 10:30PM (UTC) The most important lesson I continue to learn is that we have to give people a chance to grow. No one is born preprogrammed to deal with society and the way it constantly evolves. We learn and then we grow. This lesson has been weighing heavy on me lately when I see posts on social media about canceling whole groups of people, holding them collectively responsible for the actions of some. When people call for others to "divest" from straight Black men, to cut them out of their lives entirely, I don't know what those individuals have been through. Something extremely traumatic, I imagine. I'm not going to be the corny guy popping up in their mentions like, "Not all Black men!" or "But what will you tell your Black son?!" As I'm sure they've heard those arguments before .  : I don't have a direct rebuttal to the posts that tear apart my gender and sexuality. I respect the people behind the sentiment. But I can offer a glimpse into the reality I was raised in. It's not universal,...
    Reproduction is a driving force across the animal kingdom, with creatures developing diverse strategies to ensure their genes are passed on. Some male butterflies employ a unique technique - they force the female into a 'chastity belt' that prevents her from reproducing with other suitors. In response, some females seemed to have evolved larger, more complex genitalia that are harder to block. The result has been an all-out battle of the sexes, with males devising increasingly ornate mating plugs  -some with winglike projections, slippery scales or pointy hooks. Scroll down for video  Mating plugs are found in just one percent of butterflies. Simpler plugs may be torn or ripped off by a determined female, but in species with large, complex plugs, researchers rarely encountered a female without one A female butterfly fertilizes most of her eggs with sperm from her last partner, so its to the male's benefit to block access to rivals. But external mating plugs, also known as sphragis, are found in just one percent of all butterflies.  RELATED ARTICLES Previous 1 Next ...
    The final shot in the main title sequence for "Westworld" season one, two, and three. HBO HBO's main title sequence for "Westworld" season three was nominated for an Emmy award this year. Insider spoke with the title's designer, Patrick Clair, to learn more about the symbolism in this season's version of the opening credits.  Warning: Spoilers ahead for season three of HBO's "Westworld." Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. "Westworld" main title designer Patrick Clair, whose previous work includes HBO's "True Detective," enjoys the fun challenge of creating the ever-evolving opening credits sequence for Jonathan Nolan and Lisa Joy's sci-fi series. Especially since he knows the "Westworld" fanbase is eager to see which new themes emerge with every new season. "It's a big deal for us to take 90 seconds of the audience's time at the start of each episode," Clair told Insider over the phone from his home in Australia. "We try not to get too concerned about the details of the plot. [We're] more concerned about what's bubbling down beneath. That way it gets more...
    Humans and other primates have evolved 'significantly larger' voice boxes than other mammals to help with social interactions, a new study shows.  Compared with other mammals such as cats, the voice box, or larynx, of primates such as gorillas and chimpanzees is more than a third larger in relation to their body size.  They also found that primates' voice boxes undergo faster rates of evolution, and are diverse in function and more variable in size. Researchers made CT-scans of specimens from 55 different species, including primates and other mammals, and produced 3D computer models of their larynges.  The research claims to be the first large-scale study into the evolution of the larynx, where tissue vibrations produce sounds for vocal communication. Scroll down for video Pictured, a chimpanzee. The researchers made CT-scans of specimens from 55 different species, and produced 3D computer models of their larynges RELATED ARTICLES Previous 1 Next Humans develop fine motor skills later than other primates... No monkey business! Scientists control the actions of... Ancient 'terror crocodiles' lived 82 million years ago...
    Some fish that live in the deepest reaches of the ocean have evolved skin so dark it absorbs more than 99 per cent of all light, rendering the animal almost invisible.  The animals are so efficient at soaking up light that they appear as mere silhouettes, seemingly devoid of any features.  Academics from the US have identified at least 16 species that use the ultra-black form of camouflage to avoid predators, including the dragon fish and fangtooth. In the ocean's depths, no natural sunlight penetrates and some predators have the ability to glow using bio-luminescence to hunt their prey.  Being able to hide in plain sight and absorb all this light without being spotted is a major survival advantage.  Some of the species with the ultra-black skin also have their own bio-luminescent lures but their skin is so dark that none of the light bounces off their bodies, allowing them to attract and ensnare their food.  Scroll down for video  This deep-sea dragonfish has ultra-black skin capable of absorbing the bioluminescent light that might blow its cover Pictured, a...
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