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    Former White House Chief of Staff Mick Mulvaney poured cold water on Donald Trump’s claim that he had a “standing order” to automatically declassify certain classified government documents. Last week, FBI agents executed a search warrant of the former president’s Mar-a-Lago residence in Florida, where they retrieved boxes of documents Trump was supposed to give to the National Archives upon leaving office. Some of the materials were reportedly classified. Trump has disputed that claim and stated he had a “standing order that documents removed from the Oval Office and taken to the residence were deemed to be declassified the moment he removed them.” On Friday, Mulvaney appeared on Newsmax and was asked about the alleged “standing order.” He said there’s more to declassifying documents than what his former boss described. “Any president of the United States has broad authority to declassified documents,” Mulvaney began. “That being said, there’s a formal structure to doing that. You can’t just sort of stand over a box of documents, wave your hand and say, ‘These are all declassified.’ That’s not how the system works.”...
    Multiple former White House officials under Donald Trump denied the former president's claim of a standing order that declassified all documents after they left the Oval Office during his administration. Two senior Trump aides were part of a group of 18 administration officials who denied knowledge of the standing order, if one even existed in the first place, including former White House chiefs of staff Mick Mulvaney and John Kelly, CNN reported. JUDGE RULES NEW DETAILS FROM FBI'S TRUMP RAID WILL BE REVEALED "Nothing approaching an order that foolish was ever given," Kelly told the outlet. "And I can't imagine anyone that worked at the White House after me that would have simply shrugged their shoulders and allowed that order to go forward without dying in the ditch trying to stop it." Mulvaney stated that he was not aware of the order during his tenure, which lasted from January 2019 until March 2020, the outlet reported. Administration officials who would have been informed of the standing order or who would take part in the declassification...
    Washington (CNN)In the days since the FBI seized classified and top secret documents from Donald Trump's Mar-a-Lago resort, the former President and his allies have claimed that Trump had a "standing order" to declassify documents he took from the Oval Office to the White House residence. But 18 former top Trump administration officials tell CNN they never heard any such order issued during their time working for Trump, and that they believe the claim to be patently false. Several officials laughed at the notion. One senior administration official called it "bullsh*t." Two of Trump's former chiefs of staff went on the record to knock down the claim. "Nothing approaching an order that foolish was ever given," said John Kelly, who served as Trump's chief of staff for 17 months from 2017 to 2019. "And I can't imagine anyone that worked at the White House after me that would have simply shrugged their shoulders and allowed that order to go forward without dying in the ditch trying to stop it."Mick Mulvaney, who succeeded Kelly as acting White House chief of staff,...
    CNN’s Jamie Gangel reported Thursday she spoke to 18 former Trump administration officials who disputed claims the former President had a “standing order” that allowed him to declassify documents as he saw fit. One of Gangel’s sources called the claim “bullshit.” Last week, reporter John Solomon received a statement he said was provided to him by Donald Trump’s team regarding classified documents that allegedly led to the FBI raid of Trump’s home. Solomon read the statement on Fox News’ Friday edition of Hannity. The statement reads, in part: [Trump] had a standing order that documents removed from the Oval Office and taken to the residence were deemed to be declassified the moment he removed them. The power to classify and declassify documents rests solely with the president of the United States. The statement concluded any “idea that some paper-pushing bureaucrat with classification authority delegated by the president needs to approve the declassification is absurd.” The claim has been disputed all week, and picked apart by former government officials with experience handling classified material. On CNN’s The Lead Thursday, Gangel told...
    Donald Trump's former national security advisor John Bolton accused the ex-president of lying when he claimed Friday to have a 'standing order' that all documents taken from the White House while he was in office were to be declassified. Bolton said the claim was 'almost certainly a lie' in a New York Times piece published on Sunday.  'When somebody begins to concoct lies like this, it shows a real level of desperation,' he said. It comes about a week after Trump's Mar-a-Lago resort in Florida was targeted in an unannounced search by FBI agents who took a trove of documents sought by the National Archives and Records Administration. The warrant, which was unsealed on Friday, suggests the former president took top secret documents and may have violated the Espionage Act. Trump has offered multiple rebuttals, from claiming he was cooperating with investigators to insisting the 'raid' was a political 'witch hunt.' On Friday, ex-Fox News contributor John Solomon - who is representing Trump with the National Archives, according to the Times - read a statement claiming the documents were declassified...
    Chip Somodevilla/Getty John Bolton is not buying former President Donald Trump’s claim that he had a standing order to declassify any documents he took with him outside of the White House. And as his former National Security Advisor, he would be the first in line to know about this curious defense. The New York Times sought Bolton’s comment following a DOJ-approved search warrant of Trump’s Palm Beach mansion Mar-a-Lago which reportedly led to the confiscation of several classified and top secret documents that appear to run afoul of a 2018 law that Trump himself signed. “Trump’s Shifting Explanations Follow a Familiar Playbook” is the article’s headline, which features the DEK that reads, “The former president and his allies have given often conflicting defenses of his retention of classified documents, without addressing why he had kept them.” One such defense put forth in a statement read on Fox News by disgraced journalist John Solomon was that Trump had a “standing order” to declassify any documents in his passions outside of a secure environment.  Bolton ridiculed such a defense, calling it “almost...
    Adrien Fillon/ZUMA Fight disinformation: Sign up for the free Mother Jones Daily newsletter and follow the news that matters.As more details continue to come out about the Justice Department’s investigation into whether Donald Trump may have violated the Espionage Act and other laws, the former president’s defenses have only grown more chaotic. Trump debuted his latest alibi late Friday, issuing a statement that claimed he had a “standing order” that declassified all documents from the moment they were removed from the White House and taken to the “residence.” Here’s pro-Trump journalist John Solomon, who in 2020 was cut off from Fox News for peddling disinformation on the Bidens and Ukraine, relaying the message on Fox News:  Statement from Trump Office: As we can all relate to, everyone ends up having to bring home their work from time to time… He had a standing order that documents removed from the Oval Office taken to the residence were deemed to be declassified.. pic.twitter.com/pnTjRnOqif — Acyn (@Acyn) August 13, 2022 Even from a cursory glance, the statement appears to contain several problematic,...
    The office of former President Donald Trump issued a statement Friday claiming all documents he removed from the Oval Office and brought to the White House residence were declassified, by definition. On Monday, the FBI executed a search warrant at Mar-a-Lago in Palm Beach, where they seized 11 sets of classified documents, as well as other materials that were supposed to have been turned over to the National Archives when Trump left office. Appearing on Friday’s Hannity, the editor-in-chief of the right-wing site Just the News read an exclusive statement his outlet obtained from Trump’s office. “I apologize for looking down,” said John Solomon. “It’s so fresh, it’s on my phone. It literally just came in. This is from President Trump’s office. It Just came in a few minutes ago.” Solomon read the statement: As we can all relate to, everyone ends up having to bring home their work from time to time. American presidents are no different. President Trump, in order to prepare the work the next day, often took documents including classified documents to the residence. He had...
    Former President Donald Trump claims a "standing order" allowed him to declassify documents as soon as they left the Oval Office. A statement from Trump's office was read by journalist John Solomon on Fox News on Friday evening. "As we can all relate to, everyone ends up having to bring home their work from time to time. American presidents are no different," the statement read. "President Trump in order to prepare the work the next day often took documents including classified documents to the residence. He had a standing order that documents removed from the Oval Office and taken to the residence were deemed to be declassified the moment he removed them," the statement added. "The power to classify and declassify documents rests solely with the president of the United States. The idea that some paper-pushing bureaucrat with classification authority delegated by the president needs to approve the declassification is absurd," the statement concluded. This story is breaking and will be updated. Intelligence News Donald Trump National Security
    The US Secretary of State has warned Australia that the Chinese government now aims to dominate the entire world in military and economic power. 'To my mind, there’s little doubt that China’s ambition over time is to be the leading military, economic, diplomatic and political power not just in the ­region but in the world,' US Secretary of State Antony Blinken told The Australian.    'From the perspective of the US, and I think for Australia too, what we are about is not standing against China, per se, not trying to hold it down or contain it, but standing up for the rules-based order that is being challenged,' he said.  US Secretary of State Antony Blinken is in Melbourne for talks with other Quad members 'China also wants an (inter­national) order, but the difference is its world order would be profoundly illiberal. Ours is liberal.' Mr Blinken warned that Australia and the United States must defend those values against whomever is challenging them. Meanwhile, Russian aggression against Ukraine and its 'no limits' pact with China will be front and centre during security...
    On Friday’s edition of the Fox Business Network’s “Maria Bartiromo’s Wall Street,” House Minority Whip Steve Scalise (R-LA) stated that President Joe Biden’s executive order on Big Tech is just a throwback to net neutrality and the government trying to control the Internet, and “On the Democrats’ side, they just want more government control.” Scalise said [relevant remarks begin around 4:00] that Biden’s order lacks teeth, “But what it does is it goes back into failed programs like net neutrality, where you have the government trying to take control of the Internet. This is about a big power grab by government. It’s not about President Biden standing up to big tech. Look, what we rolled out the other day is to try to bring more transparency and accountability to big tech, which is what we need, not just against their censorship of voices across the spectrum, primarily conservatives, but all across the board. But it’s also the abuse of personal data. Anybody who uses the Internet, which is pretty much everybody in America right now, has really no control over...
    Princes Harry and William are to be separated during Prince Philip's funeral procession, it has today been announced. The pair will be split by their cousin Peter Phillips - the son of the Princess Royal, Princess Anne - as they walk with other family members in the funeral procession. Led by the band of the Grenadier Guards and followed by top military chiefs, the procession will see Prince Philip's coffin brought to St George's Chapel at Windsor Castle on the back of a specially adapted Land Rover hearse. The open-backed vehicle - a design the Duke of Edinburgh himself specially drew up - will be flanked by pall bearers from the armed forces, which will reflect his relationships with the military.  How the royals will line up in the funeral procession list: The Princess Royal and The Prince of Wales will be followed by the Earl of Wessex and The Duke of York. They will be followed by the Duke of Sussex, Mr Peter Phillips and the Duke of Cambridge. Vice Admiral Sir Tim Laurence and The Earl of Snowdon...
    MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) — If you can brave the cold, you can grab a bite to eat outside — but indoor dining areas will be off limits through the holidays. Gov. Tim Walz announced Wednesday that indoor service at restaurants, bars and breweries will stay closed through Jan. 11. But some businesses are choosing not to listen. The door opened at Alibi Drinkery in Lakeville before noon Wednesday. Owner Lisa Zarza said there are no restrictions inside. “We had people waiting for us to open, we had cars in the lot at 10:45,” Zarza said. People were occasionally shoulder-to-shoulder, reminiscent of pre-COVID-19 times. Kevin Amundson was on hand for the re-opening. “It’s nice to finally be able to go out and meet people and pay too much for a beer I have at home,” Amundson said. Zarza said she’d had enough with state orders. “There’s no way we could make it another two months not opening,” Zarza said. “It’s scary, but enough is enough, and we’re standing up.” Alibi Drinkery on Wednesday (credit: Lisa Monet/Facebook) Minnesota...
    A California pastor received a standing ovation when he welcomed his congregation to a worship service he described as a "peaceful protest.” John MacArthur, the pastor of Grace Community Church in the Los Angeles neighborhood of Sun Valley, welcomed his congregation Sunday morning in defiance of the state's order that the church remain closed because of coronavirus concerns. "Good morning, everyone. I'm so happy to welcome you to the Grace Community Church peaceful protest,” he said, which was met with a standing ovation and cheers. Some leaders across the country have condemned social gatherings over coronavirus fears while condoning protests sparked by the death of George Floyd in police custody on Memorial Day. "Are you glad to be here? Everything for us is based on the Word of God, right? And that means we are pro-life, pro-family, pro-law and order, and pro-church of the Lord Jesus Christ," MacArthur continued, before sharing that Chaplain Martin Morehouse of the Los Angeles Police Department would lead the church in prayer. MacArthur announced at the end of July in a post...
    Well-known pastor John MacArthur received an impromptu standing ovation after he welcomed churchgoers on Sunday morning to what he quipped was a "peaceful protest" at Grace Community Church in Sun Valley, California. The evangelical pastor kicked off the Sunday service — which have continued in defiance of state orders — by saying, "Good morning everyone. I'm so happy to welcome you to the Grace Community Church Peaceful Protest." After lengthy applause and celebration, MacArthur continued, saying, "Are you glad to be here? Everything for us based on the word of God, right? And that means we are pro-life, pro-family, pro law and order, and pro church of the Lord Jesus Christ." Another applause erupted from the audience when MacArthur announced that Chaplain Martin Morehouse from the Los Angeles Police Department would open the service in prayer. Grace Community Church Peacful Protest 9 Aug 2020 youtu.be The announcement took aim at Democratic California Gov. Gavin Newsom's executive order instructing churches to cancel all in-person gatherings in the name of public health despite simultaneously supporting mass protests....
    Growing violence against police officers in the largest cities has to stop, but leaders must start standing up for law and order to make that happen, Rep. Doug Collins said Friday. "This is not about coming in and shutting down a city," the Georgia Republican said on Fox News "Americas Newsroom." "We have to have a community that actually has law enforcement, people that do their job, do it right, (and) 99.9% of all of these police officers do it right. We need to get the bad ones out." Communities must also understand what their role is in being part of a civil society, but "when you have mayors and elected members of Congress who blame the police and say everything else will fall in line, that is not the way the civil society works," said Collins. "Thats why you see what you are seeing. It has got to stop. People do not need to feel unsafe in their communities." Collins also on Friday said hes concerned that students in many parts of the country wont be going back to...
    By JAMES MacPHERSON, Associated Press BISMARCK, N.D. (AP) — The owner of the Dakota Access Pipeline continued to fill it with North Dakota crude oil on Wednesday and said it has no immediate plans to shut down the line, despite a federal judge’s order that it be stopped within 30 days for additional environmental review. Pipeline owner Energy Transfer asked the court Wednesday to halt the order, and is seeking an expedited appeal. “We are not shutting down the line immediately,” said Vicki Granado, who noted that the Texas-based company is still taking orders to move oil on the line in August. “We’re not saying we’re going to defy anything.” U.S. District Judge James Boasberg on Monday ordered the pipeline shuttered for an additional environmental assessment more than three years after it began pumping oil. “We don’t believe he has the authority to do this,” Granado said. Boasberg has given the company 30 days to empty the pipeline while the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers fulfills his demand to conduct a more extensive environmental review than the one that allowed...
    FARGO, N.D. (AP) — A federal judge on Tuesday rejected a request for an emergency order to delay the process of shutting down the Dakota Access pipeline while attorneys appeal a ruling to shutter the pipeline during the course of an environmental review. Pipeline attorneys filed the motion — along with a notice of appeal — late Monday after U.S. District Judge James Boasberg ruled to stop the flow of oil by Aug. 5. In denying the request for an expedited ruling, Boasberg said he will scheduled a status hearing to discuss scheduling when he receives the Dakota Access motion to keep the pipeline running. Boasberg ordered the pipeline shuttered while the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers fulfills his demand to conduct a more extensive environmental review than the one that allowed the pipeline to start moving oil on the Standing Rock Indian Reservation three years ago. Boasberg cited the “potential harm” that the pipeline could cause before the Corps finishes its survey Dakota Access attorney William Scherman said in his motion filed Monday that shutting down the pipeline requires...
    FARGO, N.D. (AP) — A federal judge on Tuesday rejected a request for an emergency order to delay the process of shutting down the Dakota Access pipeline while attorneys appeal a ruling to shutter the pipeline during the course of an environmental review. Pipeline attorneys filed the motion — along with a notice of appeal — late Monday after U.S. District Judge James Boasberg ruled to stop the flow of oil by Aug. 5. In denying the request for an expedited ruling, Boasberg said he will scheduled a status hearing to discuss scheduling when he receives the Dakota Access motion to keep the pipeline running. Boasberg ordered the pipeline shuttered while the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers fulfills his demand to conduct a more extensive environmental review than the one that allowed the pipeline to start moving oil on the Standing Rock Indian Reservation three years ago. Boasberg cited the “potential harm” that the pipeline could cause before the Corps finishes its survey Dakota Access attorney William Scherman said in his motion filed Monday that shutting down the pipeline requires...
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