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    Maryland is getting nearly $23 million in federal money for a new training program for the offshore wind industry. The U.S. Commerce Department made the announcement on Wednesday. The department says the program will partner leading employers and seven local unions to build a training model that meets the needs of employers and local communities. In a news release, the department says the Maryland Works for Wind project will train thousands of people to enter the industry. Maryland’s project is one of 32 chosen nationwide out of more than 500 applicants. Copyright © 2022 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.
    by Bethany Blankley   An additional $30 million in Operation Lone Star (OLS) grant money is available to Texas cities and counties to enhance border security operations, the governor’s Public Safety Office (PSO) announced. The announcement came two days after six county judges and sheriffs asked the governor to declare an invasion at the southern border, and to do more to help them thwart illegal activity in their counties after experiencing a surge of drug and human smuggling and other criminal activity resulting from the Biden administration’s border policies. “While the Biden Administration has abandoned border communities, the State of Texas will support them and help them respond to the disaster that President Biden has caused on the border,” Gov. Greg Abbott said in a statement. “Operation Lone Star grant funding has played an integral role in our mission to keep Texans safe and support local communities. I encourage local governments to apply for these funds as we work together to prevent illegal immigration and the smuggling of people, illegal weapons, and deadly drugs like fentanyl from Mexico into Texas.” Additional grant...
    Councilmember Rowena Turner is asking the city of Monte Sereno for damages totaling $1 million for alleged harassment and discrimination by former and current councilmembers after she was charged with illegally voting in Oregon. Monte Sereno Councilwoman Rowena Turner, who was convicted of illegal voting in Oregon, maintains that she is innocent. (File photo) The Republican councilmember filed the claim with the city in May, stating that “on or about September 2020,” Mayor Javed Ellahie, former councilmembers Marshall Anstandig, Lionel Allan and current councilmember Bryan Mekechuk targeted her in an attempt to remove her from council. Council discussed the claim during closed session at a June 21 meeting, ultimately voting to reject it because it was “untimely,” Ellahie said after the closed session ended. The complaint alleges “a conspiracy to attack and defame Ms. Turner based on false claims that she had committed felonies and perjury by violating California and Oregon election law, claims that were demonstrably false and defamatory.” Turner was convicted in 2021 for voting in both California and Oregon during the November 2018 general election. Election records show...
    by Ken Tashjy   On March 31, 2022, an Ohio Appeals Court upheld a lower court verdict against Oberlin College awarding  $31.2 million to a local bakery on the grounds that, among other things, the College and its Dean of Students defamed the business. There has been much reporting about the incident that sparked the lawsuit against Oberlin and the potential negative impact of the court’s decision on the rights of students to engage in free speech and protest. Unfortunately, this reporting has often emphasized the alleged racial aspects of the case, at the expense of focusing on Oberlin’s conduct and the culpability of its administration.  Important lessons can be learned from Oberlin’s missteps, lessons that every college administrator should heed lest they too want to be on the wrong end of a similar verdict. The lawsuit arose out of an incident at Gibson’s Bakery, a family-run bakery and convenience store located in Oberlin, Ohio.  At the time of the incident, the bakery had been in operation for over 130 years and had a long-standing business relationship with the College. On...
    During a visit to Springfield this week, Governor Mike DeWine (R-OH) announced his authorization of nearly $4 million in grants to 16 police and sheriff departments across the Buckeye State. The allotments come as the third round of DeWine’s Ohio Violent Crime Reduction Grant Program. Springfield’s police department itself is getting a grant of $305,206.94. Those funds will go toward video recording systems and automated license plate readers to gather intelligence pertaining to gun-related violations.  Cleveland’s Division of Police, the largest recipient institution of grants this week, is receiving $1,747,101.01. That money will be devoted to anti-youth-gang programs, improved ballistics technology, and expanded Violent Crime Reduction Teams that are rapidly deployed in response to urban acts of violence.  Another sizable amount, $633,966, will go to Whitehall Police Department in Franklin County to buy numerous dispatch consoles to facilitate communication among first responders.  Other agencies getting allocations in this round of the program include: Austintown Township Police Department, Beverly Police Department, Bratenahl Police Department, Cadiz Police Department, Coldwater Police Department, Gallia County Sheriff’s Office, Marietta Police Department, Mentor Police Department, Milton...
    This article was written by WTOP’s news partner InsideNoVa.com and republished with permission. Sign up for InsideNoVa.com’s free email subscription today. Prince William County is providing a 60-day extension on its boost for taxicab drivers while considering a permanent extension and deregulating the business. During its meeting last Tuesday, the Board of Supervisors extended its emergency gas surcharge ordinance through July 13. The ordinance, first approved in March, allowed drivers of Yellow Cab of Prince William County to raise base rates by $1. The rate will be $4 as a base and $2 per mile. The taxicab company is regulated by the state and local government. The state allows localities to establish ordinances governing specifically taxicab companies, giving the local government power to set and adjust rates. Yellow Cab was established in 1978 as a consolidation of three companies that were founded as far back as 1940. The ordinance comes as gas prices in Northern Virginia averaged $4.38 per gallon for regular this week, according to AAA. A month ago, the average price was $4.07, and a year ago it...
    Today, Governor Brian P. Kemp signed major opioid legislation to secure $636 million for state and local governments to bolster critical treatment and prevention efforts. The funds are made available by the $26 billion multistate opioid settlement with Cardinal, McKesson, and AmerisourceBergen – the nation’s three major pharmaceutical distributors – and opioid manufacturer and marketer Johnson & Johnson. “Like every other state, the opioid crisis has hit Georgia communities and families hard and with lasting effect,” said Governor Brian Kemp. “These funds will help us fight the good fight against the disease of addiction, help us make our communities more secure, and help us see that justice is done for the victims of these opioid manufacturers and distributors. I want to thank Senator Brian Strickland and his co-sponsors for carrying this legislation, and the members of the General Assembly that voted unanimously for it so that impacted Georgians can begin the process of healing.” “We have worked from the very beginning to ensure Georgia is in the best possible position...
    PORTSMOUTH — Ohio Governor Mike DeWine and First Lady Fran DeWine made a stop in Portsmouth to announce details of a proposal to make an investment in the Appalachian region of Ohio. On Thursday DeWine visited the Portsmouth Welcome Center to share a proposal for a $500 million investment that would support local initiatives to revitalize downtown districts, enhance quality of life, and help rebuild the economies of Ohio’s 32 Appalachian counties. “What we are proposing for the general assembly to pass is a $500 million investment in our Appalachian counties in the next two years just from this specific program,” DeWine said in a crowded room. “The job of the governor and the job of the governor’s cabinet, at least how I see it, is to be helpful and assist in that area.” The $500 million proposal, dubbed “Ohio BUILDS – Small Communities, Big Impact – A Plan for Appalachia” would infuse funding into the proposal’s three priority areas of restoring historic downtowns, improving community health and rebuilding the local workforce. The proposal includes a $50 million planning phase...
    BALTIMORE (WJZ) — Fifty-four local business districts and 250 nonprofit organizations have received nearly $10 million in grants for security enhancements as part of Gov. Larry Hogan’s $500 million “Re-Fund the Police” initiative, state officials said Thursday. Funds can be used to make improvements that activate spaces and bring more “eyes on the street,” as well as security enhancements such as lighting, cameras and safety patrols. READ MORE: Muralist Ernest Shaw Finds Inspiration In His Children & Love Of Baltimore“Our $500 million Re-Fund The Police Initiative includes neighborhood safety grants to support hardware upgrades, lighting, cameras, and increased security services for community organizations, business districts, and Main Streets across the state,” said Hogan. “With this first round of funding, we are empowering local organizations and residents to take an active role in making their communities safer.” In Baltimore, 23 local business districts received Community Safety Works grants, ranging from $66,000 to $100,000, including Hamilton – Lauraville Main Street, Inc., which plans to build a playground in a vacant lot, Hogan’s office said. READ MORE: Maryland Weather: It's Warm, But Rain...
    (CBS DETROIT) – The stigma of HIV and AIDS causes a myriad of issues surrounding the diseases, according to Barbara Locke of the Community Health Awareness Group. “Getting stable housing has always been a problem just if you are low-income, it’s that much harder if you are a part of the LGBTQ-plus community, but it will allow us the opportunity to help them get to that point,” Locke said. READ MORE: Rep. Rashida Tlaib Tests Positive For COVID-19The organization is now working with LGBTQ Detroit to expand services to gay and bi-sexual men. A $2 million grant was awarded by the CDC to raise HIV awareness for the most vulnerable population in Detroit. “Just all those things to help you get into care, stay healthy and live a longer, healthier life,” Locke explained. “Well under this project, the difference is that we can do the same thing for you if you’re negative.” READ MORE: DPD, Wayne County Sheriff's Team Up To Donate 165 Used Bulletproof Vests To Citizens In UkraineThe funds will help organize a high-impact HIV prevention project for men...
    SACRAMENTO, Calif. -- Californians will be asked to further cut back on their water use, state officials said Monday as they warned water scarcity will shape the future of the drought-stricken state.But those cut backs would come from cities and local water districts, not the state, with members of Gov. Gavin Newsom's administration saying allowing local retailers to set conservation needs is the best approach in a state of nearly 40 million people where water needs vary."We live in a state that has many different hydrological zones, many different water usage scenarios and that one size fits all doesn't really work in California," said Jared Blumenfeld, secretary of the California Environmental Protection Agency.Blumenfeld spoke to reporters after Newsom, a Democrat, issued an executive order outlining new actions aimed to reducing water use on the heels of a historically dry January through March. The governor has previously called on all Californians to reduce their water use by 15% compared to 2020, but it's not a mandate and so far total savings sit at 6%.Like much of the U.S. West, California is...
    by Anthony Hennen   The federal Payment Protection Program established in 2020 to help small businesses and protect the jobs of their workers eventually was allowed to include unions, and millions in forgivable loans ended up with them and other organizations. Eligibility and timing are in question for many, according to a new report from the Freedom Foundation. Nationally, labor organizations received $36.7 million in PPP funds, and $1.2 million ended up in the hands of Pennsylvania unions. “Disconcertingly, the apparently inappropriate PPP loans may have been granted due to fraudulent loan applications or other questionable conduct by applicants or the private lenders operating under the SBA’s delegated authority,” wrote Maxford Nelsen, report author and director of labor policy at the Freedom Foundation. PPP eligibility expanded from small businesses and nonprofits in March 2020 to include labor unions and building corporations by March 2021. But many unions applied for funding before they could legitimately receive the largesse. Teachers’ unions and unions for state and local government employees across the country received funding, even though they were not affected by the sorts of economic shocks...
    By: KDKA-TV News Staff PITTSBURGH (KDKA) — Several organizations in Allegheny County will receive some of the $23 million in state funding for violence intervention and prevention programs. READ MORE: Glassport Awarded $50,000 In State Grants For ATV Park ProjectCCAC will get $800,000 to develop a program to reduce gun violence among young people in our area. READ MORE: First Responders, Residents And Pets Brace For Frigid WeatherFoundation of Hope will receive $1.3 million to set up a program designed to break the cycle of jail and gun violence. MORE NEWS: Another Video Surfaces Showing Suspect Beating Brashear Schoolmate A Month EarlierAnd $150,000 will go to the Healthy Village Learning Institute in McKeesport for community outreach.
    Hong Kong (CNN)More than two years have passed since China sealed off an entire city of more than 11 million people to curb the world's first Covid-19 outbreak. But in many parts of the country, tough coronavirus restrictions are still making it difficult for people to travel just days before the biggest festival of the year.Sunday marked the second anniversary of the start of the Wuhan lockdown -- a drastic move that stunned the nation just two days before Lunar New Year.China has long since recovered from the initial devastation wrought by the pandemic, while Beijing's uncompromising zero-Covid policy -- which relies on mass testing, extensive quarantines and snap lockdowns -- has enjoyed widespread public support.But with the prospect of another Lunar New Year homecoming canceled, some people are growing frustrated.Read MoreKnown as Spring Festival in China, Lunar New Year -- which falls on February 1 this year -- is the most important time for families to get together, likened by some to Christmas, Thanksgiving and New Years combined.Every year, hundreds of millions of people who have left their hometowns...
    CHICAGO (CBS) — The Chicago Auto Show returns to McCormick Place in less than a month, and excitement is building. A preview of the show’s First Look For Charity night was held at Goose Island today. READ MORE: University Of Chicago Police Officer Who Shot Man In Hyde Park Shootout Also Shot Student In 2018This year is the 30th anniversary of First Look, which has raised more than $56 million for local charities. This year, 17 charities have been selected. READ MORE: Outdoor Winter Beer Fest Coming to Lincoln Square“The charities run a gamut from the Jesse White Tumblers to New Star, and also the Susan G. Komen for Breast Cancer Awareness. So these charities are definitely in need of any contributions that they cn raise, because they’re doing more in these times than typical times,”Jason Roberts Chairman First Look For Charity Tickets for First Look are still available on the Auto Show website.  MORE NEWS: Aurora Police Sgt. Ken Thurman Dies Of COVID-19 Complications; Second Aurora Officer To Die From COVID This MonthFirst Look for Charity First Look...
    In this article DISIn this photo illustration the Disney+ logo seen displayed on a smartphone screen. Is an online video streaming subscription service owned and operated by Direct-to-Consumer & International, a subsidiary of The Walt Disney Company.SOPA Images | LightRocket | Getty ImagesThe Walt Disney Company is looking to lure in more global subscribers to its trio of streaming services. On Wednesday, the entertainment giant said it had formed an international content group to expand its pipeline in local and regional markets. This group will be helmed by Disney streaming executive Rebecca Campbell, who will directly report to CEO Bob Chapek, in the newly expanded role of chairman, international content and operations. "Great content is what drives the success of our streaming services, and I am thrilled to have the opportunity to work even more closely with the talented creators in our international markets who are producing new stories with local relevance to delight our audiences around the globe," Campbell said in a statement. While Disney has seen subscriber counts grow steadily over the last few months, the explosive...
    This original Eichler home sits on an oversized lot with a swimming pool and pickleball court. (Photo by Raj Pillai) The atrium. (Photo by Raj Pillai) The living room with the original brick fireplace. (Photo by Raj Pillai) The dining room. (Photo by Raj Pillai) The kitchen. (Photo by Raj Pillai) The kitchen opens to the family room. (Photo by Raj Pillai) The primary suite. (Photo by Raj Pillai) To the right of the vanity is a walk-in closet. The bathroom is behind the closed door. (Photo by Raj Pillai) A pickleball court-side view of the house. (Photo by Raj Pillai) A bird’s-eye view of an Eichler home in Orange that recently sold for $1.8 million. (Photo by Raj Pillai) Show Caption of Expand A well-preserved mid-century modern home in Fairhaven, the first Joseph Eichler neighborhood in Southern California...
    A compliance document filed with the Internal Revenue Service by the Mark Zuckerberg-funded Center for Technology and Civic Life (CTCL) confirms the nonprofit spent $332 million in “grants and other assistance to domestic organizations and domestic governments” in the 2020 election to “increase civic participation by modernizing engagement between local gov[ernment] and the people they serve.” As Breitbart News reported in October 2020, “Facebook founder and CEO Mark Zuckerberg announced on Tuesday that he and his wife have donated an additional $100 million to a ‘safe elections’ project run by the non-profit Center for Technology and Civic Life (CTCL), bringing their total contributions to that project to $350 million since September 1.” Critics say these grants for “local election administration” were really thinly veiled efforts to get-out-the-vote for Democratic candidates, specifically for Democrat presidential nominee Joe Biden. Biden was inaugurated as the 46th President of the United States on January 20, 2021, after a Joint Session of Congress on January 6, 2021, affirmed his 306 to 232 Electoral College vote victory over former President Donald Trump in the November 3, 2020, general election. The Capital...
     In support of the global #GivingTuesday movement, Food Lion is donating 1 million meals* to its longstanding hunger-relief partner Feeding America® and the 33 local Feeding America member food banks across its service area. The donation through Food Lion Feeds, the omnichannel retailer’s hunger relief initiative, will support efforts to combat child hunger in the towns and cities Food Lion serves. Created in 2012, #GivingTuesday is observed the Tuesday after Thanksgiving to encourage generosity, giving and good deeds. “On behalf of our 82,000 associates, we’re proud to add our name and resources to the #GivingTuesday movement and help nourish more of our neighbors and set them up for success,” said Food Lion President Meg Ham. “Supporting the towns and cities we serve is what we do, and we know more of our neighbors have become food insecure due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. We want our community partners and neighbors to know they can always count on Food Lion when they need us.” Hunger as a result of the COVID-19...
    COLUMBUS – Ohio Governor Mike DeWine today announced that over $4.8 million in funding in federal Edward J. Byrne Memorial Justice Assistance Grants (JAG) has been awarded to support the Ohio criminal justice system via multijurisdictional drug task forces, school resource officers, drug, veteran, and mental health courts, corrections projects, and justice technology initiatives. In total,153 grants were awarded to 140 local agencies in 56 counties. The grants are administered by the Ohio Department of Public Safety’s Office of Criminal Justice Services (OCJS). “We are deeply committed to providing resources to keep our communities and citizens safe and to support the important crime-prevention programs operated by local government agencies,” said Governor DeWine. The JAG program allows local and state governments to support a broad range of activities to prevent and control crime based on the needs and conditions of the jurisdictions. “These grants provide our local governments the flexibility to adapt to their local criminal justice system needs,” said OCJS Executive Director Karhlton Moore. The Federal Fiscal Year 2022 competitive grant process solicited grant proposals from state agencies, non-profit organizations,...
    The clock clash: 19 states seeking to make daylight saving time year-round Up close with Prince Williams Earthshot Prize winners On Monday evening the trustees of the Ardmore Public Works Authority approved a resolution that will allow the city to apply for a $30 million dollar loan form the Oklahoma Water Resources Board. These funds will be used to make improvements to the dams at City Lake and Mountain Lake. © Provided by The Daily Ardmoreite Ardmore City Hall The two lakes each supply a portion of the city's water supply, and Public Utilities Director Shawn Geurin said the upcoming improvements will be a continuation of the recent investments made into the city's water infrastructure. Load Error "We've worked on our plants, we've worked on our lines, and we've built water towers," Geurin said. "Here in the past couple years we've come around to taking a look at our lakes, and we hired an engineering firm that specializes in dams to come out and inspect them. They found several issues and have given us their suggestions about how...
    NEW YORK (AP) — The Nielsen company, increasingly under fire from the television industry, on Tuesday said it would soon incorporate homes that have cut off cable in favor of broadband in its viewing measurements for local TV markets. Nielsen estimates some 20% of American homes are now broadband only for onscreen entertainment. The company already includes these homes in its national TV measurements but in January will do so for local markets, giving TV stations a more complete picture of who’s watching in order to sell ads. “It’s a big step to making sure that our measurement is really inclusive,” said Catherine Herkovic, Nielsen managing director and executive vice president of local television. The move comes as media companies have been more vocal in their unhappiness with Nielsen, which for decades has had a virtual monopoly on measuring television viewership, statistics used to govern billions of dollars in advertising spending. Because of that position, it’s not uncommon for media companies to grumble about Nielsen and yearn for a competitor. They worry that Nielsen is not equipped to handle the...
    A new construction project from Mohamed Hadid has been causing problems for local residents - just months after the real estate developer tried to sell a half-built mega-mansion he had been ordered to tear down over safety concerns. Hadid, the father of supermodels Gigi and Bella Hadid, has started construction on  a new Beverly Hills property overlooking Coldwater Canyon with an asking price of $250 million. The 38-acre site at 9650 Cedarbrook Drive is the largest home ever permitted in Los Angeles County and would become the most expensive residential home ever sold in California if it meets the high asking price, as noted by Forbes Global Properties. Exclusive DailyMail.com photos show that construction of the nearly 80,000 square-foot mansion has already closed certain hiking trails in the area. Heavy machinery can be seen on the property, as well as the home's completed foundation. A sign posted at one of the trailheads reads, 'NOTICE: Trail closed by developer Mohamed Hadid. Santa Monica Mountains Conservancy & MRCA sued to keep this trail open but lost at the Court of Appeal.' Hillsides Against Hadid blasted Mohamed...
    Amazon.com Inc. has hired more than 3,000 people for its Arlington second headquarters so far, the tech giant said Wednesday. That means Amazon (NASDAQ: AMZN) has reached at least 12% of the 25,000-employee minimum that it has pledged to hire by 2030. If it makes that goal, it earns at total of $550 million in cash incentives from Virginia. Amazon could receive an additional $200 million in state funds if the company hires a total of 37,850 people by 2035. Amazon declined to provide an exact HQ2 jobs figure. Wednesday’s announcement is the first update on the company’s local hiring count since December, when it put the HQ2 employee total at 1,600. A company spokeswoman said Amazon is on track for its local hiring and investment goals. The company is currently hiring for 2,500 positions at is second headquarters, including roles for software development engineers, technical sales representatives and program managers for Amazon Web Services, Amazon Care, Global Immigration, Alexa… Read the full story from the Washington Business Journal.
    Tennessee’s Financial Stimulus Accountability Group set out its plan Wednesday for spending the first half of more than $3.7 billion in American Rescue Plan federal COVID-19 relief. The spending will include $1.35 billion on sewer-and-water infrastructure and $500 million on broadband expansion. The other $1.875 billion in what the committee is calling the Tennessee Resiliency Plan will be discussed at September’s meeting. It will fund local government technical support, health capital projects, public health and economic relief. “There has been a lot of work done to develop this strategy,” Gov. Bill Lee said before adding an important part of making sure the spending is productive is “how we can develop a plan so we can work with (local governments) and be collaborative.” An essential part of that process will be matching-fund grants with local governments for sewer-and-water infrastructure and broadband spending and the local support program. The state will use funds to create an eight-week training program on ARPA spending for local governments. The program will include updated guidance from the U.S. Treasury, best practices...
    The Press & Journal, a weekly paper covering Middletown, a small town near Pennsylvania’s capital, folded in July 2020 because its ad revenue collapsed in the pandemic. Its publishers, Joe and Louise Sukle, decided there was no future for the paper, even after getting a $146,000 emergency small-business loan from the government and donations from the community while seeing its site traffic zoom up. The town has lost a local news source that covered council meetings, school board meetings, the police and important projects in the area like a new train station. “The thing that really pains us is there’s a vacuum now,” Joe Sukle said. “The people who suffer that is the public.” The coronavirus pandemic, a high-stakes U.S. election and a racial reckoning expanded news audiences for many newspapers and TV news channels, making 2020 a blockbuster news year. But it was terrible for the newspaper industry’s finances — and also for the public that relies on original reporting to keep it informed about local governments and communities. The overall contraction of the industry — now more...
    Longtime Montclair jazz club Trumpets sold last April to a North Jersey real estate firm for $1.2 million after two years on the market, Montclair Local reports. Located across from the Walnut Street train station, the 6 Depot Sq. building was purchased by Hanini Group of Newark, according to the outlet.  The developers plan to turn the facility into a restaurant with outdoor dining, a cafe, double the two apartments on the property, the outlet said. The liquor license was not included with the purchase, Montclair Local reports. Trumpets opened in 1985 and was purchased by Kristine Massari and Enrico Granafei in 1999. The pair announced the final concert would be held Sept. 28, 2019. Hanini Group has completed more than $300 million in development projects. View this post on Instagram A post shared by Hanini Group (@haninigroup) "Committed to vibrant cities and towns, Hanini Group maintains strong dedication to producing high-end spaces with the latest amenities, while preserving historical integrity when working with older properties," its website says. Click here for the full Montclair Local story.
    MANTECA (CBS13) – Million-dollar homes are flying off the market in Manteca. A four-bedroom, three-bathroom tract home in Manteca’s Fox Chase neighborhood just sold for $920,000. Local realtors think the property on Veteran Street is not an outlier and believe nearby big homes could sell for the same price. READ MORE: Why Dont You Shut Up: Tense Moments At Modesto City Hall Over Police Reform Experts said it’s part of the ongoing real estate boom that’s seeing more buyers willing to pay luxury prices. “We were done. We were just burned out and done,” said Benjamin Sanchez Jr., a neighbor. Benjamin and his wife Debra know what it’s like to live in the hustle and bustle of the Bay Area. They said that’s why they left and came to Manteca. “I love the lifestyle, it’s very slow and mellow. Everybody is so friendly,” Debra said. “We picked this spot because it was the center,” Benjamin said. READ MORE: It’s Crazy, It’s Unconscionable: Sacramento Attorney Says Britney Spears Request To End Conservatorship Should Be Easy To Grant Lots of other families...
    New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo has launched a $5 million international ad campaign for tourism to kick start local economy despite many travelers not being allowed to enter. The advertisement was previewed at a press conference on Wednesday and shows views of maskless people enjoying the Big Apple at some of its most iconic sites. Travelers from countries across the world are still barred entry into the United States including the 26 countries in the European Schengen Area, the United Kingdom, the Republic of Ireland, China, Iran, South Africa, Brazil, and India, according to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines last updated in April. During the wide ranging press conference, Cuomo also addressed New York City's mayoral race, rising crime, and the state's controversial bail reform law. The first phase of the advertisement campaign, which costs $5 million, is being run by Empire State Development - the umbrella organization for New York's principal economic development public-benefit corporations. The ad was previewed at a press conference on Wednesday and shows views of maskless people enjoying the Big Apple at...
    More On: japan Major Japanese newspaper calls for cancellation of Tokyo Olympics Mom arrested after asking cops what to do about her son’s rotting corpse Japanese researchers dig deepest ocean hole in history US warns against travel to Japan ahead of Summer Olympics Get these $500 fixer-uppers — so long as you can read a Japanese construction manual. Japan is riddled with millions of vacant homes, called akiya, that local governments hope will sell for next to nothing. At last count, Japan’s Housing and Land survey found 8.49 million uninhabited dwellings in 2018 — a 3.2% increase in akiya since the previous survey interval in 2013. All told, more than 13% of the country’s 62 million homes are unoccupied, especially in rural prefectures such as Wakayama, Tokushima, Kagoshima and Kochi. In these regions, the average rate of vacant homes is up to 18%. Now, a new program led by Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga means to stimulate Japan’s rural economy by encouraging tourism, business and a wave of new residents. Online akiya “banks” have been set up by...
    This empty property in Tochigi, a prefecture north of Tokyo, is one of eight million vacant houses that need occupants. Tochigi Akiya The Japanese government is looking for people to occupy some eight million empty homes. Local authorities are giving away free houses and renovation subsidies to incentivize people to move in. Some provinces even have "akiya banks," which are listings of vacant houses available for sale. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. There are millions of vacant homes in Japan, and some of them are being given away nearly for free.  To find occupants for its millions of akiya, or unoccupied homes, the Japanese government is enticing would-be homeowners with financial incentives ranging from free properties to sizeable renovation subsidies. Japan's Housing and Land Survey logged a record high of 8.49 million akiya in Japan in 2018 during its survey of housing trends in the country, conducted every five years. Many of these homes were left empty after relatives died or when people moved away, the survey found. The 2018 survey found a 3.2% increase in...
                      by Tyler Arnold  Virginia awarded $135.8 million worth of grants to support state and local criminal justice programs, primarily to support those who have been the victims of a crime, Gov. Ralph Northam announced late Thursday afternoon. Nearly 63% of the funding, $85.5 million, will be used to provide services for victims. Many organizations receiving money provide direct services for traditionally underserved populations and for victims of child abuse, domestic violence and sexual assault. “Each of these grant recipients play an important role in keeping our communities safe and supporting victims and survivors of crime,” Northam said in a statement. “This funding will sustain the operations of a variety of critical programs and help expand the reach of services to underserved areas of the Commonwealth.” The funding covers 436 grants for more than 1,500 positions in local governments, state agencies and nonprofit organizations. The grants were approved by the Criminal Justice Services Board of the Virginia Department of Criminal Justice Services. “The programs supported by these grants provide essential services...
    Virginia awarded $135.8 million worth of grants to support state and local criminal justice programs, primarily to support those who have been the victims of a crime, Gov. Ralph Northam announced late Thursday afternoon. Nearly 63% of the funding, $85.5 million, will be used to provide services for victims. Many organizations receiving money provide direct services for traditionally underserved populations and for victims of child abuse, domestic violence and sexual assault. “Each of these grant recipients play an important role in keeping our communities safe and supporting victims and survivors of crime,” Northam said in a statement. “This funding will sustain the operations of a variety of critical programs and help expand the reach of services to underserved areas of the Commonwealth.” The funding covers 436 grants for more than 1,500 positions in local governments, state agencies and nonprofit organizations. The grants were approved by the Criminal Justice Services Board of the Virginia Department of Criminal Justice Services. “The programs supported by these grants provide essential services throughout the criminal justice system,” Secretary of Public Safety...
    SACRAMENTO, Calif. -- California Gov. Gavin Newsom wants to use a sliver of the state's massive budget surplus to give poor people money each month with no rules on how they spend it.Newsom's budget proposal, announced Friday, includes $35 million over five years to pay for "universal basic income pilot programs." The idea is to give poor people money each month to help ease the stresses of poverty that can make it harder to find full-time jobs and stay healthy.It's believed to be the first statewide funding for such programs, which are gaining traction in cities.The idea has been around since at least the 18th century. Even the U.S. government experimented with it in the 1960s and 1970s under President Richard Nixon. It's gotten new life in recent years thanks to former Stockton Mayor Michael Tubbs, who launched a privately funded guaranteed income program in his Northern California city in 2019.Since then, mayors across the country have started their own programs, including one in Oakland earlier this year that pledges to give up to 600 families $500 each month. Last...
    CHICAGO (WLS) -- SEE ALSO | Our Chicago Town Hall: Tax relief for Chicago homeownersProperty owners can also visit CookCountyTreasurer.com to obtain the same information available by phone and apply online for property tax refunds and missing exemptions. Select the purple box labeled "Your Property Tax Overview"; Enter your address and you will see a photo of your property; Select "View Your Property Tax Information"; Scroll down to see if you are eligible for: $76 million in available overpayments, or $46 million in missing tax exemptions; Check if your property is on the Tax Sale list of delinquent taxes. A team from the Treasurer's Office, fluent in Spanish, Polish, Chinese and English, will:Search $76 million in available property tax refundsCheck if you are eligible for $46 million in missing tax exemptionsVerify if your property is on the Tax Sale list with delinquent taxesAbout ABC7/WLS-TV ChicagoABC7/WLS-TV Chicago is the No. 1 local news source and most-watched television station in Chicago. With top-rated daily newscasts spanning decades and the largest social media presence in the market with more than 2.3 million Facebook...
    A coastal town in western Japan is under fire for using hundreds of thousands of dollars designated for COVID-19 relief for something slightly less important — a giant squid statue. Local officials said they hoped the statue would boost tourism.  The town of Noto was given 800 million yen, about $7.3 million, from the central government in relief funds, according to local media. The aid program aimed to boost local economies, which have struggled to stay afloat during the pandemic.  The Japanese government approved a $708 billion stimulus package in December to help its economy recover, as it battles a fourth wave of infections. The nation has reported over 622,000 cases of the virus, according to Johns Hopkins University.  Noto officials used about $228,000 from the emergency funding to build the massive statue, which is 13 feet tall and almost 43 feet long, local media outlets report.  A town official said that the statue is part of a "long-term strategy" to spread the word about Noto's fishing industry and its local delicacy, squid. The statue can be used both...
    Substack is luring high-profile journalists and bloggers with significant upfront payments to cover their first year on the newsletter platform, but Facebook is taking a different approach as it moves into the newsletter market. The company has set up a $5 million fund to pay local journalists multi-year licensing fees to help them build an audience and make a living from its self-publishing platform. The company told it’s focusing on local journalists “who are often the lone voice covering a given community.” Facebook announced the platform, which allows journalists to create individual websites as well as newsletters, last month. It ties into Facebook Pages, giving writers a way to tap into their existing audience on the social network with a free self-publishing tool. They’ll be able to set their own prices for subscriptions, and there may be other ways for them to earn income. The company plans to open up access to the tool gradually, first with a “small subset of independent writers.” Journalists in the US can apply starting today. Facebook says it will give priority to those...
    More from: Keith J. Kelly Institutional Investors top editors jump to London-based rival Time running out for Stewart Bainums bid as Tribune sets May 21 vote New York Times balks at gender-neutral bathrooms, transgender byline demands Media hangout Michaels Restaurant set to reopen on April 21 Two top Wired.com staffers resign, citing burnout and exhaustion Now that talks have broken off between Tribune Publishing and hotel magnate Stewart Bainum, the newspaper company’s journalists are hoping for a miracle to derail a $634 million bid by cost-cutting hedge fund Alden that will give it control of the New York Daily News, the Hartford Courant, the Chicago Tribune and other Tribune papers. “Everybody is nervous,” said Liz Bowie, a 30 year veteran of the Baltimore Sun and a rep for the Newspaper Guild union at her paper. For the past six months, Bowie has been talking with Guild representatives at other Tribune papers papers also represented by the union. They have formed a group they call Project Mayhem in an effort to help come up with the money Bainum...
    BALTIMORE (WJZ) — DJ Kopec reached his goal of raising more than $2 million for local organizations in need over the past 12 months with his quarantine dance parties. WJZ has been following Kopec throughout the year as he hosted virtual dance parties to raise people’s spirits, while also raising money for those in need. READ MORE: BARCS Caring For Moose, Dog Found Stabbed Near Clifton Park CORONAVIRUS COVERAGE: TIMELINE: Coronavirus In Maryland, Tracking The Spread Latest coronavirus stories from WJZ Latest CDC Guidelines Kopec said Saturday was his second-biggest night. READ MORE: Gas Prices Expected To Hit $3 Per Gallon By Memorial Day, Experts Say He was able to raise more than $132,000 for The Ulman Foundation. The event put them well over the $2 million mark. MORE NEWS: Baltimore Ranked 15th On Orkins Top-50 Termite Cities List For the latest information on coronavirus go to the Maryland Health Department’s website or call 211. You can find all of WJZ’s coverage on coronavirus in Maryland here.
    By Rodrigo Viga RIO DE JANEIRO (Reuters) - Brazil could begin full production of AstraZeneca Plc's COVID-19 vaccine by July if regulators allow, an official at biomedical center Fiocruz said, moving up by 100 days the timeline to produce shots without imported ingredients. Fiocruz Vice President Marco Krieger told Reuters that, if health regulator Anvisa waives some controls, the biomedical institute could move up the Sept. 30 target date for 100% local production of the shot by AstraZeneca and Oxford University. "This would be important at a time when Brazil is facing vaccine shortages," Krieger said in an interview on Friday. Delays in getting supplies from India and China have slowed Fiocruz's finishing line and Brazil's vaccination program. Only 6% of Brazil's adult population has had their first of two shots. Federally funded Fiocruz, based in Rio de Janeiro, has delivered 4 million ready-made vaccines from India and is filling and finishing shots with active ingredients from China. Delivery of those doses, starting this week, is expected tototal 100.4 million by July. Fully local production of the vaccine is scheduled...
    INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — Indiana has awarded nearly $30 million to communities and nonprofit groups for construction of 70 miles of new trails Gov. Eric Holcomb says will boost local tourism and economic development. The $29.6 million in funding announced Thursday for 18 communities and non-profit organizations is the part of the second round of Holcomb's Next Level Trails program. More than $24 million for 17 other trail projects totaling 42 miles were announced in May 2019 in the first funding round. Whitcomb said trails improve the quality of life in the state and are “a valuable tool for economic and tourism development." He said Hoosiers have frequented trails during the coronavirus pandemic. “Trails have been an important resource for Hoosiers’ physical and mental well-being throughout the pandemic,” he said. Dan Bortner, the director of the Indiana Department of Natural Resources, said the agency is excited to partner with local governments and nonprofits on the trails projects. He said Hoosiers visited the trails and parks “ in unprecedented numbers" during the past year. “Demand for trails has never been higher," Bortner...
    MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) – Local business owners who sustained damage during last summer’s civil unrest and lawmakers who represent those communities are renewing their plea to the legislature to approve state aid for rebuilding. The damage to Minneapolis and St. Paul exceeds $500 million. Private property damage and losses just in the city of Minneapolis carries an estimated price tag of $350 million or more, according to a city economic official. Nine months after the civil unrest tore apart neighborhoods in the Twin Cities, hundreds of millions of dollars looms, hampering the road to recovery, which is why DFL lawmakers from Minneapolis and St. Paul are pushing for state assistance. “We made a promise and a commitment that we will never, ever walk away from supporting the small businesses impacted by the civil unrest,” said Rep. Mohamud Noor, DFL-Minneapolis, said Thursday a news conference in the Lake Street Corridor, an area hit hard by the unrest. “Today, we reaffirm that commitment.” One proposal, dubbed the “Promise Act,” would allocate $267 million for a grant program to provide relief to businesses. It’s...
    MIAMI (CBSMiami/AP) — Former Miami Marlins owner Jeffrey Loria has agreed to reimburse the county and the City of Miami a total of $5.5 million for the cost of building Marlins Park. The Miami-Dade County Commission approved the final lawsuit settlement after Loria agreed to a last-minute increase in the amount. A tentative settlement of $4.2 million was reached last month. RELATED: Curry Helps Warriors Rally Past Heat In OT The payment stems from the $1.2 billion sale of the team by Loria in 2017 to Derek Jeter and his ownership group. Loria bought the Marlins for $158.5 million in 2002. In 2009, local government agreed to help pay to build Marlins Park in exchange for Loria’s pledge to share profits if he later sold the team. That agreement called for Loria to pay 5% of net proceeds from the sale of the team. RELATED: Huberdeau Scores In OT, Lifts Panthers Past Hurricanes 4-3 Public money covered more than three-fourths of the $634 million cost for Marlins Park, which opened in 2012. The settlement follows months of negotiations. The...
    BATON ROUGE, La. (AP) — ExxonMobil is hosting a virtual event to scout for a wider network of local suppliers for its planned $410 million refinery project in Louisiana's capital city. The Advocate reports that the Baton Rouge Supplier Forum is scheduled for Wednesday. ExxonMobil said it expects to spend $226 million in Baton Rouge and set aside at least $3.5 million for diverse suppliers and $1 million for Baton Rouge-based companies. “From local catering and marketing supplies to landscaping and pest control services, the multitude of needed services and products for the project vary immensely,” the company said. Copyright 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed. Tags: Louisiana, Associated Press
    New York restaurant workers will now be eligible for the coronavirus vaccine if local governments can spare the shots, Gov. Andrew Cuomo announced Tuesday — reversing his position from just a day before after the federal government said it would send more doses to states. The governor hung a U-turn one day after saying the state couldn’t afford to make any additions to the vaccine eligibility list due to a lack of supplies — and hours after New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio called on him to do it anyway, citing the impending resumption of indoor dining at 25 percent capacity. Though the state controls who is eligible for the vaccine, Cuomo on Tuesday pinned responsibility on local leaders like de Blasio to make the call on if they can afford to vaccinate the newly-eligible groups. “I’m leaving it up to the local governments to determine what fits their situation,” said Cuomo during a Tuesday press briefing in Manhattan. New York restaurant workers are now eligible to receive COVID-19 shots, Gov. Andrew Cuomo announced on February 2, 2021. John...
    More On: COVID vaccine De Blasio clashes with Cuomo again — calls for restaurant workers to be vaccinated A COVID-19 mutation has evolved again – into something ‘worrying’ Russia’s COVID-19 vaccine is 91% effective, study says McDonald’s paying employees to get COVID-19 vaccine New York restaurant workers will now be eligible for the coronavirus vaccine if local governments can spare the shots, Gov. Andrew Cuomo announced Tuesday, reversing his position from just a day before in light of an increased allocation from the federal government. The governor hung a U-turn one day after saying the state couldn’t afford to make any additions to the vaccine eligibility list due to a lack of supplies — and hours after New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio called on him to do it anyway, citing the impending resumption of indoor dining at 25 percent capacity. Though the state controls who is eligible for the vaccine, Cuomo on Tuesday pinned responsibility on local leaders like de Blasio to make the call on if they can afford to vaccinate the newly-eligible groups. “I’m leaving...
    On the heels of news that cultural organizations and artists west of I-495 have lost $80 million since the start of the pandemic, an art space for well-known local acts is closing. On Sunday, Jan. 31, Director Brain F. Hale said that The Bing Arts Center’s building in Springfield has been put up for sale. The asking price on the more than 10,000-square-foot property on Sumner Avenue is $175,000, according to LoopNet. “Unfortunately the cessation of income was not matched by a corresponding end of facility costs,” Hale said. “Our capacity to continue paying the bills is rapidly diminishing, leaving us with little choice but to sell the property.” Hale said The Bing hadn’t been able to host a show since March 2020. A planned 10th-anniversary party in June was expected to be a kick-off party for more events, but COVID-19 had other plans. Hale never said The Bing is dissolving, just that the organization is selling its building. The Bing Arts Center, formerly the Bing Theater, has three large rooms, ample restrooms, parking in the rear, and...
    The FCC leveled a nearly $10 million fine against a Montana man who it said made racist and threatening robocalls. AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin The FCC fined Scott Rhodes $9.9 million for making thousands of racist and threatening robocalls. Targets of the calls included Black and Jewish politicians, as well as a murder victim's family. "In this instance, not only were the calls unlawful, but the caller took them to new levels of egregiousness," the FCC said. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. The Federal Communications Commission said it fined a Montana man $9.9 million for making racist and threatening robocalls that targeted Black and Jewish politicians, the family of a murder victim, and residents of Charlottesville, Virginia, in an attempt to influence a jury in a murder case against an avowed neo-Nazi. Scott Rhodes made thousands of calls using an online platform to manipulate caller ID so the calls appeared to be from local numbers, a technique known as "neighbor spoofing." The FCC said it was this tactic combined with the content of the calls that resulted...
    Officers at the Los Angeles Police Department have rejected a plan to raise $10 million to fight layoffs and support candidates in the 2022 elections, dealing a setback to a union attempting to push back against calls to defund the police. The Los Angeles Police Protective League, which represents around 9,800 officers, asked its members last month to approve the creation of a “Protecting Our Profession” assessment, which would have collected $22 per paycheck from each officer over a nearly two-year period. Proceeds would have gone toward supporting the union’s political allies, campaigning against public safety cuts and fighting new legislation. In a statement, the union’s board said that it’s now looking at additional options to “ensure the interests of our membership and the public are fully protected at the local, state, and federal level.” The union confirmed that the proposal had been defeated but declined to release election results. However, one source familiar with the vote said the assessment had been defeated by a roughly two-to-one margin. The rank-and-file officers’ union has been highly influential in state and local...
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