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    (CNN)First things first: Joe Biden isn't going to take away your hamburgers. There's a bizarre rumor going around in right-wing circles -- and being spread by Fox News and Republican members of Congress -- that President Biden is scheming to come into your kitchen and pry the cold, dead beef out of your hands. Rep. Lauren Boebert of Colorado claimed that Democrats "want to limit us to about four pounds [of beef] a year," a falsity echoed on Fox by host Jesse Watters, who said, "That adds up to a burger a month. That's it." Jill FilipovicExcept it's not. The Biden administration is not limiting Americans' red-meat consumption -- not now, not by 2030, and not in any proposal written anywhere. This claim is entirely invented, pulled from a 2020 academic paper from the University of Michigan Center for Sustainable Systems that examined the hypothetical impact of Americans reducing their beef consumption to four pounds per year (it goes without saying, Americans eat many times more than that -- one estimate puts per capita consumption at more than 58 pounds...
    Washington (CNN)A Fox News anchor admitted on air on Monday that his show was inaccurate when it claimed on Friday that President Joe Biden is trying to require Americans to sharply reduce their consumption of red meat.John Roberts, co-host of the afternoon show "America Reports," made the Monday concession after CNN and other media outlets published fact check articles explaining that Biden does not have any plan to restrict red meat consumption.Roberts acknowledged Monday that "a graphic and the script" from his Friday show "incorrectly implied" that a 2020 academic study about meat-eating and greenhouse gas emissions is "part of Biden's plan for dealing with climate change." "That is not the case," Roberts said.Roberts had falsely claimed on Friday that the study -- which is not connected in any way to Biden's actual policies -- found that people need to "say goodbye to your burgers if you want to sign up to the Biden climate agenda." As Roberts spoke on Friday, Fox aired a graphic that claimed "Biden's climate requirements" are to "cut 90% of red meat from diet, max...
    Washington (CNN)Republican members of Congress, Fox News personalities and other prominent right-wing figures are falsely claiming that President Joe Biden is trying to force Americans to eat far less red meat."Joe Biden's climate plan includes cutting 90% of red meat from our diets by 2030. They want to limit us to about four pounds a year. Why doesn't Joe stay out of my kitchen?" Colorado Rep. Lauren Boebert wrote on Twitter on Saturday.No fewer than five Fox News or Fox Business personalities told versions of the scare story on the air since Friday morning. For example, Fox News host Jesse Watters said Saturday that "Americans are going to have to cut their red meat consumption by 90% in order to reduce emissions to hit Biden's target. That means you're only allowed to eat four pounds of red meat a year. That adds up to a burger a month. That's it." In a particularly odd moment on Twitter on Sunday, two Republican governors, Greg Abbott of Texas and Brad Little of Idaho, tweeted their opposition to the Biden red meat policy...
    UK scientists have linked the consumption of any form of red meat – such as beef, lamb and pork – with a decline in heart function.  The researchers, who studied nearly 20,000 individuals, found that greater intake of red and processed meat was linked with a decline in three different measures of heart health.   Processed meats – such as sausages, salami and cured bacon – are meats that have been preserved by smoking or salting, curing or adding chemical preservatives.  There is some evidence that red meat alters the gut microbiome, leading to higher levels of certain metabolites in the blood, which have in turn been linked to greater risk of heart disease.   Red meat consumption has already been linked to heart disease – the world's biggest killer.  Burger lovers could consider switching to the many plant-based alternatives that now line supermarket shelves – which are also better for the environment.  Bad news for burger lovers: An observational study of nearly 20,000 individuals has found that greater intake of red and processed meat is associated with worse heart function RELATED ARTICLES ...
    New York : Bet on consuming meat from grass-raised animals, they have lower fat content, more omega-3 acids and beta-carotenes. Photo: Image by vika-imperia550 on Pixabay / Pixabay Without a doubt meat consumption It has been one of the most controversial nutritional issues in recent months. Based on this, the main question that has arisen in most recurring consumers is How often should we eat meat? Although, the answer may vary a bit depending on the source. Lhe studies are conclusive in this regard and agree that a lower consumption of red meat will always improve health. Regarding the amount of meat that is “safe”, numerous scientific references, such as the renowned Harvard University, verify that the consumption of 50 to 100 grams (1.8 to 3.5 ounces) red meat per day, increases the risk of chronic diseases. On the contrary, there does not appear to be a measurable risk from eating red meat. once or twice a week. Obviously all this information has unleashed some controversy and has led many people to even wonder Is...
    PEOPLE who scoff more steak and sausages are a third more likely to develop diabetes, a study warns. Eating more red and processed meat increases the chances of getting the disease by 30 per cent. 1Eating more red meat could increase your chance of having diabetesCredit: Getty Images - Getty A team at the University of Oxford found eating meat regularly can increase the risk of heart disease and pneumonia, among other common conditions. Data from 475,000 British adults revealed bigger fans of meat were more likely to smoke, drink and be overweight. Even people who ate a higher amount of leaner chicken or turkey saw a raised rise of diabetes and gallbladder disease. Lead author Dr Keren Papier, from the Nuffield Department of Population Health at the University of Oxford, said: "We have long known that unprocessed red meat and processed meat consumption is likely to be carcinogenic and this research is the first to assess the risk of 25 non-cancerous health conditions in relation to meat intake in one study. “Additional research is needed to evaluate whether the...
    New York : An excessive consumption of red meat can be associated with possible weight gain, bad breath, digestive problems and fertility. Photo: Image by RitaE on Pixabay / Pixabay In recent months much has been said about the consequences of a excessive consumption of meat. However red meat is a staple in the diet of many Americans and it is present in all kinds of very classic and traditional dishes. However, as with practically everything, too much of something can be bad for your health. While it is true that red meat is a high quality protein source and feeds the body with important essential nutrients as is the case with iron, zinc and vitamin B12, eating too much through the recurrent consumption of red and processed meats It has been linked to negative results such as an increased risk of cancer and heart disease. Not in vain are recognized health organizations worldwide, as is the specific case of The Global Fund for Cancer Research and the American Institute for Cancer Research; recommend...
    New York : Red meat includes not only beef, but also pork, lamb, veal, horse, venison, and goat. Photo: Kasumi Loffler / Pexels You may think that you have a moderate consumption of red meat, two or three times a week, but your calculations may not be adequate. Experts point out why it is not advisable to eat brown meat in excess and how much is recommended. Colorectal cancer, heart disease, type 2 diabetes, and respiratory diseases The World Health Organization (WHO) has classified processed meat as a carcinogen and red meat as probable. The WHO stated that each 50 gram serving of processed meat consumed per day increases the risk of colorectal cancer by 18%. Researchers from the Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) found that a daily serving of 50 grams (1.8 oz) processed meat (about 1-2 slices of cold cuts or 1 hot dog) was associated with a 42% increased risk of developing heart disease and a 19% risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Increased risk of premature death In other Harvard...
    In the last few months everyone has been talking about the benefits of following a plant-based diet and consequently many questions have arisen around the meat consumption and its health effects. Taking into account that most americans include beef as a primary part of their diet, it is worth talking about it. According information disclosed by the USDADuring 2017, active meat eaters ate approximately 217 pounds of red meat per person. However it has various studies and references who have found that diets that focus on meat consumption can potentially lead to health problems long-term. It is not a question of demonizing the consumption of meat, since by choosing the right variants and in moderate quantities it symbolizes a important source of nutrients and above all of proteins of high biological value. The truth is that it is essential understand what happens in the body by consuming too much meat, in such a way that we can make healthier and more balanced decisions that will help us to promote health, prevent chronic diseases and...
    Last week, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) published an 835-page report that will be used to inform the 2020-2025 Dietary Guidelines. Every five years, an advisory committee of health experts reviews the latest dietary and nutrition research to help determine federal nutrition policies and healthy eating recommendations. While the report is consistent with previous guidelines, there were some notable differences. Tightened restrictions on alcoholic beverages for men Previous guidelines recommended that men limit themselves to two drinks per day and women limit consumption to one drink per day. The new report recommends that both men and women should have only one drink per day. Tightened restrictions on added sugars The 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines urged Americans to limit their consumption of added sugars to 10 percent or less of their total caloric intake. The advisory committee report this year now recommends that Americans to reduce their added sugar intake to 6 percent of total calories. Stronger evidence linking meat to chronic diseases Plant-based advocates are celebrating this year’s findings that show more evidence linking red and processed meat consumption...
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