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    (CNN)The Democrats' $369 billion climate package, the largest such investment in US history, could have significant implications for global greenhouse gas emissions and the US' standing in the world, after months of uncertainty in Congress undermined the Biden administration's claims that "America is back." US officials are hoping it puts them in a better position for difficult negotiations to come: the international climate talks in Egypt this fall. Whats in the Manchin-Schumer deal on climate, health care and taxesThe inability of US lawmakers to pass federal climate legislation has for years been a black eye for the country's international delegates at global climate talks. The Trump years were a low point, but even at COP26 in Glasgow last year, President Joe Biden and US Climate Envoy John Kerry's calls to action did not have the necessary legislative weight behind them. Kerry and Biden now have billions of legislative investments in clean energy to tout when they go to COP27 in November, which US lawmakers and experts say is a gamechanger. "I think we all felt like we were walking through...
    Friday, February 11, 2022 at 7:42 p.m. Brest (France) – More than 100 countries have expressed their commitment to protecting the oceans by participating in the “Brest Ocean Commitments” in collaboration with the UN Secretary-General, the Director-General of UNESCO and the Secretary-General of the International Maritime Organization. The “Ocean Summit” event was held in Brest from 9 to 11 February. The summit brings together 41 states, with representatives of civil society and business holding the rotating chairmanship of the EU Council, at the initiative of France. An Ocean Summit, organized in collaboration with the United Nations, should provide “strong political impetus” to the European and international agenda on maritime issues, particularly affecting the oceans and the successful conclusion of the “Ocean” multilateral talks that will be held in Lisbon at the end of June 2022. . “Recognizing that the place of the sea in today’s international political agenda is not conducive to its role in the planetary climate, environment and social balance, the leaders at Brest are determined to work together to put an end to the degradation of the...
    The impact of agriculture on climate change is significant. According to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the agriculture sector is responsible for 10 percent of the total U.S. greenhouse gas emissions, after transportation (29 percent), electricity production (25 percent), industry (23 percent), and commercial and residential usage (13 percent). However, according to Peter Lehner, managing attorney for EarthJustice, a nonprofit environmental law firm, the EPA estimate is "almost certainly significantly quite low." Lehner argues that most analyses exclude five unique sources of emissions from the farming sector: soil carbon (carbon released during the disturbance of soil), lost sequestration (carbon that would still be sequestered in the ground had that land not been converted into farmland), input footprints (carbon footprint for products used in agriculture, like the manufacturing of fertilizer), difficult measurements (it is harder to measure the carbon emissions of biological systems like agriculture than it is to measure the emissions of other industries that are not biological, like transportation), and potent gases (like methane and nitrous oxide). Regarding that last source: Focusing on carbon dioxide as the main greenhouse...
    "The Five" discussed President Joe Biden appearing to fall asleep at a United Nations conference in Glasgow, Scotland, Monday. The panel pointed out that the president's apparent doze lasted for a longer period of time – it wasn't a mere few seconds. "The president might have been exercising his right to prayer," Harold Ford Jr. quipped on the latest Biden gaffe.  In a speech during his Europe trip, Biden stressed the importance of combatting climate change. "This is a challenge of our collective lifetimes. The existential threat, a threat to human existence as we know it. And every day we delay the cost of inaction increases. So let this be the moment that we answer history's call." "He fell asleep during this climate thing – [and] this is what's going to kill us all in a matter of years," Jesse Watters said. "It does look dopey that the president is falling asleep at a climate change conference in Europe while Americans are suffering from high gas prices here. It's off."  BIDEN APPEARS TO USE PREPARED LIST OF REPORTERS AGAIN FOLLOWING...
    The Taliban has shown its support for anti-climate change efforts, calling for international aid to help complete environmental projects in Afghanistan. Citing a need to protect the country’s ‘fragile climate’, Taliban spokesman Suhail Shaheen said ‘tremendous work’ was needed to help Afghanistan become greener. The Taliban regime, which came into force in August, will not be represented at Cop26 as it is yet to be recognised internationally. Taliban spokesman Suhail Shaheen said ‘tremendous work’ was needed to help Afghanistan become greener RELATED ARTICLES Previous 1 Next Fresh terror for brave Afghan interpreters: How fleeing... Taliban supreme leader makes first public appearance Share this article Share But Mr Shaheen said that environmental projects which had been approved for United Nations funding under the former Afghan government must ‘fully resume work’. And he stressed that the Taliban – which formerly targeted international contractors – was ‘committed’ to ensuring their safety. Mr Shaheen said: ‘Afghanistan has a fragile climate. There is need for tremendous work. ‘Some climate change projects which have already been approved and...
    (CNN)Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison said Monday he might not show up at the COP26 climate talks in Glasgow this November, as his government becomes increasingly isolated in international efforts on the crisis.More than 100 world leaders, including US President Joe Biden, have confirmed their attendance at the talks hosted by the United Kingdom, a close ally of Australia. Leaders of the G20, which includes Australia, will be convening in Rome a day ahead of the climate talks. While it is not yet confirmed if Morrison will be at that summit, many G20 leaders are likely to take the short flight from the Italian capital to COP26 in Scotland."We haven't made any final decisions about (attending COP26). I mean it is another trip overseas and I've been on several this year and spent a lot of time in quarantine," Morrison told the West Australian newspaper. Australia is shaping up to be the villain of COP26 climate talksMorrison said he needed to focus on the country's reopening after an extended lockdown. His government is aiming to relax its hardline border restrictions...
    VIDEO7:4807:48The European Green Deal: Europe's last-ditch climate planDigital Original The European Union's proposed carbon pricing rules could hit a major snag in the form of China and the U.S., but one expert predicts it will still possible to convince the economic superpowers to get onboard using a series of cautious steps. The EU said in July that it wants to impose a carbon border adjustment mechanism — also referred to as CBAM. The measure, if approved, will force EU businesses to pay a carbon levy for goods they import from outside the bloc. In essence, it aims to incentivize other places with less stringent emissions rules to reduce their carbon footprints or else risk losing some business. The problem is that some nations might not want to go down that route; or at least not as fast as the EU, which is aiming to cut its greenhouse gas emission by 55% from 1990 levels by the end of 2030. China, India, South Africa and Brazil said in April they had "grave concern" regarding the EU's intentions for a carbon tax,...
    Mississippi contractor charged after driving into airmen on US base House Dems hustle for votes to extend eviction moratorium after Biden push The European Central Bank this month announced it would factor climate change considerations into its policy decisions, and the Bank of Japan launched an effort to finance projects that address the warming planet. Load Error Those moves mark the latest steps taken by some of the world's largest financial institutions to aid the environmental fight.  But the financial sector as a whole remains slow to recognize and address the costs of climate change, says Pavan Sukhdev, president of WWF International, one of the world's leading environmental advocacy groups.  The industry's focus on financial capital results in neglect for value derived from the natural world, and renders the sector sluggish in fighting the degradation of the environment, he told Yahoo Finance in a recent interview. "In all of these deliveries of benefits which don't transact in a marketplace — just because they don't transact in the marketplace — our tendency is to ignore them," says Sukhdev, a...
    London (CNN)This week, Boris Johnson gets his first big chance to answer a question that's puzzled many in the international community for some time: Post-Brexit, what is Britain actually for? Critics of the United Kingdom's decision to leave the European Union have long worried that, overseas, Brexit was viewed as an inward-looking project carried out by a nation hostile to the outside world. Policies enacted by Johnson's government since have done little to assuage these fears: Cultural battles over British heritage; disputes with the European Union over the trade deal signed by the Prime Minister himself last year; slashing spending on foreign aid, to name a few. Now, Johnson has a truly golden opportunity to write chapter one in the story of post-Brexit Britain's return to the international community as a champion of the liberal democratic world and protector of Western values. The G7 summit, taking place from Friday on the coast of Cornwall in southwest England, is the first major in-person meeting of the leaders of the world's biggest economies since the start of the Covid-19 pandemic. It is...
    In a speech before the United Nations Security Council, naturalist and activist, David Attenborough, called climate change the biggest security threat, France24 reported. He addressed a virtual meeting about climate risks to international security. “If we continue on our current path, we will face the collapse of everything that gives us our security: food production, access to fresh water, habitable ambient temperature and ocean food chains,” Attenborough said, “And if the natural world can no longer support the most basic of our needs, then much of the rest of civilization will quickly break down.” “People today all over the world now realize this is no longer an issue which will affect future generations,” he said. “It is people alive today, and, in particular, young people, who will live with the consequences of our actions.” Source: COP26/YouTube Committee chair Boris Johnson told the council, “I know that there are people around the world who will say that this is all kind of green stuff from a bunch of tree-hugging, tofu munchers and not suited to international diplomacy and international...
    (CNN)America, welcome back to the frontline of the global fight against climate change. On Friday, President Joe Biden delivered on a key climate campaign pledge by re-joining the Paris Agreement -- the international climate accord agreed in 2015 by world nations to tackle global warming. The US was a key player in helping to deliver the Paris Agreement, with former State Secretary and current US climate envoy John Kerry playing an instrumental role in this successful process. I have been extremely encouraged by the conversations I have had with Kerry and White House National Climate Advisor Gina McCarthy -- both formidable allies in the fight against climate change.Read MoreThe return of the US paves the way for climate action to run like a golden thread through US domestic and international policies -- mirroring our approach in the United Kingdom as we prepare to welcome world leaders to the 26th United Nations Climate Change Conference, COP26, in Glasgow this November.Texas disaster casts harsh light on Americas futureWhy does this all matter? The UN Climate Conference in Paris, the 21st such...
    Americans suffer from a tendency to look inward, an affliction exacerbated by isolationist political winds as well as the COVID-19 pandemic. Now more than ever, the United States needs the Peace Corps, brainchild of the late Minnesota Sen. and Vice President Hubert H. Humphrey, to help our citizens engage with the rest of the world; cultivate future foreign service leaders; and foster a more climate friendly international development approach. Here are three arguments for why a Biden-Harris administration should prioritize this federal agency — and key steps to get there. William G. MoseleyFirst, the Peace Corps could help the U.S. emerge from four years of isolationism by rebuilding person-to-person bridges between Americans and other peoples. Since its creation during the Kennedy administration in 1961, more than 240,000 Americans have served as Peace Corps volunteers in 142 countries. While the Peace Corps is commonly thought of as a grass-roots development organization that places Americans for two years of service in communities in the Global South, it also serves as a vital conduit for cross-cultural exchange. Most former Peace Corps volunteers, including...
    In June 2017, Donald Trump announced the United States’ exit from the Paris Agreement. The news, expected by most observers, ushered in a long list of multilateral processes from which Washington would gradually withdraw. On November 4, 2020, at the end of the three-year legal deadline for their exit, the United States formally withdrew from the Agreement. The very next day, Joe Biden announced that his first decision as president would be to bring his country back. The news was greeted with enthusiasm all over the world – the former executive secretary of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), Christiana Figueres, in office at the time of the signing of the Paris Agreement, is even filmed jumping for joy in his living room. The election of Joe Biden is undeniably great news for international cooperation against climate change. Under Barack Obama, the United States pledged to reduce its greenhouse gas emissions from 26 to 28% below their 2005 level by 2025: the presidency of Donald Trump, marked by four years of denial of the climate change and...
    A man, displaced by Hurricane Eta in Honduras, cooks plantains in a refugee camp along the median of a highway in San Pedro Sula.Seth Sidney Berry/Zuma Let our journalists help you make sense of the noise: Subscribe to the Mother Jones Daily newsletter and get a recap of news that matters.This piece was originally published in Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists and appears here as part of our Climate Desk Partnership. When it comes to dealing with floods, droughts, heat waves, or other adversities that our lively planet throws at us, one classic solution for humanity has always been to simply pick up and leave. Mobility has always been a strategy for humans to deal with climate changes, whether they be seasonal shifts, regional droughts, or mini ice-ages. And we are all potentially vulnerable to displacement, whether it be temporary evacuation, regular movement throughout the seasons, or a more permanent relocation. But what happens when huge numbers of people must leave, in unprecedented numbers—so-called “climate migrants”—as is already starting to occur with climate change? How do we not only react defensively...
    Since President Donald Trump took office in 2017, the U.S. has stepped back from its international climate commitments by leaving the Paris Agreement and rolling back dozens of Obama-era climate policies, leaving a void in international climate leadership that China aims to fill. In some ways, the country is well poised for climate leadership. China has become the world's largest manufacturer of solar panels, lithium-ion batteries and electric vehicles. It buys more than half of the world's new electric cars, and nearly all the globe's electric buses. In September, China's president, Xi Jinping, announced the country's intent to be carbon neutral by 2060, strengthening previous commitments. But "climate leader" is a complicated designation for a country that also burns more coal than the rest of the world combined. While experts say international pressure could push China to decarbonize more quickly, frayed U.S.-China relations might make climate cooperation difficult for President-elect Joe Biden. Here's how the U.S. fell behind China in the fight against climate change, and what it means for the future of our planet.Related Tags Environment Technology Alternative and...
    Xi Jinping’s vow to snuff out emissions by 2060 completes a diplomatic pirouette that moves China to the heart of the global green agenda, wrong-foots the US and cuddles up to Europe’s climate advocates in one nimble step. The Chinese leader last month chose the UN as the stage for his country’s unexpected pledge to reach peak coal use by 2030 and go carbon neutral three decades later. The announcement gives China — the world’s biggest polluter and second-largest economy — an opportunity to show environmental leadership at the same time as the United States retreats from the issue under climate change sceptic Donald Trump. While light on details, the plan is a game-changer if China is good to Xi’s word, and the pledge was welcomed by the European Union, which is already toughening up its own emissions targets. “It comes at a very good time,” says Wendel Trio, of Climate Action Network Europe, with the European Commission launching its own proposal to deepen its emissions cuts to 55 percent by 2030. China has become a diplomatic pariah after spats...
    WASHINGTON – The Governor of New Mexico, Michelle Lujan Grisham, highlighted this Wednesday during her speech at the Democratic National Convention that the virtual candidate of the White House party, Joe Biden, will return to the International Climate Agreement if he wins the November elections. . “As president, Joe Biden will rejoin the international climate agreement, and the US will once again lead on this important issue,” said Lujan Grisham, in a speech recorded from a field with solar panels from Albuquerque. The climate crisis is one of the issues addressed tonight at the convention, which also dedicates blocks to firearms control and female leadership. “I am proud of how New Mexico has shown what climate leadership should be: While the (Donald) Trump Administration has been removing environmental protections, we have expanded them.” “While they have been repealing regulations on oil and gas, we have stood up to the pollutants and held them accountable,” said the governor. “We are committed to a renewable energy future,” said Lujan Grisham. US President Donald Trump on Thursday lent credence to a...
    WASHINGTON – The Governor of New Mexico, Michelle Lujan Grisham, highlighted this Wednesday during her speech at the Democratic National Convention that the virtual candidate of the White House party, Joe Biden, will return to the International Climate Agreement if he wins the November elections. . “As president, Joe Biden will rejoin the international climate agreement, and the US will once again lead on this important issue,” said Lujan Grisham, in a speech recorded from a field with solar panels from Albuquerque. The climate crisis is one of the issues addressed tonight at the convention, which also dedicates blocks to firearms control and female leadership. “I am proud of how New Mexico has shown what climate leadership should be: While the (Donald) Trump Administration has been removing environmental protections, we have expanded them.” “While they have been repealing regulations on oil and gas, we have stood up to the pollutants and held them accountable,” said the governor. “We are committed to a renewable energy future,” said Lujan Grisham. US President Donald Trump on Thursday lent credence to a...
    WASHINGTON – The Governor of New Mexico, Michelle Lujan Grisham, highlighted this Wednesday during her speech at the Democratic National Convention that the virtual candidate of the White House party, Joe Biden, will return to the International Climate Agreement if he wins the November elections. . “As president, Joe Biden will rejoin the international climate agreement, and the US will once again lead on this important issue,” said Lujan Grisham, in a speech recorded from a field with solar panels from Albuquerque. The climate crisis is one of the issues addressed tonight at the convention, which also dedicates blocks to firearms control and female leadership. “I am proud of how New Mexico has shown what climate leadership should be: While the (Donald) Trump Administration has been removing environmental protections, we have expanded them.” “While they have been repealing regulations on oil and gas, we have stood up to the pollutants and held them accountable,” said the governor. “We are committed to a renewable energy future,” said Lujan Grisham. US President Donald Trump on Thursday lent credence to a...
    Registration is now open for world’s largest event for green building and sustainability leaders WASHINGTON, Aug. 19, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — The U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) and Informa Connect are proud to announce that Christiana Figueres, former executive secretary of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) will headline the 2020 Greenbuild International Conference and Expo. Figueres will deliver the keynote address during the opening session on Tuesday, November 10. This year’s virtual Greenbuild experience will take place November 10-12 with three virtual summits focused on green business, resilience and global health and wellness, taking place September 10, October 1 and October 22 as a lead up to the main event. Registration is now open. “Greenbuild is honored and excited that Ms. Figueres has accepted our invitation to speak at Greenbuild 2020,” said Sherida Sessa, Greenbuild brand director. “Ms. Figueres is a global leader and through her leadership brought forward one of the most valuable commitments to combating climate change the world has seen. Her dedication to humanity and actionable change is unwavering and we are excited...
    Dharna Noor3 minutes ago•Filed to:greenhouse gasesgreenhouse gasesUnited NationsParis AgreementtechnologySaveAl GorePhoto: Matthias Nareyek (Getty Images) For the first time ever, the world will have technology to track greenhouse gas emissions in near real-time. That’s the promise of Climate TRACE, a coalition of nine organizations led by former Vice President Al Gore. The group says it will use a combination of satellite data, artificial intelligence, and other technology to remotely track global greenhouse gas emissions. They have developed an early prototype of the tracking system and plan to have a full version ready by next summer, before the next round of international climate negotiations. The alliance believes that by speeding up the process of counting emissions and by providing a quantitative accountability measure, the new platform could revolutionize the United Nations’ climate talks and the world’s efforts to curb climate change. Climate TRACE says that by improving accountability, their project could inspire confidence in negotiations and lead to the adoption of more ambitious targets. But new technology alone won’t solve the fundamental political issues at the heart of the international...
    Jocelyn Timperley60 minutes ago•Filed to:airplanesairplanesclimate talksUnited NationsCarbon Emissionsair travelSaveA composite photo of planes taking off from Heathrow Airport over the course of an hour.Photo: Dan Kitwood (Getty Images) A United Nations council of 36 countries has agreed on a major change to the main global scheme addressing the climate impact of aviation, a move expected to remove requirements for airlines to offset emissions for several years. The change to weaken what was already viewed as a wholly inadequate climate policy has been met with dismay by climate experts. The aviation industry has long argued for a unified approach to regulating emissions at a global level rather than a patchwork of policies by regions and countries. Now, that argument looks weaker than ever with the new watered rules governing air travel emissions. “It took ICAO [the International Civil Aviation Organization] almost 20 years to come up with recommendations on how to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions from international aviation,” Dan Rutherford, director of aviation at the International Council on Clean Transportation (ICCT), told Earther. “By delaying those already weak policies, [the ICAO]...
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