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    SACRAMENTO —  California school officials could more easily check student COVID-19 vaccine records under a bill introduced Friday that would expand access to a statewide database, part of a broader effort in the Legislature to drive up school immunization rates. The state Department of Public Health oversees a centralized, confidential online portal for all vaccine records, the California Immunization Registry. Healthcare providers can voluntarily submit vaccine information to the portal, and school officials can check the registry to ensure that students have the shots necessary for enrollment. Current required vaccines include those for chickenpox, polio, measles, mumps and rubella. The new proposal would allow school administrators to check students’ COVID-19 vaccine status and would implement a mandate for vaccine providers to submit all immunization records to the registry. A third provision of the bill would require providers to report race and ethnicity data to help determine demographic groups in which vaccination rates are lagging. Assembly member Akilah Weber, a San Diego Democrat and physician, said during a Friday news conference that the bill would equip schools with important vaccine...
    A STUDENT loan giant is giving tens of thousands of Americans $1.7billion worth of student debt relief. Student loan processor Navient Corp. announced Thursday it struck a deal with nearly 40 states to settle legal issues. 1The agreement settles the student loan giant's legal issues with statesCredit: Getty In recent years, Navient has faced various law suits, which allege the company of engaging in unfair and misleading practices. “Navient repeatedly and deliberately put profits ahead of its borrowers—it engaged in deceptive and abusive practices, targeted students who it knew would struggle to pay loans back, and placed an unfair burden on people trying to improve their lives through education,” Pennsylvania Attorney General Josh Shapiro said. As part of the agreement, Navient will send a one-time payment of roughly $145 million to the states. While Navient denies violating any laws, 66,000 borrowers with "certain qualifying private education loans" will see their student balances cancelled. Most read in MoneyHOPE ON THE HORIZON Double ‘$3,600 stimulus’ payments may be decided as IRS letter sentHELPING HAND Extra food stamps sent out...
    A NEW year usually brings with it a lot of changes that could impact your finances - and the start of 2022 is no different. From Social Security and minimum wage boosts to student loans, we've rounded up a number of key changes that you need to be aware of from January. 1Social Security claimants are getting a payment boost from JanuaryCredit: Getty It comes as December is filled with frenzied holiday shopping and spending. But there are also some key money moves you can make this month to set you up for financial success into the new year - we've rounded up these in our guide. 1. Federal student loan relief ends January 31 Since the beginning of the pandemic, the US has implemented a pause on the repayment of student loans. Currently, the pause on repayment of interest, and collections is set to expire on January 31. The education department announced the “final extension” of the student loan pause in August. Most read in MoneyFINAL CHECK? Last '$3,600 stimulus' check to be sent in DAYS as calls grow to...
    Police beefed up their presence at Westwood Regional High School following what some considered a threat triggered by an incident between students. It began after an 18-year-old student allegedly stole a cellphone from a younger one, multiple sources confirmed. The alleged victim and a friend grabbed the older student and beat him in a school hallway after lunch this past Tuesday, the sources said. The incident was captured on school surveillance cameras and student cellphone video, they said. His assailants apparently didn't know that the older student had previously sustained a traumatic brain injury. He was brought to Hackensack University Medical Center as a precaution and reportedly checked out OK, the sources said. Then he apparently took to social media to vent his frustrations. Washington Township Police Chief Richard Skinner said his department, in consultation with the Bergen County Prosecutor's Office, didn't find the alleged threats credible. Skinner and Westwood Police Chief Michael Pontillo nonetheless boosted police presence at the school this past week out of what Skinner said was "an abundance of caution." The chief said he couldn't comment further...
    NEW YORK -- The move toward greater diversity in Hollywood is getting a big boost in Brooklyn at the film school located inside a working movie studio.The Feirstein Graduate School of Cinema is part of Brooklyn College and has drawn a diverse group of students.It's a truly unique place located at Steiner Studios where working professionals train the next generation of filmmakers using state of the art equipment."Our environment is the environment of professional filmmaking," Executive Director Richard Gladstein said during a walk around campus,.One student called it "invaluable."Gladstein discovered Quentin Tarantino working in a video store and produced his first movie, "Reservoir Dogs." They have worked together often in the decades since."I like new talent. I like new voices," Gladstein explained."I feel it's really important to have someone of that stature believe in us," graduate student Jose Jesus Valdez said."On top of that," added Sheherzad Raza Preisler, "it's also great being with a lot of fellow native New Yorkers."They are representative of a student body that another student, Neha Gautam, called, "very diverse. It's predominately students of color."Gautam grew...
    MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) — A TikTok trend involving students stealing items from schools and posting swaggering videos online afterward has prompted at least two Twin Cities schools to crack down, boosting security and surveillance. In a statement to parents Thursday, Shakopee West Middle School officials said that the social media-spurred theft, known as “devious licks,” has increased significantly in the last week, leaving bathrooms particularly damaged. “We have tried several measures to prevent the vandalism and theft, but have been unable to get it to stop,” Principal Lori Link wrote. “In fact, it is escalating.” In response, the school says it is temporarily locking student bathrooms during classtime, although staff bathrooms will remain open for use. The only times student bathrooms will be open is briefly before and after school, during passing time, and lunch. During lunch, however, staffers will be posted outside the bathrooms, making sure that no one walks off with a trophy mirror or urinal. Across the metro at Stillwater Area High School, administrators say they are boosting staff supervision and adding additional hallway...
    The Biden administration announced that COVID-19 vaccination status for student athletes will be incorporated in sports physicals and that pediatricians will be sent to speak to parents at schools, in an effort to boost vaccinations among children ages 12 and up. The White House announced the new steps on Thursday ahead of students getting back to grade school, undergraduate, and graduate school this fall amid concerns over rising COVID-19 cases. “For young people, getting vaccinated right away is the best way back to the things they love – like playing sports, completing their studies, and spending time with friends and loved ones,” the White House said in a statement. Over a dozen sports and medicine organizations, including the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) and the American Medical Society for Sports Medicine, plan to issue a joint statement urging all medical providers to ask about COVID-19 vaccine status during sports physicals, according to the White House.  AAP will issue revised forms to doctors, parents, and student athletes that includes language on the COVID-19 vaccination. The group estimates that about 60 to 70 percent...
    LANSING, Mich. (AP) — Michigan lawmakers on Wednesday overwhelmingly approved a $17.1 billion K-12 budget, one that will eliminate a longstanding base per-student funding gap among districts and boost overall funding by a substantial 10%. Democratic Gov. Gretchen Whitmer is expected to sign what many education officials called a historic bill, providing certainty to districts whose fiscal years begin Thursday. READ MORE: Michigan Launching $5M Sweepstakes To Boost COVID-19 Vaccines Senate Appropriations Committee Chairman Jim Stamas, R-Midland, speaks with reporters in the Senate chamber following the approval of a $17.1 billion K-12 budget on Wednesday, June 30, 2021, in Lansing, Mich. The bill would boost overall funding by 10% and eliminate a gap in base per-student funding.(AP Photo/David Eggert) Budgets for state departments and funding for universities, community colleges, and local governments will wait, potentially until September, despite a 2019 law requiring that they also be sent to the governor before Friday. The state fiscal year does not start until Oct. 1. Traditional districts and charter schools will receive $8,700 in base per-student state aid, not including at least $1,093...
    CureVac to plow forward with Covid vaccine despite disappointing results 17 Things That Are Free in July It started with a synchronized dance to the "Chicken Wing Beat," the smooth dribbles of twins Hanna and Haley Cavinder hitting the pavement together as the beat drops. Nearly a full year later, the payday is here.  Boost Mobile announced its sponsorship Thursday of the Cavinder twins, star guards for the Fresno State women's basketball team, ushering in the new era of college sports and proving female athletes will benefit from the name, image and likeness (NIL) changes that go into effect Thursday.     “Today is a big step in empowering student athletes like us to take charge of our future and achieve fair recognition for the hard work we put in —  both on and off the court," Haley Cavinder, a two-time Mountain West Player of the Year, said in a statement. "We are excited to partner with Boost in and for their support of this big milestone, not just for us, but for student athletes across the country — and for...
    California public colleges and universities will receive a massive funding boost to expand affordable student housing, repair aging facilities, better train students for state workforce needs and shift Humboldt State to a technology focus under the budget proposal unveiled Friday by Gov. Gavin Newsom. The state’s unexpected $75-billion surplus allowed Newsom to restore steep cuts imposed last year as the COVID-19 pandemic battered the economy and to invest a record-setting $48.7 billion in the University of California, California State University, California Community Colleges and the California Student Aid Commission. That amounts to a 5% increase in base ongoing general funds for UC and Cal State, Newsom said. This higher education funding comes on top of Newsom’s proposed $93.7 billion for the kindergarten-through-12th grade public education system. That historic investment includes funds to guarantee schooling for all 4-year-olds, a program to be phased in over three years beginning in fall 2022. “This is just simply without precedent,” Newsom said at a news conference Friday. For K-12 schools, Newsom is primarily making use of dollars that he already is required...
    By AMY R. SISK, The Bismarck Tribune BISMARCK, N.D. (AP) — Students walking to class at the Bismarck Public Schools Career Academy might come across a huge array of solar panels that just went in behind the building where a number of high schoolers study energy each semester. “When it comes to solar energy, kids look at you like a deer in headlights,” said Dale Hoerauf, career and technical education director. “They don’t have a good understanding of it. That’s what’s exciting about this project, is we’re going to have a better understanding when we can see what it’s producing.” North Dakota is essentially dead last in the country for solar installations, according to various rankings, though the industry is beginning to grow in the state. Several arrays went up last year near Cannon Ball on the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation, which straddles North and South Dakota, and United Tribes Technical College has installed panels on some of its facilities in Bismarck. The 115 panels at the Career Academy were installed in late October, and an inverter recently went in...
    IF Joe Biden does not secure a second stimulus package, Americans could still get a $200 social security boost or see their student debt cancelled. The final string of the CARES Act will run out by the end of 2020 and President-elect Biden is urging lawmakers to immediately pass a new relief package. 4Joe Biden is urging Congress to 'come together and pass a Covid relief package like the Heros Act'Credit: Reuters “Right now Congress should come together and pass a Covid relief package like the Heros Act,” Biden said Monday in Wilmington, Delaware. The HEROS Act is the $2.2trillion measure passed by the Democratic-led House before the Election. However, the bill stands no chance in the Republican-led Senate and there has been no active negotiations between House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell. The Republicans are more in favor of a relief bill worth $500billion. 4The HEROS Act is the $2.2trillion measure passed by the Democratic-led House before the ElectionCredit: AP:Associated Press 4Biden said he will support the Hero’s act or something that resembles it in...
    By TODD RICHMOND, Associated Press MADISON, Wis. (AP) — Interim University of Wisconsin System President Tommy Thompson said Tuesday that he'll ask Gov. Tony Evers to include a nearly $100 million boost for the system in the next state budget as the coronavirus pandemic bleeds revenue from campuses. A UW news release outlining the request makes no mention of the virus. The closest it comes is a sentence with Thompson acknowledging “unprecedented challenges." Instead, the release lists a number of new initiatives Thompson wants to use the money to launch. Chief among them is the Wisconsin Tuition Promise, a pledge to pay up to four years' worth of tuition and fees at any system school for incoming state resident freshmen and transfer students whose families make $60,000 or less. The initiative is modeled after UW-Madison's Bucky's Tuition Promise, which covers tuition for resident freshmen and transfer students at the state's flagship university. The money also would go toward expanding and enhancing online courses, forgiving teachers' student loans, providing stipends for student teachers, adding 20 county-based agriculture positions in the Division...
    BEDMINSTER, N.J. -- President Donald Trump signed four COVID-related orders Saturday after weeks of failed negotiations between the White House and Congress on a new sweeping stimulus package. One order mandates a federal unemployment benefit reduced to $400 per week.Millions of Americans bore the brunt of these failed talks as the weekly federal $600 unemployment boost expired in July and an eviction moratorium for federally subsidized housing also ended.The orders -- one executive order and the other three memoranda -- address four categories: jobless aid, evictions, student loans and Social Security payroll taxes.Here is a breakdown of each:Extended federal unemployment boostThis memorandum reinstates the federal jobless aid bonus but will reduce weekly payments from $600 to $400.Trump said states will be asked to cover 25% of the cost and can use federal funds allocated through the CARES Act, the $2.2 trillion economic stimulus bill signed into law in March.It is unclear how that will be enforced, but Trump said it would be up to states to determine how much, if any of it to fund.It is also unclear when Americans...
    BEDMINSTER, N.J. -- President Donald Trump signed four COVID-related executive orders Saturday after weeks of failed negotiations between the White House and Congress on a new sweeping stimulus package. One order mandates a federal unemployment benefit reduced to $400 per week.Millions of Americans bore the brunt of these failed talks as the weekly federal $600 unemployment boost expired in July and an eviction moratorium for federally subsidized housing also ended.The executive orders address four categories: jobless aid, evictions, student loans and Social Security payroll taxes.Here is a breakdown of each:Extended federal unemployment boostThis order reinstates the federal jobless aid bonus but will reduce weekly payments from $600 to $400.Trump said states will be asked to cover 25% of the cost and can use federal funds allocated through the CARES Act, the $2.2 trillion economic stimulus bill signed into law in March.It is unclear how that will be enforced, but Trump said it would be up to states to determine how much, if any of it to fund.It is also unclear when Americans will see these renewed benefits in their bank...
    President Donald Trump signed three executive actions — one executive order and three memoranda — on Saturday addressing the pandemic after Republican negotiators and Democratic leaders failed for nearly two weeks to negotiate a coronavirus relief package that could pass through both chambers of the legislature. During a press conference on Saturday, Trump said he was taking several executive actions, including establishing a payroll tax holiday for workers who earn less than $100,000 per year, protecting renters from evictions, and expanding unemployment benefits by $400 per week — 25% which would be covered by states. The president said that he could make the the payroll tax holiday permanent after the election, meaning that those taxes would not simply be deferred but eliminated, and contrasted this decision with Biden, who the president argued would not be able to do so because the Democrats are in favor of adding “three trillion dollars in taxes.” According to The Wall Street Journal, the Disaster Relief Fund will provide the money for the weekly benefits, which will be available until early December “or until the...
    PRESIDENT Donald Trump said on Friday that he plans to use an executive order to bypass Congress and provide benefits to jobless Americans. With no deal reached between Democrats and Republicans on the latest coronavirus aid, Trump announced his own ideas for virus relief. 4President Donald Trump announced on Friday that he plans to use an executive order to bypass Congress and provide benefits to jobless AmericansCredit: AP:Associated Press 4Trump addressed the press from Trump National Golf Club in Bedminster, New JerseyCredit: AP:Associated Press He said he's going to extend payroll taxes and enhance unemployment benefits until the end of the year, while also deferring student loans until further notice. “We’re going to have the payroll tax go until the end of the year and it will be retroactive to July 1st, so we will go back to July 1st and it will go to the end of the year payroll tax. "At the end of the year it may be extended,” Trump said about payroll tax cuts. “We’re going to enhance unemployment benefits through the end of the year....
    Igor Derysh August 6, 2020 4:39PM (UTC) A coalition of Democratic student groups called on Trump-backed New Hampshire Republican Senate candidate Corky Messner to disband his charitable foundation after The Washington Post reported that it provided only one student with a scholarship over 10 years. Messner, a Colorado lawyer who worked as the general counsel for Chipotle to amass a net worth between $14 million and $53 million before running in New Hampshire, has repeatedly touted the foundation on the campaign trail. While Messner claimed that the foundation gives out scholarships to "inner city" students each year, only one student appears to have gotten financial help between 2009 and 2019, while Messner received ample press attention for his charitable giving. Messner's claims earned him "Four Pinocchios" from Washington Post fact-checker Glenn Kessler. : This week, a coalition of student groups that includes the College Democrats of America, College Democrats of New Hampshire and High School Democrats of Colorado, signed a letter to Messner calling on him to dissolve the foundation they say was used to "deceive vulnerable, hard-working students and defraud the foundation's donors." "You raised hundreds...
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