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    by Scott McKay   First, a caveat: this Trump versus DeSantis debate that pops up here and there really isn’t as big a thing as the legacy media and some of the old-school political trolls want to make it, because there is no rivalry of any real note between Donald Trump and Ron DeSantis. The two are on the same side in the massive political fight for the future of the country that is just beginning. But attempts to stoke division between Team Trump and Team DeSantis have found occasional purchase because the more hard-line Team Trump folks seem to have the willies over the idea that the Republican establishment is going to throw The Donald overboard for DeSantis, whom, the story goes, they can control. And a lot of the Never-Trump gang, realizing that the dreams of a Mike Pence or Nikki Haley taking us back to the bygone days of the Bush GOP really won’t be fulfilled, are projecting those dreams onto DeSantis as a more palatable alternative to The Orange Man. These are both very short-sighted...
    (CNN)There's a strong political case for Republicans to ignore Donald Trump halfway through a midterm primary season that's seen his influence over voters wane. But as the January 6 hearings hit prime time, the ex-President's thunderous demands for loyalty and the hunger for power of his acolytes in the House mean that's not an option. Trump's demand for, and the GOP's willingness to offer, a robust defense into what are expected to be damaging details of his complicity in a coup attempt are deeply revealing about his future political intentions and the former President's control over his party. The evolving plan to hit back against the committee on behalf of Trump also exposes the hypocrisy and the ambition of key House Republican leaders who whitewash Trump's role in the history of the January 6, 2021, insurrection to advance their own careers. It offers a foreboding reality check 17 months after the Capitol insurrection about how the House Republican conference has chosen the promise of future political advancement over the protection of American democracy.The plan for pro-Trump lawmakers to blitz the...
    Moscow (CNN)The last remaining Soviet-era head of state has stepped down.Kazakh President Nursultan Nazarbayev announced his resignation Tuesday, after nearly three decades in office. The former Communist Party official is the last of the leaders who were running the 15 Soviet republics when the USSR collapsed in 1991. In a nationally televised address, Nazarbayev, 78, alluded to Kazakhstan's transition to independence after the breakup of the Soviet Union, precipitated by the signing of the Belovezh Accords and a botched coup against Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev. "I have decided to terminate my powers as president," Nazarbayev said, according to a transcript of remarks carried by Russian state news agency TASS. "This year marks my 30th year in office as the supreme leader of our country. I was given the great honor of my great people to be the first president of independent Kazakhstan."Nazarbayev is not as well known internationally as the man who runs the country to Kazakhstan's north: Russian President Vladimir Putin. But he has dominated political life in his country in a way that even the Kremlin leader cannot...
    (CBS4) – “I think it’s changed this year significantly,” said Monica Johnson, superintendent of Strasburg 31J Schools. Looking back at what she’s been through in the past year, some of her work has been different. Less talk about students and education and making things better. “You realize you know we’re not doing the things we used to do and having the conversations we used to have and instead we’re focused on this one topic it seems like.” That topic has been the pandemic and dealing with it and the division that has grown from it. “We can teach kids in a gym, we can teach them with plexiglass up, we can teach them with a mask on, we can teach them with a shield on. But we can’t teach them if they’re not here,” said Johnson. Many of the conversations she’s been having have been about masking and vaccinations and protecting the health of students, fewer have been about educational matters like curriculum design for the future that concerns her. After 7 years as superintendent in Strasburg, 15 total as...
    The political media world has been electrified by Chris Wallace’s surprise announcement that he’s leaving Fox News effective immediately. The Fox News Sunday anchor concluded his latest broadcast by announcing his departure and explaining that “I want to try something new, to go beyond politics to all the things I’m interested in.” “I’m ready for a new adventure,” Wallace told his viewers. “And I hope you’ll check it out. And so — for the last time, dear friends — that’s it for today. Have a great week. And I hope you’ll keep watching Fox News Sunday.” Fox News is expected to cycle through a rotating line-up of anchors for Fox News Sunday until they name a permanent new host. Meanwhile, Mediaite has confirmed Variety’s report that Wallace is joining CNN’s upcoming subscription-based streaming service, CNN+, marking a gigantic shift for the industry. With all of this being said, Wallace’s leave-taking was a major bombshell for media watchers, many of whom reacted with shock, well-wishes, and public commentary about what this development says about the network. HOLY SHIT! https://t.co/xyAsV7Wqv1 —...
    For the last decade, Virginia has been a heavily Democratic state but ahead of the upcoming gubernatorial election, Democrats have reason to be concerned. When former President Donald Trump was still in office, there wasn't much Democrats needed to do to get the message across. In fact, the political agenda was simple and motivational factors were simple: vote so Trump is not re-elected. However, with the former embattled president out of office, Democratic lawmakers are facing an uphill battle to motivate the base to vote. The latest poll projections also underscore the Democratic challenge. "Public polling has been shifting in Republican newcomer Glenn Youngkin's direction in recent weeks, while Democrat Terry McAuliffe, a former governor and close ally of President Joe Biden, has struggled to energize his base as Biden's approval ratings sink. Republicans, consumed by infighting and crisis while Trump was in office, are suddenly optimistic they can win in a state Trump lost by 10 percentage points last year." Despite Democrats' decade-long winning streak in Virginia, the latest shifts have not been missed by Republican strategists...
    On one of the now unwatchable Sunday "news" shows, Meet the Press host Chuck Todd introduced a segment on the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic by—I'm just kidding. It wasn't about the COVID-19 pandemic. It was a segment about the most favorite of all Sunday show segments, and indeed largely the only segment any of the Sunday shows ever do: How will This Thing, the major news of the day, Affect Mah Politics? "The economy's inability to fully recover from the shock of COVID-19 is both an economic story and a political one," intoned Todd. The economy's inability to fully recover from the COVID-19 pandemic is in large part due to anti-distancing, anti-mask, vaccine-skeptical, pro-virus-spreading policies from Republican politicians who have been using conservative frustration with safety measures as a rallying cry for their own careers, resulting in a new wave of overwhelmed hospitals and dead victims that was entirely preventable if sociopathic politicos had not turned pandemic crisis protocols into the latest spite-riddled "culture war." "All those economic problems add up to a big political problem for the president. Is all...
    The "both sides" shows weren't built to handle pandemic, violent insurrection, or the rise of hoax-based political campaigns. Now the formats look farcical and openly contemptuous of hard truths. On one of the now unwatchable Sunday “news” shows, Meet the Press host Chuck Todd introduced a segment on the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic by—I’m just kidding. It wasn’t about the COVID-19 pandemic. It was a segment about the most favorite of all Sunday show segments, and indeed largely the only segment any of the Sunday shows ever do: How will This Thing, the major news of the day, Affect Mah Politics? “The economy’s inability to fully recover from the shock of COVID-19 is both an economic story and a political one,” intoned Todd. The economy’s inability to fully recover from the COVID-19 pandemic is in large part due to anti-distancing, anti-mask, vaccine-skeptical, pro-virus-spreading policies from Republican politicians who have been using conservative frustration with safety measures as a rallying cry for their own careers, resulting in a new wave of overwhelmed hospitals and dead victims that was entirely preventable if sociopathic...
    It’s not Bill Clinton’s Democratic Party anymore. That was the message Sen. Josh Hawley, a Missouri Republican, attempted to send with his “vote-a-rama” amendment to the budget resolution funding 100,000 new police officers across the country. A hundred thousand new police officers on the street was a key Clinton campaign promise in 1992, then later the centerpiece of the 1994 bill he signed into law. President Joe Biden, then a senator from Delaware and Senate Judiciary Committee chairman, helped get the legislation written and passed. Neither the White House nor Senate Democrats took the bait. "The Republicans are joining the Democrats in supporting Joe Biden's cops program,” said Sen. Dick Durbin of Illinois, the No. 2 Democrat in the chamber. “A long overdue but appreciated shift,” White House deputy press secretary Andrew Bates tweeted approvingly. SHADES OF PAST CONSERVATIVE REVOLTS APPEAR IN GOP INFRASTRUCTURE SPLIT The amendment to the nonbinding budget resolution passed 95-3, with two of the no votes coming from Republicans. Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont was the only lawmaker who caucused with the Democrats to oppose it....
    Donald Trump spent four years twisting the federal government to his own purposes, and nowhere was that more evident than in the Department of Justice. The urgency of cleaning house at Justice cannot be overstated—but Attorney General Merrick Garland doesn’t seem to feel that urgency, to the increasing concern of some Democrats. In recent weeks we’ve learned that the Trump Justice Department secretly subpoenaed records of Democratic members of Congress and of reporters at three media outlets. Trump also pressured top officials to help him overturn his election loss. And those are just the headline-grabbing abuses. The Revolving Door Project has spent months warning of ways Trump could have politicized the federal bureaucracy, where, for all Trump’s disdain of George W. Bush, the Bush administration provided a road map to increasing the power of political appointees and politicizing the hiring of career civil servants. At the Justice Department, Team Trump ultimately got seven political appointees hired to career civil service positions. The house needs cleaning. But Garland isn’t rushing to do that. In fact, it’s worse. Under Garland, the Justice Department has followed the policy instituted under William Barr of helping...
    Senator Susan Collins (R-ME) said Sunday on CBS’s “Face the Nation” that it was “really important” there is an “in-depth investigation” into the Department of Justice’s action under former President Donald Trump. Collins’ declaration comes as Apple reportedly supplied the phone data for several Democratic lawmakers, their aides and some family members. Anchor John Dickerson said, “Let me move on to the question of a New York Times report this week that said that during the Trump administration, the Department of Justice subpoenaed some information from Apple that uncovered the accounts of two Democrats on the House Intelligence Committee. You’re on the Senate Intelligence Committee. What does that report- what’s your reaction to that report? Collins said, “There are two serious allegations here. One has to do with whether or not there was a leak of classified information by members of Congress. But the second, which is also important, is, has the Justice Department abused its power by going after members of Congress or the press for partisan, political- political purposes? And that’s why I support the deputy attorney general’s...
    Washington (CNN)The Biden-led Environmental Protection Agency says Trump administration political officials "compromised" an assessment of chemical dangers and has replaced it with a new one they say "upholds the tenants of scientific integrity." "The assessment posted today fixes the errors in the version issued earlier this year, was developed by EPA career scientists, and upholds the values of scientific integrity," Dr. Jennifer Orme-Zavaleta, acting assistant administrator for the Office of Research and Development and the agency's science adviser said in a statement. "This PFBS (Perfluorobutane sulfonic acid) assessment reflects the best available science, involved extensive federal, state, and public engagement, and is critical to EPA efforts to help communities impacted by PFAS." PFAS, which stands for per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances, is a family of synthetic chemicals known for links to health complications.Biden administration launches task force to ensure scientific decisions are free from political influenceAfter taking office, President Joe Biden's EPA said that it was removing a toxicity assessment for PFAS due to allegations that Trump administration officials overruled science to make it easier for regulators set their own standards...
    (CNN)Justice Stephen Breyer, who may be nearing the end of his Supreme Court tenure, expressed concern on Tuesday about the standing of the high court and the possible erosion of public confidence in its decisions. In an expansive, two-hour lecture at Harvard Law School, Breyer bemoaned the common practice -- by journalists, senators and others -- of referring to justices by the presidents who appointed them and of describing the nine by their conservative or liberal approach to the law. "These are more than straws in the wind," the 82-year-old Breyer said. "They reinforce the thought, likely already present in the reader's mind, that Supreme Court justices are primarily political officials or 'junior league' politicians themselves rather than jurists. The justices tend to believe that differences among judges mostly reflect not politics but jurisprudential differences. That is not what the public thinks." When Justice Stephen Breyer rules (on retirement), the White House might know firstBreyer also warned against proposals to expand the size of the Supreme Court from its current nine members. Public trust was "gradually built" over the...
    Washington (CNN)The Biden administration is planning to probe "Trump-era political interference" in government science in an effort to prevent abuses in the future, The New York Times reported Monday. The White House Office of Science and Technology Policy is planning to announce later Monday the "formation of a task force aimed at identifying past tampering in scientific decisions," which will also "review the effectiveness of policies that were supposed to protect the science that informs policy decisions from inappropriate political influence," according to the Times. Though White House officials told the newspaper that there are few ways to hold Trump administration officials accountable for actions taken, the forthcoming probe represents "the first step in what White House officials described as a sweeping effort to rebuild a demoralized federal work force" and stands as an early example of the Biden administration's commitment to science and government accountability. "The goal won't be to look backward," Alondra Nelson, the deputy director for science and society at the White House science office, told the Times. "The goal will be to try to implement practices...
    Much to the delight of conservatives, Donald Trump changed politics in a number of seismic ways. But one smaller consequence of his presidency has proven a true parasite for conservatives: the rise of scam Political Action Committees posing as charities. Legal and campaign finance experts say these groups—many of which have chosen causes championed by former President Trump to prey on his supporters—stand out precisely because they mislead donors into thinking their contributions aren’t political and will benefit a legitimate charitable cause. But the reality is these cleverly named PACs are exploiting loose election laws to funnel contributions back to the scammers. The Daily Beast surveyed the top 25 grossing PACs that style themselves as law enforcement and veterans support groups. We found they collectively pulled in more than $85 million over the last four years. For perspective, that’s about $18 million more than the two top-raising House campaigns combined over that same time period. Of the 25 super PACs in The Daily Beast’s survey, the biggest moneymaker was Law Enforcement for a Safer America, which CNN profiled in October...
    A Salon essay published on Friday accuses Republicans of resembling “good Germans” of the Nazi era — wishing to believe they are decent people while hiding behind “fictions of plausible deniability for the evils committed by their leader” —  and describes today’s conservatism as seeking “friendly fascism” masked in an appeal to return to “traditional values.” The essay, penned by staff writer Chauncey Devega and titled “Conservatives are the new ‘good Germans,’ enabling and defending Trump’s crimes,” begins by claiming “Whatever ‘conservative’ once meant in American politics, it’s now just a flimsy rhetorical shield for fascism.” Devega continues by declaring the former president as “a force of political, human, moral and economic destruction.” “He is the leader of an American neofascist and white supremacist movement,” he writes. “Today’s Republican Party has fully become an extension of his political cult and crime family.” “Trump incited a lethal attack on the Capitol as part of a larger plot to overthrow American democracy,” he adds.  Noting Trump’s “historic level of support” at the polls during the recent presidential election and his popularity in...
    (CNN)Donald Trump's era in Washington is over. The all-consuming, camera-hungry, truth-starved era that fixated the nation and exposed its darkest recesses officially concludes at noon Wednesday. The President, addled and mostly friendless, will end his time in the capital a few hours early to spare himself the humiliation of watching his successor be sworn in.He departs a city under militarized fortification meant to prevent a repeat of the riot he incited earlier this month. He leaves office with more than 400,000 Americans dead from a virus he chose to downplay or ignore.For his opponents, Trump's departure amounts to a blissful lifting of a four-year pall on American life and the end to a tortured stretch of misconduct and indignities. Even many of Trump's onetime supporters are sighing with relief that the White House, and the psychology of its occupant, may no longer rest at the center of the national conversation. At least some of the 74 million Americans who voted for Trump in November are sad to see him go. Scores of them attempted an insurrection at the US Capitol...
    CHICAGO (WLS) -- A new era in Illinois government begins with the selection of Rep. Emanuel "Chris" Welch as House speaker, ending Mike Madigan's record-setting reign.Better Government Association President David Greising joined ABC 7 Chicago Saturday to talk about what's next.Greising said it was clear Madigan's role was in jeopardy when the ComEd scheme accusations came out.But Madigan fought hard to keep the job. There just wasn't enough support, Greising said.RELATED: New IL House speaker, Mike Madigan's successor Rep. Emanuel 'Chris' Welch gives one-on-one interviewEMBED More News Videos Rep. Emanuel "Chris" Welch is the next speaker of the Illinois House, succeeding Mike Madigan, who has held the post for decades. Welch is the first Black speaker in Illinois history, and the BGA hopes to see good things from him; although, he is a protege of Madigan.Some of his initial comment were "promising," Greising said.In the new legislative session, the BGA is calling for an end to the "revolving door" to lobbying, concrete ethics reform, fair maps and fiscal reform.Read more at BetterGov.org.
    Photograph: REX/Shutterstock Millions of lives across America and the world were touched by Donald Trump’s unlikely candidacy and presidency. But some were upended completely, resulting in life-changing or career-ending experiences and instant fame or notoriety as four incredibly tumultuous and norm-shattering years played out. Here are 20 examples of those who emerged from relative obscurity to become “stars” of the Trump era. The lawyer: Michael Avenatti The “smashmouth” lawyer represented Stormy Daniels, an adult film actor, in her lawsuits against Donald Trump and relished goading the US president’s children on social media with the hashtag “#Basta”, meaning “enough”. He even flirted with running for president. But his relationship with Daniels soured and his fall from grace was complete in February when he was convicted of trying to extort more than $20m from Nike. The political guru: Steve Bannon Steve Bannon talks to media during the ‘Sovereignism v Europeanism’ debate on 25 March 2019 in Rome, Italy. Photograph: Alessandra Benedetti/Corbis/Getty Images The former naval officer and rightwing media executive went from marginal status to arguably the second most powerful man...
    President-elect Joe Biden and Vice President-elect Kamala Harris stand with spouses Jill Biden and Doug Emhoff. JIM WATSON/AFP via Getty Images Jill Biden, President-elect Joe Biden's wife, has said that she plans to continue working as a college professor while serving as first lady. She would be the first FLOTUS to have a full-time job. Doug Emhoff, husband of Vice President-elect Kamala Harris, is quitting his job at a high-powered law firm to focus on his duties as second gentleman and support his wife's career. Both are defying stereotypical gender roles of political spouses. Myra Gutin, a professor at Rider University and author of "The President's Partner: The First Lady in the Twentieth Century," told Insider that the change is "a breath of fresh air" since "we've always looked at the political spouse through very gendered glasses." Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. It's not just Joe Biden who's making history as the oldest president ever elected, or Kamala Harris as the first Black and South Asian woman to serve as vice president. Their partners, too, are...
    CNN political reporter Abby Phillip took the opportunity of former Vice President Joe Biden’s likely electoral victory to take a pointed dig at President Donald Trump, noting that Trump’s political career began with a racist lie but could end “with a Black woman in the White House.” After Pennsylvania’s latest vote count saw Biden overtaking Trump, placing the ex-veep on the precipice of an Electoral College victory, CNN correspondent Dana Bash reflected on the historic nature of Sen. Kamala Harris (D-CA) becoming the first woman of color to become vice president. “For the first time, and a female of color in America, you know, women have been waiting a long time to see representation at the highest levels of government,” she said. “It may not be the president, but it’s right below that and there is going to be — it’s going to be pretty remarkable to watch that.” Phillip, who is African-American, pointed out that “for Black women, this has been really a proving moment for their political strength and carrying Joe Biden to the Democratic nomination through the...
    Reuters October 29, 2020 0 Comments U.S. Senator Susan Collins is fighting for her political life in a race that could decide control of the Senate, having enjoyed years of popularity as an independent-minded moderate before fellow Republican Donald Trump entered the White House. A senator from Maine since 1997 who has voted with Trump two-thirds of the time, Collins is among nine Republicans whose prospects for re-election have been thrown into doubt in a chamber where their party holds a mere 53-47 majority. Trailing her Democratic rival in opinion polls and fundraising, Collins, 67, faces a reckoning with longtime supporters, unsettled by her tepid criticisms of Trump and her votes for White House priorities including the 2018 confirmation of Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh despite charges of sexual misconduct, which he denied. Incurring Trump’s wrath, Collins on Monday became the sole Republican senator to reject his choice of Amy Coney Barrett to fill another Supreme Court seat. She said it was inappropriate to fill the vacancy so close to a presidential election. Collins has voted with Trump 67.5%...
    SANTIAGO – Amid a year of contagion and turmoil, Chileans vote Sunday on whether to draft a new constitution for their nation to replace guiding principles imposed four decades ago under a military dictatorship. The country's conservative government agreed with the center-left opposition to allow the plebiscite a month after the outbreak of vast street protests that erupted a year ago in frustration over inequality in pensions, education and health care in what has long been one of South America's most developed nations. If approved, a special convention would begin drafting a new constitution that would be submitted to voters in mid-2022. Chile's current constitution was drafted by the dictatorship of Gen. Augusto Pinochet, and was sent to voters at a time where political parties had been banned and the country was subject to heavy censorship. It was approved by a 66%-30% margin in a 1980 plebiscite, but critics say many voters were cowed into acceptance by a regime that had arrested, tortured and killed thousands of suspected leftist opponents following the overthrow of an elected socialist government. “I think...
    By EVA VERGARA, Associated Press SANTIAGO, Chile (AP) — Amid a year of contagion and turmoil, Chileans vote Sunday on whether to draft a new constitution for their nation to replace guiding principles imposed four decades ago under a military dictatorship. The country's conservative government agreed with the center-left opposition to allow the plebiscite a month after the outbreak of vast street protests that erupted a year ago in frustration over inequality in pensions, education and health care in what has long been one of South America's most developed nations. If approved, a special convention would begin drafting a new constitution that would be submitted to voters in mid-2022. Chile's current constitution was drafted by the dictatorship of Gen. Augusto Pinochet, and was sent to voters at a time where political parties had been banned and the country was subject to heavy censorship. It was approved by a 66%-30% margin in a 1980 plebiscite, but critics say many voters were cowed into acceptance by a regime that had arrested, tortured and killed thousands of suspected leftist opponents following the overthrow...
    In this image from video, Rev. Gabriel Salguero delivers the invocation during the first night of the Democratic National Convention on Monday, Aug. 17, 2020. Associated Press For indispensable reporting on the coronavirus crisis, the election, and more, subscribe to the Mother Jones Daily newsletter.Rev. Gabriel Salguero is an influential evangelical pastor in Orlando known for the passionate bilingual sermons he delivers with his co-pastor and wife, Rev. Jeannette—he usually speaks in Spanish as she translates to English. They have an undeniable spark on stage thanks to their rapid-fire Puerto Rican New Yorker energy (they left the city for Florida six years ago), and their swift interpretation of each other is hypnotizing. When Salguero is talking politics, which he does with increasing regularity these days, he often likes to share a version of this: “People see me and say, ‘Oh he’s Latino, he must be a Democrat.’ Then they say, ‘He’s evangelical, so he must be a Republican.’ Then they say, “He’s a Latino evangelical? What is he?’” Latinx evangelicals, Salguero notes, tend to support humane treatment of migrants at the...
    After the 2016 election, I was deeply shaken not just by the outcome, but by the terrifying sense that I did not understand the nation as well as I’d thought I did. To blunt the shock, I went on a bender through American history. I dove into books about the Civil War, the Progressive era and, finally, Robert Caro’s titanic biography of Lyndon B. Johnson, where I washed up on the shores of the turbulent 1960s. I discovered something amazing: After 1960, much of history as many Americans experienced it — through popular culture on TV, on the radio and at the movies — is preserved and easily accessible online. With a few clicks around YouTube, history leaps into the present, often in ways that deepen and complicate the narrative. For instance, Caro ably describes Johnson’s stirring first presidential address to Congress. It was five days after the assassination of John F. Kennedy, and the new president pressed lawmakers to pass civil rights legislation in Kennedy’s honor. “Everywhere you looked, people were crying,” the journalist Hugh Sidey wrote. Watching the...
    APPLETON, Wis. (AP) — Nothing can shake Scott Rice’s faith that President Donald Trump will save the U.S. economy — not seeing businesses close or friends furloughed, not even his own hellish bout with the novel coronavirus. He was once a virus skeptic. But then the disease seeped into the paper mill where he works, and he was stricken, suddenly losing his appetite. He lay in bed, feverish, drenched in sweat. His body seemed at war with itself. After 16 days at home, Rice told his co-workers that the disease was scary and real. But Trump held onto his vote for one reason: The stock market was climbing. “The 401(k)s, just the economy,” Rice said. “He got jobs going. Just accumulated a lot of jobs, being a businessman.” Rice’s belief represents the foundation of Trump’s hopes — that Americans believe the economy is strong enough to deliver him a second term. But in Appleton, a city of 75,000 people along the Fox River, the health of the economy isn’t judged on jobs numbers, personal bank accounts or union contracts. Instead,...
    James Murdoch (L) and his wife Kathryn Hufschmid arrive at St Bride's church on Fleet Street in central London on March 5, 2016, to attend a ceremony of celebration a day after the official marriage of Australian born media magnate Rupert Murdoch and former model Jerry Hall.Justin Tallis | AFP | Getty Images The powerful Murdoch family is often linked to conservative politics, particularly through its control of Fox News. Yet James Murdoch, one of billionaire media mogul Rupert Murdoch's sons, and spouse Kathryn Murdoch are working to create their own legacy by supporting causes across the political spectrum. They have have used their cash and influence to become a political power couple in a fractured Washington.  A list from the nonpartisan Center for Responsive Politics showing the 2020 election cycle's top donors ranks James and Kathryn Murdoch 13th among a group of 100 contributors from both parties. Data shows that the Murdochs have contributed over $11 million to political causes, with over $2.5 million going to Democrats.  They have also focused some of their efforts on opposing President Donald Trump. ...
    BOSTON (AP) — After the 1963 assassination of President John F. Kennedy, Jacqueline Kennedy famously compared his 1,000-day presidency to “Camelot,” a popular Broadway musical about the legend of King Arthur — crafting a wistful shorthand for the Kennedy tenure, and by extension the entire Kennedy dynasty. Now, 60 years after JFK’s election as president, some are wondering if the days of “Camelot” are over after U.S. Rep. Joe Kennedy lll’s failed attempt to oust incumbent U.S. Sen. Edward Markey in Tuesday’s state Democratic primary. The loss marks the first time a member of the political dynasty has come up short in a race for Congress in Massachusetts. The 39-year-old Kennedy, even as he conceded the election, seemed to leave open the possibility of a future chapter in his family’s long political saga. “No matter the results tonight, I would do this again with all of you again in a heartbeat,” Kennedy told supporters. “We may have lost the final vote count tonight, but we built a coalition that will endure because this coalition, our coalition, is the future of...
    Washington (CNN)In 2016, Jerry Falwell Jr. was among those who took the stage at the Republican National Convention to praise Donald Trump. As president of Liberty University, the massive Christian college in Virginia founded by his televangelist father, Falwell had made waves earlier that year when, on the eve of the Iowa caucus he'd endorsed Trump rather than Ted Cruz. Falwell's early support helped Trump solidify his hold on evangelical Republicans and propel him to the nomination. Four years later, things have changed. Rather than speaking at the RNC, Falwell was instead in the midst of an epic fall from grace -- leaving many Christian conservatives to wonder how the namesake of the Moral Majority founder ended up battling allegations of a sexual affair, needing help from Trump's disgraced fixer, and forced to resign from the university he built into one of the most financially successful Christian schools in the country. On Monday, the first day of the GOP convention, Falwell announced his intention to resign from Liberty following allegations from a former hotel pool attendant who claims to have...
    Dan Froomkin August 22, 2020 11:00AM (UTC) This article was co-produced with Press Watch, a new website that monitors and critiques American political coverage. Please consider supporting Press Watch by making a donation. The webcam-scaled Democratic National Convention showed us something that, it now becomes very clear, has been sadly missing from the wall of noise that is modern American political coverage: ordinary Americans, miserable and desperate for change. Half a century ago, television coverage from the front lines in Vietnam turned the American people against the war because it brought the horrors of combat directly into their living rooms. This convention — completely unexpectedly — brought other people's living rooms into our living rooms. : As a result, I suspect that many ordinary Americans are suddenly, viscerally aware that they are not alone in their misery and frustration; that they are not the only ones wholly disgusted by the government's failure to control the pandemic; that they are not alone in experiencing Trump and Trumpism as aberrational, un-American and unacceptable. They wouldn't necessarily feel that way from reading the...
    (CNN)The arrest of former White House political adviser Steve Bannon Thursday on charges of fraud related to fundraising for the construction of a private border wall with Mexico is, quite literally, the single most emblematic storyline of the Trump era in Washington.Consider this story arc:1) Bannon, after years of toiling in the fever swamps of the far-conservative right, signs on as an adviser to Trump's decidedly long-shot presidential campaign. It's a marriage of convenience -- and necessity. Bannon isn't getting a whole lot of offers to serve as a senior adviser to a presidential campaign. Trump can't attract any high-end staff or advisers -- all of whom are too wary of his past provocations and scared off by his infinitesimal chances of actually winning.2) Bannon guides Trump to not just the Republican nomination but the presidency -- pushing Trump's border wall proposal to the center of the campaign and running as much against the media as any Republican or Democratic opponent.3) Trump rewards Bannon by installing him as chief political strategist in the White House.Read More4) Less than nine months...
    (CNN)Political conventions are the ultimate insider events.Once rife with smoke-filled rooms and back-room deals, it's where the most prominent members of a political party gather, surrounded by party activists from around the country. All conveniently trailed by political reporters (and camera crews). The days are packed with convention events and programming, and at night, parties and social gatherings. In short -- and writing from experience -- they are a lot of fun.The pandemic has obviously changed all of that. No longer is it safe to gather thousands of people from around the country in one arena (despite President Donald Trump's best efforts). Democrats had already announced a nearly entirely virtual convention, but now we know more: The DNC will feature two hours of prime time programming on each of the four nights between August 17 and 20, from 9 p.m. to 11 p.m. Eastern, according to CNN's MJ Lee. THE POINT -- NOW ON YOUTUBE! In each episode of his weekly YouTube show, Chris Cillizza will delve a little deeper into the surreal world of politics. Click to...
    A Russian submarine carrying land attack missiles has been intercepted in the English Channel by two Royal Navy warships. The Krasnodar sub was spotted passing through the Dover strait, close to UK waters. It is feared it may have breached treaty rules that forbid the route except for exceptional repair reasons. HMS Mersey was deployed to take over from HMS Tyne to make sure the sub was accompanied The Krasnodar submarine was spotted entering UK waters by the Naval authorities It comes as a bombshell report by the UK government's Intelligence and Security Committee accused Russia of meddling in Britain by interfering in the 2014 Scottish Referendum, flushing dirty money through London and conducting cyber warfare.  RELATED ARTICLES Previous 1 2 Next Man overboard! Sailors told to stop using male-themed Navy... Royal Navy nuclear submarine had near-miss with car ferry... World's first private icebreaker is launched: £79.5m vessel... Share this article Share The vessel, built in the Soviet Union for the Soviet Navy in the 1980s, was met by...
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