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    A San Francisco high school is handing out significantly more failing grades than ever before in its first semester after it scrapped its merit-based admissions scheme for a diversity, equity, and inclusion-focused one. At Lowell High School — formerly one of only two public schools in the district with a merit-based admissions system — 24.4 percent of freshmen received at least one D or F in the fall semester, compared to 7.9 percent in the fall of 2020 and 7.7 percent in the fall of 2019, according to the San Francisco Unified School District data obtained by the San Francisco Chronicle. These numbers represent a tripling of students receiving those grades from 2020 to 2021, which also represents the timeframe for the change from a merit-based admissions system. According to the Chronicle, increases in poor grades also existed in grades 10 through 12 — students who were admitted into the school based on merit — but the increases were “slight” comparatively. School administrators appear reluctant to attribute the grades to the change in admissions policy, however. “Over a year of distance...
    The UK’s publicly funded healthcare system is not properly questioning its “transgender” patients before surgery, a former “transgender woman” has alleged. A person who formerly lived as a “transgender woman” has alleged that the UK’s socialised healthcare system is not properly questioning people before they undergo sex-change surgery. Ritchie Herron, who has returned to identifying as a man, voiced the allegations while saying that he intended to take legal action against the British National Health Service (NHS) over the way it treated him. According to a report by The Times, Herron claimed that the socialised healthcare provider failed to heed his own concerns about undergoing transgender surgery, with medics even allegedly putting down his fears to his obsessive compulsive disorder. As a result, Herron reportedly ended up undergoing a “vaginoplasty surgery”, the results of which have allegedly left him in pain, with no sex drive, and with problems emptying his bladder. “There’s like a conveyor belt system going on where they’re just trying to rush through people as quickly as possible, because the waiting list is like five years in some...
    Friday marked the 50th anniversary of the Watergate burglary that would end Richard M. Nixon’s presidency two years later. By then, his vice president and successor, Gerald R. Ford Jr., would tell Americans, “Our long national nightmare is over.” Little could Ford or his audience have imagined the nation’s current nightmare, one that’s far from over. We’re enduring the biggest presidential scandal since Watergate, or ever: Donald Trump’s continued assault on democracy, following his unprecedented refusal to accept the 2020 election result and allow for the peaceful transfer of power to the winner. When it comes to presidential disgrace, Don the Con tops even Tricky Dick. Trump, however, has had much more help achieving his ignominy. When Nixon resigned and helicoptered away from the White House, the often uttered consensus was that “the system worked.” All three branches of government had done their part: Congress, the courts and even the executive branch once Nixon’s henchmen were out of the way and prison-bound. In Trump’s case, the system hasn’t worked. So far. He walks free as the Justice Department dallies, has raised hundreds of...
    Even with the gains of the Affordable Care Act of 2010, a.k.a. Obamacare — which has brought health insurance to millions of previously uninsured Americans and enjoyed record enrollment in 2022 — the United States continues to lag behind Europe, Canada, Australia, New Zealand and Japan when it comes to health care outcomes and life expectancy. The health care system in the U.S. is challenging in a variety of ways, from preventative care — access to dental checkups, colonoscopies, weight management programs — to Type 1 diabetics being able to afford their insulin. One thing that isn’t talked about as much during discussions of health and wellness in the U.S. is lower breastfeeding rates, but according to Vox reporter Dylan Scott, that problem is underscored by the infant formula shortage the U.S. is presently suffering. “One of the more crass responses to the ongoing formula shortage has been that mothers worried about empty shelves where their infant’s formula used to be should just breastfeed instead,” Scott explains in an article published by Vox on June 17. “Breastfeeding alone would never...
    BALTIMORE (WJZ) — Multiples Baltimore high schools changed more than 12,500 failing grades to passing over a several-year span, according to the findings of an audit released Tuesday by the Maryland Office of the Inspector General for Education. The report was the product of a three-year review of grading procedures within Baltimore City Public Schools, which was launched in response to complaints about students being promoted despite poor academic performance and allegations that teachers were pressured to change grades. READ MORE: Armed Man Arrested In Maryland For Threat To Kill Justice KavanaughIts findings were based on a combination of documents, including emails exchanged by district and school staff, and interviews with educators and administrators, some of whom the auditors’ say were reluctant to speak out of fear that it could cost them their jobs. “A culture of fear and a veil of secrecy affected the BCPS system and kept many from speaking freely about misconduct,” the report states. “Regrettably, these actions delayed the completion of this investigation and hindered the truth-seeking process.” The audit, which covered the school years from...
    Michael Bloomberg says America's public school system is failing and blames teacher's union leaders for resisting return to in-classroom instruction 'long after it was clear that classrooms were safe.'   The former New York City mayor and 2020 Democratic presidential candidate described the public education system as 'failing' in an op-ed titled, 'A Wake Up Call for Public Education' that was published on Thursday, after an analysis revealed that a reported 1.3 million students have left public schools since the pandemic began. Bloomberg said the message to educators and elected officials could hardly be clearer: 'Too many public schools are failing, parents are voting with their feet, and urgent and bold action is needed.' 'Until now, however, the only governmental response has been to spend more money — too much of which has gone to everyone but our children,' he continued. Bloomberg also criticized teacher's union leaders because they 'resisted a return to in-classroom instruction long after it was clear that classrooms were safe.'  In the op-ed, Bloomberg cited a recent national analysis that 'contained a deeply disturbing finding that has generated little public discussion when...
    Sen. Bernie Sanders demanded the end to the nation's 'dysfunctional healthcare system on Thursday, as he revived his Medicare for All plan during a Senate hearing. He used an op-ed piece to lay out his case for the economic and social benefits of universal healthcare. 'Now is the time for Congress to stand with the American people and take on the powerful special interests that dominate health care in the United States.  'Now is the time to improve and extend Medicare to everyone,' the democratic socialist senator wrote in a piece for Fox News. 'Here is the bottom line: If every major country on earth can guarantee health care to all and achieve better health outcomes, while spending substantially less per capita than we do, there is no reason, other than greed, that the United States of America cannot do the same.' Sanders' argument is familiar and one that he has been making for years: The U.S. must catch up with every other wealthy nation in introducing a universal system for healthcare. Sen. Bernie Sanders revived his Medicare for All plan...
    (CNN)Investigators are continuing to pore through the extensive library of YouTube videos created by Frank James, the 62-year-old man accused of shooting 10 people on a New York City subway train, searching for clues about his motive. But those videos and his case have also refocused America's attention on the acute mental health crisis that is gripping this country, from the vast number of untreated people in need of psychological help to the difficulty that Congress will face if they actually try to fix what has long been a broken system. Many details of James' story are still unknown, but the portrait that has emerged from some of his videos is that of a man who seemed isolated, deeply frustrated by his treatment by society and often filled with rage, misogyny and animus toward people of all races, including African Americans. His thoughts in the videos were often disjointed and difficult to follow. But he made his threats in plain view for anyone who clicked, stating in one recent video that he had "been through a lot of sh*t, where...
    With the lawsuit, which is still in its early stages, the couple is accusing Baltimore city officials and BCPS of failing to educate area children — and in the meantime wasting massive amounts of taxpayer money. "We’ve heard for decades about some of the failures to educate and things like social promotion, lack of resources," Jovani, who ran as a Republican for city council president in 2020 on a platform of accountability in education, added. "[Yet] year after year, time after time, all we hear is, 'Well, this is the way it’s always been. This is the way it’s always going to be.'" His wife, Shawnda, has firsthand experience in the classroom. She worked as a public school teacher in Baltimore for almost a decade. She recalled how low standards and oversized classrooms led to educational failures. "Most of the time, my class size was pushing 40 kids with no assistant. To effectively teach 40 children, that is a challenging task," she said, adding that teachers are not the ones at fault. Rather, "it’s just the way that the system...
    America First Legal founder Stephen Miller blasted the president on "Fox News Primetime" Wednesday for failing to focus on the "ongoing catastrophe" on America's southern border during his nearly two-hour press event, a disaster the former Trump adviser says Biden now "owns" and "created." STEPHEN MILLER: Joe Biden spoke for two hours and he spent all of his time focusing on the wrong border which is Ukraine’s border and not America’s southern border. Let’s be very clear, what’s happening on our southern border today and tomorrow and the day after that and the day after that is getting Americans killed. Killed with drugs, killed with gangs, killed with crime. It’s resulting in hospitals being overloaded, our schools being overloaded our police departments being overloaded, our public health, public financing system. It is an ongoing catastrophe. We need to focus on our border here at home. Let’s be very clear about something. When Donald Trump left office there was no catch and release. If you crossed illegally, you either went home, you went to Mexico, or a willing, safe, third country, period. Joe Biden inherited that perfect, seamless system and he ripped it to shreds. Just like he ripped apart our vetting system that was used to keep out foreign nationals like the individual who committed...
    Former House Speaker Newt Gingrich told "Fox & Friends" on Monday that Americans are seeing a system failing under the Biden administration, specifically with the supply chain crisis and rising inflation.  NEWT GINGRICH: Gallup just reported that Biden entered the year with the Democrats having a 9-point advantage in party identity and ended the year with the Republicans having a 5-point advantage in party identity. Party identity is a very hard thing to shift. They shifted it 14 points if you add the two together. 14 points in one year in reaction to the Biden presidency.  And I think part of it is reality … you have 101 ships still sitting off Long Beach, California. You have a logistic supply chain mess. You have the former head of Walmart saying his stores look like the Soviet era in Russia. They can’t put anything on the shelves. I think people look at all of this and they feel it every time they fill up their car. And they see a system that’s failing. And they don’t see any evidence that the...
    A 22-year-old education trailblazer who wants to create a charter school in Atlanta, Georgia, said the public school system is graduating kids who don't have basic literary skills Wednesday on "Fox News Primetime."  "I've been working with children for the past three years, and when I began working with the children, seeing them not be able to read … [or] write, I became alarmed," said King Randall. "I was wondering why and how these kids were being passed through school … And when I say you can't read and write, I mean literally just that." Children in a classroom. (iStock) Randall, founder of "The X for Boys," added that schools tout their graduation rates, but beneath that veneer are illiterate kids.  "They're touting, 'We have a super high graduation rate and these children are … graduating functionally illiterate," Randall told host Lawrence Jones.  Randall cautioned against blaming the black hole in the education system on the teachers, who are affected by the toxic system just as students are. CHICAGO SCHOOL SYSTEM, TEACHERS UNION DISAGREE OVER SAFETY CONDITIONS AS COVID...
    The prestigious Mayo Clinic fired 700 employees who refused to comply with the hospital's COVID-19 vaccine policy. Workers had until Monday to get their first shot or obtain a medical or religious exemption to the healthcare system's vaccine mandate. The clinic, which is the largest employer in its home state of Minnesota, reportedly granted the majority of exemption requests. 'While Mayo Clinic is saddened to lose valuable employees, we need to take all steps necessary to keep our patients, workforce, visitors and communities safe,' the clinic told the Star Tribune. 'If individuals released from employment choose to get vaccinated at a later date, the opportunity exists for them to apply and return to Mayo Clinic for future job openings.' The prestigious Mayo Clinic fired 700 employees who refused to comply with the hospital's COVID-19 vaccine policy Mayo Clinic, which first informed employees about the vaccine mandate last July, has faced heavy criticism over the vaccination requirement. While primarily associated with Minnesota, where it was founded, the healthcare system also operates hospitals in Arizona, Florida, Iowa and Wisconsin.  A group of 38...
    CHICAGO (CBS) — Advocate Aurora Health has fired about 440 staffers who were noncompliant with the hospital system’s COVID-19 vaccination policy. In a statement issued Tuesday, the hospital system reported that 99 percent of its staffers are compliant with the requirement to get vaccinated for COVID-19. READ MORE: Dixmoor Sends Plea For Help As Water Pressure Down To A Trickle In Parts Of South SuburbBut about 440 staffers – amounting to 0.6 percent of the workforce and nearly half of whom were per diem employees – were not in compliance, the hospital system said. READ MORE: Man Shot And Killed In Logan SquareThus, those employees have been fired. MORE NEWS: Police Warn Of String Of Armed Robberies At Downtown 7-Eleven StoresAdvocate Aurora Health is based in Downers Grove and Milwaukee and operates 26 hospitals in Illinois and Wisconsin.
    U.S. Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen answers questions during the Senate Appropriations Subcommittee hearing to examine the FY22 budget request for the Treasury Department on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC, June 23, 2021.Greg Nash | Pool | Reuters The Treasury Department has determined that the nation's child care system is "unworkable," saying it is plagued by market failures that put quality care out of reach for many families. In a report to be released Wednesday, Treasury details the struggle many parents face to afford child care, especially as bills pile up before their peak earning years. At the same time, Treasury found that many industry workers are paid low wages, suffer high turnover and face discrimination. Treasury is making the case for federal government support for paid family leave, universal preschool, and significant tax credits for parents and dependent care as Democrats in Congress are working to write a social-spending bill that could total $3.5 trillion. Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen and Vice President Kamala Harris will highlight those initiatives during a joint speech Wednesday afternoon at the department. Individual families should...
    VIDEO4:1904:19Carl Lewis says the 4x100 relay effort was a 'total embarrassment'The News with Shepard Smith Olympic track and field legend Carl Lewis told CNBC that he stands "100 percent" by his criticism of Team USA's men's 4x100m relay team after it finished sixth in its semifinal on Thursday and failed to qualify for the final.  He emphasized, however, that his ire was not directed towards the athletes, but towards the U.S. relay program that put the teams together.  "The federation sets up the teams, and the coaches and the system, and they're failing the athletes," said Lewis, who won the 4x100 Olympic gold medal twice and seven other golds. "That's why I was so emotional and so angry, because these athletes work their whole lives, they run fast and doing everything to make the team and then you put them in a position that's impossible to be successful." Americans Trayvon Bromell, Fred Kerley, Ronnie Baker and Cravon Gillespie were eliminated from the event as China, Canada, Italy, Germany and Ghana all qualified. Lewis told "The News with Shepard Smith" that...
    LONDON (AP) — Around two-thirds of female veterans in the British armed forces have experienced bullying, harassment or discrimination in their careers, a parliamentary report said Sunday. The report also said that women who reported serious sexual offences are “denied justice” by an inadequate military court system and complaints process. Parliament’s defense committee found that 64% of female veterans and 58% of serving women said they have experienced bullying, harassment, discrimination in the army. Most say they don’t believe the military does enough to address the problem. The committee heard accounts of “unacceptable behaviors” experienced by servicewomen, including gang rape, bullying for refusing sexual advances and assault by senior officers. Others reported “witnessing friends being attacked by groups of men but being too afraid to report it,” and said mess halls and accommodation were seen as “places of danger.” “The complaints system, as it stands, is woefully inadequate and leaves most feeling unable to come forward,” said lawmaker and veteran Sarah Atherton, who chairs the subcommittee on women in the armed forces. “We also heard accusations of senior officers...
                      by Brad Polumbo  Students often face punishment from parents when they get a bad report card. But what happens when our school system gets one? The latest national “report card” is out, and it shows that our schools are failing Americans when it comes to science education. These most recent data come from the 2019 National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) science assessment. The Nations Report Card just came out for 2019 science: 4th Grade: 36% proficient8th Grade: 35% proficient12th Grade: 22% proficient — Corey A. DeAngelis (@DeAngelisCorey) May 25, 2021 Just 36 percent of 4th graders were at least “proficient” in science in 2019. Meanwhile, only 35 percent of 8th graders were proficient, and, most worryingly, just 22 percent of 12th graders tested at or above a proficient level in science. These numbers are all essentially unchanged or marginally worse than the same figures in 2015, suggesting no improvement or progress has been made on this front. These findings are more than just an embarrassment for those who run our...
    Baltimore City Public Schools will not require students who failed classes in 2021 to repeat their grades, citing academic challenges brought on by the coronavirus pandemic. All students will instead be tested in the fall to determine their competency levels, and schools will create catch-up plans for students who are behind. “The challenge of virtual learning cannot be understated,” said Chief Academic Officer Joan Dabrowski, according to the Baltimore Sun. “As a system, this is why we have to approach post-COVID in a very different frame.” PANDEMIC CLOSURES LIKELY TO LEAVE PUBLIC SCHOOL STUDENTS FURTHER BEHIND IN FALL Officials announced the plan at a school board meeting Tuesday and separately in emails to parents and teachers, and it does not require board approval. The school system’s aim is to provide assistance to students rather than punish them for circumstances beyond their control, Dabrowski said. As part of its plan, the system will adjust how it grades students, giving elementary students who have an “unsatisfactory” grade in any course a “not completed.” Middle school students...
    More On: times square NYPD release new photo of man wanted in Times Square shooting Family of suspected Times Square shooter wants him to surrender, brother says Man charged in fatal stabbing at Times Square homeless shelter Suspected Times Square shooter is career criminal with a lengthy rap sheet For proof that New York City’s criminal-justice system is utterly failing at its most basic function — putting bad guys away — look no further than the long rap sheet of accused Times Square shooter Farrakhan Muhammad. Cops say Muhammad shot three innocent bystanders, including a 4-year-old girl who was toy shopping with her family, on Saturday. But consider what he’d already “achieved” in his 31 years. His criminal record, according to Post sources, dates back to January 2007, with a robbery charge for stealing a victim’s phone in Brooklyn, followed by another robbery case in November 2009 for grabbing a woman’s bag while she was loading a car — and fleeing the scene with a second suspect in tow. Then there’s the 2012 bust where cops seized a...
    (CNN)Ma'Khia Bryant was charging at two young women with a knife, police body camera video footage shows, when an officer arrived and fatally shot her outside the foster home she had been living in for about two months. Ma'Khia's foster mother Angela Moore, who wasn't home at the time, said the dispute stemmed from an argument over a messy house and an unmade bed between Ma'Khia and some of Moore's former foster children who had come to the house to throw Moore a birthday party. At least two of the women involved in the altercation were adults ages 20 and 22, according to a police report. While there are still a lot of unanswered questions surrounding the April 20 incident and the investigation is ongoing, one thing is clear: 16-year-old Ma'Khia died while under the care of a system that was created to provide safe, temporary homes for children whose biological parents are unable to raise them.And Ma'Khia's biological mother, the family's attorney and child welfare experts say they believe the foster care system failed Ma'Khia. Columbus police records show...
    Ma'Khia Bryant's biological mother plans to sue after after her daughter was shot and killed by police outside of her home, it has been revealed. Deja Torrence, the 16-year-old girl's cousin, told Insider that her mother Hazel Bryant had spoken with Bryant's biological mother Paula throughout the week. Torrence said that they were in talks with a lawyer to file a lawsuit in the wake of Bryant's death outside her foster home in Columbus, Ohio, on Tuesday.  It was not immediately clear who the family wants to sue or when it would be filed - but members of the family have claimed Bryant was failed by the foster care system before her death. Torrence said that Bryant had called the police for help when two women fought with her. When officers arrived, body camera shows Bryant was shot while lunging at one of the girls with a knife.  Ma'Khia Bryant's biological mother plans to sue after after her daughter was shot and killed by police outside of her home in Columbus, Ohio on Tuesday Paula Bryant, her biological mother, said...
    ANNAPOLIS, Md. (WJZ) — Outrage is growing over Maryland’s patchwork vaccination system with all Democrats in Maryland’s Congressional delegation demanding a centralized website and telephone hotline where people can make appointments. They wrote a letter to Governor Hogan saying the vaccination program “is failing Marylanders.” Latest Maryland #COVID19 numbers. Below 1k new infections; likely still impacted by weather @wjz pic.twitter.com/pI1e4p3DPU — Mike Hellgren (@HellgrenWJZ) February 3, 2021   “Across the state, Marylanders eligible for the vaccine are unable to schedule their appointments and do not know when, where, and by whom they can get vaccinated, leaving people and communities extremely frustrated. It is clear that the State is not meeting the needs of Marylanders, and we urge you to put forth a strategy and clear guidance that significantly improves Maryland’s vaccination program,” the lawmakers wrote. Sharp criticism from some of Maryland’s federal delegation of Gov. Hogan’s vaccine rollout. https://t.co/XJUerNyMlk ““The lack of state-wide coordination and communication in Maryland’s vaccine program has yielded rampant confusion…” @wjz — Mike Hellgren (@HellgrenWJZ) February 3, 2021   “It is imperative we stop...
    DETROIT (AP) — Toyota will pay $180 million to settle U.S. government allegations that it failed to report pollution control system defects in its vehicles for a decade. The company also agreed in court to investigate emissions-related defects quickly and report them to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in a timely manner. “Toyota’s actions undermined the EPA’s self-disclosure system and likely led to delayed or avoided emissions-related recalls,” Audrey Strauss, the acting U.S. Attorney in Manhattan said Thursday in a prepared statement. The Japanese automaker’s actions brought financial benefits and excessive pollution, she said. The company was accused in a government lawsuit of delays in filing 78 emissions defect reports as required by the Clean Air Act. The reports covered millions of vehicles, the statement said. The lawsuit was filed Thursday and settled on the same day, according to the statement. Copyright © 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.
    PHILADELPHIA (CBS) — The governors of New Jersey and Pennsylvania blasted federal lawmakers for failing to pass a new COVID relief bill. New Jersey Gov. Phil Murphy said, not only do individuals and businesses need the help, so do state and local governments. “This is about continuing to employ the very frontline, essential workers who we desperately need in our hour of need,” Murphy said. Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Wolf called it “disgraceful” that federal leaders “seem to be incapable of providing support.” The governors, both Democrats, blamed Republican Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell for the impasse. MORE ON CBSPHILLY.COM Philadelphia Weather: Winter Storm Watch Issued For Parts Of Region Beginning Wednesday As Powerful System Set To Impact Delaware Valley Philadelphia Court System Receives Blistering Criticism From Commanding Police Officials Over Handling Of Recent Firearm Violation Cases FAQ: New Pennsylvania COVID-19 Restrictions Explained
    Come the new year, Fairfax County Public Schools in Virginia will have some new grading policies in place to help curb the dramatic spike in students receiving failing grades during the pandemic. “We’ve seen some really, really large increases in percent of students earning ‘F’ grades,” said Sloan Presidio, the school system’s chief academic officer. According to an internal report, which looked into student grades this school year, in the first quarter the school system saw the number of middle and high school students with at least two F’s increase 83% compared to previous school years, with almost 9,700 students finding themselves in that position. Two populations that have been impacted the most by lower grades since the start of the pandemic have been students with disabilities and those who are learning English. Almost 1,200 more students with disabilities saw at least two F’s during the first quarter — an increase of 111% over last year. Almost 1,800 English learners fell into that category — a change of 106%. Presidio said they have been hearing from many students who say...
    CHICAGO (CBS) — More than 65,000 new jobless claims were filed in Illinois the week of Nov. 16 – a whopping 40 percent jump from the week before. The big question – will those out of work get help? All we know is that Illinois’ unemployment system continues to Fail – with a capital F – the people out of work in Illinois. CBS 2 Investigator Dorothy Tucker set out to get the answers taxpayers deserve from top managers at the Illinois Department of Employment Security. “$6,184.22. $1,672.20,” CJ Farrar read as he flipped through a pile of his bills. “It’s approximately $20,000 total that I owe on the credit cards. And then medical bills are about $30,000 at this point.” Balances are ballooning for Farrar as he desperately battles to get unemployment benefits to feed his family. “That’s exactly what it was the whole time, just a huge fight to try and get my money that they owed me,” said Farrar. Tens of thousands of unemployed Illinoisans are struggling just like Farrar. “I’m broke. I have $3 to...
    It’s a heartbreaking story that’s grown all too common in this city: The grandma of the homeless man charged with shoving a straphanger onto Brooklyn subway tracks says she tried for years to get him help — but the system failed at every turn. Police say the victim, 29, was on a 4 train with his girlfriend around 11:30 a.m. Sunday when Michael Medlock, 33, woke up and started screaming. When the couple got off at Atlantic Avenue, he followed and allegedly shoved the man onto the tracks. Medlock has been diagnosed with bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. He’s been living on the streets since management banned him from his grandmother’s East New York apartment building. “I have been having problems with him since the third grade,” Medlock’s grandmother Athense told The Post. “I’m angry with the system. I tried and tried to get help for him. They said if he is not a danger to himself, there is nothing they can do.” One 311 operator told her he just needed detox. Officials refused to keep him in the hospital when...
    While more school districts face a return to completely virtual classrooms as the latest coronavirus surge sweeps the nation, systems are increasingly reporting that online learning doesn't cut it, with rates of failure soaring across the country. In Fairfax County, Virginia, a new report from the Office of Research and Strategic Improvement found that the percentage of failing grades so far were up more than 80% compared to last year's rates — jumping 6% to 11%. In the Los Angeles Unified School District, Ds and Fs among middle and high school students have surged — as has school attendance, according to the Los Angeles Times. LA schools did not report the year-on-year differences, but other districts in the Bay Area reported 50% jumps in failing grades compared to relative stability over the past few years, according to the Mercury News. In Austin, Texas, nearly one-quarter of all middle school students in the Austin Independent School District were failing at least one class, a 70% increase compared to last year, according to the Texas Tribune. In the Van...
    Outgoing Rep. Denver RigglemanDenver RigglemanSunday shows preview: Trump, Biden gear up for final sprint to Election Day Ben Carson attended indoor fundraiser where attendees didn't wear masks: report GOP congressman condemns Trump-promoted theory that Bin Laden killing was a hoax MORE (R-Va.) said on Sunday that being a politician with any party right now is “difficult” and expressed doubts over whether the two-party system is benefitting Americans. Riggleman was asked by Chuck ToddCharles (Chuck) David ToddHHS secretary: Avoiding large gatherings 'a difficult message for all Western democracies' Trump bashes NBC ahead of town hall, adds it's 'a free hour on television' Chuck Todd indirectly refers to former colleague Olbermann as 'somebody from the very far left' of the media world MORE on NBC’s "Meet the Press" if he is still a Republican. “I’ll tell you what, I'm a Republican, what I thought a constitutional Republican was, but the way the GOP is going in Virginia it’s very difficult for me to stay with any party. I believe duopoly is really, the two-party system is really failing the American people right now,” he...
    MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — The American Civil Liberties Union of Minnesota is suing the state, alleging prison officials have not taken adequate precautions to protect inmates from COVID-19. The ACLU-MN filed a petition Thursday asking a court to force the state to keep people in custody safe. The Department of Corrections did not immediately comment on the lawsuit. Data posted on the DOC's website show 937 inmates in the prison system have tested positive for the virus, with 270 cases still active. Two inmate deaths have been linked to COVID-19. There have been 237 correctional staff in the prison system who have tested positive for COVID-19, and 164 of them have returned to work, according to the database. Copyright 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed. Tags: Minnesota, Associated Press
    MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — The American Civil Liberties Union of Minnesota is suing the state, alleging prison officials have not taken adequate precautions to protect inmates from COVID-19. The ACLU-MN filed a petition Thursday asking a court to force the state to keep people in custody safe. The Department of Corrections did not immediately comment on the lawsuit. Data posted on the DOC’s website show 937 inmates in the prison system have tested positive for the virus, with 270 cases still active. Two inmate deaths have been linked to COVID-19. There have been 237 correctional staff in the prison system who have tested positive for COVID-19, and 164 of them have returned to work, according to the database. (© Copyright 2020 The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.)
    The San Diego Unified School District approved an overhaul of its grading system to combat racism, moving to not penalizing students on late assignments or behavior in their overall academic grade. “If we’re actually going to be an anti-racist school district, we have to confront practices like this that have gone on for years and years,” SDUSD Vice President Richard Barrera said. “I think this reflects a reality that students have described to us, and it’s a change that’s a long time coming.” The school board voted unanimously last week to make the changes, which include teachers not taking into account whether a student turned in assignments on time or their classroom behavior for an academic grade. Instead, those topics will work toward their “citizenship grade,” according to a local NBC affiliate. “During the first semester of last year, 30% of all D or F grades were given to English learners. One in four, 25%, of failing marks went to students with disabilities. By ethnicity, 23% went to Native Americans. Another 23% of failing grades went to Hispanics....
    Demetrius Harvard was reportedly “smiling” as that Manhattan A-train flew off the rails Sunday morning, sideswiping at least 10 steel beams and tearing a huge chunk of metal off one car. It was another failure of the systems that are supposed to protect New Yorkers from sickos. Harvard is accused of tossing metal construction debris onto the tracks at the West 14th station as the train pulled into the station. The derailment did nearly $1 million in damage, the MTA says. Luckily, only three people were injured — none killed. So on Monday night, he was held in lieu of $50,000 cash bail at his arraignment in Manhattan Criminal Court. He was charged with assault, criminal tampering, reckless endangerment, criminal mischief and unlawful interference with a railroad train. But he should’ve already been in custody: He was arraigned earlier in the month on one count of misdemeanor criminal mischief for allegedly striking an MTA bus with a metal street barricade and shattering two windows. Manhattan prosecutors didn’t ask for bail then, and Harvard was granted supervised release — even though...
    This story is part of Prism’s series on incarceration as gendered violence. Read the rest of the series here.  By Ashley C. Sawyer, Esq.  When I was fresh out of undergrad, I worked as a victim advocate with people who survived violent harm in Essex County, New Jersey. The memories of the survivors and victims replay regularly in my mind. I cannot forget the story of a Black woman, Monica Paul, who was murdered at a local YMCA by her ex-boyfriend while she was watching their son’s swim lessons. To this day, I feel a visceral anger at the Black man who could snatch the life of another human being in front of their own children. At the time, I didn’t have a critique for the system that failed to protect Monica. I think many of us believe the lie that the murder couldn’t have been prevented, and the only thing our society can control is how we mete out punishment. It escaped me that she already had a restraining order against her ex-boyfriend through the same criminal legal system, and it...
    Chancellor Richard Carranza stands exposed by the COVID crisis as utterly incompetent at actually running the school system. His team bungled as the virus rose, even ordering administrators to conceal infection information from school staff. It was helpless in the transition to remote learning, switching software repeatedly and never requiring teachers to actually teach or even speak with students. Until The Post exposed it, Team Carranza was poised to spend hundreds of millions on idle school buses. For summer school, it didn’t even try to monitor remote “attendance.” see also Carranza expands his DOE staff despite looming teacher shortage, layoffs Despite a budget crunch that threatens teacher layoffs and a... And it bungled the runup to the fall — failing to see that every school’s HVAC system was vetted in time; failing to note the possibility of outdoor classes until far too late — indeed, failing to set any clear standards until summer was nearly over. Not to mention: failing to work with the unions (or come up with a practical plan for end-running them) to allow for...
    Facebook whistleblowers allege the tech giant ignored racial bias research as early as mid-2019 on Instagram's automatic removal system and told employees to keep the findings secret.   In mid-2019, researchers for Facebook-owned Instagram found that accounts that said they belonged to a black person were 50 per cent more likely to have their accounts disabled by the new moderation system than white people. The new system, designed to remove problematic and bullying accounts, was introduced to the photo-sharing app in 2019.  The revelation, made to NBC News, came from two current and one former staffers.  Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg testifies before the Senate judiciary and commerce committees on Capitol Hill on April 10, 2018, in Washington, D.C RELATED ARTICLES Previous 1 Next Social media influencer, 33, reveals how she was able to... Australia's first female supercar driver who's now earning... Share this article Share After taking complaints to their superiors, the employees were ordered to stop researching the racial bias in the system, and to avoid talking to their colleagues about...
    Tucker Carlson unleashed a long rant against those who have torn down statues and rioted in the past few weeks, calling out both President Donald Trump and his Justice Department for not rounding them up as “criminals,” “frog marching” them out in the public, and branding them as “domestic terrorists.” The Fox News host on Thursday called the ongoing unrest a “national crisis” that is “designed to produce a national result, the destruction of our system of government and the removal of Donald Trump.” “People expect a president to respond to a moment like this to fix it and they have a right to expect that. The president runs the country,” Carlson said. “If the rioters were Saudi nationals, it would be very clear there was nothing local about what we are watching. He would understand immediately it is terrorism. The president would give a prime time address. Within hours, the feds would be hunting these people down and arresting them. They would be in prison facing life. So the question is, why isn’t the Justice Department responding like...
    OAKLAND —  A civil grand jury report found that Castlemont High School educators misused a grading system in order to pass students who didn’t qualify and misled the public about it. “This school and the district that runs it are failing its students. There is no excuse for awarding a high school diploma to those who do not earn it,” the Alameda County Civil Grand Jury report stated. In 2019, allegations came to light that administrators manipulated grades and graduation requirements on an online system called Apex in order to pass otherwise failing students. After the district did its own investigation, it found there was no evidence of any wrongdoing. Apex is a credit recovery program used to offer struggling students an online alternative to completing required work, according to the district. But in the grand jury report released Monday, the investigation found that the district’s conclusion of no wrongdoing was “arguably misleading” and “incomplete.” The jury said that even though the district’s investigation found poor practices, a misuse of the online program by teachers, inadequate training and insufficient monitoring...
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