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    Wisconsin Lieutenant Governor Mandela Barnes who is running to become the Democratic nominee for the U.S. senate greets guests during a campaign event at The Wicked Hop on August 07, 2022 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.Scott Olson | Getty Images Republican Sen. Ron Johnson of Wisconsin will defend his seat against Democratic Lt. Gov. Mandela Barnes in a swing-state face off that could become one of the most competitive races of the midterms. Johnson breezed through the state's Republican primary election Tuesday night, NBC News projected. Barnes was expected to have a tougher primary battle up until his top Democratic opponents dropped out late last month, clearing his path to the nomination, NBC projected. Democrats have zeroed in on Johnson's seat as they fight to hang onto their razor-thin Senate majority. The two-term incumbent, backed by former President Donald Trump, is the only Republican senator running for reelection in a state that President Joe Biden won in 2020. Multiple polls also show Johnson's approval ratings underwater. Johnson, 67, has also been a magnet for criticism from Democrats who say he has spread...
    (CNN)Wisconsin Republican Sen. Ron Johnson and Democratic Lt. Gov. Mandela Barnes are political opposites.But as the two prepare for what could become one of the most closely watched Senate races of the 2022 cycle, they are leveling similar attacks to define each other: Casting their opponent as too extreme and out of touch with Wisconsin voters, while arguing the other is not a true representative of the state's working class."The problem is Ron Johnson has turned his back on working people and I've fought for working people my entire career, even before I was an office," Barnes said when asked for the single biggest difference between himself and Johnson, who made millions running a plastics manufacturer before he entered public office. "His wealth isn't the problem -- it's the fact that he is ultra-wealthy and out of touch."Johnson's campaign declined to make him available to CNN, but a Johnson campaign adviser previewed a notably similar message. "(Barnes) is out of touch with where the majority of the state is," said adviser Ben Voelkel, citing some of the more liberal positions...
    (CNN)Wisconsin state Treasurer Sarah Godlewski ended her US Senate campaign on Friday as the field in the Democratic primary consolidates around Lt. Gov. Mandela Barnes.Godlewski, who is endorsing Barnes in the contest to take on GOP Sen. Ron Johnson, is the third Democrat to drop out of the race this week as it became clear that the lieutenant governor was likely to win the August 9 primary. Both Milwaukee Bucks executive Alex Lasry and Outagamie County Executive Tom Nelson also ended their campaigns this week and endorsed Barnes."It's clear that if we want to finally send Ron Johnson packing, we must all get behind Mandela Barnes and fight together," Godlewski said in a statement. "I'm proud of what our 72-county campaign has accomplished, and while I may not be on the ballot this November, every issue we fought to bring front and center will be." The 10 Senate seats most likely to flip in 2022While there are other candidates in the race, Barnes is the overwhelming front-runner in the primary and is now poised to face Johnson in November."I am...
    Wisconsin Democratic U.S. Senate candidate Mandela Barnes speaks at a recent rally at his alma mater, John Marshall High School in Milwaukee. Morry Gash/AP Facts matter: Sign up for the free Mother Jones Daily newsletter. Support our nonprofit reporting. Subscribe to our print magazine.It’s looking all but certain that Wisconsin Lieutenant Governor Mandela Barnes will be the Democratic opponent to take on the much-maligned Wisconsin Senator Ron Johnson in November. This week two of Barnes’ main rivals dropped out ahead of the August 9th primary, clearing the path for the 35-year-old Milwaukee native. Barnes has already secured the endorsement of Senator Bernie Sanders and campaigned last weekend alongside Senator Elizabeth Warren. The race between Barnes and Johnson will be among a few set to determine which party controls the Senate. Barnes has been a rising star in Wisconsin politics for the last decade. He was elected as a State Representative in 2012 and then joined Governor Tony Evers campaign to oust Scott Walker in 2018, becoming Lieutenant Governor at 31. He is only the second Black elected official in statewide...
    Prominent U.S. Senate candidate Alex Lasry dropped out of the Democratic primary, likely setting up a November contest between Mandela Barnes and Republican Senator Ron Johnson. Lasry, who was the closest opponent to Barnes in recent polling, immediately endorsed the lieutenant governor after suspending his campaign for the position. “The stakes are just too high to wait. The single best thing we can do for Wisconsin—and for America—is to beat Ron Johnson, and that must start now. Today, I am ending my campaign and endorsing my friend @TheOtherMandela to be the next great Senator from the State of Wisconsin,” Lasry said in a tweet. The stakes are just too high to wait. The single best thing we can do for Wisconsin—and for America—is to beat Ron Johnson, and that must start now. Today, I am ending my campaign and endorsing my friend @TheOtherMandela to be the next great Senator from the State of Wisconsin. — Alex Lasry (@AlexLasryWI) July 27, 2022 While other candidates remain, no other contender has been able to demonstrate double-digit support. For example, in a...
    MADISON, Wis. (AP) — Milwaukee Bucks executive Alex Lasry plans to drop out of Wisconsin’s U.S. Senate race on Wednesday, less than two weeks before the Democratic primary, his campaign spokesman said. Lasry’s departure in the race would leave Lt. Gov. Mandela Barnes as the top Democratic candidate in the primary where the winner will advance to take on Republican U.S. Sen. Ron Johnson. Barnes has led in public polls, all of which showed a tight race between him and Lasry. This week, Barnes’ campaign released an internal poll that showed Barnes ahead of Lasry by 14 points. State Treasurer Sarah Godlewski and other lesser-known candidates remain in the contest. On Monday, Outagamie County Executive Tom Nelson dropped out of the race and endorsed Barnes. Lasry will endorse Barnes, his campaign spokesman Thad Nation said. Lasry, 35, already had spent more than $12.3 million of his own money on the race. His plans to drop out of the race were first reported by the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. Lasry was born in New York City and moved to Milwaukee in 2014...
    MADISON, Wis. (AP) — Tom Nelson, a candidate who tried to position himself as the most progressive in Wisconsin’s Democratic primary race for U.S. Senate, announced Monday he dropped out of the contest to face Republican incumbent Ron Johnson in November. Nelson, the Outagamie County executive, threw his support to Lt. Gov. Mandela Barnes, who is in a tight race with Milwaukee Bucks executive Alex Lasry. State Treasurer Sarah Godlewski is polling further behind. Nelson was in fourth place. “Mandela can now count on me to be on his side every step of the way,” Nelson said in a statement. “I urge other Democratic primary voters to also support him now as well.” Nelson’s decision ends a campaign he launched in October 2020. Federal filings show Nelson raised a little less than $1.4 million for his campaign and he said “unfortunately, money matters way too much in politics and running against two self-funding millionaires proved too much for this pastor’s kid.” Lasry and Godlewski are both multi-millionaires. Lasry has poured in more than $12 million on his campaign, while Godlewski...
    For months, Wisconsin Lieutenant Governor Mandela Barnes looked like a runaway candidate for the Democratic Senate nomination in the state, which would pit him against Sen. Ron Johnson (R) in November. A progressive star who’d already won a statewide election, Barnes has racked up endorsements from Majority Whip Jim Clyburn (SC), Sen. Cory Booker (NJ), Sen. Elizabeth Warren (MA) and more since announcing his candidacy in July 2021. He’s the state’s first Black lieutenant governor, would be the state’s first Black senator, and could be one of the youngest members of the Senate—all factors that traditionally drive excitement for candidates among Democrats. Although he originally entered an already buzzing field of Senate hopefuls, he had the benefit of name recognition and popularity among the state-party’s base. But as the Aug. 9 primary creeps closer, Barnes’ Democratic primary opponents are increasingly on his tail, none more than Milwaukee Bucks executive Alex Lasry—and his money. Lasry, who is the son of billionaire and Bucks co-owner Marc Lasry, had been running for months before Barnes hopped in the race. He’d positioned himself as...
    MADISON, Wis. (AP) — Top Democrats running for the chance to take on U.S. Sen. Ron Johnson in Wisconsin largely kept their focus on the Republican opponent during the first and only televised debate Sunday, while the only female candidate faulted the men for not doing more to advocate for abortion rights. The debate bringing together five candidates came just over three weeks before the Aug. 9 primary. The winner will advance to face Johnson, who is seeking a third term, in what is expected to be one of the most costly and hotly contested races in the country with majority control of the Senate at play. Polls show Lt. Gov. Mandela Barnes and Milwaukee Bucks executive Alex Lasry are leading the crowded field. Both Barnes and Lasry focused on Johnson, and not one another, in the debate as they advocated for getting rid of the Senate filibuster to pass a bill protecting abortion rights, passing gun safety laws, protecting the environment and tax changes to benefit the middle class. Barnes pointed to his win as Gov. Tony Evers’ running...
    The Senate Majority PAC on Friday rolled out a $1 million ad buy against incumbent Sen. Ron JohnsonRonald (Ron) Harold JohnsonBarnes rakes in almost 0K after Johnson enters Wisconsin Senate race Senate GOP campaign arm raises .6 million in last quarter of 2021 Booker endorses Mandela Barnes in Wisconsin Senate race MORE (R-Wis.), becoming the latest Democratic group to hit Johnson on air following the announcement of his reelection bid.  The top Senate Democratic super PAC's ad is set to be aired on television markets in the Badger State, as well as on digital and streaming platforms.  The ad comes after Johnson's campaign released two ads after he announced he would seek a third term in the upper chamber. In one of the ads, Johnson explained why he was running for another term despite saying six years ago that he would only serve two terms in the Senate.  "With Democrats in total control, our nation is on a very dangerous path. If you're in a position to make our country safer and stronger, would you just walk away? I decided...
    Wisconsin Lt. Gov. Mandela Barnes (D) has raked in almost $150,000 in the days since Sen. Ron JohnsonRonald (Ron) Harold JohnsonBooker endorses Mandela Barnes in Wisconsin Senate race Johnson, Thune signal GOP's rising confidence Senate Democrats release first TV attack ad against Johnson in Wisconsin MORE (R-Wis.) announced that he will run for reelection in the Badger State, giving the Democratic candidate a fundraising boost amid a 12-person primary battle. Barnes's campaign said more than 5,000 individual donors have contributed since Sunday morning, when Johnson announced he will run for a third term representing Wisconsin in the U.S. Senate. The average donation was $28. The roughly three-day haul gives the Barnes campaign a strong footing in the Democratic primary race, where 12 candidates are running for the party’s nomination to take on Johnson. Barnes has emerged as an early front-runner in the field. An internal poll released by the campaign on Friday found that he has a 29-point lead over Milwaukee Bucks executive Alex Lasry, and is 30 points ahead of Wisconsin Treasurer Sarah Godlewski. Twenty-nine percent of respondents, however,...
    SACRAMENTO (CBS13) — Sacramento County Sheriff Scott Jones says he will not be seeking a fourth term. “Although I have not made a formal decision, it is my intention—and I have said so publicly—NOT to seek a fourth term as Sheriff,” Sheriff Jones write in a statement released on Wednesday. The comments come on the same day that Sacramento County Sheriff Captain Jim Barnes announced his campaign for sheriff. A 22-year veteran of the Sacramento County Sheriff’s Office, Barnes is also a graduate of Sacramento State University. Sheriff Jones says he supports Barnes’ candidacy. “I know Jim Barnes, and he is fully committed to keeping this community safe,” Jones said in a statement released by Barnes’ campaign. “He has an untarnished reputation of experience and leadership to be an excellent Sheriff.” Jones was first elected as sheriff in 2010. In his most recent election, 2018, he won with 51.3 percent of the vote. He also ran an unsuccessful campaign for the U.S. House in 2016 for California’s 7th Congressional District. More from CBS Sacramento: DMV Mistakenly Issues Driver’s License...
    MADISON, Wis. (AP) — Lt. Gov. Mandela Barnes' campaign was fined more than $1,600 for taking too much money from a political action committee, a fine the campaign inaccurately stated as a payment for legal fees to the state Elections Commission, according to a published report. State law limits a candidate for lieutenant governor to $26,000 in donations from a PAC. But campaign records show Barnes' campaign received five donations from the Wisconsin Working Families Party Political Action Committee in 2018 for a total of $27,652, the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reported. The Milwaukee Democrat agreed to pay a $1,652 forfeiture to the state Ethics Commission for the excessive amount, described in a July 2020 campaign report as legal fees. A state Republican spokeswoman criticized Barnes for the campaign finance violation, saying it fits of a pattern of mistakes by Barnes who in the past has been delinquent on property taxes and was blocked from registering a car because of unpaid parking tickets. “Mandela Barnes can’t follow laws as basic as paying parking tickets or property taxes, and his own campaign...
    Three months before Election Day, James Barnes teleconferenced into a strategy meeting about how, exactly, to persuade people not to vote for Donald Trump. The 32-year-old wore his hair loosely gathered in a man bun and had the sober expression of someone who, as a hazard of his occupation, thinks about the president nearly all the time. Other faces popped up on his monitor, offering glimpses into millennial apartments, until someone started a screen share. They were here to review a series of video testimonials by conservatives who had decided to oppose Trump. Barnes and his colleagues wanted to know which ones resonated most with prospective voters on Facebook. Were testimonials from men or women more effective? Midwesterners or Southerners? How many viewers made it past the first 15 seconds? October 2020. Subscribe to WIRED. Barnes, who works at the political nonprofit Acronym, attends these meetings every week. His team has two goals—to nudge voters away from Trump and to close what he politely calls the “enthusiasm gap” for Joe Biden. Using a custom-built tool dubbed Barometer, they micro-­target “movable”...
    Vice presidential hopeful Kamala Harris had an awkward moment during a campaign event in Wisconsin, describing the state as “part of her story,” while avoiding reporters. The moment happened during an in-person campaign event Monday with Black, Milwaukee-based business leaders when the state’s Lieutenant Gov. Mandela Barnes tried to turn the microphone to her to take questions from the press. Harris had already given remarks on the “dignity of work,” a theme of the campaign, and Barnes figured the vice presidential hopeful would be answering questions as reporters bemoan a lack of access to the Biden campaign. “We are very honored, proud and lucky to have Sen., soon-to-be vice president, Harris with us today, and I will pass it back over to you. I know you want to take some questions before you get out of here,” Lt. Governor Mandela Barnes said before reaching over and offering the microphone to Harris. Before Harris could take it from Barnes, a member of Harris’ staff could be heard saying, “Oh, I think we’re all set.” “Thank you all, we’re all set....
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