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    by Brent Addleman The picture for Connecticut’s November general election cleared with Tuesday’s primary. The Election Day turnout of 20.37% cast ballots to determine who qualifies for the November election for one U.S. Senate seat, five U.S. House seats, and the state’s secretary of state and treasurer. In the lone U.S. Senate race, according to Ballotpedia, Democratic incumbent Richard Blumenthal ran unopposed in the primary and advances to November, where he will face Leora Levy, the Republican primary winner, and independents Andrew Hyduchak and Kristi Talmadge. On the Republican ticket, Levy garnered 46,665 votes (50.5%), besting challengers Themis Klarides (37,017 votes, or 40.1%) and Peter Lumaj (8,643, or 9.4%). In the U.S. House races, five incumbent Democrats ran unopposed in respective districts and advanced. They are John Larson, District 1; Joe Courtney, District 2; Rose DeLauro, District 3; Jim Himes, District 4; and Jahana Hayes, District 5. Four Republicans challenged and ran unopposed: Larry Lazor, District 1; Mike France, District 2; Lesley DeNardis, District 3; and George Logan, District 5. In District 4, Jayme Stevenson (9,961 votes, or 60.31%) defeated Michael Goldstein...
    Former President Donald Trump has endorsed Leora Levy, a Republican candidate who is running for US Senate in Connecticut and has vowed to "beat back" Democratic Sen. Richard Blumenthal. Levy is running against Themis Klarides and Peter Lumaj in the Republican primary election, which is set for Tuesday, Aug. 9. Trump gave his endorsement on Thursday, Aug. 4. If elected, Levy said she would "beat back" Blumenthal, a Democrat who first assumed office in 2011. Trump has clashed with Blumenthal numerous times over the years, as detailed in a 2019 report from Politico. "Thank you President Trump! I’m honored to have your COMPLETE and TOTAL endorsement!" Levy tweeted on Thursday, Aug. 4. "I’m the ONLY candidate who can Beat Back Blumenthal and hold Joe Biden accountable." Levy, age 65, who lives in Greenwich, was born in Havana, Cuba, according to Balltopedia, which noted she served as the finance chair of the Connecticut gubernatorial campaigns of Tom Foley and Bob Stefanowski, She was nominated by Trump to be United States Ambassador to Chile in September 2019. But the then Republican-controlled Senate never voted on...
    Former President Donald Trump endorsed Connecticut Republican Leora Levy Thursday in her primary race for the U.S. Senate seat occupied by career Democrat Senator Richard Blumenthal (D-CT). “Leora Levy is running to represent the Great State of Connecticut in the United States Senate,” Trump said in the statement regarding his endorsement. Thank you President Trump! I’m honored to have your COMPLETE and TOTAL endorsement! I’m the ONLY candidate who can Beat Back Blumenthal and hold Joe Biden accountable. Help us win BIG on Tuesday! >> https://t.co/HQAYkYZ51l #ctsen #ctpol pic.twitter.com/0RDeEqllC9 — Leora Levy (@LeoraLevyCT) August 5, 2022 “The current Senator is a mocked and laughed at fool, who said for many years that he was a brave war hero in Vietnam, when the facts later revealed that he had never even been to Vietnam,” the former president continued about Blumenthal, and added: Blumenthal stated, over and over again, that he had watched men die by his side as he fought in battle, talked and bragged about it incessantly, and yet it was all a total hoax and “con job,”...
    Former Connecticut State Representative Themis Klarides touted her 22 years as a state lawmaker and her support for abortion and gun control as she faced off against two conservative Republican candidates during a GOP primary debate for the U.S. Senate seat currently occupied by career Democrat Senator Richard Blumenthal. Klarides’ liberal positions on several issues, portrayed as being acceptable for Connecticut Republicans, clashed with those of Greenwich fundraiser and former trader Leora Levy and immigration attorney Peter Lumaj. “I have served 22 years in the state legislature,” Klarides, the state GOP’s endorsed candidate, said Tuesday during the debate hosted by News 8 Hartford. “I’m the only candidate here that has ever been elected to office. I fought in the trenches for the people of Connecticut.” Republicans have been the minority party during Klarides’ career in the Connecticut legislature. While all three candidates agreed Blumenthal’s views represent the radical left Democrat Party, which has given the United States record inflation and unprecedented illegal immigration, they battled on issues that are important to many Republican-Americans. “You want to talk about Dick Blumenthal?”...
    (The Center Square) – A public hearing pertaining to rising health care costs is the focus of a new call from Connecticut's Senate and House leadership. Republican legislative leaders in both chambers renewed a call for a public hearing to be held at the Capitol that would focus on proposed health insurance rate filings next year for individual and small group markets. Proposed rate increases, according to the release, average more than 20%. Earlier this week, Republicans penned a letter to Gov. Ned Lamont and Insurance Department Commissioner Andrew N. Mais, according to the release, urging the duo to schedule the public hearing to discuss the estimated increases in health care insurance. Senate Republican Leader Kevin Kelly, R-Stratford, House Republican Leader Vincent Candelora, R-North Branford, and Seante Republican Leader Pro Tempore Paul Formica, R-Easy Lyme, said the proposed rate increases need to be addressed. “The proposed health insurance rate increases are outrageous, unacceptable, but sadly not surprising in a state where inflation surges and those in power have rejected solutions year after year to make...
    by Brent Addleman   A public hearing pertaining to rising health care costs is the focus of a new call from Connecticut’s Senate and House leadership. Republican legislative leaders in both chambers renewed a call for a public hearing to be held at the Capitol that would focus on proposed health insurance rate filings next year for individual and small group markets. Proposed rate increases, according to the release, average more than 20%. Earlier this week, Republicans penned a letter to Gov. Ned Lamont and Insurance Department Commissioner Andrew N. Mais, according to the release, urging the duo to schedule the public hearing to discuss the estimated increases in health care insurance. Senate Republican Leader Kevin Kelly, R-Stratford, House Republican Leader Vincent Candelora, R-North Branford, and Senate Republican Leader Pro Tempore Paul Formica, R-Easy Lyme, said the proposed rate increases need to be addressed. “The proposed health insurance rate increases are outrageous, unacceptable, but sadly not surprising in a state where inflation surges and those in power have rejected solutions year after year to make health care more affordable,” the Republican...
    The nonpartisan Cook Political Report updated its analysis of congressional races this week to indicate 10 contests have a heightened chance of favoring Republicans, including two races in Connecticut. Cook previously deemed Connecticut’s 2nd Congressional District, now held by Democrat Joe Courtney, “Solid D[emocratic]”; the journal now considers the district “Likely D.” And the state’s 5th Congressional District, represented by Jahana Hayes, was moved from “Likely D” to “Lean D.”  Courtney unseated moderate Republican Rob Simmons in 2006 by a razor-thin margin of 91 votes. In 2020 he won his district — which includes New London, Norwich and Mansfield — by 21 percent, while Joe Biden’s presidential campaign carried it by 10 fewer points.  Cook’s David Wasserman, however, commented that Courtney “hasn’t faced a credible opponent in 16 years” and may find State Representative Mike France (R-Ledyard) an especially formidable challenger. France is a submarine engineer who served in the U.S. Navy and reported having $116,000 in his campaign bank account at the end of March.  Hayes, a teacher first elected to Congress less than four years ago, represents a...
    While Democratic officials met news of Connecticut’s boosted credit rating effusively on Tuesday, Republicans drew attention to new survey results showing on-the-ground feelings about the economy overall aren’t so rosy.  Standard & Poor’s (S&P), a major New York City-based credit-rating agency, assigned the state’s general obligation bonds a “positive” outlook; before, the rating was merely “stable.” S&P attributed its upgrade to the state projecting it will accumulate a $3.31-billion fund balance in the next fiscal year, amounting to 15 percent of appropriations. “Credit rating upgrades aren’t that jazzy,” Governor Ned Lamont (D) tweeted in response to the news. “However, we’ve received five rating increases since early 2021 – worth pointing out … . We’re transforming CT’s narrative from ‘fiscal crisis’ to ‘fiscal turnaround,’ and doing it while still investing in our kids, families, and economy.” State Representative Matt Blumenthal (D-Stamford) was equally elated about the rating jump.  “Our responsible budgeting has led to yet another credit-rating upgrade,” the legislator proclaimed in a Twitter post. “This is not just a vote of confidence in our finances — it will save taxpayers...
    Themis Klarides received the endorsement of the Connecticut Republican Party last week for nomination to unseat Democratic Senator Richard Blumenthal, but fellow Republicans Leora Levy and Peter Lumaj got sufficient backing at the nominating convention to pursue primary campaigns. Both Levy, a businesswoman, and Lumaj, a former secretary of state hopeful and former gubernatorial candidate, are running to the right of Klarides, a former minority leader of the state House of Representatives who has voted for gun-control legislation and favors abortion rights. Levy and Lumaj oppose both. Insofar as this year’s election will be decided amidst the expected overturning of the 1973 Supreme Court case Roe v. Wade which legalized abortion, Klarides could find her position on abortion a liability in the primary, though possibly an asset in a blue-state general election.  During Connecticut’s GOP Convention, Republican National Committee Chair Ronna McDaniel voiced her support for Levy in an email, calling the candidate “a trusted friend, respected public servant, and great American.”  Levy and Lumaj have aligned themselves more closely with former President Donald Trump than has Klarides, who reportedly...
    A Connecticut bill that would protect abortion access comes as GOP-dominated states enact new restrictions in anticipation of the Supreme Court overturning Roe v. Wade. The Connecticut House of Representatives passed a bipartisan bill this week that could transform the state into a sanctuary for legal abortion and effectively combat laws banning abortion in other states.   As a growing number of conservative-led state legislatures across the country introduce and pass anti-abortion laws, Connecticut lawmakers moved to protect women's reproductive rights. If the U.S. Supreme Court overturns the landmark Roe v. Wade decision this summer, 26 states are likely to ban abortion, according to an analysis by the Guttmacher Institute. "Expanding access and protecting reproductive rights in Connecticut has never been more important," Democratic state Rep. Christine Palm said in a statement on April 20. "I was proud to be a co-sponsor of HB 5414, which will protect Connecticut residents, including abortion providers, from the vigilantism being encouraged by such bills as Texas' S.B. 8 and Missouri's H.B. 2810 (which even criminalizes a woman experiencing a dangerous ectopic pregnancy)."  House Bill...
    Connecticut Republican gubernatorial candidate Bob Stefanowski announced Tuesday at Fairfield Town Hall that he has picked Deputy House Minority Leader Laura Devlin (R-Fairfield) as his running mate.  Stefanowski is challenging Governor Ned Lamont’s (D) bid for re-election. A former chief executive officer of the Dollar Financial Group who previously worked for General Electric, the Republican candidate touted Devlin’s background as an entrepreneur before she became a legislator in 2015.  “Like me, Laura’s an outsider,” he said. “She found her way to politics wanting to put her professional skills to work to make a difference where she and her family lived.” Before her first election to the General Assembly, Devlin served on Fairfield’s Board of Assessment Appeals and on its Representative Town Meeting, representing District 3. At Tuesday’s press conference, she underscored Nutmeggers’ struggles with inflation, business owners’ difficulty finding employees, and residents’ shouldering of burdensome state and local taxes as problems she and her running mate want to address. (State and local taxes together claim almost 13 percent of residents’ earnings, making Connecticut’s combined tax take the second-highest in the...
    Democrat incumbent U.S. Representative Jahana Hayes recently intimated to supporters in a Zoom call that her black GOP opponent was only in the campaign because of his race. Hayes also recently told supporters that if she loses her race in November, then Democrats all around the country are in trouble. Sources tell The Connecticut Star that Hayes is feeling the pressure in Connecticut’s highly competitive 5th Congressional District contest. Hayes, who is also black, said to supporters on the call, “There’s this idea that the only reason I got elected is because white liberals felt super sorry and guilty and voted for me so just give them any other African American and they’ll vote for this person all the same.” Hayes Republican challenger, former State Senator George Logan, fired back. “It is disheartening to hear these remarks from Congresswoman Hayes, boiling this campaign down to skin color,” he said. “Perpetuating a narrative that says candidates of color are defined by how they look rather than what they’ve accomplished is dangerous.” “I’m running for Congress because I believe my life experiences,...
    Former Connecticut House Republican Leader Themis Klarides received the endorsement of 47 current state lawmakers this week for her U.S. Senate bid. This compounds an already strong showing of support Klarides has boasted among party leaders and committee members across the state. Should she secure her party’s nomination in the August 9 primary, she will face 10-year incumbent Senator Richard Blumenthal (D) in November.  Klarides’s successor as House Minority Leader Vin Candelora (R-North Branford) and other former General Assembly colleagues touted what they see as the candidate’s strong budgetary experience. They also praised her economically conservative perspective, which they said would help to correct what they consider harmful Leftist policies pursued by Blumenthal and President Joe Biden that have exacerbated inflation. “Themis Klarides knows what it takes to fight and win when it counts the most,” Candelora said in a statement. “Washington is in desperate need of someone with the leadership abilities, courage, and principles that Themis embodies. Connecticut needs a fighter in Washington who will hold this administration accountable for their poor leadership and failed policies. Themis is the...
    A former top-ranking Republican Connecticut state lawmaker announced on Sunday that she would be running against Sen. Richard Blumenthal (D-Conn.) in the upcoming midterm election. Themis Klarides, the former House Minority Leader in the Connecticut House of Representatives, announced on WTNH's "This Week in Connecticut" that she will be running to be the GOP nominee in the race. Speaking to WTNH's chief political anchor Dennis House, Klarides cited "the palpable dysfunction and the palpable disgust of the dysfunction in Washington D.C." as part of her reason for running. Klarides had been expected to be run for governor before making the switch to the Senate race, House noted. Klarides said she was taken aback by the "how upset they are — Republicans and Democrats alike — with what's going on in Washington" as part of her reason for running. "After hearing all that I started to say to myself, 'We have United States senator who's up for reelection this November and is he just going to get a pass?' He needs to explain to people why he votes almost 100 percent of the time with the...
    Connecticut Republican Bob Stefanowski The Daily Kos Elections Morning Digest is compiled by David Nir, Jeff Singer, Stephen Wolf, Daniel Donner, and Carolyn Fiddler, with additional contributions from David Jarman, Steve Singiser, James Lambert, David Beard, and Arjun Jaikumar. Leading Off ● CT-Gov: Wealthy businessman Bob Stefanowski, a Connecticut Republican who lost the 2018 gubernatorial race 49-46 to Democrat Ned Lamont, announced Wednesday that he was launching his long-awaited bid for a rematch and had made an "initial investment of $10 million" into his new campaign. Lamont, for his part, self-funded almost his entire effort last time, and the CT Mirror's Mark Pazniokas reports the incumbent "plans to do so again this year." No Connecticut governor has lost re-election since 1954, when Democrat Abraham Ribicoff narrowly dispatched Republican John Lodge. Before Stefanowski can focus on taking on Lamont, though, he may need to get past former state House Minority Leader Themis Klarides in the August primary. Klarides has yet to officially enter the race, though she's spent heavily on polling and has been publishing anti-Lamont op-eds; the Hartford Courant adds...
    A former digital director for the GOP in Connecticut has moved to Florida and is now appearing in pornographic videos, according to a new report. The New York Post reported that 33-year-old Patrice Thibodeau said he worked for the Connecticut Republican Party from January 2018 to December 2019 and later reported working for Project Veritas. In November of 2021, he started promoting his pornhub.com videos on his Twitter account, the report said. Thibodeau told the NY Post he made the career change because "it's liberating." Read the full report from the New York Post here.
    HARTFORD, Conn. (AP) — Since the coronavirus pandemic hit, a pair of politically conservative lawyers has become the go-to team for groups seeking to sue Connecticut over the school mask mandate, restrictions on bars and restaurants, and other aspects of the governor’s emergency executive orders. The two men, Doug Dubitsky and Craig Fishbein, are also Republican members of the state General Assembly. That arrangement has brought criticism from some Democrats, but ethics officials who have reviewed it say it doesn’t violate state laws. As long as being a legislator is part-time work in Connecticut, they say, officials are entitled to have other jobs to pay their bills. “It’s just an odd one to sue the state you represent, that you’re duly elected to represent,” said House Speaker Matt Ritter, a Democrat from Hartford and a private attorney. “I wouldn’t change the statute. I just personally would not sue the state of Connecticut as a lawyer, as a legislator.” Dubitsky’s private and public roles appeared to overlap last month when a woman testifying before the legislature’s Conservative Caucus accused...
    The chairman of the Connecticut Republican Party is condemning his state’s Democrat U.S. senators for failing to openly condemn what he referred to as President Joe Biden’s “horrific failure” in Afghanistan, one that led to “a total Taliban takeover.” Chairman Ben Proto said in a press statement Sens. Chris Murphy (D-CT) and Richard Blumenthal (D-CT) have “failed a test of leadership at this critical moment in history.” “The colossal disaster unfolding in Afghanistan demands an investigation and accountability of the Biden administration,” Proto said. “Lack of leadership from Biden and his Democrat allies has led to a humanitarian, foreign policy, and national security catastrophe.” Seeing as you are a member of the Foreign Relations Committee, you really shouldnt be stunned. You knew Biden was ignoring the military experts & the intel. *Now* you act surprised. Be a professional. Take responsibility. You guys blew it. #AfghanistanCrisis #BidenFailure https://t.co/UhbhfsAY8o — CT GOP (@CTGOP) August 21, 2021 As the state Republican chairman observed, both Murphy and Blumenthal serve on critical committees in the Senate that scrutinize intelligence and provide essential information to the...
    A Republican special election win in a Connecticut state Senate district that broke for President Joe Biden by double digits is an encouraging sign for Republicans looking to repeat the success in this year’s state-level elections and in the 2022 midterm elections. Ryan Fazio, an investment analyst, won a Tuesday special election for Connecticut’s Greenwich-area 36th State Senate District special election by 2.6%, flipping the seat to Republican control. Greenwich, on the state’s southern tip bordering New York, broke for Biden by 25 points in the 2020 election. The district has about 3% more Democrats than Republicans. CENSUS HIGHLIGHTS VIRGINIA SHIFTS THAT CHALLENGE REPUBLICANS IN GOVERNOR’S RACE AND BEYOND It marks the first state legislative seat to flip control after the 2020 election and puts the Democratic state Senate majority one vote short of being able to override gubernatorial vetoes. “In our race, we focused relentlessly on state and local issues,” Fazio told the Washington Examiner. “I think the voters were frustrated with the direction of our state government, which was too extreme...
    In what could be an indicator of things to come in the 2022 mid-term election, the GOP flipped a state senate seat in a Connecticut special election on Tuesday night – the first flip for either party in 2021. The Republican State Leadership Committee (RSLC) announced in an email: State Republicans tonight delivered the first flip of a state legislative seat in a special election by either party in 2021, as Republican Ryan Fazio defeated liberal Democrat Alex Gevanter in Connecticut’s state Senate District 36 – a district Joe Biden won by more than 25% in 2020. RSLC President Dee Duncan hailed the moment as a sign that the “people of Connecticut are sick and tired” of the Democratic Party’s radical agenda: After holding the line in two Biden-won districts in New England early this year, our momentum continues tonight with the first successful flip of the 2021-2022 election cycle. Congratulations to Ryan Fazio on running a strong campaign. His victory demonstrates that the people of Connecticut are sick and tired of the radical tax and spend agenda coming from Democrats in Hartford and in Washington, D.C....
    By SUSAN HAIGH, Associated Press Connecticut Republicans have been rallying public opposition against legislation proposed by the top state Senate Democrat that would create a new, statewide tax on commercial and residential real property. In recent days, the state GOP, as well as individual lawmakers, have ramped up their public resistance to the bill offered by Senate President Pro Tem Martin Looney of New Haven. The General Assembly's Finance Revenue and Bonding Committee is scheduled to hold a public hearing Monday on that and other tax-related bills. “Democrats call this a ‘mansion tax.’ But in reality it’s another tax on middle-class families," the Connecticut Republican Party said in a mass email sent Saturday, urging supporters to submit testimony opposing the legislation. The email warned that “money would go directly to the state, not to your town or city, and the state would distribute your tax dollars to places like Hartford and New Haven.” Looney has proposed several local property tax reforms bills during this year's legislative session to address what he calls disparate and unequal local taxation across Connecticut. Under...
    NEW HAVEN, Conn. (AP) — More than 5,000 Connecticut Republicans left the political party in the six weeks after the Jan. 6 breach of the Capitol, according to a published report. That is far more than the number of Democrats who changed their affiliation, the New Haven Register reported. In all, 5,302 Republicans left the party, or slightly more than 1% of the state's roughly 484,000 GOP voters registered on Jan. 6. In contrast, 1,957 Democrats left their party, or about .2% of the 856,559 registered in the state. Republican voters interviewed by the newspaper who had left the party in January and February gave a variety of reasons, including the party's support for former President Donald Trump and his claims of election fraud; general political polarization and a fear of backlash over being associated with the Republican party. “It really doesn’t boil down to any of the candidates. I just felt there became a real viciousness on both sides regarding party allegiance,” Lisa Purdy, a Fairfield resident who runs an insurance company, told the newspaper. Most of the voters...
    HARTFORD, Conn. (AP) — Connecticut Republicans have chosen Sue Hatfield, a state prosecutor and vice chair of the state GOP, to finish the remainder of J.R. Romano's term as chairman. Members of the Connecticut Republican State Central Committee on Monday night elected Hatfield following a four-way race. She will hold the position until June, when Romano's term was scheduled to expire. “I look forward to bringing much-needed stability, and will work hard to unify our party, at this critical time,” Hatfield said in a written statement. “We are at an important crossroads.” Romano informed state Republicans on Jan. 12 that he was ending his third two-year term six months early. He did not give specific reasons for his resignation during an interview, saying only, “It’s time for someone new. It’s time for a new voice.” Hatfield, who lives in Pomfret, was the party’s nominee for attorney general in 2018. She ultimately lost to Democratic Attorney General William Tong. Hatfield has served as as state prosecutor with the state Division of Criminal Justice since 2005. Copyright 2021 The Associated Press. All rights...
    Connecticut’s Republican state auditor was found dead in his home Friday evening, according to former colleagues and local reports. Robert Kane, 54, was found after relatives requested a wellness check. “I am saddened to hear about the sudden passing of Rob Kane, State Auditor and former state Senator, who worked on behalf of Connecticut residents for more than a decade,” Lt. Gov. Susan Bysiewicz tweeted Friday night. “My heart breaks for his family. My thoughts and prayers are with them during this difficult time.” Police said family members told them they had not heard from him all day. Additional details about his death were not immediately available. Police said family members told them they had not heard from him all day. Additional details about his death were not immediately available. He was a father of two, according to his bio on the state’s website. “A lot of friends of his, in and out of politics, are reaching out to one another, trying to make sense of it all. … I will miss him dearly,” former state Rep. Brian Flaherty, who is also...
    Connecticut’s Republican state auditor was found dead in his home Friday evening, according to former colleages and local reports. Robert Kane, 54, was found after relatives requested a wellness check. "I am saddened to hear about the sudden passing of Rob Kane, State Auditor and former state Senator, who worked on behalf of Connecticut residents for more than a decade," Lt. Gov. Susan Bysiewicz tweeted Friday night. "My heart breaks for his family. My thoughts and prayers are with them during this difficult time." Police said family members told them they had not heard from him all day. Additional details about his death were not immediately available. CONNECTICUT COLD CASE MURDER SOLVED VIA DNA EVIDENCE The former state senator’s chief accomplishment as a legislator was the Safe Harbor for Exploited Children Act, which aimed to protect minors who have been victims of human trafficking and increased penalties for traffickers. (CT Senate Republicans) He was a father of two, according to his bio on the state’s website. "A lot of friends of his, in and out of politics, are reaching...
    Connecticut GOP House Rep. Craig Fishbein was declared the loser in the race for his seat until a town clerk found an “error” had caused the race to be called for his Democrat opponent. Wallingford town clerk Barbara Thompson said Tuesday her office discovered that votes had not been recorded in the state’s reporting system from Yalesville Elementary School, reported CT Mirror. The school is one of nine polling places in the 90th House District that includes Wallingford and Cheshire. “I can’t answer if it was a clerical error or a computer error in the elections management system,” Thompson said. “All I know is we caught it yesterday and amended it.” As of Wednesday morning, unofficial results on the secretary of state’s elections website showed incumbent Fishbein ahead of challenger Jim Jinks, but, according to the Mirror, a recount will be conducted Thursday because of a margin of less than 0.50 percent. “There’s no circumstance when an error like that is not caught and corrected,” Gabe Rosenberg, a spokesman for the secretary of the state, said. The Mirror further reported: Normally...
    After 15 terms in Congress, Rep. Rosa DeLauro (D-CT), a longstanding ally of House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-CA), is facing an aggressive challenge for her seat by real estate executive Margaret Streicker (R). “We have a representative in office who has fundamentally failed to reach across the aisle and has voted 100% of the time with Nancy Pelosi this cycle,” Streicker said during a debate Thursday hosted by WTNH-TV, the Hartford Courant reported. “It’s not OK that the voices of Connecticut are not being heard.” Streicker, a wealthy real estate developer, has invested a total of $1.6 million in her campaign to unseat DeLauro in the state’s 3rd district, reported the CT Mirror. Her campaign website states that, among her priorities, is the fact that Connecticut “pays the 4th highest property taxes and 2nd highest combined sales and income taxes in the nation.” “The national economy is booming yet we still don’t see the growth here at home,” the campaign adds. Streicker shares a similar view to David X. Sullivan, a Republican running to unseat Democrat U.S. Rep. Jahana Hayes in...
    In a move that made news throughout Connecticut last week, the daughter of the Nutmeg States late and much-revered Democratic Gov. Ella Grasso endorsed Republican State Rep. Devin Carney for reelection. "As the daughter of Ella Grasso, it is no surprise I am a staunch Democrat," declared Susanne Grasso, who lives in the 23rd District which includes Lyme, Old Saybrook, and Westbrook. "But I will be proudly splitting my ticket and casting a vote for Devin Carney." That blessing packs a punch in a state where there is an Ella Grasso Turnpike, the Ella Grasso Technical High School, an Ella Grasso Boulevard, and numerous other monuments to the first woman in U.S. history to be elected governor without following her husband. Grasso, who also served as U.S. representative, was governor from 1974-80 and died of cancer six weeks after resigning from office. She is warmly remembered for her tough-minded governance and especially for getting her state through the 30-inches of snow that came in the blizzard of February 1978. Three-term legislator Carney also has some notable lineage: he is the...
    A TV sports reporter was fired on Wednesday after he called Republican Sen. Tim Scott (S.C.) an "Uncle Tom." Fred Gerteiny, a sports reporter for the News 12 Connecticut network, wrote the racial slur in a since-deleted post on Twitter. Gerteiny replied to a tweet by The Hill's Twitter account that linked to an article about Scott commenting on President Donald Trump's remarks during the first presidential debate regarding the Proud Boys. Gerteiny wrote, "Thanks Uncle Tom," in the now-deleted tweet. deleted, but the List comes for all, @FredGerteiny. ✍????✍????✍???? https://t.co/2ktrow7JuM — Siraj Hashmi (@Siraj Hashmi)1601492251.0On Wednesday, Gerteiny issued an apology on his Twitter account, which has since been deleted. "Earlier today, I tweeted a racially insensitive comment, when I referred to @SenatorTimScott as an 'Uncle Tom.' I apologize to the Senator, my colleagues @News12CT, and anyone else I may have offended with this deeply offensive tweet," Gerteiny wrote. Gerteiny, who is white, claimed that he also "wrote an email to Senator Scott" to apologize for the comment. Gerteiny was fired by News...
    HBO comic John Oliver attacked the city of Danbury, Connecticut, recently, ranting, “If you’re going to forget a town in Connecticut, why not forget Danbury? Because, and this is true, f*** Danbury!” Oliver then cited its “charming railway museum” and “historic Hearthstone Castle” before sniping, “Danbury, Connecticut can eat my whole a**.” He added, “If you’re from there, you have a standing invite to come get a thrashing from John Oliver, children included, f*** you.” On Saturday, the GOP mayor of Danbury got even, announcing on Facebook that the city’s sewage plant would be renamed the “John Oliver Memorial Sewer Plant” because “it’s full of crap like you.” Mayor Mark Boughton, standing in front of the plant, stated: Hi. I’m Mayor Mark Boughton of the city of Danbury, Connecticut. You know, last week John Oliver had us on his show, and he pointed three important points of interest of Danbury: one, was our wonderful railway museum, and we agree with that; two, was our great castle, and we certainly agree with that, and then three, was that we were once...
    By SUSAN HAIGH, Associated Press HARTFORD, Conn. (AP) — Justin Anderson, a lieutenant colonel in the Connecticut Army National Guard, emerged as the winner Tuesday following a recount in a Republican congressional primary in which his opponent dropped out the race following a domestic violence arrest. Anderson, 49, is a retired state correctional officer and member of the East Haddam Planning and Zoning Commission who recently left his job as a state intelligence operations specialist. In November he will face U.S. Rep. Joe Courtney, a Democrat who has represented the eastern Connecticut district since 2007. His opponent, Thomas Gilmer, was charged the night before the Aug. 11 primary election with first-degree unlawful restraint and second-degree strangulation and dropped out of the race the following day. The charges stem from a May 2017 attack on a former girlfriend and July 22 interview with the victim, according to Wethersfield police. The initial results were close enough to trigger an automatic recount. Final results showed Anderson was the winner Tuesday, according to the secretary of the state's office. On the weekend before the...
    A Republican candidate for Congress accused of domestic assault dropped out of the race on Monday, Aug. 10 - the night before the primary election. Thomas Gilmer, 29, of Madison, was arrested Monday, Aug. 10, and charged with first-degree unlawful restraint and second-degree strangulation, police said. He posted a $5,000 bond and is expected to be in court Tuesday, Aug. 11, police said. The Connecticut GOP confirmed Aug. 11 that Gilmer had been arrested and dropped out of the race. “With the severity of the accusations Mr. Gilmer has ended his campaign,” the CT GOP said. Gilmer had been running against Justin Anderson, of East Haddam, to represent Eastern Connecticut. The winner of the primary race would face U.S. Rep. Joe Courtney, a Democrat, in the November election. The assault for which Gilmer was arrested happened on July 22, police said. 
    Connecticut – District 1 0 of 135 precincts – 0 percent -Open Mary Fay, 0 – 0 percent Jim Griffin, 0 – 0 percent Connecticut – District 2 0 of 145 precincts – 0 percent -Open Thomas Gilmer, 0 – 0 percent Justin Anderson, 0 – 0 percent Connecticut – District 3 -Open Margaret Streicker, Uncontested Connecticut – District 4 -Open Jonathan Riddle, Uncontested Connecticut – District 5 -Open David Sullivan, Uncontested Minnesota – District 1 Jim Hagedorn (i), Uncontested Minnesota – District 2 -Open Tyler Kistner, Uncontested Minnesota – District 3 0 of 249 precincts – 0 percent -Open Leslie Davis, 0 – 0 percent Kendall Qualls, 0 – 0 percent Minnesota – District 4 0 of 225 precincts – 0 percent -Open Sia Lo, 0 – 0 percent Gene Rechtzigel, 0 – 0 percent Minnesota – District 5 0 of 238 precincts – 0 percent -Open Dalia Al-Aqidi, 0 – 0 percent Lacy Johnson, 0 – 0 percent Danielle Stella, 0 – 0 percent Minnesota – District 6 0 of 281 precincts – 0 percent Tom Emmer...
    By SUSAN HAIGH, Associated Press HARTFORD, Conn. (AP) — With the state's Aug. 11 primary fast approaching, some Republican congressional candidates have been bucking conventional wisdom it will be difficult to run in Democratic-leaning Connecticut on an outspoken conservative message this November. Instead, they argue that they're resonating with a large number of silent voters concerned by what they see as efforts to move the country drastically to the far political left. They've often used words like “socialist," “radical” or “leftist” in their campaigns to describe Democratic policies and the political positions of the five incumbent Democratic members of the U.S. House of Representatives, all of whom are all seeking re-election. Jonathan Riddle, the endorsed Republican in the 4th Congressional District who doesn't face a primary challenge, recently accused four-term Democratic U.S. Rep. Jim Himes on Twitter of being a “Marxist in sheep’s clothing bent on supporting the Socialist agenda of Nancy Pelosi, AOC, and their far leftist squad," a reference to U.S. Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-New York, and three other freshman members of Congress. A message was left seeking...
    BANGOR, Maine (AP) — A group that has targeted Republican President Donald Trump with biting attacks is now going after Republican Sen. Susan Collins. A $1.1 million ad funded by the Lincoln Project accuses Collins of enabling Trump and contrasts her with GOP figures including her role model, the late Sen. Margaret Chase Smith, and her mentor, former Sen. William Cohen, the Bangor Daily News reported. Collins is facing her toughest reelection challenge from Democratic House Speaker Sara Gideon, who is beating her in fundraising. The Lincoln Project was founded by a group of former Republican political consultants. It has gotten money from both Republicans and Democrats and its biggest contribution this cycle is from Connecticut hedge fund manager Stephen Mandel, who has a long history of giving to Democrats, the newspaper reported. Copyright 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed. Tags: Connecticut, Maine
    Connecticut Republicans launched a Citizen Voter Fraud Task Force Thursday that seeks to put a stop to “decades of irresponsible Democrat leadership” that has led to a “voting system full of irregularities and bad data,” the state GOP chairman said. J.R. Romano outlined, as the state’s primary election approaches in August: Our voter rolls are a mess, with dead and moved voters remaining eligible to vote for years. Now Secretary of the State Denise Merrill has made an already bad system even worse by unilaterally sending tens of thousands of absentee ballot applications to voters across the state. If you see any Voter Fraud or get any absentee ballots for non eligible voters please text Fraud to 555888 or go to our website https://t.co/qTIGxdA2kG and Click on Voter [email protected] @RepTKlarides @CTGOPChair @SOTSMerrill @NedLamont #FreeElections #LeadRight pic.twitter.com/YgYU1H9Q0b — CT GOP (@CTGOP) July 9, 2020 The new task force comes as Merrill, a Democrat, sent out 1.2 million unsolicited absentee ballot applications to all Democrats and Republicans listed as active voters in the state, to be used for the August primary. Approximately...
    The Connecticut GOP called upon the “Democratic Party” to change its name Monday, issuing a resolution that asserts Democrats must address “the hundreds of years of racial oppression, violence, and multiple violations of human rights” associated with their party. “We believe it is vital that every citizen know the truth about the so-called party of inclusion and acceptance,” said the state GOP Chairman J.R. Romano in a press release. He continued: If we are to hold Christopher Columbus accountable over 500 years after the fact, it is our duty and moral obligation to hold the Democratic Party accountable. As recently as 1977, Joe Biden sought the support of segregationists. Biden has publicly stated that ‘you ain’t black’ unless you support the Democratic Nominee. Statements like this bring back the ugly imaginary of political cartoons like ‘Of Course He wants to vote Democrat Ticket.’” The resolution states Connecticut Republicans “deem it necessary that the Democratic Party change its name due to the Party’s long tragic legacy denying Americans basic human rights,” including: Democrats blocked the first attempt to ratify the...
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