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    Sen. Catherine Cortez Masto made history nearly six years ago as the first Latina elected to the U.S. Senate following a hard-fought, expensive race that she won by less than 3 percent. Her re-election is looking just as difficult and one demographic is especially key to maintaining her seat: Latinos. Republicans, emboldened by their gains with Latinos in South Texas and Florida in recent elections, are eying Nevada as their next opportunity to make inroads with a voting demographic that’s been trending in the right’s direction. GOP nominee and former Nevada Attorney General Adam Laxalt, through his “Latinos for Laxalt” coalition, is pitching those voters that his MAGA-brand candidacy is an opportunity for change. “The only thing we have to look forward to is that people are waking up to it,” Laxalt said at a Latinos-focused campaign stop in Las Vegas earlier this month, according to a dispatch from The Nevada Independent. “They’re throwing the Democrats off. They know these policies are dangerous and toxic for our kids, for our country.” But left-leaning Latino organizing groups and Cortez Masto’s campaign...
    With Yesenia Sanchez’s victory in the Alameda County sheriff’s race, the Bay Area now appears to poised to see two Latinas at the top of county law enforcement agencies — marking a first in California history after the upset victory of sheriff’s Captain Christina Corpus in San Mateo County last week. Sanchez — a sheriff’s office commander who has about 53% of the vote in Alameda County — joined Corpus in scoring an upset victory over her boss, four-term incumbent Greg Ahern. Ahern conceded Sanchez’s victory Wednesday night, Corpus, who like Sanchez ran a campaign on promises to inject new ideas into law enforcement, handily defeated incumbent San Mateo County Sheriff Carlos Bolanos last week, with 56% of the vote. “It took a lot of courage to do what we did,” Corpus said in an interview. “It’s hard when you’re going up against the machine, and when you’re going up against the status quo.” The results “speaks a lot for women and for Latina women — that we are a force to be reckoned with, and we did the unthinkable,”...
    Dr Strange is already one of the top-grossing movies of the year, with an A-list cast featuring Benedict Cumberbatch and Elizabeth Olsen. But the break-out star of the Marvel hit is 16-year-old Xóchitl Gomez, who is set to become a huge pull of the franchise. The teenager, who was born in Californian to Mexican parents, plays America Chavez in the 28th film within the Marvel Cinematic Universe. America is the MCU's first ever 'queer Latina superhero' and has the ability to punch star-shaped portals between parallel universes. It's a breakout role for Xóchitl (pronounced soh-chee), who gave up her role in Netflix's Babysitter's Club for a shot at superhero fame. Dr Strange is already one of the top-grossing movies of the year, with an A-list cast featuring Benedict Cumberbatch and Elizabeth Olsen. But the break-out star of the Marvel hit is 16-year-old Xóchitl Gomez, who is set to become a huge star of the franchise (pictured) Xochitl Gomez and Benedict Cumberbatch attend Sony Pictures' 'Spider-Man: No Way Home' premiere  One of the youngest ever actors to take to a main role in...
    LOS ANGELES -- An appeals court judge who is the daughter of Mexican immigrants was nominated Tuesday by Gov. Gavin Newsom as the first Latina to serve on the California Supreme Court.Patricia Guerrero, 50, of San Diego, grew up in the agricultural Imperial Valley and has worked as a federal prosecutor, law firm partner, Superior Court judge and now sits on the 4th District Court of Appeal."Her extraordinary journey and nomination to serve as the first Latina justice on the bench of our state's highest court is an inspiration to all of us and a testament to the California Dream's promise of opportunity for all to thrive, regardless of background or ZIP code," Newsom said in a statement.If confirmed, Guerrero would fill the vacancy left in October when Associate Justice Mariano-Florentino Cuéllar stepped down to become president of the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. Cuéllar was nominated to the court by former Gov. Jerry Brown, also a Democrat.The seven member court is currently made up of four justices nominated by Democrats and two by Republicans. Another Brown nominee, Justice Leondra...
    . Audris Rijo was the first finalist in the seventh season of Nuestra Belleza Latina Nuestra Belleza Latina has been full of all kinds of memorable moments, ranging from those tender memories that have revealed the most vulnerable side of the hundreds of young women who have gone through the reality show, to serious fights, dismissals and scandals. But throughout the 11 seasons of the beauty contest, undoubtedly one of the most remembered controversies has to do with the seventh edition, where the Dominican Audris Rijo, who eventually became the first finalist, after being defeated by the Salvadoran Marisela Demontecristo, was the center of a scandal, when in full competition, nude photographs of him began to circulate in networks. The photos generated a stir and although it was even thought that the young woman would be dismissed from the contest, the jury decided to support her and allowed her to continue in the show, with the support of the public’s votes. Play Audris Rijo – the scandal of her nude photos – Sal...
    A Colombian-born teacher is the first person of Hispanic descent to be named National Teacher of the Year in sixteen years.  The Council of Chief State School Officers announced last week that Juliana Urtubey, a special-education teacher at Kermit R. Booker Sr. Innovative Elementary School in Las Vegas, was chosen from a shortlist of state teachers. Urtubey is the first Latina National Teacher of the Year chosen since at least 2005 and the first National Teacher of the Year from Nevada, according to CCSSO. Urtubey “exemplifies the dedication, creativity and heart teachers bring to their students and communities," Nevada Superintendent of Public Instruction Jhone Ebert said in a press release. The First Lady Jill BidenJill BidenJennifer Garner to travel to West Virginia with Jill Biden Biden honors his mom on Mother's day: 'She was the quintessential lady' Jill Biden commends moms on Mother's Day for being 'strong and resilient' amid pandemic MORE surprised Urtubey with a bouquet of flowers in a surprise visit to her elementary school last week. WATCH: @FLOTUS Dr. Jill BidenJill BidenJennifer Garner to travel to West Virginia with Jill Biden Biden honors his...
    Natasha Lycia Ora Bannan speaks in an interview for LatinasRepresent about the underrepresentation of Latina lawyers. For years, prominent human rights attorney Natasha Lycia Ora Bannan has positioned herself as an advocate for Latinx communities, most recently identifying as a Puerto Rican woman from New York determined to aid the island and bring attention to the economic and humanitarian crises produced by colonization. Unbeknownst to many in the Latinx communities she worked alongside and claimed as her own, Bannan is a white woman who grew up in Georgia. Since at least 2006, she has accepted opportunities expressly intended for Latinas and other people of color. The 43-year-old, who is currently senior counsel at LatinoJustice Puerto Rican Legal Defense & Education Fund, has publicly identified as a Latina for years, though the specifics of her identity and origin story have shifted over time. News of Bannan’s misrepresentation comes on the heels of reports that Hillary “Hilaria” Baldwin spent more than a decade pretending to be from Spain. While the concept of “passing” originated with lighter-skinned African Americans who attempted to...
    She experienced homelessness at a young age. She worked several odd jobs throughout high school and college to make ends meet. A high school car accident left her with a chronic health condition. Now she’s running for Congress hoping to flip a red seat blue, and Candace Valenzuela thinks her story as a political outsider who overcame hardships will win over voters. “My story does resonate,” Valenzuela said in an interview with The Texas Tribune. “As soon as my constituents hear my story, it’s incredibly easy for them to relate.” Seemingly overnight, Valenzuela has become a new face of Democrats’ optimism for 2020. Six months ago, she was an underdog in the Democratic primary for Congressional District 24, a mostly suburban North Texas district that straddles parts of Dallas, Denton and Tarrant counties. Now, she’s being touted as a potential future star — someone who could win a seat long held by U.S. Rep. Kenny Marchant, a retiring Tea Party Republican, and become the first Black Latina elected to Congress. That Valenzuela is considered a viable candidate is another sign...
    Law enforcement officials are seen outside the home of federal judge Esther Salas, where her son was shot and killed and her defense attorney husband was critically injured, in North Brunswick, New Jersey, U.S. July 20, 2020. Eduardo Munoz/Reuters Authorities believe the suspect in the shooting of the family of US District Judge Esther Salas is a self-described anti-feminism activist Roy Den Hollander. Salas' 20-year-old son, Daniel Anderl, was killed in the incident, and her husband, Mark Anderl, was critically injured after the suspect opened fire in their home in North Brunswick, New Jersey. Den Hollander, who worked as a "men's rights" activist, railed against Salas in his self-published book, calling her "a lazy and incompetent Latina judge appointed by Obama," according to an NBC News report. On his website, Den Hollander referenced appointed officials by Obama as "Obamite bigots," and he complained of "feminist infested American judicial system" and the "feminarchy," NBC News reported. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. The suspect in a shooting at the home of US District Judge Esther Salas railed against...
    Candace Valenzuela secured the Democratic nomination in Texas' 24th Congressional District on Tuesday. If she wins the general election in November, Valenzuela would be the first Afro-Latina to be elected to Congress.  Valenzuela defeated retired Air Force Colonel Kim Olson in a runoff. Olson won the March 3 primary, but failed to cross the 50% vote threshold needed to avoid a runoff. Valenzuela will now face former Irving mayor Beth Van Duyne, a Republican, in the general election.  Valenzuela, who has received support from former presidential candidates Kamala Harris, Elizabeth Warren, Julián Castro and Cory Booker, talked about the importance of an Afro-Latina potentially representing a district she describes as diverse, young, suburban, majority-minority and well-educated.   Get Breaking News Delivered to Your Inbox "One of the things we're lacking here is representation exactly for those groups, for those groups who are younger or more diverse. It means that we have to have better conversations about what equity looks like," she during a Wednesday news conference. "Equity in our schools, which isn't fully there. Equity in our access to...
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