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    Supercharged by gusty thunderstorms and drought-ravaged trees, the McKinney Fire exploded over the weekend into California’s largest fire of 2022 — wiping out houses, sending 1,300 people fleeing for safety and forcing dozens of hikers to be rescued from the Pacific Crest Trail near the California-Oregon border. The blaze charred more than 51,000 acres as of Sunday morning and remained just 1% contained as it barreled out of control through the Klamath National Forest — a remote enclave northwest of Mt. Shasta that’s renowned for its fishing, white-water kayaking and rafting. And with scores of lightning strikes — some originating from its own billowing smoke plume — hitting around the central conflagration this weekend, firefighters warned thousands more to be ready to flee at a moment’s notice. At least 400 structures remained threatened by the blaze Sunday, which needed less than 48 hours to swell to twice the size of any other fire so far this year in California. But while temperatures eased slightly on Sunday and thunderstorms eased somewhat early Sunday afternoon, firefighters girded for another round of potentially...
    A wildfire near the California border with Oregon exploded overnight from 300 acres to an estimated 18,000 acres, prompting evacuation orders for nearby communities. The McKinney fire is burning through heavy, drought-stressed timber in steep terrain in the Klamath National Forest, about 10 miles west of Yreka, said Caroline Quintanilla, a public information officer. “It’s very active fire behavior at this point,” she said. Evacuation orders have been issued for multiple communities along the Klamath River. The dynamic situation forced firefighters to shift their efforts from controlling the perimeter of the fire to assisting with evacuations and defending structures, Quintanilla said. The fire started Friday afternoon on the south side of the Klamath River amid triple-digit heat. It was fanned by erratic winds from thunderstorms that moved through the area overnight, Quintanilla said. The cause of the fire remained under investigation. The National Weather Service has issued a red-flag warning for the area that’s in effect through Saturday, saying that scattered thunderstorms could result in abundant lightning striking critically dry vegetation.
    UPPER KLAMATH LAKE, Ore. (AP) — Farms that rely on irrigation from a depleted, federally managed lake on the California-Oregon border, along with a Native American tribe fighting to protect fragile salmon, will both receive greatly reduced amounts of water again this summer as a historic drought and record-low reservoir levels drag on in the U.S. West. More than 1,000 farmers and ranchers who draw water from a 257-mile-long (407-kilometer) river that flows from the Upper Klamath Lake to the Pacific Ocean will have access to roughly one-seventh the amount they could get in a wetter year, a federal agency announced Monday. Downstream salmon will receive about half the water they’d get if the reservoir was full. READ MORE: SF, LA Districts Attorneys File Suit Against Law Firm Over Alleged Fraudulent ADA LawsuitsIt’s the third year in a row that severe drought has impacted farmers, fish and tribes in a region where there’s not enough water to satisfy competing demands. The U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, which manages the irrigation project, announced $15 million in relief for affected farmers and $5 million...
    PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — Farms that rely on irrigation from a depleted, federally managed lake on the California-Oregon border, along with a Native American tribe fighting to protect fragile salmon, will both receive greatly reduced amounts of water again this summer as a historic drought and record-low reservoir levels drag on in the U.S. West. More than 1,000 farmers and ranchers who draw water from a 257-mile-long (407-kilometer) river that flows from the Upper Klamath Lake to the Pacific Ocean will have access to roughly one-seventh the amount they could get in a wetter year, a federal agency announced Monday. Downstream salmon will receive about half the water they’d get if the reservoir was full. It’s the third year in a row that severe drought has impacted farmers, fish and tribes in a region where there’s not enough water to satisfy competing demands. The U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, which manages the irrigation project, announced $15 million in relief for affected farmers and $5 million for Native American tribes as a result of its decision and warned farmers not to...
    Crews battling three fires in the far reaches of Northern California faced a sweltering holiday weekend even as they made some progress in stopping the flames’ spread across unforgiving terrain. Despite the threat of 100-degree temperatures and thunderstorms through the weekend near Mount Shasta and the Oregon border, fire officials were optimistic Saturday about further containing the blazes that have ripped through the remote region and forced thousands to evacuate. The Lava Fire, which broke out last week near Mount Shasta, has burned more than 24,000 acres and is about 26% contained. In a video update Saturday, Shasta-Trinity Forest Operations Section Chief Trainee Kerri Gilliland said that crews have fully wrangled the fire’s western spread near Highway 97, which stretches from the city of Weed to the Canadian border. To the east, however — near Whitney Creek and heading south toward Mount Shasta — hand crews, dozers and aircrafts are up against taxing mountainous terrain. Nearly 1,500 personnel are battling the Lava Fire in total. “This portion of the incident is very steep, very rugged terrain,” she said of the...
    'The impacts to our family farms and these rural communities will be off the scale,' said Klamath Irrigation District president Ty Kliewer. The water crisis along the California-Oregon border went from dire to catastrophic this week as federal regulators shut off irrigation water to farmers from a critical reservoir and said they would not send extra water to dying salmon downstream or to a half-dozen wildlife refuges that harbor millions of migrating birds each year. In what is shaping up to be the worst water crisis in generations, the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation said it will not release water this season into the main canal that feeds the bulk of the massive Klamath Reclamation Project, marking a first for the 114-year-old irrigation system. The agency announced last month that hundreds of irrigators would get dramatically less water than usual, but a worsening drought picture means water will be completely shut off instead. The entire region is in extreme or exceptional drought, according to federal monitoring reports, and Oregon's Klamath County...
    More On: california $2.5 million worth of meth hidden in watermelon shipment seized Friends search for LA woman who went to convention and never returned Durst jurors hear testimony about his ‘homicidal side’ Park ranger discovers 400-lb. ‘monster salmon,’ more in prehistoric fossil trove PORTLAND, Ore. — The water crisis along the California-Oregon border went from dire to catastrophic this week as federal regulators shut off irrigation water to farmers from a critical reservoir and said they would not send extra water to dying salmon downstream or to a half-dozen wildlife refuges that harbor millions of migrating birds each year. In what is shaping up to be the worst water crisis in generations, the US Bureau of Reclamation said it will not release water this season into the main canal that feeds the bulk of the massive Klamath Reclamation Project, marking a first for the 114-year-old irrigation system. The agency announced last month that hundreds of irrigators would get dramatically less water than usual, but a worsening drought picture means water will be completely shut off instead. The entire...
    Five rural Oregon counties voted on Tuesday to secede from the state of Oregon and join the state of Idaho. The Idaho Statesman reported: Thousands of people in eastern Oregon voted Tuesday for their elected officials to consider ditching their state and becoming part of Idaho. Voters in Sherman, Lake, Grant, Baker and Malheur counties all voted for ballot measures that would lead to them becoming Idahoans. People in Union and Jefferson counties had already voted in favor during the November election. . . The vote is only the first step of the “Greater Idaho” project, which would allow some Oregon counties to join a state that advocates say more closely aligns with their political preferences. Breitbart News reported in April that a political action committee and a new 501 c 4 non profit group are driving efforts that will allow rural counties in Oregon to join Idaho: Move Oregon’s Border is a Political Action Committee formed in 2019 that focuses on Oregon ballot initiatives. In March, Move Oregon’s Border founder Michael McCarter announced the establishment of a 501 c 4, Citizens for Greater Idaho, which will focus “on Idaho,...
    PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — The water crisis along the California-Oregon border went from dire to catastrophic this week as federal regulators shut off irrigation water to farmers from a critical reservoir and said they would not send extra water to dying salmon downstream or to a half-dozen wildlife refuges that harbor millions of migrating birds each year. In what is shaping up to be the worst water crisis in generations, the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation said it will not release water this season into the main canal that feeds the bulk of the massive Klamath Reclamation Project, marking a first for the 114-year-old irrigation system. The agency announced last month that hundreds of irrigators would get dramatically less water than usual, but a worsening drought picture means water will be completely shut off instead. READ MORE: Newsom Budget Targets Cleaning Up California; The State’s Too Damn Dirty The entire region is in extreme or exceptional drought, according to federal monitoring reports, and Oregon’s Klamath County is experiencing its driest year in 127 years. “This year’s drought conditions are bringing unprecedented...
    Joe Biden’s proposed tax hike to pay for his ‘human infrastructure’ bill will cost high-earning Americans in more than a dozen states upwards of 50% on their long-term capital gains and other qualified dividends. Nearly doubling the federal capital gains rate could discourage those making more than $1 million from investing in the stock market as it’s increased from 23.8% to 39.6%, which would lower the GDP by 0.1% and reduce federal revenue by around $124 billion over 10 years, according to the Tax Foundation. The current per state capital gains average is 29%, while the new rate Biden is proposing would make the average 48%. When local and state capital tax rates are combined with the new federal level, 13 states and Washington D.C. would have a combined rate above 50%. California, New York and New Jersey would have the highest rates at 56.7%, 54.3% and 54.2% respectively – and top combined rates in some localities would go even higher. New York City, for example, has a local capital gains rate of 3.87% – meaning an investor would pay...
    PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — Hundreds of farmers who rely on a massive irrigation project that spans the Oregon-California border learned Wednesday they will get a tiny fraction of the water they need amid the worst drought in decades, as federal regulators attempt to balance the needs of agriculture against federally threatened and endangered fish species that are central to the heritage of several tribes. Oregon’s governor said the prolonged drought in the region has the “full attention of our offices,” and she is working with congressional delegates, the White House and federal agencies to find relief for those affected. The U.S. Bureau of Reclamation briefed irrigators, tribes and environmental groups early Wednesday after delaying the decision a month. The federally owned irrigation project will draw 33,000 acre-feet of water from Upper Klamath Lake, which farmers said was roughly 8% of what they need in such a dry year. Water deliveries will also start June 1, two months later than usual, for the 1,400 irrigators who farm the 225,000 acres (91,000 hectares). “The simple fact is it just hasn’t rained or...
    This border crisis couldn’t have come at a worse time. As some media outlets and politicians focus attention on the plight of migrant children at our porous border with Mexico, one significant storyline is being mostly ignored. Thanks to the lax policies under the Biden administration, our open border lets cartels take better advantage of the drug legalization policies spreading in the Pacific Northwest. Drug culture threatens to consume the Pacific Northwest. I know the reality. I live here and have seen firsthand how it’s ravaged communities, worsened the homelessness crisis, and torn families apart. This is a crisis of our own making.  JASON RANTZ: SEATTLE REACHING HOMELESS BREAKING POINT – HERE'S HOW CITY RESIDENTS ARE TAKING ACTION If we don’t act fast, we will lose Seattle and Portland. Drugs are flooding our streets, overdoses are on the rise, and Mexican drug cartels are expanding their reach. There doesn’t appear to be any end in sight. In fact, we’re just getting started. VideoThe Washington State Supreme Court and Oregon voters codified legalization in their respective states. CLICK HERE TO GET THE OPINION NEWSLETTER...
    RENO, Nev. (AP) — Authorities in northern Nevada say a suspect in a Reno homicide was taken into custody over 200 miles (322 kilometers) away after a chase involving officers from multiple agencies. The Humboldt County Sheriff's Office said Humboldt County sheriff's deputies tried unsuccessfully to stop a vehicle getting off Interstate 80 in Winnemucca, which is 148 miles (238 kilometers) northeast of Reno. Officials said the vehicle then was pursued 75 miles (121 kilometers) north to the Fort McDermitt Indian Reservation on the Nevada-Oregon border where the driver was arrested. Nicholas Silva, 23, was arrested on suspicion of homicide and other crimes. Details on the Reno homicide that occurred early Tuesday morning weren't immediately released and it wasn't immediately known whether Silva had an attorney who could comment on his behalf. Officials say the Reno and Winnemucca police departments, the federal Bureau of Indian Affairs and the Humboldt County Sheriff’s Office all assisted in the arrest. Copyright 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed. Tags: Nevada, Associated Press
    Copyright 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed. Tags: Associated Press, Oregon, business, science, California
    PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — APNewsBreak: Agreement revives plan for largest US dam demolition to save dwindling fish along California-Oregon border. Copyright © 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.
    Portlanders protesting state-sanctioned violence hold a sign reading, 'America will hold you accountable.' The unidentified Customs and Border Protection (CBP) special tactical agents who’ve kidnapped at least two demonstrators right off the street in Portland, Oregon, are wholly untrained in how to properly deal with large demonstrations and a former senior Border Patrol agent turned whistleblower calls the Border Patrol Tactical Unit, or BORTAC, among “the most violent and racist in all law enforcement”. “Racism has plagued the institution for decades,” The Guardian reports. “Jenn Budd recalled that when she signed up for service in 1995 her Spanish instructor blithely informed her that Latino migrants were referenced within the agency as ‘tonks’ and ‘wetbacks.’” It’s not an isolated incident at CBP, or a dated one: As recently as 2019, agents have pleaded guilty to assaulting migrants while on duty. One agent called migrants “disgusting subhuman shit unworthy of being kindling for a fire” in the weeks before he hit a Guatemalan man with his truck and then lied about it. “Local officials and other critics say the tactical unit, which is trained for high-risk missions and usually conducts operations along the border targeting smugglers...
    PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — A federal judge has denied a petition to bypass state-required signatures to qualify as a ballot measure its proposal for 17 counties to divorce from Oregon and become part of Idaho. U.S. District Judge Michael J. McShane ruled Monday that the group Move Oregon's Border was not “reasonably diligent” in attempting to collect signatures, even amid the unusual limitations due to the coronavirus pandemic. The Oregonian reported the judge found that Move Oregon’s Border provided scant evidence of a conscientious effort to obtain signatures thus far. The plaintiffs only held one rally, in Roseburg on March 7, collecting 389 signatures. The group also pointed to the approximately 9,195 members on its Facebook group, the judge noted. The state mandates petitioners obtain a minimum number of signatures in order to qualify for the ballot. But Move Oregon’s Border had argued COVID-19 restrictions had made the usual methods of signature gathering impossible. “Holding one rally, collecting less than 400 signatures, and hosting a Facebook page does not constitute reasonable diligence when compared with other initiative proponents,” the judge...
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