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    The nation’s most glorious natural wonders are preserved for posterity as national parks. While some say that the best way to experience all that wilderness is by hiking and camping amid the splendor, others argue it’s even better if there’s a super swanky hotel, rather than a bedroll, waiting at the end of the day. The blogger behind TheLuxuryTravelExpert falls, of course, into the latter category and offers up a top 10 list of hotels and lodges that fit the bill. They’re all in — or near — U.S. national parks, and offer memorable lodging at price points that range from $359 to *cough* 10 times that. The list leans heavily toward the western U.S. — Tennessee’s Great Smoky Mountains is the only park east of the Rockies. California is represented by the Ahwahnee at Yosemite and the Inn at Death Valley. (Defer that trip a bit, though. Death Valley’s roads were closed last week by a devastating, once-in-a-millenium flash flood.) Wyoming’s Grand Teton National Park has two hotels on the list. And in Utah, the first phase of a new wilderness...
    A flash flood that stranded more than 200 people on the Palm Springs Aerial Tramway on Monday in California’s latest bout of heavy summer rainfall is expected to close the attraction for a week. Citing extended cleanup efforts, officials said the tramway is scheduled to reopen next Monday. “After completing a thorough inspection earlier today, we realized that it would take additional days for the mud and debris to be fully removed from our equipment and dock area,” said Nancy Nichols, the tramway’s general manager. “We sincerely regret the inconvenience this is causing our visitors and appreciate their understanding.” The tramway begins its 2.5-mile scenic trek in the Sonoran Desert and ends in an alpine forest, going from the floor of the Coachella Valley to near the top of San Jacinto Peak, some 8,500 feet above sea level. It opened in 1963 and is considered one of the largest rotating aerial trams in the world. California Triple-digit heat, increased humidity expected to hit Los Angeles County this weekend Los Angeles County weather sees triple-digit heat and increased humidity in...
    Firefighters in Denver placed children onto their backs and shoulders as as part of a heroic rescue effort as parts of the Mile High City were deluged by floods. The children were part of 29 people who were saved during Sunday evening's flooding in the city which occurred after almost 3inches of rain fell in just a couple of hours.  Wading into chest-high water, the rescuers carried children, sometimes two at a time, out of the deep brown water and onto dry land.  Multiple children were helped from their minivan which suddenly broke down as it became stuck in an underpass at 38th and Blake Street.  Firefighters helped rescued several children, including a baby. Several children were rescued from a submerged vehicle in the middle of a Denver highway, as flash flooding slammed the area on Sunday Wading into chest-high water, the rescuers carried children, sometimes two at a time, out of the deep brown water and onto dry land Witnesses watched on in awe as the firefighters walked into the cold water to save the children Several children were...
    Photographer John Sirlin was in a canyon in the northeast part of Death Valley National Park late Thursday to shoot lightning in an expected thunderstorm. Then the lightning petered out and the storm became a nonstop torrential downpour that lasted for hours, bringing near-record rainfall to one of the hottest, driest places on Earth. “It seemed serious,” said the 46-year-old from Chandler, Ariz., who also leads storm-chasing workshops. “It was a magnitude of flooding I had not experienced before.” More analysis will be needed to determine whether climate change helped drive the storm’s intensity. But its extreme nature is consistent with what can be expected as global temperatures rise, experts said, drawing parallels with the historic flooding that damaged Yellowstone National Park in June. “We’re already in a climate where the odds of intense precipitation are elevated,” said climate scientist Noah Diffenbaugh, a professor and senior fellow at Stanford University. “And we have a clear understanding that as global warming continues, the heavy precipitation events are likely to continue to intensify overall.” Rainfall totaling 1.46 inches was recorded at Furnace...
    Floods continue to wreak havoc in the US, most recently at Death Valley National Park in California, where flash floods triggered by heavy rainfall left 1,000 people stranded and crushed cars.  Park officials said the Furnace Creek area of the park, near the Nevada-California state line, experienced 1.7 inches of rain, which they described as 'nearly an entire year's worth of rain in one morning.' The officials also said about 60 vehicles were buried by the rushing floodwaters, and 500 park visitors and 500 park workers were left stranded, though no injuries have been reported. The California Department of Transportation said it may take four to six hours to clear a main road out of the park, which would allow visitors to leave.  'All roads into and out of the park are currently closed and will remain closed until park staff can assess the extensiveness of the situation,' the National Park Service said Friday.  Park officials at Death Valley National Park said flash floods that left 1,000 stranded were caused by 'nearly an entire year's worth of rain in one...
    (CNN)Death Valley National Park announced its closure Friday due to substantial flooding within the park, according to a news release."All roads into and out of the park are currently closed and will remain closed until park staff can assess the extensiveness of the situation," the National Park Service said Friday.Currently, there are approximately 500 visitors and 500 staff at the park, according to the agency, and stranded visitors can leave if they wish. No injuries have been reported.Abby Wines, public affairs officer for the National Park Service, told CNN Friday that a number of visitors to Death Valley National Park have voluntarily left the park.Despite road closures, Wines says "no one is stopping" visitors if they find a way out of the park. Read MoreAt The Inn at Death Valley, approximately 60 cars belonging to visitors and staff are buried under debris, according to a news release.Approximately 60 cars belonging to visitors and staff at Death Valley National Park are buried under debris."The park received 1.46 inches of rain at Furnace Creek, which nearly matches the previous daily record of 1.47 inches," the release...
    DEATH VALLEY NATIONAL PARK, Calif. (AP) — Flash flooding at Death Valley National Park triggered by heavy rainfall on Friday buried cars, forced officials to close all roads in and out the park and stranded about 1,000 people, officials said The park near the California-Nevada state line received at least 1.7 inches (4.3 centimeters) of rain at the Furnace Creek area, which park officials in a statement said represented “nearly an entire year’s worth of rain in one morning.” The park’s average annual rainfall is 1.9 inches (4.8 centimeters). About 60 vehicles were buried in debris and about 500 visitors and 500 park workers were stranded, park officials said. The California Department of Transportation estimated it would take four to six hours to open a road that would allow park visitors to leave. It was the second major flooding event at the park this week. Some roads were closed Monday after they were inundated with mud and debris from flash floods that also hit western Nevada and northern Arizona hard. During Friday’s rainstorms, the “flood waters pushed dumpster containers...
    DEATH VALLEY NATIONAL PARK, Calif. (AP) — Some roads in and out of Death Valley National Park have been closed after they were inundated over the weekend with mud and debris from flash floods that also hit western Nevada and northern Arizona hard. Officials on Sunday provided no estimate on when the roads around Death Valley would be reopened. Motorists were also urged to avoid Southern California’s Mojave National Preserve after flooding buckled pavement on some roads. The rain also prompted closures of highways and campgrounds elsewhere, but no injuries were reported The storms produced torrential downpours and the National Weather Service reported that more than an inch (2.5 centimeters) of rain fell in 15 minutes Sunday near Kingman, Arizona, which is close to the stateline with California. Forecasters said more thunderstorms were possible on Monday. Copyright © 2022 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.
    David Kelleher — a former Marine Corps captain — was found dead only 30 feet from an obscured highway on June 14 The body of a retired marine has been found in Death Valley with a note on his car saying he ran 'out of gas'. Park visitors stumbled upon the body of 67-year-old David Kelleher — a former Marine Corps captain from Huntington Beach — only 30 feet from an obscured highway on June 14. A heat wave caused record temperatures, of up to 123°F in California's Death Valley. Kelleher seemed to have walked two and half miles from his car from Zabriskie Point toward Furnace Creek after running out of gas. On June 8, a park ranger noticed his car as the only one in the parking lot of Zabriskie Point. A crumpled note inside Kelleher’s vehicle said: 'Out of gas'. Park rangers began an investigation on June 11, learning it was assigned to Kelleher, who had not been reported missing. A records search also showed that a park ranger had cited Kelleher for off-road driving on May...
    A former Marine Corps officer was found dead in Death Valley National Park after his car ran out of gas, the National Park Service reported Wednesday. The body was identified as 67-year-old David Kelleher, a Southern California man who left his car to find more gas in the 123-degree heat, according to the NPS. He was discovered two and a half miles from his car by park visitors, 30 feet away from an obscured highway. A note crumpled in his pocket confirmed Kelleher's mission to get more gas. INTERIOR SECRETARY BANS PLASTIC FROM NATIONAL PARKS Kelleher's family confirmed his death Wednesday and described him as a "proud veteran" who spent 22 years in the Marine Corps. Kelleher was an officer, earning the rank of "captain" during his tenure. It's unclear what day Kelleher died, but an NPS ranger discovered his abandoned car on June 8. A few days later, the ranger returned to the site and saw the car again. After running a check on the car, NPS discovered Kelleher was the owner and had...
    A Huntington Beach man was found dead Tuesday in Death Valley National Park after it appears he ran out of gas and tried walking for assistance during a dangerous heat wave, according to National Park Service officials. David Kelleher, 67, was found about 30 feet off a highway in the park and less than three miles from his parked vehicle, according to a statement from the park service. Officials found a crumpled note inside his vehicle that read, “Out of gas.” A park ranger first encountered Kelleher on May 30 — about two weeks before he was found dead — on Dantes View Road, when Kelleher mentioned he was low on gas, the statement said. Kelleher was then cited for off-road driving. California Blisters, nausea, hallucinations: A hiker’s grueling attempt to cross Death Valley in four days An astrophysicist set out to break a record crossing Death Valley. He took almost no water. Then he began hallucinating. Nine days after that interaction, a park ranger noticed Kelleher’s vehicle by itself in the lot of one of the...
    On June 14, Kelleher’s body was found by park visitors around 2 p.m., a little more than 2 miles from his vehicle. He was only 30 feet from California Highway 190, but his body was obscured by terrain and a mesquite tree. This is the second fatality at Death Valley National Park this month. After two days of ground and air searches, John McCarry, 69, was found deceased in Panamint Valley on June 1, according to the National Park Service. In 2021, six people died while hiking in Death Valley National Park. Two people died after falling from cliffs, and four perished from extreme heat. The National Park Service rangers recommend that in extreme heat, people should wait at the disabled vehicle, rather than attempting to walk for assistance. The National Park Service also advises park visitors not to hike at low elevations after 10 a.m., to stay within a short walk of air conditioning, to drink plenty of water, and to eat salty snacks. On Friday, Death Valley hit a record-breaking daily temperature of 123 degrees – surpassing...
    (CNN)A Death Valley National Park tourist was found dead Tuesday after his car ran out of gas, the National Park Service (NPS) reports. A park ranger noticed a lone car in the parking lot on June 8 at Zabriskie Point, a popular spot to view sunrise and sunset, according to an NPS press release. The same ranger noticed the car still in the lot three days later.A note that read "Out of gas" was found inside the car, which was registered to David W. Kelleher, 67, of Huntington Beach, California. Temperatures hit a sweltering 123 degrees, say NPS, limiting search efforts. He had not been reported missing but officials noted that Kelleher was cited for off-road driving on May 30 and had mentioned he was low on gas when a park ranger contacted him. Read More"Kelleher's body was found by park visitors around 2 p.m. on June 14. Kelleher was about 2.5 miles from their vehicle, but only about 30 feet from California Highway 190, obscured by terrain and a mesquite tree," according to NPS. During extreme heat, visitors are...
    DEATH VALLEY NATIONAL PARK  — The body of a Southern California man who had been missing since last month was found in a remote section of Death Valley National Park, authorities said. John McCarry, 69, of Long Beach last contacted a family member by text message from the U.S. 395 community of Olancha, saying he was heading to the desert park, the National Park Service said in a statement. Related Articles Crime and Public Safety | Police release video of deadly confrontation with suspect in missing Oakley woman case Crime and Public Safety | Authorities: Alexis Gabe disappearance now considered a homicide, suspect dead Crime and Public Safety | Hiker finds body of missing San Jose man in Sierra Nevada Crime and Public Safety | Oakley police to issue statement on missing woman Crime and Public Safety | Missing climber found dead on iconic Colorado peak McCarry’s vehicle was found by park rangers in Panamint Valley on May 31 and an air and ground search located his body about...
    A woman who saw her husband die after they were lost for a week in the Nevada desert said they went off course by following GPS instructions and then became stranded without blankets or water. Beverly and Ron Barker. (Family photo via Esmeralda County Sheriff’s Office)  The account by 69-year-old Beverly Barker, who was rescued Tuesday west of the community of Silver Peak, was relayed by her nephew Travis Peters on the Facebook group he set up during the search. Beverly Barker and her 72-year-old husband, Ronnie, had been on a long road trip from their Indianapolis home in their recreational vehicle. On the day they went missing — Sunday, March 27 — they left Mount Shasta, Calif., on an itinerary that had them spending the night in Fallon, Nev. Instead, they continued farther south, and their RV was last seen driving through Luning, Nevada, around 6 that evening. As Beverly Barker described it, once they passed Luning their GPS directed them to a small road heading into the desert south of Coaldale, at the intersection of highways 6 and...
    A couple driving to Arizona went missing more than a week ago, with the last signs of them recorded in the Nevada desert, police say. Beverly and Ron Barker. (Family photo via Esmeralda County Sheriff’s Office)  Ronnie Barker, 72, and Beverly Barker, 69, left Mount Shasta, Calif., around noon on March 27, a Sunday. Their itinerary had them staying that night in Fallon, Nev., about 50 miles east of Reno. But the last image of their recreational vehicle, around 6 p.m., was caught on video about 100 miles farther south, on Highway 95 in the town of Luning, Nev. Their family members say all indications are that the couple never made it as far as Tonopah, and possibly turned west on Highway 6. The search is centered in the area where the last cellphone ping was recorded: Dyer, a small outpost on the California-Nevada line about 25 miles from Death Valley. The Barkers, from Indianapolis, were driving a white 2015 Sunseeker RV with Indiana plates C128H. They were towing a white 2020 Kia Soul with Indiana plates FL211A. They...
    DEATH VALLEY NATIONAL PARK, Calif. (AP) — Death Valley National Park rangers are reminding visitors to limit stressful activities during blazing summer heat after another hiker died along the same trail within days. Blake Chaplin, 52, of Leawood, Kansas, was found dead on Aug. 21 along the Golden Canyon Trail, the park said in a statement Tuesday. A search-and-rescue team recovered the body after it was reported by an early morning hiker. The cause of death was being investigated by Inyo County authorities but foul play was not suspected, the park said. Temperatures on Aug. 21-22 reached 109 degrees Fahrenheit (43 Celsius), below the daily normal of 115 F (46 C). Authorities said Lawrence Stanback, 60, of San Francisco died on the same trail on Aug. 18. Heat stroke was suspected in his death. “Although these temperatures may be cooler compared to a typical Death Valley summer day, precautions should still be taken while visiting in the heat,” the park said. Summer visitors should limit hiking to the relatively cooler morning hours, ending treks by 10 a.m., drink plenty...
    DEATH VALLEY NATIONAL PARK (CBSLA) — Two men died while hiking in Death Valley National Park in less than five days, park officials said Tuesday. (Photo by David Becker/Getty Images) Both deaths happened as they hiked near the Golden Canyon Trail in Death Valley National Park, where temperatures reach triple digits by 10 a.m. in the summer. READ MORE: Vehicle Veers Off Freeway, Crashes Into 2 Anaheim Apartment Buildings Killing A Resident A morning hiker found 52-year-old Blake Chaplin of Leawood, Kan. near the Manly Beacon formation along the Golden Canyon Trail Saturday, according to the National Park Service. A search and rescue team was needed to hike in to recover Chaplin’s body because no helicopters were available at the time to assist. Chaplin’s death is under investigation, but foul play is not suspected. READ MORE: Parolee Roland Morrow Arrested For Allegedly Terrorizing Venice Neighborhood, Then Leaving On Bicycle Just four days earlier, 60-year-old Lawrence Stanback of San Francisco died while he hiked near Red Cathedral along the Golden Canyon Trail. Park staff were notified of a suspected heat stroke...
    A hiker from Washington state was found dead in Death Valley National Park in California, an area known for having some of the world’s highest recorded temperatures, park authorities said Thursday. Douglas Branham, 68, was found dead around two miles from the closest road in Death Valley National Park, according to a joint statement from the park and the Inyo County Sheriff’s Office. Family members said he had planned a 12-mile round trip hike through the salt flats located in the California park. Family members called his hotel Wednesday morning after Branham missed his Tuesday flight home to Tukwila, Washington, the statement said. The hotel discovered his belongings were still in his room and National Park Service rangers found his vehicle at a nearby parking lot. Branham’s body was discovered by a California Highway Patrol helicopter crew Wednesday afternoon. The helicopter had to land and unload equipment before returning with a park ranger to recover the body, the statement continued. Temperatures in Death Valley at the time, and during much of the week, reached triple-digits. “Helicopter rotors struggle to...
    DEATH VALLEY NATIONAL PARK  — A hiker from Washington state has been found dead in Death Valley National Park, where temperatures can be among the hottest on Earth, authorities said Thursday. Douglas Branham, 68, of Tukwila, had planned a 12-mile (19-kilometer) round trip through the salt flats of the California park but missed a flight home on Tuesday. A California Highway Patrol helicopter crew discovered his body Wednesday about 2 miles (3.2 kilometers) from the closest road, according to a joint statement from the park and the Inyo County Sheriff’s Office. “Helicopter rotors struggle to create enough lift in hot air, and temperatures were about 115 degrees Fahrenheit at the time,” the statement said. The helicopter had to land and unload equipment to reduce weight before returning with a park ranger to recover the body, officials said. Related Articles Five children, adult injured in Antioch highway crash CHP: Teen dead after driver fleeing police crashes on Highway 101 Officials: Little hope remains for 5 missing in Germany blast One dead, 4 missing...
    A hiker from Washington state has been found dead in Death Valley National Park, where temperatures can be among the hottest on Earth, authorities said Thursday. Douglas Branham, 68, of Tukwila, had planned a 12-mile round trip through the salt flats of the California park but missed a flight home on Tuesday. A California Highway Patrol helicopter crew discovered his body Wednesday about 2 miles from the closest road, according to a joint statement from the park and the Inyo County Sheriff's Office.   "Helicopter rotors struggle to create enough lift in hot air, and temperatures were about 115 degrees Fahrenheit at the time," the statement said. Joint press release with Death Valley National Park Hiker fatality in Death Valley DEATH VALLEY, CA – A California...Posted by Inyo County Sheriff's Office on Thursday, July 29, 2021 The helicopter had to land and unload equipment to reduce weight before returning with a park ranger to recover the body, officials said. Branham probably began his hike on Sunday or Monday, when temperatures hit 118 degrees Fahrenheit with 91% humidity, the statement said....
    California’s Death Valley reached 130 degrees on Friday, amid a historic heat wave that is impacting the Pacific Northwest and stretching into parts of the Southwest.   The blistering temperature in the desert valley along the California-Nevada border was reported by the National Weather Service’s Las Vegas office, which predicted that the heat could reach as high as 132 degrees on Saturday.  DEATH VALLEY UPDATE ️High temp at Death Valley today = 130F.⚠️ If this says anything about how hot SAT-SUN will be, HEED THESE WARNINGS. Do not put yourself, nor first responders in danger this weekend!This observed high temp is considered preliminary & not yet validated. https://t.co/BwovUm42PE— NWS Las Vegas (@NWSVegas) July 10, 2021 While the highest observed temperature in Death Valley was recorded as 134 degrees on July 10, 1913, scientists have disputed this reading, meaning Friday’s temperature could be one of the highest ever measured on Earth, according to The Washington Post.  As of noon local time Saturday, the temperature in Death Valley had already reached 123 degrees, according to the National Weather Service.  As of 12pm...
    DEATH VALLEY NATIONAL PARK (CBSLA) — One of the hottest places on Earth nearly set a new record Wednesday after hitting 129 degrees. Death Valley National Park officials have been warning visitors that daytime highs could reach 128 degrees at some point during this week’s heat wave. READ MORE: Teen Captures Close Encounter With Great White Shark In Santa Barbara County But far from scaring off people, the extreme heat drew several tourists. Some even lingered near the thermometer just outside the Furnace Creek Visitor Center to see if the temperature would rise even higher. One couple traveled to Death Valley to celebrate their 25th wedding anniversary. READ MORE: Tory Carlon, Firefighter Killed In Agua Dulce Fire Station Shooting, To Be Remembered In Memorial Service At The Forum “We’re here from Vermont, which is a much different climate, you know, it rarely gets near this warm,” Doug Cummings said. “Just to see this place, the destination and the views and the history of the place, its worth every minute of it.” The highest temperature ever recorded in Death Valley was...
    The family of an Arizona congressional staffer who died while camping in Death Valley National Park in California have revealed that his SUV had gotten stranded with two flat tires, and his wife suffered a severe injury to her foot during the ill-fated trip last week.  Alexander Lofgren, 32, and Emily Henkel, 27, were found on Friday on a steep ledge near Willow Creek, California, but Lofgren did not survive.  Henkel was rescued and flown to Lemoore Naval Air Station for treatment. Her brother, Chris Henkel, wrote in the description of a GoFundMe campaign that his sister required surgery.  Alexander Lofgren, 32 (left), an Army veteran working on the staff of Congressman Raul Grijalva in Arizona, died last week trying to cross a canyon in California's Death Valley National Park with his wife, Emily Henkel (right) The Sheriff's Office posted a picture of the their white 2018 Subaru Forester with Yakima roof rack and several dogs near what is believed to be Tucson. The vehicle became stranded after getting two flat tires   RELATED ARTICLES Previous 1 Next ...
    DEATH VALLEY NATIONAL PARK  — An Arizona tourist died and his girlfriend was rescued Friday after their vehicle got two flat tires and they went missing in Death Valley National Park in California. In this undated image released by the Inyo County Sheriff’s Office shows campers Alexander Lofgren, 32, top, and Emily Henkel, 27. An Arizona tourist died and his wife was rescued Friday, April 9, 2021 after they went missing in Death Valley National Park. Alexander Lofgren, 32, and Emily Henkel, 27, were found on a steep ledge near Willow Creek in the California desert park but Lofgren was dead, according to a statement from the Inyo Creek Sheriff’s Office.(Inyo County Sheriff’s Office via AP)  Alexander Lofgren, 32, and Emily Henkel, 27, were found on a steep ledge near Willow Creek in the desert park, but Lofgren was dead, according to a statement from the Inyo Creek Sheriff’s Office. Henkel was flown to Lemoore Naval Air Station for treatment, and there was no immediate word on her condition. The Tucson residents, described as experienced campers, failed to return Sunday...
    More On: missing persons Missing pregnant woman found dead, boyfriend’s car set ablaze Mother of two vanishes on Miami trip where boyfriend was set to propose Missing mom’s husband allegedly wanted to order hit on her lover Missing woman gave ominous ‘if anything happens to me…’ warning days before she vanished An Arizona congressional aide was found dead and his wife rescued after the pair went missing on a camping trip to Death Valley National Park in California, officials said. Alexander Lofgren, a 32-year-old an aide to Arizona Rep. Raul M. Grijalva, and his wife, Emily Henkel, 27, became stranded when their Subaru got two flat tires in the park in the Mojave Desert, according to the Inyo Creek Sheriff’s Office. When the couple hadn’t returned from their camping trip Tuesday, they were reported missing. Authorities searched along Lofgren’s back-country itinerary route in addition to tourist attractions and hotels. Park staffers found the couple’s missing Subaru on Wednesday along with a note that read, “Two flat tires, headed to Mormon Point, have three days’ worth of water.” The note was...
    A visitor walks on the Badwater Basin salt flats on August 18, 2020 in Death Valley National Park, California. Mario Tama/Getty Images A congressional staffer who was reported missing after going on a campus trip died, authorities said.  Authorities searched for Alexander Lofgren and his girlfriend for days at Dead Valley National Park.  Lofgren, 32, was a caseworker for Arizona Rep. Raúl Grijalva. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. An Arizona congressional aide — who was reported missing after going on a camping trip in Death Valley National Park in California  — was pronounced dead, according to authorities and reports.  Alexander Lofgren, 32, and his girlfriend Emily Henkel,27,  of Arizona were first reported missing on Tuesday, April 6, according to a press release from the Inyo County Sheriff's Office. The couple was expected to return from their trip on April 4.  On Wednesday, officials searched for the couple near the park, and attractions along the Death Valley Highway 190. They also used "Lofgren's backcountry itinerary" for guidance during the search, the press release said.  After a days-long...
    An aide to Rep. Raúl Grijalva (D-Ariz.) was found dead on Friday after he and his girlfriend went missing in Death Valley National Park in California. The Inyo County Sheriff’s Office said in a statement posted to Facebook that 32-year-old Alexander Lofgren and his girlfriend 27-year-old Emily Henkel were located via aerial reconnaissance on a “remote and steep ledge” in the Willow Creek Area of the park.  -Final Press Release- INYO COUNTY, CA, APRIL 9, 2021, 3:30pm- At approximately 11:40am today Inyo County Search and... Posted by Inyo County Sheriff's Office on Thursday, April 8, 2021Authorities said that Lofgren is deceased, but Henkel was located alive and was flown out for medical treatment. The cause of Lofgren’s death, as well as Henkel’s condition, are both unclear. Lofgren was a case worker in Grijalva’s district office. According to The Arizona Republic, he was hired in 2019 as part of the congressman’s Wounded Warrior Fellowship Program. “The passion he dedicated to his work each day touched countless lives. No matter the situation, Alex met those he helped with a smiling face, a...
    DEATH VALLEY NATIONAL PARK (AP) — An Arizona tourist died and his wife was rescued Friday after their vehicle got two flat tires and they went missing in Death Valley National Park in California. Alexander Lofgren, 32, and Emily Henkel, 27, were found on a steep ledge near Willow Creek in the desert park but Lofgren was dead, according to a statement from the Inyo Creek Sheriff’s Office. Henkel was flown to Lemoore Naval Air Station for treatment and there was no immediate word on her condition. Undated photo shows campers Alexander Lofgren and Emily Henkel. The couple was found in the Death Valley but Lofgren was dead, according to a statement from the Inyo Creek Sheriff’s Office The Tucson residents, described as experienced campers, failed to return Sunday from a camping trip and were reported missing Tuesday. Authorities searched hotels and major tourist attractions along a highway and checked Lofgren’s back-country itinerary. On Wednesday, park staff found the couple’s missing Subaru. According to the sheriff’s office, a note in the car stated: “Two flat tires, headed to Mormon Point,...
    DEATH VALLEY NATIONAL PARK, Calif. (AP) — An Arizona tourist died and his wife was rescued Friday after their vehicle got two flat tires and they went missing in Death Valley National Park in California. Alexander Lofgren, 32, and Emily Henkel, 27, were found on a steep ledge near Willow Creek in the desert park, but Lofgren was dead, according to a statement from the Inyo Creek Sheriff’s Office. Henkel was flown to Lemoore Naval Air Station for treatment, and there was no immediate word on her condition. The Tucson residents, described as experienced campers, failed to return Sunday from a camping trip and were reported missing Tuesday. Authorities searched hotels and major tourist attractions along a highway and checked Lofgren’s back-country itinerary. On Wednesday, park staff found the couple’s missing Subaru. According to the Sheriff’s Office, a note in the car stated: “Two flat tires, headed to Mormon Point, have three days’ worth of water.” That proved to be “a crucial tip in directing search efforts,” the Sheriff’s Office said. On Thursday, the couple was spotted from the...
    A man canyoneering died in Death Valley National Park on Saturday after he plummeted 95-feet to his death, authorities said. Justin Ibershoff, 38, of Los Angeles was exploring the canyon with six friends, all of whom were experienced canyoneers, the National Park Service (NPS) said in a statement. As Ibershoff attempted to descend a “steep, rocky slope” he stepped on a loose rock, triggering a rockslide that swept him past two of his friends and over the edge of the 95-foot-tall dry fall, according to the NPS. DEATH VALLEY NATIONAL PARK, CALIFORNIA – AUGUST 18: The Devil’s Golf Course salt pan is viewed on August 18, 2020 in Death Valley National Park, California. (Mario Tama/Getty Images) The group contacted emergency services using an emergency locator beacon. The NPS said the group’s ability to use the emergency locator allowed them to provide detailed information of the accident which allowed rescuers to find Ibershoff. Inyo County search-and-rescue (SAR) and Death Valley park rangers, assisted by a crew from the Navy’s VX-31 helicopter, were able to reach Ibershoff’s body hours after the accident...
    An experienced rock climber fell off a 95-foot cliff to his death at Death Valley National Park in California.   Justin Ibershoff, 38, was descending Deimos Canyon on Saturday when he stepped on a loose rock and triggered a rockslide, according to the National Park Service.   The rockslide then pushed Ibershoff past two of his climbing companions and over the edge of a dry fall.  His body was recovered on Sunday by an Inyo County search-and-rescue team and a California Highway Patrol helicopter.   Justin Ibershoff, 38, (pictured) fell off a 95-foot cliff to his death at Death Valley National Park Ibershoff was descending Deimos Canyon (pictured) on Saturday when he apparently stepped on a loose rock and triggered a rockslide, according to the National Park Service Officials advised climbers to avoid the upper section of Deimos County because the rock slide left it unstable.   The six friends who were out climbing with Ibershoff had used an emergency beacon to alert authorities immediately after he fell, but by the time they found him he was already dead.   Ibershoff, who lived...
    (CNN)A man canyoneering in Death Valley National Park has died after falling off a cliff, according to the National Park Service (NPS).Justin Ibershoff, 38, from Los Angeles, died on Saturday as he was descending a technical route in Deimos Canyon with six friends, the NPS said in a news release.All the party members were experienced canyoneers and had descended into this canyon several times.Ibershoff was descending a steep, rocky slope when he stepped on a loose boulder that triggered a rockslide. He was swept past two of his friends and over the edge of a 95-foot cliff, the release said.The friends called for assistance and after a few hours, a crew from the Navy's VX-31 helicopter were able to reach Ibershoff and establish he had passed away. His body was recovered the following day, according to the NPS.Read MoreThe park service warns canyoneers that conditions in that area remain unstable and all are advised to avoid the upper section of Deimos Canyon.
    DEATH VALLEY NATIONAL PARK — An experienced climber who was descending a canyon in Death Valley plunged to his death over the weekend when he was caught in a rockslide, authorities said. Justin Ibershoff, 38, of Los Angeles, died at the scene in the California desert park Saturday, according to a statement from the park and the Inyo County Sheriff’s Office. Ibershoff and six friends, all “very experienced” canyoneers, were descending Deimos Canyon using a steep technical route when he apparently stepped on a rock that moved, triggering a slide that swept him past two companions and over a 95-foot-tall dry fall, the statement said. Rescuers were summoned and a crew from a Navy helicopter managed to reach Ibershoff a few hours after the accident but he was dead, the statement said. His body was recovered the next day by an Inyo County search-and-rescue team and a California Highway Patrol helicopter, authorities said. The area of Deimos Canyon where Ibershoff fell is still considered unstable and canyoneers were advised to avoid the upper section, authorities said. Related Articles Sonoma...
    Startled by Gov. Gavin Newsom’s Monday rollback of statewide COVID-19 rules, county officials, park rangers, hoteliers, restaurateurs and others scrambled to reopen lodgings, campgrounds and restaurants. Some — like the Inn at Death Valley — will restart within days. For others, including the campgrounds at Joshua Tree National Park, it’s likely to be a few weeks. Most California state park campgrounds remain closed. A state parks spokesman said the agency was consulting with state and local health officials and “appreciates the public‘s patience as it prepares to increase access” to the state park system. Now that the state has stepped back from the Regional Stay Home order that banned overnight vacations and closed restaurant dining rooms and patios in most of the state, county officials are deciding what businesses can open and how they will be allowed to operate. Here are some places that are starting to reopen as a result of Monday’s action. Death Valley National Park In Death Valley, the Inn at Death Valley and Ranch at Death Valley, both run by the Xanterra Travel Collection as...
    Sarah Romero / Production: Pablo Cantudo What is five times hotter than the surface of the Sun and is capable of sending a DeLorean back to the future? Removing the science fiction part, the first thing is true and the answer is … lightning. It is a short-lived phenomenon that, for a fraction of a second, has been found to the air around a lightning bolt heats up to about 30,000 ° C, becoming the highest temperature on Earth. How is it possible that lightning is hotter than the surface of the Sun? There is the key. We have talked about the surface, not the entire Sun. First, it is important to realize that the surface of the sun is actually its coldest layer. If we dive into its core we will find plasma temperatures of approximately 15 million kelvin, approximately 27 million degrees Fahrenheit or 15 million degrees Celsius. And on the surface? If what we are looking for is the surface place where heat is the main protagonist, we will find another...
    After weeks of poor air quality and the pervasive threat of wildfires, more heat and wind are headed for Southern California this week. The National Weather Service issued a red flag warning Monday signifying the likelihood for “extreme fire danger” in Los Angeles County, the Santa Clarita Valley and parts of Ventura County. Gusty Santa Ana winds up to 40 mph are expected, and humidity could fall into the teens and single digits, forecasters warned. Heat, too, is expected to reach dangerous levels: The forecast calls for temperatures in the triple digits in the valleys through at least Thursday, and in the 90s in some coastal areas. “We are expecting some hot temperatures this week,” said Mike Wofford, a meteorologist at the National Weather Service in Oxnard. “You’ll notice it warmer today, but especially tomorrow, and Wednesday and Thursday, which will probably be the hottest days.” California Fires besiege wine country: 11,000 acres burned, homes lost, thousands flee California Fires besiege wine country: 11,000 acres burned, homes lost, thousands flee Four...
    Once he saw that temperatures in Death Valley National Park had hit 130 degrees Fahrenheit, Dan Markham, 40, knew he had to go. The southern Utah local made the drive last month and found himself in the company of dozens of other park visitors hoping to get a picture alongside a thermometer listing one of the hottest recorded temperatures on Earth. According to Markham, visitors from Nevada, Washington, and California sat in their cars, air conditioners blasting, and waited as the thermometer toggled between 129 and 130. Markham stayed for two hours. “It would be stuck at 129 and then all of a sudden it would go up to 130 and everyone would run out of their cars to take a picture,” Markham said. Those who missed it — and “were like, ah man, 129 again” — headed back to the shelter of their automobiles to wait for another photo opportunity. Dan Markham poses in front of the thermometer at Furnace Creek.(Dan Markham) This year will go down as the fourth hottest summer in Death Valley history after the park...
    DEATH VALLEY (CBSLA) – The hottest place on Earth is getting hotter. Several heat records were broken between June and August at Death Valley National Park, which marks “a continued record of a changing climate,” park officials said. DEATH VALLEY NATIONAL PARK, CALIFORNIA – AUGUST 17: Visitors walk near a sign warning of extreme heat danger on August 17, 2020 in Death Valley National Park, California. The temperature reached 130 degrees at Death Valley National Park on August 16, hitting what may be the hottest temperature recorded on Earth since at least 1913, according to the National Weather Service. Park visitors have been warned, ‘Travel prepared to survive.’ (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images) “Death Valley National Park is known for its extreme temperatures, and this year certainly didn’t disappoint when it comes to heat,” Superintendent Mike Reynolds said in a statement. Death Valley National Park made news when a preliminary temperature of 130 degrees was recorded on Aug. 16 at Furnace Creek. Officials say a climate extremes committee is in the process of verifying the record as the hottest temperature...
    In the last few days, a moisture-laden heat wave has unleashed extreme weather in almost every corner of California. In a single day, Northern California was hit with triple-digit temperatures, as well as hundreds of lightning strikes that ignited brush fires. The mercury hit 107 degrees Sunday in Santa Cruz, known for its moderate climate, and Death Valley reached 130 degrees — one of the hottest temperatures ever recorded there. People take selfies at the Furnace Creek Visitor Center’s thermometer in Death Valley National Park on Monday. Death Valley recorded a scorching 130 degrees Sunday — one of the hottest temperatures ever recorded there.(John Locher / Associated Press) Meanwhile, unusually muggy air made Los Angeles feel like Houston, and warm nights failed to offer much relief. The Central Valley sweltered with temperatures exceeding 110 degrees. A fire-caused tornado touched down near the Sierra Nevada community of Loyalton. And a pyrocumulus cloud towered over Southern California, where heat and wildfires pushed smog levels higher than they’ve been in years. Did we mention the power went out too? As one of...
    Death Valley’s Furnace Creek recorded its highest temperature in 107 years on Sunday, potentially breaking the nation’s record for the highest temperature the Southern California desert region previously set in 1913.  The temperature in Death Valley reached 130 degrees Fahrenheit on Sunday, according to the National Weather Service Prediction Center.  If the temperature is valid, Sunday’s temperature would be the first time the Death Valley reached that temperature since 1913, according to the National Weather Service. Per the climate data in xmACIS2, this is the first time since 1913 that Death Valley has reached 130F. In July 2013, it last reached 129F. If valid, it would be the hottest August temperature at the site by 3F. @NWSVegas pic.twitter.com/gZNBW4NXI4— NWS WPC (@NWSWPC) August 16, 2020 The last time it came close was in July 2013 when the temperature reached 129 degrees Fahrenheit, according to the National Weather Service.  The record set in 1913 is the highest recorded temperature in the world, according to the World Meteorological Organization.  A world high record of 134 degrees Fahrenheit was observed in Death Valley...
    EARTH’S hottest ever temperature may have been recorded in California’s Death Valley as the mercury rose to more than 130F. The blistering heat in the Mojave Desert came as an intense heat wave scorched the West Coast, sparking a 'firenado', wild lightning storms and power cuts. 8Death Valley National Park confirmed the record breaking temperature 8Lighting strikes the ground as a storm rips across  across the Santa Rosa plain near Healdsburg, CaliforniaCredit: AP:Associated Press 8The firenado looms in a thick plume of smoke from the Loyalton Fire in Lassen County, CaliforniaCredit: Reuters The record temperature in Death Valley was reached yesterday at 3.41pm Pacific time according to the National Weather Service.  Death Valley National Park posted on its Facebook page that if verified, it would be the hottest temperature officially verified on Earth since July 1913, which was also recorded in Death Valley. It said: "Today would also break the daily record by 5 degrees Fahrenheit and the monthly record for August by 3 degrees Fahrenheit." Meanwhile the National Weather Service extended a red flag fire warning for the entire...
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