Tuesday, Aug 09, 2022 - 23:11:10
106 results - (0.028 seconds)

on medical care:

latest news at page 1:
123
    The Indiana doctor whose abortion on a 10-year-old girl was used as a talking point by the left and doubted by conservatives has hit back at her detractors - including the state's attorney general, who she is suing for defamation. The account asserts the unnamed girl was forced to seek an abortion in Indiana after her home state of Ohio barred abortions, and became a flashpoint in the debate over abortion rights after it was shared to a local newspaper by an unnamed source last month. The story soon came under scrutiny - with pundits, politicians, news publications and even personalities clashing over its veracity following last month's controversial overturning of Roe vs. Wade. That initial doubt, however, was soon quelled, after it was revealed that the rape had taken place, and that a 27-year-old Ohio man has been charged with raping the girl.  Records further revealed that the abortion also occurred, days after the historic ruling- and that Indianapolis obstetrician-gynecologist Caitlin Bernard was the doctor who performed it. Speaking on national television Tuesday, Bernard slammed politicians and news publications who...
    HEALTH care expert Christy has a trick to get rid of medical bills - especially if they are sent to collections. Christy, who goes by Christyprn on TikTok, is a registered nurse as well as a patient and healthcare worker advocate. 1Christy started Healthcare Reformed bringing transparency to heath careCredit: CHRISTYPRN She has tons of videos educating her 804,000 followers on healthcare and the rights that they have.  In a recent TikTok, she broke down The Fair Debt Collection Practices Act (FDCPA) and how this relates to debt collectors. FDCPA is an amendment prohibiting debt collection agencies from using any abusive, unfair, or deceptive practices. The health care expert read the entire hundred-page document and shared her findings. Read More on Saving MoneyCHILL OUT The exact temperature to set your thermostat at and save 10% on your energy billSUPER SAVINGS I’m a Walmart superfan - the five electronics on clearance up to 85% off Below are the three tips that may cancel your medical debt. 1. Memorize the name The FDCPA will come in handy when you want to contest...
    An attorney with the American Civil Liberties Union urged a federal appeals court Wednesday to continue blocking Arkansas’ ban on gender confirming treatments or surgery for children, saying reinstating the restriction would create uncertainty for families around the state. A three-judge panel of the 8th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals heard arguments in the state’s appeal of the preliminary injunction issued last year against ban, which was enacted by the majority-Republican Legislature. ACLU attorney Chase Strangio said allowing the law to be enforced would cause unnecessary disruption since a trial over it is scheduled to begin in October before the judge who issued the injunction. “If the injunction were lifted now, these families would have to leave their homes, their communities, their jobs, travel to another state just to potentially return” months later, said Strangio, who is deputy director of transgender justice for the ACLU’s LGBTQ and HIV Project. Arkansas was the first state to enact such a ban, which also prohibits doctors from referring youths elsewhere for such medical care. Republican Gov. Asa Hutchinson vetoed the ban but was...
    Most people who’ve had kids know the routine (some of us know it several times over): At certain points during pregnancy, tests are administered at various intervals to determine the existence of any abnormalities or unusual conditions. Tests for Down’s syndrome, Edwards’ syndrome, Patau’s syndrome, and spina bifida are typical. These blood and genetic tests are usually punctuated by recurrent ultrasounds in which the fetus’ development is analyzed by physicians for any physical problems or deformities, even missing body parts like a fully formed skull, or absent fingers, toes and limbs. As explained by Sarah Zhang, writing for The Atlantic, the legality of abortion in this country—even if restricted in some states—has typically permitted those who are pregnant the right and option to terminate their pregnancy at its early stages based on such information, particularly information indicative of severe genetic issues. The fact that this is permitted only to a certain degree in several states is a reflection of the restrictions on terminating a pregnancy that already exist; however, if and when Roe is overruled and states are free to ban...
    Reps. Jason Smith (R-MO) and Gary Palmer (R-AL) are leading a charge against Health and Human Services Secretary Xavier Becerra after he “spread misinformation to the American people” about the government incentivizing doctors to provide race-based medical care. “We write to express our deep disappointment with your testimony … where you twice denied the existence of a rule to incentivize physician practices to implement so-called ‘anti-racism’ plans,” a letter provided exclusively to Breitbart News states. “Rather than giving us answers about why your department is encouraging these prejudicial practices, you instead spread misinformation to the American people.” The letter comes after Becerra repeatedly testified before Congress that the federal government does not doctors to implement “anti-racism” policies in exchange for more government funding. The incentive structure — which also calls on physicians to define race as a “a political and social construct, not a physiological one” — was, in fact, published in the Federal Register. Becerra continues to deny its existence, however, and testified to Palmer that HHS “does not have a policy as [he] described” and that the premise of the...
    The department also pointed out that puberty is important for brain development and that scientific evidence suggests the part of the brain responsible for decision-making is not fully developed until age 25. Further, "potentially irreversible consequences such as cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis, infertility, increased cancer risk, and thrombosis" are known side effects of puberty blockers and cross-sex hormone doses, DOH said. The guidance states that social gender transition, prescribed puberty blockers or cross-sex hormones, and gender reassignment surgery have "an unacceptably high risk of doing harm" to minors. Florida's guidance contradicts federal guidance and the opinions of doctors and psychologists in major medical groups. The Biden administration endorsed sex-change surgeries and cross-sex hormone substitutions for gender-dysphoric minors in a series of documents released last month in response to actions by Republican-controlled state governments. HHS asserted that "gender-affirming care" is the "standard of care for transgender, gender diverse, and intersex youth" that is approved by "major medical associations," including the American Medical Association, American Psychiatric Association, and American Academy of Pediatrics. The Florida...
    MONTGOMERY, Ala. (AP) — Alabama has become the first state to criminalize the use of puberty blockers and hormones to treat transgender people under age 19. In line with some other Republican-led states, legislators here also passed a law requiring students to use bathrooms corresponding to their sex at birth and prohibiting discussion of gender and sexual identity in the lower grades. Critics have derided the limitation on such discussions as the “Don’t Say Gay” law. The two GOP bills were signed into law Friday by Republican Gov. Kay Ivey, a day after being passed by the Alabama Legislature. Advocacy groups quickly filed a lawsuit Monday challenging the medication ban. Republicans argue the bills are needed to protect children and that decisions on gender-affirming medications should wait until adulthood. Critics say the politicians are interfering with medical decisions that belong with families and their doctors. Cathryn Oakley, state legislative director and senior counsel for the Human Rights Campaign, a national advocacy group for the LGBTQ community, called the two pieces of legislation “the single most anti-transgender legislative package in...
    A bill in Alabama that would ban transgender treatments for minors, such as puberty blockers and hormone therapy, has passed out of the legislature and will go to Gov. Kay Ivey’s desk for signature. NEW COLORADO LAW SOLIDIFIES ABORTION ACCESS THROUGHOUT PREGNANCY — WHAT TO KNOW The bill, the Alabama Vulnerable Child Compassion and Protection Act, advanced out of the state House on Thursday by a vote of 66-to-28, mostly along party lines, having passed out of the Senate in February. If enacted, the bill would classify certain transgender treatments delivered to people under 18 as a felony, and doctors found to be violating the law could face up to 10 years in prison. “We make decisions in this body all the time that are to protect children from making decisions that could permanently harm them before they are old enough and have a brain developed enough to fully understand their decisions,” said Republican state Rep. Wes Allen, who introduced the House version of the bill. The bill would also ban all school personnel from withholding...
    President Biden on Wednesday tore into the 'political attacks' on transgender children coming from state legislators across the country such as Florida's so-called 'Don't Say Gay' bill.  'Visibility matters, and so many transgender, nonbinary, and gender nonconforming Americans are thriving,' Biden said in a statement marking Transgender Visibility Day. 'Despite this progress, transgender Americans continue to face discrimination, harassment, and barriers to opportunity.' Biden said that in 2021 and 2022, states had proposed 'hundreds of ant-transgender bills.  'Efforts to criminalize supportive medical care for transgender kids, to ban transgender children from playing sports, and to outlaw discussing LGBTQI+ people in schools undermine their humanity and corrode our Nation's values.' On Wednesday, Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey signed a bill that would ban anyone under the age of 18 from getting gender reassignment surgery and limiting transgender  girls from playing in girls' sports.  Arizona joins a dozen other states with limits on sports participation for trans girls and becomes the third state to try and limit health care options for transgender teens. Until two years ago, no state had passed a law...
    Physicians say they're worried political attacks will make it harder for patients to access gender-affirming care. Physicians who provide gender-affirming care for trans adults and minors say that they see connections between political attacks on this necessary medical care and attacks on abortion care, and are concerned that the attacks will harm patients in similar ways. Anti-LGBTQ groups and GOP legislators and state officials, relying on misleading claims about the so-called harms of gender-affirming care for minors, have set out to stigmatize and criminalize all forms of it, despite the fact that medical experts have debunked those claims. In a complex and lengthy process prior to receiving care, trans youth first speak with pediatricians, who then connect them with clinics staffed with pediatric psychiatrists, pediatricians, and endocrinologists to determine whether a patient is in fact a good candidate for it. Professional medical organizations and associations, including the American Psychiatric Association, American Psychological Association, the American Academy of Pediatrics, and the Endocrine Society have all issued policies in support of age-appropriate gender-affirming care. But Republican lawmakers have introduced bills across the...
    Kyiv, Ukraine (CNN)An injured woman, heavily pregnant, is carried on a stretcher past the smoldering wreckage of Mariupol's maternity and children's hospital. Her face is pale, one hand cradles her belly in a protective gesture. Every window on that side of the building appears to be blown out; wreckage litters the ground around it.The searing image was taken following what Mariupol city officials said was a Russian airstrike on the hospital Wednesday that injured 17 people, including children, women and doctors. "Three died, among them one child, a girl," the city council said Thursday.The city in southeastern Ukraine has been besieged by Russian forces for days, its trapped residents forced to shelter underground, melt snow for water and scavenge for food. Now, even a hospital caring for pregnant women, newborns and children is not safe.And Mariupol's hospital wasn't the only children's medical facility that authorities said was damaged by Russian forces on Wednesday. Two hospitals in Zhytomyr, west of the capital, Kyiv, had their windows blown out in a Russian airstrike on a thermal power plant and civilian building in...
    PITTSBURGH (KDKA) — Pittsburgh City Councilman Ricky Burgess introduced a new ordinance aimed at bridging the gap in the city’s infrastructure budget. The proposed ordinance would impose a user privilege tax on students of colleges and patients of hospitals in the city. The tax would be 1 percent of the total tuition amount or medical bill, and the money collected would help fund infrastructure. READ MORE: 1 Dead After Shooting In HazelwoodBurgess pointed out that these groups of people use and create a greater need for maintenance on city streets and bridges. Some people agree with him. Ethan Lasser, a Pitt student, told KDKA, “If it’s for the betterment of society, I’m fine with it.” But many other college students KDKA spoke with disagreed with the proposal, considering the already steep cost of education and other financial burdens. READ MORE: Pittsburgh's Assistant Fire Chief Receives Huge Honor“It’s terrible in Pittsburgh,” Pitt student Riley Fantini said. “There are potholes everywhere. But I don’t think students is the right way to go, considering this is largely a community that doesn’t have...
    'It felt like my life was being signed away,' an Arkansas teenager told the New York Times in January. As part of their broader campaign attacking transgender rights, conservative lawmakers are now pushing inaccurate and misleading information about transgender youth whose families want them to be able to seek the potentially life-saving care they deserve. With a slate of bills that would outlaw gender-affirming care for minors, Republican governors and state lawmakers are targeting health care professionals who provide their patients with gender-affirming care such as hormone treatments, puberty blockers, and in some cases, gender-affirming surgery. So far this year, GOP lawmakers in 11 states have already introduced bills restricting gender-affirming care for transgender youth, adding to at least 35 similar bills that Republican lawmakers introduced last year. Arkansas passed a gender-affirming care ban last year, but a federal judge temporarily blocked the law from going into effect. "It felt like my life was being signed away," Sabrina Jennen, a transgender teenager living in Arkansas, told the New York Times in January, adding...
    NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) — Are inmates at New York City jails being denied access to proper medical care? That will be the subject of a hearing this week. Records from January revealed nearly 6,800 inmates missed their medical appointments in city jails. In the previous month, more than 7,000 appointments were missed. In December, a Bronx Supreme Court judge ordered the city to provide timely medical care. The Department of Correction says it’s taking steps to fix the problem after dealing with pandemic staffing shortages.
    HACKENSACK, N.J. (CBSNewYork) — Nicholas Pagano, the man suspected of setting a colleague on fire Monday at Hackensack University Medical Center, was found dead 24 hours later of a self-inflicted gunshot wound, according to authorities. The Bergen County Prosecutor’s Office said Pagano’s body was discovered Tuesday morning in Waterford Township. He was wanted on charges of attempted murder, aggravated arson, aggravated assault and unlawful weapons possession. READ MORE: New York State's Indoor Mask Mandate Set To Expire ThursdayThe 31-year-old traveling nurse allegedly confronted a patient care technician around 5:15 a.m. Monday in a hospital break room. Authorities said he hit the woman with a wrench and set her on fire. Pagano was not scheduled to work that day, CBS2’s Nick Caloway reported. A witness told police he saw Pagano near the break room and then heard a female screaming. The witness also told police he saw the victim running in the hallway, with Pagano chasing her. Pagano left the hospital and after a manhunt, his body was found Tuesday morning in Camden County. The 54-year-old victim suffered third-degree burns and...
    A male nurse hired by a short-staffed New Jersey hospital torched a female staff worker and then hit her in the head with a wrench after the two were reportedly heard having an argument in the break room early Monday morning, police said. The unidentified male contract nurse hired in November by Hackensack University Medical Center doused the woman with an unknown accelerant before lighting her on fire and then smashed her in the head with a plumber's wrench, cops said. He then fled in his car and remains at large. There were no witnesses when the incident took place shortly before 5.30 a.m. in one of the hospital's break rooms after the pair were heard arguing. His unidentified victim - a patient care technician (PCT) - suffered third-degree burns to her upper body and lower face, as well as lacerations to her head that required stitches, hospital officials said.  She is in critical but stable condition after being brought to St Barnabas Medical Center in Livingston to treat her severe burns.  Police do not know what the motive was for the...
    KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia (AP) — Former Malaysian Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamad is recovering after being hospitalized for the third time since December and is eager to get back on his feet, his daughter said Wednesday. The 96-year-old two-time former premier, once the world’s oldest leader, was admitted to the coronary care unit at the National Heart Institute on Jan. 20. He underwent an elective medical procedure at the same hospital on Jan. 7. Last month, he was admitted for a full medical checkup and observation. Marina Mahathir said in a statement that her father “is cheerful and eager to fully recover.'” He was transferred out of the coronary care unit earlier Tuesday to a normal ward, but isn’t allowed to receive visitors apart from family members, she said. Mahathir has had two coronary bypass surgeries but was still robust and sharp witted. He led the opposition to a historic election victory in 2018 that ousted a corruption-tainted government in the first peaceful transfer of power since Malaysia’s independence in 1957. Mahathir became the world’s oldest leader at 92 for a...
    MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) — A judge in Anoka County has ordered Mercy Hospital to keep a patient battling COVID-19 on a ventilator, the latest development in an ongoing legal battle with the man’s family. Judge Jennifer Stanfield filed the order Thursday. According to the court document, a hearing will happen Feb. 11 (via Zoom), and if the plantiff — listed as Anne Quiner — doesn’t proceed with a temporary injunction, this temporary restraining order would then dissolve. READ MORE: Suburban Restaurants Brace For Changes, New Customers Due To Twin Cities COVID RulesAccording to a GoFundMe launched to help Quiner’s family with the medical bills, her husband was initially admitted to a hospital in Waconia after testing positive for COVID-19 in October. There, he was put on a ventilator and taken to an ICU at Mercy Hospital, according to the GoFundMe. READ MORE: Here Are Ways To Prove Your Vaccination Status At Twin Cities Bars, Restaurants And MoreQuiner also reportedly went on a national podcast to talk about plans to remove him from life-sustaining treatment. Allina Health has issued a statement regarding...
    The parents of a five-time Jeopardy! champion are suing for medical malpractice after their 24-year-old son died in February following colorectal surgery. Brayden Smith was considered the 'last great champion' of legendary host Alex Trebek, who died on November 8, 2020, age 80. Smith taped his final appearances in October 2020, and died of blood clots to his lungs in February 2021, three weeks after surgery to treat his ulcerative colitis.  The Nevada-born contestant's death shocked fans of the show, and on Monday The Las Vegas Review-Journal reported that his family were suing two hospitals in their home town of Henderson, Nevada.  Brayden Smith, 24, is seen in October 2020 during his fifth appearance on Jeopardy! Smith, far left, is seen with Jeopardy! host Alex Trebek in one of the final episodes Trebek recorded before his November 2020 death Scott and Debbie Smith filed the lawsuit against Dignity Health; the hospital in Henderson, Nevada, where he was operated on - St. Rose Dominican Hospital, Siena campus; Fidelity Home Health Services; two physicians; and the St. Rose nursing staff. They...
    DOWNEY (CBSLA) — Kaiser Permanente says its Downey emergency room is going on diversion because it has been overwhelmed with COVID-19 and flu patients. Many emergency rooms are at capacity due to the latest surge of both flu and COVID-19 patients in Los Angeles County, which reported its highest number of new cases since the pandemic started – 37,215 new cases on Thursday. This latest wave of infections appears to be driven by the Omicron variant, which experts say is highly contagious even for people who have been fully vaccinated and boosted. READ MORE: Forsberg, Predators Stay Hot With 4-2 Victory Over KingsKaiser this week put its Downey Medical Center on diversion, which means the facility will not accept new emergency room patients, who must be taken to get care at other hospitals. READ MORE: Mobley Scores 19, No. 7 USC Perfect After 77-63 Win Over Cal“Diversion is commonly used to deal with overloaded hospitals and ensures that ambulances will efficiently get patients to facilities for care,” a statement from Kaiser Permanente said. “Diversion is only done when it is...
              by Nyamekye Daniel   Three Georgia laws go into effect at the start of the new year that impact juvenile justice, sales tax on vehicles and medical transactions. House Bill 63 changes the way the fair market value of a vehicle is estimated. The value of a car will be calculated as the total depreciation, lease amortized amounts and down payments. Fair market value is how much a vehicle is worth for sale. The new bill excludes interest or finance charges in base or down payments. Senate Bill 80 is aimed at improving medical billing transparency. It requires insurers to disclose their prior authorization policies online. The prior authorization process calls for health care providers to contact the insurer before providing a particular service to ensure it would be covered under a patient’s plan. It adds another layer of health care approval that critics said could prolong care. Senate Bill 28 overhauls juvenile laws to increase protections for children who have been neglected, abused or are in foster care. It changes the state’s legal meaning of “sexual exploitation” by removing the reference “prostitution”...
    SACRAMENTO (AP) — A new California policy could send dozens of quadriplegic, paraplegic or otherwise permanently incapacitated inmates from nursing homes back to state prisons. Prison officials say a change in federal rules led them to limit medical parole to inmates so ill they are hooked to ventilators to breathe, meaning their movement is so limited they are not a public danger. The state previously included a much broader range of permanent incapacities allowing inmates to be cared for in nursing homes outside prison walls. READ MORE: Coyote Likely Behind ‘Suspicious’ Animal Deaths In Citrus Heights, Police SaySteve Fama, an attorney with the nonprofit Prison Law Office, said the court-appointed federal office that controls health care in California prisons told him the change could affect about 70 of the 210 inmates approved for medical parole under the current system, started in 2014. “It’d be an awful shame if those people were returned to prison,” Fama said. “Those patients have been proven not to need a prison setting given their medical conditions.” The policy shift comes as the state has been...
    A new California policy could send dozens of quadriplegic, paraplegic or otherwise permanently incapacitated inmates from nursing homes back to state prisons. Prison officials say a change in federal rules led them to limit medical parole to inmates so ill they are hooked to ventilators to breathe, meaning their movement is so limited they are not a public danger. The state previously included a much broader range of permanent incapacities allowing inmates to be cared for in nursing homes outside prison walls. Steve Fama, an attorney with the nonprofit Prison Law Office, said the court-appointed federal office that controls health care in California prisons told him the change could affect about 70 of the 210 inmates approved for medical parole under the current system, started in 2014. FILE - A wheelchair-bound inmate wheels himself through a checkpoint at the California Medical Facility in Vacaville, Calif., on April 9, 2008. California corrections officials have begun limiting medical parole only to inmates so ill they are on ventilators. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli, File) "It’d be an awful shame if those people...
    SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — A new California policy could send dozens of quadriplegic, paraplegic or otherwise permanently incapacitated inmates from nursing homes back to state prisons. Prison officials say a change in federal rules led them to limit medical parole to inmates so ill they are hooked to ventilators to breathe, meaning their movement is so limited they are not a public danger. The state previously included a much broader range of permanent incapacities allowing inmates to be cared for in nursing homes outside prison walls. READ MORE: Sacramento Renews Interest In Zoo Relocation SitesSteve Fama, an attorney with the nonprofit Prison Law Office, said the court-appointed federal office that controls health care in California prisons told him the change could affect about 70 of the 210 inmates approved for medical parole under the current system, started in 2014. “It’d be an awful shame if those people were returned to prison,” Fama said. “Those patients have been proven not to need a prison setting given their medical conditions.” The policy shift comes as the state has been reducing its prison...
    SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — A new California policy could send dozens of quadriplegic, paraplegic or otherwise permanently incapacitated inmates from nursing homes back to state prisons. Prison officials say a change in federal rules led them to limit medical parole to inmates so ill they are hooked to ventilators to breathe, meaning their movement is so limited they are not a public danger. The state previously included a much broader range of permanent incapacities allowing inmates to be cared for in nursing homes outside prison walls. Steve Fama, an attorney with the nonprofit Prison Law Office, said the court-appointed federal office that controls health care in California prisons told him the change could affect about 70 of the 210 inmates approved for medical parole under the current system, started in 2014. “It’d be an awful shame if those people were returned to prison,” Fama said. “Those patients have been proven not to need a prison setting given their medical conditions.” The policy shift comes as the state has been reducing its prison population due to the coronavirus pandemic, as...
    SHEFFIELD UNITED star John Fleck has been rushed to hospital after collapsing on the pitch in worrying scenes against Reading. The Blades midfielder, 30, received SIX MINUTES of urgent medical care on the pitch at the Madejski Stadium. 1John Fleck, left, left the Madejski Stadium in an ambulance after collapsing on the pitch - where he received six minutes of urgent medical attentionCredit: Alamy Fleck was taken away from the ground in an ambulance in what Sheff Utd called 'concerning moments'. The club tweeted: "Concerning moments as urgent medical attention needed for John Fleck. "Play is yet to restart but the Scottish midfielder is on his feet and receiving further medical care. "Fleck leaves the field on a stretcher after receiving urgent medical care. "Our thoughts are with you, Flecky!" Fleck was replaced by Conor Hourihane with Sheff Utd leading Reading 1-0 at the time of the shock incident. MORE TO FOLLOW... Most read in Premier LeagueLive BlogCHELSEA 1 JUVENTUS 0 Chalobah smashes in opener as Tuchel's men make lively start at BridgeLive BlogFOOTY LIVE Rice wanted across Europe, Newcastle...
    "All of humanity could be wiped out if they make [another] tragic error," Glenn responded. "This is not something that the elites should be the ones making the decision. We should all be involved in these decisions. There's no bigger decision to make than, 'should we be playing around with things that don't exist necessarily in nature that have jumped to humans?' Should we be playing around with these things, making [dangerous viruses], so in case it jumps to humans, we can kill it with a vaccine? This is insanity. Insanity. Especially with arrogance coupled to it." Sen. Paul went on to point out the additional dangers of allowing any one person to have too much authority, particularly, as in the case of Dr. Fauci, a person with casual disregard for both science and individual liberty. "Fauci not only has a casual disregard for science, but also for individual liberty. You combine the two — ignoring the science, and then having no regard at all for individual liberty — and you have a really dangerous...
              more   In a recent letter, the Michigan Rheumatism Society and similar organizations from elsewhere in the U.S. have urged members of Congress to prioritize the development of predictive drug-response testing and other elements of precision medicine. The model of precision medicine, also referred to as personalized care, calls for collecting and assessing information specific to a patient’s condition, including genetics, health history and living environment. Treatments and preventive measures prescribed after such analysis can then be better suited toward each individual. Heretofore, healthcare prescription has usually followed a one-size-fits-all paradigm that doesn’t work best for every patient.  In recent years, the federal government has taken increased interest in this new medical model. Currently, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is working to improve the accuracy of the Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) tests that examine a person’s genome (or DNA) and are essential to personalized care.  According to a report last week from the Business Research Company, the COVID-19 pandemic has significantly driven up demand for precision medicine.  Organizations that signed the letter to Congress advocate for those suffering from...
    (CNN)New York Attorney General Letitia James urged the Supreme Court Wednesday to deny a request from a group of New York health care workers to block the state's vaccine mandate, arguing that the emergency rule requiring vaccinations for certain health care workers is necessary to combat the spread of the virus, which can lead to a "vicious cycle of staff shortages and deterioration of patient care."James' filing was in response to a lawsuit brought by three nurses and a group called We the Patriots USA, Inc., who object to the fact that while the mandate allows exemptions for those with medical objections, there is no exemption for people with religious objections.New York attorney general releases former Gov. Andrew Cuomos testimony and other documents from sexual harassment investigationIt's the latest dispute concerning the various types of mandates to reach the high court, and it is nearly identical to recent cases brought by workers in Maine. The court has yet to block a mandate, although the Maine mandate went into effect over the objection of three conservative justices.The nurses say they object...
    Former President Bill Clinton shared a video update on his condition on Wednesday after he was released this week from a Southern California hospital where he successfully battled an infection. "I'm really glad to be back home," said 75-year-old Clinton in a video shared to Twitter.  He offered appreciation for the doctors and nurses at the University of California Irvine Medical Center for the "absolutely wonderful care" they provided to him during his stay. BILL CLINTON RELEASED FROM HOSPITAL IN SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA (Getty Images) "I'm doing great, enjoying this beautiful fall weather," Clinton added, noting that he is "on the road to recovery" after spending six days in the hospital. "I want to remind everyone out there: Take the time to listen to your bodies and care for yourselves," he said. "We all have work to do, and each of us has an important role to play in life and the immediate future." ORANGE CA OCTOBER 17, 2021 - Former President Bill Clinton, standing with his wife, Hillary, was discharged from UC Irvine Medical Center Sunday morning. (Allen...
    KYIV, Ukraine (AP) — Belarus on Monday ordered a halt to routine medical care at state clinics in order to devote more resources to coronavirus patients. The Health Ministry said the suspended services include medical examinations and screenings, physiotherapy and dentistry. Belarus has been hit by a rising wave of coronavirus infections, with around 2,000 new cases reported daily in the country of 9.3 million. Authoritarian President Alexander Lukashenko has often brushed off concerns about the coronavirus pandemic, once saying that infections could be treated with “a tractor, a bath and vodka.” Only about 20% of the population have been fully vaccinated. Overall for the pandemic, Belarus has registered about 574,000 infections — about 6% of the population — and 4,417 deaths. ___ Follow AP’s pandemic coverage at https://apnews.com/hub/coronavirus-pandemic Copyright © 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.
    California was the first state in the country to announce all health care workers must be fully vaccinated. Sept. 30, is the deadline for that mandate.There is very high compliance among Bay Area health care providers. Stanford Medicine says 97% of its workforce is fully vaccinated UCSF says 97% of their employees in San Francisco and at Zuckerberg San Francisco General Hospital have had at least one vaccine dose Sutter Health says 92% of its employees and 97% of its affiliated providers are vaccinated Kaiser Permanente says nationwide 90% of their employees and 97% of their physicians are vaccinated RELATED: Proposed bill would require COVID vaccine, negative test for domestic air travel ahead of holidaysDespite the high levels of compliance, there are still some health care workers who feel they can't get the vaccine and now may not have a paycheck until they do."I definitely feel like I'm between a rock and a hard place," said surgical technologist, Megan Broadstreet, who is unvaccinated.Because she's unvaccinated, her employer - Salinas Valley Memorial Hospital - said she'll be placed on...
    SAN FRANCISCO (CBS SF) — As San Francisco Giants prepare to head into the playoffs for the first time since 2016, the team no longer has to worry about a strike by Oracle Park concession workers during the post-season. Early Wednesday morning, union leaders announced they have tentatively reached an agreement with the park concessionaire — Bon Appétit — that includes COVID hazard pay for games played in 2020 and 2021. READ MORE: Concord Police Warn Porch Thieves Getting Bolder As Holiday Season Approaches“This deal will help us be safer on the job, support our families in the Bay Area, get medical care without worrying about the bill, and retire with dignity,” said Deborah Torrano, a suite attendant at Oracle Park and union negotiating committee member. “We were ready to strike, and now our lives will change.â READ MORE: Giants Earn 103rd Win To Tie Third-Most Wins In Team History, Beat Diamondbacks 6-4The union will hold a ratification meeting on Thursday to finalize the deal which runs through March 2024. MORE NEWS: COVID: Roughly 10% Of Bay Area Police, Hospital,...
    (CNN)One night many years ago, I was looking forward to finally getting some sleep after working 17 hours straight as a medical intern. But before I could leave, I got called to see another patient: A homeless man with black grime covering his plaid shirt and brown pants who had a severe blood infection from shooting up heroin with dirty needles. Robert KlitzmanHis record said he had been hospitalized three times in three months for the same medical problem. If he had stopped using dirty needles, he wouldn't be in the hospital. And I could sleep. I remember feeling exhausted, frustrated and angry. I have been thinking about this man and my reaction more recently as my fellow doctors around the country have had to treat an increasing number of patients who ended up with severe cases of Covid-19 after choosing to forgo the vaccine. One colleague told me, "My ICU is full again, with Covid-19 patients who refused to get vaccinated! It's stressing me out! Why should we have to care for patients who didn't want to get...
    Why wear all the gear for safety if you don't really care about being safe? On Aug. 13, 2021, Gov. Kate Brown of Oregon issued an executive order requiring any employee or worker employed by the executive branch of the state’s government to get vaccinated against COVID-19. The order required state employees to get these vaccinations before Oct. 18. This order includes law enforcement in the state as well as firefighters. The argument made by the governor is that both agencies have front-line medical training because both agencies are frequently first responders to medical emergencies.  A handful of police and firefighters have subsequently sued the governor and the state, saying that the order infringes on their “rights and responsibilities to make medical decisions for themselves under Oregon common law.” Their argument is that this order is an unenforceable overreach by the executive branch. On Aug. 30, the Portland City Council announced that unless a person received a medical or religious exemption, all Portland employees must be fully vaccinated against COVID-19 by Oct. 18 or potentially lose their jobs. At the time, the city said it considered the...
    On a special edition of Facing South Florida, Jim DeFede devoted the entire half hour to an investigation of the health care provided by cruise lines for passengers. DeFede interviewed members of two families who took cruises. READ MORE: South Beach Appears To Be Pretty Calm This Labor Day Weekend One traveled on Royal Caribbean, while the other on Carnival, in which passenger received medical care that had dire, and in one case deadly, consequences. Firsthand accounts and an in-depth look at the fallout are highlighted in the program. GUESTS: -Cliff Puchalski, Richard Puchalski’s Son -Laura Goodloe, Richard Puchalski’s Daughter READ MORE: Festivities Continue Ahead Of Sundays Orange Blossom Classic -Todd Michaels, Attorney -Ron Radowski, Suing Carnival Corp. -Christine Radowski, Cruise Ship Passenger -Prof. Ross Klein, Memorial University, Newfoundland Watch PART 1 in the video player above. MORE NEWS: More Shelter Pets Arrive From Louisiana In The Aftermath Of Hurricane Ida Watch PART 2 in the video player below:
    A man was saved on Long Island by Bay Constables after both of his legs were hit by a boat's propeller. The accident took place around 1:30 p.m., Sunday, Aug. 29 in Suffolk County in Noyac Creek in Southhampton. According to Southampton Police Lt. Susan Ralph, the injured man was transported to a residence where Bay Constables were the first to arrive. Once on the scene,  Constables Chris Fraser immediately applied tourniquets to both legs which slowed the victim’s blood loss.  Suffolk County Police Aviation Unit was requested and flew the victim to Stony Brook Hospital to receive further care. "Bay Constable Fraser’s medical training and actions saved the victim from further blood loss and provided immediate medical care," Ralph said. The victim's condition was not known. 
    With hospitals across the U.S. refusing to comply with a new federal rule requiring them to disclose the prices they negotiate with health insurers, a sampling of previously secret data published late Sunday reveals how much basic medical procedures cost at dozens of major hospitals in a project that critics of the for-profit healthcare system said reveals the severity of its dysfunction. The database of hospital rates compiled by the New York Times and researchers at University of Maryland-Baltimore details how patients are charged drastically different prices for the same medical care depending on what insurance company they use—with some procedures costing less if a patient has no insurance at all. As the Times reported, at University of Mississippi Medical Center a patient with a Cigna plan can expect to pay $1,463 for a colonoscopy, while someone with Aetna insurance would be charged more than $2,100. An uninsured patient would be billed for $782. Patients receiving an M.R.I. at Memorial Regional Hospital in Hollywood, Florida will be billed between $1,827 and $2,455 if they have a Cigna, Humana,...
                      by John Murawski  The national movement to eradicate what activists call systemic racism and white privilege from medicine and health care has few public critics in the medical profession. A possible reason: Skeptics who have questioned these efforts have been subject to harsh Twitter campaigns, professional demotions and other blowback. A podcast of the Journal of the American Medical Association caused a furor this year when one of its editors suggested that discussion of systemic racism is an unfortunate distraction that should be taken off the table. In response to a protest petition, the AMA launched an internal investigation into the creation of the podcast (and a since deleted Tweet that promoted it). Eventually, the Journal’s top two editors, who are both white, resigned – the editor-in-chief’s departure coming after he issued a public apology in which he affirmed the existence of structural racism in the United States and in the health care field. In Minneapolis, Hennepin Healthcare System removed gynecologist Tara Gustilo, of Filipino descent, from her position as chair of the OB/GYN department after members...
    Editor’s note: This story is part of the annual Mosaic Journalism Workshop for Bay Area high school students, a two-week intensive course in journalism. Students in the program report and photograph real stories under the guidance of professional journalists. As COVID-19 cases rise and employers wrestle with whether to require vaccinations, South Bay health care workers are split on the issue, even as they acknowledge the dangers of the coronavirus. “Honestly, I am more scared of getting the vaccine than being worried about getting COVID,” said 28-year-old medical assistant Itzel Zamora, who works in Palo Alto. She has not gotten vaccinated. However, Laura Sanchez, a COVID-19 tester in Silicon Valley, is vaccinated, and she thinks others should get the vaccine as well. Maria Bustos, a 42-year-old medical assistant in Palo Alto, agrees with Sanchez. She thinks everyone needs to be protected and the safest way to do that is to get the vaccine. “It’s people’s duty to inform yourself to make the right choice for yourself and your family,” said Sanchez, 36. “Everyone needs to get vaccinated,” she said. While...
    DALY CITY — Three years Seton Medical Center nearly closed when its previous owner went bankrupt, the hospital system is getting a $60 million injection from AHMC Healthcare as part of a bid to modernize aging facilities. On Friday, Southern-California based AHMC Healthcare officials broke ground on a new project to seismically retrofit the Daly City hospital and perform overdue maintenance repairs as part of investments totaling $160 million for new medical equipment and facility upgrades in the future. Dr. Kenneth Kim, chairman of AHMC Seton Medical Center, said the investment ensures Seton will continue to operate and serve the San Mateo County, San Francisco and coastline communities. “This hospital is vital because without it is a healthcare desert, as there are few nearby alternatives for our community,” Kim said in a press release. AHMC Healthcare — a for-profit company — bought Seton out of bankruptcy from nonprofit healthcare provider Verity Health in August 2020 in the midst of the coronavirus pandemic, prompting California Attorney General Xavier Becerra to weigh in on whether the sale would benefit the community. The...
    Dozens of medical groups are calling on employers to make COVID-19 vaccines mandatory for all health care workers. In a joint statement published on Monday, 57 organizations - including the American Medical Association, the American Academy of Pediatrics, the American College of Physicians and the National League for Nursing -noted the rise in case in the U.S. due to the Indian 'Delta' variant spreading among unvaccinated populations. 'We call for all health care and long-term care employers to require their employees to be vaccinated against COVID-19. 'The health and safety of U.S. workers, families, communities, and the nation depends on it.' The groups add that mandating vaccines will help protect not only patients but also vulnerable people, including unvaccinated children and the immunocompromised.  It comes as several health systems across the country mandate that their staff members get vaccinated or risk being fired.   In a joint statement on Monday, 57 medical groups called on employers to make COVID-19 vaccines mandatory for all health care workers. Pictured:  Several experts and institutions have issued statements supporting that all health workers get...
    A leading medical ethics journal faced fierce backlash online after publishing an article suggesting that parents lose their authority to manage their transgender children’s medical decisions. In an article, titled “LGBT testimony and the limits of trust” published last month in the Journal of Medical Ethics, Dr. Maura Priest, a philosophy professor and bioethicist at Arizona State University, wrote that parents should lose their “veto power” in most “transition-related paediatric care”: If the medical community is to take LGBT testimony seriously (as they should) then it is no longer the job of physicians to do their own weighing of the costs and benefits of transition-related care. Assuming the patient is informed and competent, then only the patient can make this assessment, because only the patient has access to the true weight of transition-related benefits. Moreover, taking LGBT patient testimony seriously also means that parents should lose veto power over most transition-related paediatric care. In the paper’s pre-publication draft, Priest states, “Guardian veto power over identify-affirming care [results] in injustice whenever such power means one trans child is denied the care...
    (CNN)Not long ago, Republican Congresswoman Marjorie Taylor Greene -- who opposes passing the Equality Act, which would guarantee federal civil rights protections for LGBTQ Americans -- hung a sign outside her office. Her sign read, "trust the science." If only she -- and like-minded others -- would. Jack Turban Jules Gill-PetersonOne of us is a physician-scientist and the other is a historian of medicine. We've both been watching as conservatives claim their legislative attacks on transgender people are rooted in science. Because we lack explicit federal civil rights protections for transgender people, a problem The Equality Act would remedy, Republicans have been able to launch a range of attacks on the civil rights of transgender people, each time using "science" as their justification. Republican Gov. Ron DeSantis, when signing a piece of anti-trans legislation into law earlier this month, claimed "We are going to go based off biology -- not based on ideology." But here's the thing -- they're not. In fact, attacks on trans people are also attacks on science itself.First of all, transgender people are not "denying science"...
    WHEAT RIDGE, Colo. (CBS4)– SCL Health broke ground Tuesday on a new hospital in Wheat Ridge. The facility will replace Lutheran Medical Center at Clear Creek Crossing. (credit: CBS) The new hospital is being built at Interstate 70 and 40th Avenue in Wheat Ridge, just 3 and a half miles from the existing campus. READ MORE: Can’t Float Away The Heat: Most Colorado Waterways Closed To Tubing SCL Health said the need for an updated hospital will expand access to emergency and critical care for families in Jefferson County. It will also give health care workers more capability to handle situations like the pandemic. (credit: CBS) READ MORE: Antonio Pozos Identified As Victim In Deadly Shooting At Colfax And Quebec “The new replacement hospital will reflect many of the lessons learned over the last year. One example is that most of the beds in the new hospital will have the capabilities to be easily converted into ICU rooms,” said SCL Health CEO Lydia Jumonville. (credit: CBS) MORE NEWS: Man Arrested, Accused Of Shooting While Driving, 1 Man...
    People are turning increasingly to self-managed medication abortions. The year 2021 is awash in anti-abortion bills, with over 500 abortion restrictions and over 150 outright bans introduced so far this year. Additionally, the U.S. Supreme Court recently agreed to hear a case about Mississippi's 15-week abortion ban. It's a grim time for abortion rights and access, which may be why people are seeking information on self-managed medication abortion.  Self-managed medication abortions are when an individual takes the drugs that induce an abortion outside of a clinic setting, without the direct assistance of an abortion provider. Medication abortion is a very safe procedure, and  research from other countries has shown that patients can safely and effectively manage medication abortion without direct assistance.  A new study from Advancing New Standards in Reproductive Health (ANSIRH) examined how many U.S. residents reached out to Aid Access, a nonprofit that provides online consultations for medication abortions, in the period from March 2018 to March 2020. In those two years, over 57,000 people from all 50...
    "Madness of Crowds" author Douglas Murray slammed Harvard professionals and doctors on Wednesday for calling to implement a critical race theory agenda, allowing preferential admission for black and other minority heart patients.  UNIVERSITY PROFESSORS HIT BACK AGAINST OPPONENTS OF CRITICAL RACE THEORY DOUGLAS MURRAY: It’s unbelievable except for anyone who’s followed what critical race theory is trying to do and the extent to which it is just running America. Every single facet of America. It is quite amazing to look at what these Harvard professionals have been arguing for. They say race should be a determining factor in how American heart patients are treated and it says wait for this, that there should be a preferential admission option for black and Latinx patients.  I mean you just have to pause for a moment and imagine how outraged we would all rightly be if some Harvard professional said you know there should be preferential treatment for heart failure patients who are white. I mean we would be outraged. And here are these medical professionals saying that there should be preferential treatment...
    The editor-in-chief of the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) plans to step down later this month after the journal received backlash for publishing a podcast that included controversial remarks from two white doctors on structural racism in health care. The American Medical Association (AMA) announced Tuesday that Howard Bauchner will leave his position after 10 years on June 30 following a review of the podcast and a related tweet. The editor-in-chief had been on administrative leave since March while the review was conducted.  Bauchner said he remains “profoundly disappointed in myself for the lapses that led to the publishing of the tweet and podcast.” “Although I did not write or even see the tweet, or create the podcast, as editor-in-chief, I am ultimately responsible for them,” he said in a statement.  “I share and have always supported the AMA’s commitment to dismantling structural racism in the institutions of American medicine, as evident by numerous publications in JAMA on this issue and related subjects, and look forward to personally contributing to that work going forward,” he added. Thousands signed a petition requesting...
    As Daily Kos continues to cover, trans people—and especially, trans youth—are being attacked on all sides by Republicans. In some states, lawmakers are pushing bills to exclude trans girls from participating in girls’ sports teams. Some states are working to make sure trans folks of any age cannot update the sex on their birth certificate, causing potential nightmares with paperwork and identity for people who do update other information, like their name. And some Republicans are working to ban trans youth from being able to receive gender-affirming medical care by making it a crime for physicians to provide it. All of this amid a literal global pandemic. Whether or not you’ve followed legislation surrounding trans health care closely, plenty of people got a very disappointing perspective on equality and access thanks to a segment on 60 Minutes. Airing on Sunday, journalist Lesley Stahl hosted a segment that promised to go deep on trans folks and medical care. Instead, viewers learned about detransitioning without other important contexts. First, we can dive into the segment—and why it was such a failure on behalf...
123