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    (CNN)Kitchen sponges harbor more bacteria than kitchen brushes, which may be a more hygienic way to clean your dishes, according to researchers in Norway. "Salmonella and other bacteria grow and survive better in sponges than in brushes, the reason is that sponges in daily use never dry up," said Trond Møretrø, a research scientist at Nofima, a Norwegian food research institute. "A single sponge can harbor a higher number of bacteria than there are people on Earth," said Møretrø, an author of a new study, which published online in the Journal of Applied Microbiology.While many bacteria are not harmful, those that are -- like salmonella -- can spread from sponges to hands, kitchen surfaces and equipment and potentially make people sick, he said."The sponge is humid and accumulates food residues which are also food for bacteria, leading to rapid growth of bacteria."Read MoreA sponge is the perfect environment to host various types of bacteria, study saysWhat surprised the researchers most about their findings was that it didn't really matter how people cleaned their sponge or how often. "That the way...
    If you normally use a sponge to wash the dishes and leave it by the sink to dry – then it might be time to come clean. A sponge harbours potentially harmful bacteria for twice as long as a dish-washing brush, a study has found.  Even after squeezing it out, it is still a moist environment where germs can thrive. Brushes, thought to be used by only 29 per cent of Britons, dry more quickly so bacteria on them die faster.  Researchers put salmonella and campylobacter bacteria on different surfaces. Salmonella lasted seven days on two out of three sponge types, but died within three days on a brush hung up to dry.  If you normally use a sponge to wash the dishes and leave it by the sink to dry – then it might be time to come clean (stock image) Campylobacter survived on a sponge for a day but disappeared from a brush. The study looked at the dish-washing habits of almost 10,000 people in Europe.  It found 12 per cent of Britons hung sponges up but two-thirds...
    WHETHER you rely on a dishwasher or scrub your flatware and dishes by hand, a kitchen sponge is probably perched on the edge of your sink right now. But your sponge's resting place could be dirtying your dishes, especially if you aren't taking the time to regularly disinfect it. 4Experts say you should disinfect your sponge every few daysCredit: Getty 4A blend of water and bleach will help you keep your kitchen sponge cleanCredit: Getty The home experts at Martha Stewart revealed two tactics for cleaning your kitchen sponges and one telltale sign that it's time to replace the sponge on your counter. Before getting into the nitty-gritty details of sponge maintenance, it's important to bust one major myth. In the past, some creative cleaners have turned to the microwave to disinfect their sponges. But because it's hard to know exactly how long each sponge would need to stay in the microwave, and since each microwave has different wattage and settings, there's a good chance your sponge won't actually get clean. READ MORE CLEANING TIPSKEEP IT CLEAN I’m a...
    HOW MANY times have you rushed to change your shirt after noticing white deodorant stains streaking the fabric? Well, one beauty expert has revealed the tool she uses to remove unsightly stains - and you probably have it in your makeup bag. 4Sleeveless tops can end up ringed with deodorant stainsCredit: TikTok/kethenydutka 4Using a dry makeup sponge, Ketheny blots the stain away from the fabricCredit: TikTok/kethenydutka At the start of her video demo, TikTok user Ketheny Dutka showed off a patch of deodorant stains under the arms of her black sleeveless top. Instead of switching her top, she used a dry makeup sponge to blot away the deodorant, leaving a clean shirt behind. "This is life-changing," Ketheny said in the caption. THE PROCESS The technique is similar to how you would use the sponge to blend makeup. Starting where the stains are heaviest, you should blot and swipe the sponge over the area. The contours of the sponge make it easy to lift deodorant from folds and seams. Most read in LifestyleROYAL REUNION Duchess' night out with...
    DECLAN RICE looks certain to be a future England captain. The midfielder, who is set to earn his 27th cap in Tuesday's World Cup qualifying clash with Hungary at Wembley, is West Ham skipper when Mark Noble is not playing. 1Declan Rice looks set to be a future England captainCredit: Richard Pelham / The Sun And the 22-year-old will become the Hammers’ official club captain when long-serving Noble, 34, leaves at the end of the season. Rice, who swapped the Republic of Ireland for England in 2019, was a key player at Euro 2020 and has taken his game to another level for David Moyes' side this season. Three Lions boss Gareth Southgate said: “I spoke to Declan when he was making the transfer from Ireland and we had seen things in him which we believed could be helpful to us as a country. “You could tell his mentality was one where he wanted to learn and improve and test himself. “He is a real sponge for tactical information and observations on his game and is desperate to be the...
    Are large loads of laundry leading you to seek out money-saving solutions? Well, maybe DIY dryer sheets can help you cut down on costs. All you need are sponges, fabric softener and water to create your own version of a dryer sheet, according to Cary Colón – who shared her family’s laundry hack in a viral TikTok video.  In her video, Colón demonstrated how you can make dryer sheet replacements by soaking soft sponges in fabric softer and water.  GRANDMOTHER'S VIRAL DISHWASHER HACK CLAIMS TO SOLVE AN AGE-OLD PROBLEM Cary Colón shared her family’s long-used laundry hack in a viral TikTok video, which shows dryer sheets can be replaced with sponges. (Cary Colón / Pairs Well with Whine) Whenever Colón makes her dryer sponges, she cuts the household item in half and throws them in a flip-tight container. She then pours in an equal amount of fabric softener and water and mixes the liquid before sealing the container.  On laundry days, Colón squeezes out the excess liquid and throws two sponge halves into the dryer with her clothes....
    A mum has shared why you should be putting your dish sponge in the dishwasher if you want to banish germs and stop spreading bacteria. Leanne, from Brisbane, said she puts a dirty dish sponge in with her grubby dishes at least once per week, so she doesn't have to replace the sponge quite as regularly. 'Do you clean your kitchen sponge regularly? If you answered no, stop reading immediately,' Leanne posted on Instagram. Scroll down for video A mum has shared why you should be putting your dish sponge in the dishwasher if you want to banish germs and stop spreading bacteria (pictured) RELATED ARTICLES Previous 1 Next Dietitian reveals why you should NEVER squeeze an avocado to... Mum with more than 2 MILLION TikTok followers for her... Student, 26, diagnosed with aggressive skin cancer TWICE... Shoppers are going crazy for this serum that promises to... Share this article Share 'Did you know that your kitchen sponge can house 362 different species of bacteria and alarmingly 45billion bacteria...
    A sponge-like fossil dating back approximately 890 million years may be the oldest prehistoric animal on Earth. The fossils were first discovered in Canada's Northwest Territories and new research in the scientific journal Nature posits just that.  103-MILLION-YEAR-OLD DINOSAUR FOSSIL FOUND IN OREGON Researchers said that if "millimetric-to-centimetric vermiform-microstructured organism" is the fossilized tissue of keratose sponges, "the material described here would represent the oldest body-fossil evidence of animals known to date, and would provide the first physical evidence that animals emerged before the Neoproterozoic oxygenation event and survived through the glacial episodes of the Cryogenian period." While most major groups of animals first appear in the fossil record during the Cambrian Period around 541 million years ago, the research presents evidence of sponge fossils that could be 350 million years older. The petrographic work is supported by images of microscopically-viewed 30-μm-thick rock slices from the approximately 890-million-year-old Little Dal reefs. "The shape, size, branching style and polygonal meshworks of the Little Dal vermiform tubules closely resemble both spongin fibre networks of modern keratosan sponges and vermiform microstructure either demonstrated or interpreted...
    More On: fossils Fossilized feces from dinosaur relative yields new beetle species Are these mangled remains mankind’s first shark attack victim? Alaskan baby dino fossils suggest ‘polar dinosaurs’ lived in Arctic year-round Bizarre prehistoric skull could be ‘missing link’ in human evolution WASHINGTON, July 28 – Fossils found in rugged mountainous terrain in Canada’s Northwest Territories may give a glimpse at the humble dawn of animal life on Earth – sea sponges that inhabited primordial reefs built by bacteria roughly 890 million years ago. A Canadian researcher said on Wednesday the fossils, dating to a time called the Neoproterozoic Period, appear to show distinctive microstructures from the body of a sea sponge built similarly to a species living today called the Mediterranean bath sponge, or Spongia officinalis. If this interpretation is correct, these would be the oldest fossils of animal life by roughly 300 million years. “The earliest animals to emerge evolutionarily were probably sponge-like. This is not surprising given that sponges are the most basic type of animal both today and in the fossil record,” said geologist Elizabeth...
    A scientist says fossils she collected from an ancient seabed in the mountains of northwestern Canada may be the earliest evidence of animal life on Earth ever discovered.  In a study published Wednesday in the science journal Nature, Laurentian University geologist Elizabeth Turner detailed how she found fossilized three-dimensional structures that resemble modern sponge skeletons in thin sections of rocks taken from the remnants of a prehistoric ocean reef. Turner said the surrounding rock was 890 million years old, which would make the fossils she discovered about 350 million years older than the oldest undisputed sponge fossils previously found. Many scientists believe Earth’s first animal groups included simple, soft sponges or sponge-like creatures that lack muscles and nerves but have other features of simple animals, including cells with differentiated functions. But scientists often disagree on specifically what the earliest animal life might have looked like. Turner’s discovery will be carefully vetted by other scientists, and it has been greeted with excitement and skepticism. Paleobiologist Graham Budd of Sweden’s Uppsala University told The New York Times the problem was the 350...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — A Canadian geologist may have found the earliest fossil record of animal life on Earth, according to a report published Wednesday in the journal Nature. Around a billion years ago, a region of northwest Canada now defined by steep mountains was a prehistoric marine environment where the remains of ancient sponges may be preserved in mineral sediment, the paper says. Geologist Elizabeth Turner discovered the rocks in a remote region of the Northwest Territories accessible only by helicopter, where she has been excavating since the 1980s. Thin sections of rock contain three-dimensional structures that resemble modern sponge skeletons. “I believe these are ancient sponges — only this type of organism has this type of network of organic filaments,” said Joachim Reitner, a geobiologist and expert in sponges at Germany’s University of Gottingen, who was not involved in the research. The dating of adjacent rock layers indicates the samples are about 890 million years old, which would make them about 350 million years older than the oldest undisputed sponge fossils previously found. “What’s most...
    More On: new york knicks The big obstacle that can end Chris Paul-to-Knicks dream Two Knicks selected to USA Basketball Select Team Peloton star Ally Love tells Jalen Rose about almost dying at age 9 Nets have options when it comes to guard’s future Obi Toppin didn’t get much of a chance to prepare for his rookie season because of the pandemic. Drafted with the No. 8 pick in late November, Toppin was in Knicks training camp on Dec. 1. Now he’s got time. And he’s making the most of it. Oh, is he ever. And Toppin is certain his second campaign won’t resemble his rookie season. After the first-round elimination by Atlanta, Toppin took four days off and came back to the Tarrytown campus for workouts. Soon after, he got a surprising invite to the U.S. Select Team to compete this week against the Olympic Team in Las Vegas. In August, also in Sin City, Toppin will compete in his first summer league. Speaking from Vegas on Zoom after a second practice against the Olympians on Wednesday, Toppin...
    Researchers at Northwestern University have created a membrane that is capable of sucking up phosphate to prevent dangerous algae blooms, allowing the mineral to be reused. Likened to a 'Swiss Army knife,' the Phosphate Elimination and Recovery Lightweight (PEARL) membrane is a porous, flexible material that captures up to 99 percent of phosphate ions in polluted water.  It's coated with a material that binds to the phosphate and effectively acts as a sponge, either holding the phosphate inside or pushing it back out for additional use.  'We used to reuse phosphate a lot more,' said the study's lead author, Northwestern's Stephanie Ribet, in a statement. 'Now we just pull it out of the ground, use it once and flush it away into water sources after use. So, it's a pollution problem, a sustainability problem and a circular economy problem.'  The findings will be published later this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science.   The Phosphate Elimination and Recovery Lightweight membrane is a porous, flexible material that captures up to 99 percent of phosphate ions in polluted...
    BOSTON (CBS) – When young Dylan Duato and some friends spotted an unusual blob on a Falmouth beach recently, they couldn’t figure it out. “I took my foot, and I kind of pushed against it a little bit with my foot,” Dylan said. “And it had kind of like a spongy feeling.” His uncle walked over, picked it up, and broke off a piece. Inside, it looked like yellow sponge cake. So the family started googling. “We’ve had it for two or three weeks now and it seems like it’s headed more toward the ambergris,” said Paul Duato, Dylan’s father. Ambergris. It’s poop from only a sperm whale, and it’s worth a ton of money to perfume manufacturers. A boy found a mysterious object on a Falmouth beach that could be ambergris (Image credit Dylan Duato) “I know that they sell this for so much money,” Dylan said. “Because basically a video I watched a couple years back, it was like insane finds.” WBZ contacted sperm whale researchers in the Bahamas and sent them photos. They thought maybe ambergris, but...
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