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    Citing Household Survey Data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, Payne noted that full-time jobs dropped by 71,000, while part-time jobs increased by 384,000, and people who held multiple jobs rose by 92,000. \u201cHousehold Survey\nFull Time -71,000\nPart Time +384,000\nMultiple Jobs +92,000\u201d — Charles V Payne (@Charles V Payne) 1659708224 The report also found that there were 279,000 fewer people who were self-employed. \u201cSelf Employed dropping like a stone the past year.\u201d — Frog Capital (@Frog Capital) 1659721317 Federal Reserve Economic Data revealed that 433,000 Americans are working two full-time jobs – which is an all-time high. \u201c433,000 Americans now working 2 full time jobs.\nThat is an all time high.\u201d — Frog Capital (@Frog Capital) 1659720907 Just The News reported, "This trend of the economy dropping full-time jobs while adding second and part-time jobs has been accelerating since March." Many people suggest that the surge in part-time jobs and people getting multiple jobs is because they are facing soaring inflation month after month. In July, inflation hit 9.1% – the highest in more than 40 years. Despite the Biden...
    Eleven medical professionals at a single Missouri hospital are all pregnant at the same time — with two nurses even due to give birth on the same day. At Liberty Hospital in Liberty, Missouri, ten nurses and one doctor are all expecting babies this year. Coincidentally enough, most of them work in obstetrics and labor and delivery. 'They always do things in groups, but we’ve never had 10 at the same time,' Birthing Center Director Nicki Kolling told Fox4 KC. 'So, it’s been fun.' Ten nurses and one OB-GYN at Liberty Hospital in Liberty, Missouri are pregnant The women are all set to give birth this year, with the soonest deliveries expected in the next couple of weeks and the latest one expected around Thanksgiving  The women are all set to give birth this year, with the soonest deliveries expected in the next couple of weeks and the latest one expected around Thanksgiving.  'There's a lot of nurses saying they won't drink the water,' Hannah Miller, a 29-year-old postpartum nurse who is expecting her first child, told Good Morning America. 'One of...
    A slice of New York pizza now costs more than a ride on the city's subway system. In what is a very New York metric, also known as the 'pizza principle,' the average cost of regular slice is of pizza is now $3.14, well above the $2.75 fare for a ride on the subway. The price of a slice is more than $3 in all of the five borough's for the first time. Brooklyn average's at $3.06 while the cost is even higher in Manhattan at $3.26. An average slice of pizza in the Bronx is $3.15, it's $3.12 in Staten Island and slightly cheaper in Queens at $3.10.  Prices for a slice of plain pizza are now heading well above $3.00 in New York Subway fares have been frozen at $2.75 a ride for the foreseeable future New York's Governor Kathy Hochul has said the fare for the subway will remain frozen for the foreseeable future, which means inflation driving up the cost of pizza ingredients, the gap between the price of a slice and subway ride may yet...
    On Friday’s broadcast of the Fox Business Network’s “Varney & Co.,” Labor Secretary Marty Walsh said that “we have to transition into clean energy” at some point and that we’re in the process of making the transition. Walsh also stated that making the transition “can be painful in some sectors and some fields,” and isn’t going to happen instantaneously. Walsh stated, [relevant remarks begin around 2:15] “Well, certainly, we have to continue to work on our energy plan, is what we have to do, and we have to continue to work on clean energy, we need to work on platforms for clean energy. The president, certainly — it’s not going to happen overnight. But in the infrastructure bill, we put in there about creating opportunities for electric charging stations. We’re working to increase our productivity in charging in electric vehicles moving in this country, we’re moving in that direction. Yeah, it’s not going to happen tomorrow, but we are definitely heading in that direction. And at some point, we have to transition, and that’s what we’re in the process of doing right...
    A first-time mom-to-be has revealed of guidelines for her friends and family to follow when she goes into labor, warning them not to post pictures without their permission, to keep their mouths shut if they disagree with a medical choice they make, and to refrain from kissing their newborn when they finally get to meet her. Taylor Davis shared the rules she came up with as she prepares to welcome her first child, a daughter, with her husband, John, posting the lengthy list on TikTok last month. 'Just a few of the things we are asking for when our little girl decides to come,' Taylor, who is now 38 weeks pregnant, caption the video. Her rules have since gone viral, sparking fierce debate in the comments — with some vocal critics them 'ridiculous' and accusing Taylor of being too demanding, and others insisting that the rules are all completely reasonable and applauding her for setting boundaries. American mother-to-be Taylor Davis and her husband, John, are expecting a daughter this month She shared the 12 rules they wrote up for family...
    FedEx predicted that Monday will be a record day for deliveries for the 2021 holiday season, company executives told CNBC. “We’ve seen a lot of people actually starting their Christmas shopping in the month of October, which is fundamentally different than we have seen traditionally in the past,” FedEx vice president of global e-commerce Ryan Kelly told CNBC. “What you see is a lot of messaging about shop and ship early, pulling sales forward, pulling promotions forward. A lot of retailers have really leaned into that this year,” Kelly said. FedEx delivered roughly 96% of its packages on time during October, compared to 99% for UPS and the U.S. postal service, according to data obtained by CNBC. Federal Express trucks fuel up at the Love’s Truck Stop in Springville, Utah, on December 1, 2021. – High fuel prices and a shortage of truckers have had a negative effect on the US supply chain. (Photo by GEORGE FREY/AFP via Getty Images) On-time delivery over 95% is considered an indication of an efficient network, according to CNBC. Additionally, 70% of online deliveries...
    A truck picks up a shipping container at the Port of Savannah in Georgia. The supply chain crisis has created a backlog of nearly 80,000 shipping containers at this port, the third-largest container port in the United States, with around 20 ships anchored off the Atlantic coast, waiting to offload their cargo.Paul Hennessy | LightRocket | Getty Images LONDON — Top executives at multiple European blue-chip companies have told CNBC that supply chain problems, labor shortages and inflationary pressures will run for longer than policymakers are expecting. The most recent inflation prints have done little to assuage concerns about stickier inflation. The U.S. consumer price index jumped 6.2% in October from a year ago, official figures revealed on Wednesday, the sharpest annual rise for 30 years and vastly outstripping the U.S. Federal Reserve's target. Chinese producer price index inflation surged 13.5% annually in October, while U.S. PPI grew at 8.6% annually, equaling an all-time record. Companies around the world are battling supply chain bottlenecks as a post-pandemic spike in demand converges with industrial production struggling to catch up after lengthy Covid-induced...
    Happy Labor Day, if a Labor Day that represents the cut-off date for unemployment benefits for millions of people and on which the federal minimum wage hasn’t risen for well over a decade offers much to be happy about. But it is a day to celebrate workers—and the labor movement that has built what power U.S. workers have. So let’s take a few minutes to make clear the difference that unions have made, both to their members and to all workers. That second point is an important one: Unions lower economic inequality. As union membership has dropped, the share of income going to the top 10% of people has risen. And higher union density means higher wages for nonunion workers, as employers are forced to try to keep up. “Had union density remained at its 1979 level,” according to the Economic Policy Institute, “weekly wages of nonunion men in the private sector would be 5% higher (that’s an additional $2,704 in earnings for year-round workers), while weekly wages for nonunion men in the private sector without a college education would be 8%, or $3,016...
    AMERICANS will enjoy their time off from work on Labor Day barbecuing and vacationing as the summer comes to a close. The day became a national holiday in 1894 when the government granted laborers a day of rest to honor the working class.  2Labor Day is celebrated annually on the first Monday of SeptemberCredit: Getty What is Labor Day? Labor Day is a national holiday in the US celebrated on the first Monday in September to honor the American working class.  It originated during the Industrial Revolution in the 19th century, when Americans worked roughly 12-hour days with little pay and poor working conditions. Labor laws weren't really established at the time, so children also worked in factories to help their families make ends meet. Growing concerns about the squalid conditions led to the creation of labor unions, which protested to demand laws that protected workers. How did Labor Day become a national holiday? On September 5, 1882, 10,000 workers took unpaid time off to march from City Hall to Union Square in New York City as a tribute to...
    In this article MCD CMG TGT WMT CVS DENN Denny's Mobile Relief DinerSource: Denny'sRestaurant chain Denny's recently mobilized its 53-foot kitchen truck. Instead of serving up pancakes and coffee to natural disaster victims as it usually does, it had a different mission: A nationwide hiring tour. Employers are going to new lengths to attract workers. CVS Health dropped requirements for entry-level job candidates to have a high school degree. And Walmart is doling out bonuses to warehouse workers for staying on the job this summer and fall. For many low-wage workers, the tighter labor market means that the tables have turned with employers. Companies' desire to quickly fill job openings has taken on more urgency, as retailers gear up for the holiday season and restaurants race to make up for months when they had to temporarily shutter or saw sales crater. That has meant bigger paydays and perks for employees. In recent months, Chipotle Mexican Grill has raised hourly wages and introduced referral bonuses, while McDonald's is chipping in millions of dollars to help its franchisees pay workers more...
    The high-profile decision the other day by the U.S. Supreme Court allowing student athletes at colleges and universities to receive upgraded educational-related benefits beyond those currently limited by their governing body, the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA), could lead to a number of changes in college athletics. One is the imminent likelihood of allowing athletes to receive compensation from outside sources for endorsements, testimonials, and the like. Although not expressly addressed by the Supreme Court in its June 21 ruling in NCAA v. Alston et al., that clearly is on the horizon, especially because a number of states have adopted laws to that effect. But there is another less visible change looming, perhaps of even greater significance, and it stems from litigation right here in Minnesota. Three weeks before the Supreme Court decision, the Eighth Circuit Court of Appeals, the federal court that oversees federal litigation in Minnesota and six surrounding states, reversed a lower court ruling by the Federal District Court in Minnesota that had dismissed a lawsuit bought by 10 Black University of Minnesota football players, claiming discrimination on how...
    Morgan Stanley CEO James Gorman (shown in a 2019 photo) said on Monday he expects all New York City staff to return to the office full time by Labor Day Morgan Stanley CEO James Gorman said on Monday he expects all New York City staff to return to the office full time by Labor Day, and if they don't they may face salary cuts.  Gorman was speaking at the firm's annual U.S. Financials, Payments & CRE Conference when he made the remarks, some of the strongest indicators yet of how big business will handle getting their staff back to work in person.   Right now, the bank still isn't dictating how many days a week staff should come in, but Gorman says that'll change if people don't choose to come back themselves by the end of the summer.    'Make no mistake about it. We do our work inside Morgan Stanley offices, and that's where we teach, that's where our interns learn, that's how we develop people .  'On Labor Day, I'll be very disappointed if people haven't found their way into...
    On Friday’s “CNN Newsroom,” Labor Secretary Marty Walsh reacted to the jobs report by stating that issues of childcare and the fact that “many of our kids are still in school in a hybrid model” and some are still learning remotely are some of the “barriers” to people getting back into the workforce. Walsh said, “I think that there are definitely barriers to people coming back to work. There’s lots of issues around childcare. There’s still — many of our kids are still in school in a hybrid model. Some are in-person. Some are learning remotely.” Follow Ian Hanchett on Twitter @IanHanchett
    While the United Farm Workers union prepared to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the Delano grape boycott, Al Rojas was too busy plotting his next move to partake in the festivities. There was no doubt the longtime, scrappy organizer understood the importance of the anniversary. The late 1960s boycott organized by Filipino and Latino laborers marked a milestone for farmworkers and revolutionized the labor movement in the United States. It led to the passage of the California Agricultural Labor Relations Act of 1975, which established collective-bargaining power for farmworkers in the state. But Rojas knew there were still too many laborers who needed help. “No time to celebrate. Agricultural workers in California and Mexico are still unorganized!” Rojas wrote in a 2016 letter to the UFW days before the celebration. “Today there is an anti-labor offensive not only against farmworkers but against all workers — from postal workers who face privatization to teachers who face charters and union-busting along with more segregation in the schools.” Working within the shadows of titan labor organizers, Rojas pushed for...
    In 2012, Oregon mother Julie Keith opened a package of Halloween decorations from her local Kmart. Inside, she found something far more unsettling than a bunch of plastic skeletons and gravestones: an SOS letter from the prisoner who made them.  Written neatly in a blue pen, it read:  Please kindly resend this letter to the World Human Right[s] Organization. Thousands [of] people here who are under the persecution of the Chinese Communist Party Government will thank and remember you forever.  Julie froze.  “Is this a prank?” she thought.  The 42-year-old read on as the note detailed inhumane work conditions and the fact that many workers were imprisoned despite having committed no crimes. She Googled the name of the labor camp mentioned in the note: Masanjia. It was real. She tried contacting various human rights organizations and finally went to the Oregonian newspaper, which published a story about the SOS.  Then she waited.  Sun Yi was arrested and sent to a labor camp for practicing a meditation-based philosophy and being critical of the Communist Party.Photo Courtesy: Letter From Masanjia / Flying...
    More On: china WHO backtracks, says COVID-19 lab leak possibility not ‘discarded’ NYPD cop accused of spying for China to be freed on $2M bond Chinese TV features blackface performers in New Year’s gala BBC banned in China after explosive report on Uighur rape In 2012, Oregon mother Julie Keith opened a package of Halloween decorations from her local Kmart. Inside, she found something far more unsettling than a bunch of plastic skeletons and gravestones: an SOS letter from the prisoner who made them.  Written neatly in a blue pen, it read:  Please kindly resend this letter to the World Human Right[s] Organization. Thousands [of] people here who are under the persecution of the Chinese Communist Party Government will thank and remember you forever.  Julie froze.  “Is this a prank?” she thought.  The 42-year-old read on as the note detailed inhumane work conditions and the fact that many workers were imprisoned despite having committed no crimes. She Googled the name of the labor camp mentioned in the note: Masanjia. It was real. She tried contacting various human rights organizations...
    ATLANTIC CITY, N.J. (CBS) — The holiday weekend is coming to a close. In Cape May and at shore towns across the country, beachgoers are saying goodbye to the summer season. Due to the pandemic, it’s been unlike anything we’ve experienced before. So how are businesses doing down the shore? The best way to answer how businesses have done this holiday weekend is to just take a look at the scene from Monday. So many people are on the boardwalk, going in and out of shops and restaurants and the casinos in Atlantic City. “Everybody got smiles on their faces, it’s a good vibe out here,” one person said. From the casino floor of Caesars Palace in Atlantic City to the shores of the Atlantic Ocean, beachgoers are waving goodbye to another summer as Labor Day winds down. “Just hang out, enjoy the sun, play some games,” said Ryan Berton, who was visiting from Hamden, Connecticut. In Ocean City, families flocked to the boardwalk Monday. “The boardwalk’s really fun,” Susan Berton said. “What’s your favorite part about coming to OC?” asked CBS3’s...
    Centennial varsity football coach Mike Diggins kept checking the time Thursday. That evening, he was scheduled to coach the Cougars in their season opener against Edina. But that was before the Minnesota State High School League voted to move football to a modified spring season this year, citing coronavirus concerns. So, instead, Diggins took in three sixth-grade football games on Thursday night, checking the time throughout. “I kept looking at my phone like, ‘We’d be in warmups right now.’ or ‘We would be in the first quarter right now,’ ” Diggins said. “It was hard, and it was a beautiful night for high school football, so that was the hard part, too.” Woodbury football coach Andy Hill spent the better part of Thursday making plans for his team’s allotted fall practices. By the evening, he was with his family, purposefully attempting to distract himself from the season that wasn’t starting. “I think that most of us coaches have just gotten to the point of distracting ourselves,” Hill said. “I don’t even know if it’s really set in, but you definitely...
    CHATHAM — Activists across the city are preparing for another “Hit the Hood” peace initiative over Labor Day weekend as they work to limit gun violence through positive programming. Neighbors will serve as “interrupters and peace agents” in Chicago’s violence “hotspots,” while organizers are planning events and marches to engage with residents over the holiday weekend. “We are calling all different organizers — the faith-based community, block clubs, the city of Chicago at large — to make sure that they start organizing now so we can start getting ahead of this community violence,” said William Calloway, executive director of anti-violence nonprofit Christianaire and former 5th Ward aldermanic candidate. Grants of $5,000 each issued by My Block, My Hood, My City will fund a weekend full of community-led events, including: A “Feed the Hood” fish fry, 5 p.m. Sept. 4 at Josephine’s Southern Cooking, 436 E. 79th St. in Chatham. A back-to-school “peace party” and giveaway of tablets and bookbags for kids in South Shore, location and time to be determined. A free “Taste on 63rd Street” featuring local restaurants...
    By Jonnelle Marte, Ann Saphir and Howard Schneider Aug 27 (.) – The United States Federal Reserve unveiled an aggressive new strategy on Thursday to restore employment and bring the consumer price index to healthy levels, considering that now in the world “the downside risks to the employment and inflation have increased. “ Under the new scheme, released in a statement approved by the 17 central bank governors, the Fed said that it will seek an average inflation target of 2% over time and that it will compensate for periods below that threshold by allowing an inflationary index. major “for a certain time”. In addition, he said he will focus on preventing employment from falling below its established maximum levels. “Our revised strategy reflects our appreciation for the benefits of a strong labor market, especially for many low- and middle-income communities, and because we believe that a robust labor market can be sustained without causing an unwanted advance in inflation,” said the president of Fed Jerome Powell in remarks prepared for his speech at the Jackson Hole central bank chiefs...
    US coronavirus: Average deaths are over 1,000 a day for 16th straight day Oranges, Lemons, Limes and Potatoes Have Been Recalled Due to Listeria Contamination Uber and Lyft threaten to temporarily shut down in California over labor disputes © Max Whittaker/Reuters Taxi drivers protest against transportation network companies such as Uber and Lyft along with Assembly Bill 2293 at the State Capitol in Sacramento, California, June 25, 2014. Max Whittaker/Reuters Both Uber and Lyft said they could temporarily shut down in California if forced to consider its drivers employees.  On Monday, a court ruled in favor of labor activists in ordering Uber and other gig-work firms to pay workers as employees, not contractors. The companies requested a 10-day stay on the ruling.  A group of companies that rely on independent contractors have proposed a "third" way of classifying workers, including a benefits pool that can follow workers across apps and platforms while maintaining flexibility.  Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. Uber and Lyft could temporarily shut down in California if a court ruling saying its workers...
    Rebecca Gordon August 3, 2020 12:26AM (UTC) This piece originally appeared on TomDispatch. In two weeks, my partner and I were supposed to leave San Francisco for Reno, Nevada, where we'd be spending the next three months focused on the 2020 presidential election. As we did in 2018, we'd be working with UNITE-HERE, the hospitality industry union, only this time on the campaign to drive Donald Trump from office. Now, however, we're not so sure we ought to go. According to information prepared for the White House Coronavirus Task Force, Nevada is among the states in the "red zone" when it comes to both confirmed cases of, and positive tests for, Covid-19. I'm 68. My partner's five years older, with a history of pneumonia. We're both active and fit (when I'm not tripping over curbs), but our ages make us more likely, if we catch the coronavirus, to get seriously ill or even die. That gives a person pause. : Then there's the fact that Joe Biden seems to have a double-digit lead over Trump nationally and at least an eight-point lead in Nevada, according to the...
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