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    Women are more likely to suffer from a miscarriage during the dog days of summer, and the sweltering heat in many parts of the U.S. may be to blame, a new study finds. A research team led by Boston University found that American women are 44 percent more likely to suffer a miscarriage in late-August than they are in late-February - a drastic difference across a six month period. While the exact reason for this disparity has yet to have been determined, researchers speculate that it is likely due to the extreme heat as states with more severe summer weather exhibited the trend the most. They also note that many other potential birth issues, like stillbirths and low birth weight are more common in summer as well. Researchers found that women are 44% more likely to suffer a miscarriage in late August than in late February. They believe it has to do with the hotter weather during theses months. Other experts warn it is easier for a mother's body to become dehydrated or worn out when having to manage two...
    IT IS no longer a case of if but more likely when we will answer the question: "Are we alone?". Even in our own cosmic backyard – our solar system – there are numerous potential candidates for life.  2Footage released by the Pentagon of an explained encounter with a UFO near the USS Roosevelt in 2015 - known as the 'Gimbal' 2Sara Cruddas is a TV presenter, author and journalist with a background in astrophysics From the red planet Mars – which scientists understand was likely much warmer and wetter in life, and may have had the conditions for simple microbial life. To Europa and Enceladus – icy moons of the gas giants Jupiter and Saturn, which have probable liquid oceans beneath their frozen surfaces. Even the planet Venus – previously deemed an inhospitable world – has been subject to scrutiny about the possibility of simple life in its clouds.  But when it comes to intelligent life, to the likes dreamed up by science fiction, or perhaps something even beyond the imagination, we just don’t know. For...
    The St. Louis Cardinals should try to swing a trade for Texas Rangers ace Kyle Gibson at the deadline. Per MLB insider Jon Heyman, Gibson remains one of the more likely pitchers moved at the trade deadline, as the Texas Rangers are clear sellers. With Joey Gallo also potentially out the door, the Rangers could restock their farm system by dealing Gibson as well. Heyman had this to say about the starting pitching market as a whole: “Rivals view Kyle Gibson as a bit more likely to be traded than José Berrios. Meanwhile a thin starter market and uncertainty about availability of top guys Gibson, Berrios and other stars who range from possibilities to go (ie Morton) to long shots (ie Scherzer) delays market.” The Cardinals, meanwhile, have been lacking a true ace for their pitching staff ever since the injury to Jack Flaherty. After a promising start post All-Star break, Mike Girsch is left wondering if this team is worth adding to in pursuit of an NL Wild Card berth.MLB rumors: Could the Texas Rangers trade Kyle Gibson to...
    Exoplanets that have a modest tilt on their axis like Earth are more likely to have complex life due to the potential for an oxygenated atmosphere, a NASA-funded study says. Since the first exoplanet was discovered in 1992, nearly 30 years ago, it's been widely believed that multiple components are needed for a planet to support life: it has to be in the 'Goldilocks region of its star so water can exist; water should be present; and for advanced life, such as our own, it should have atmospheric oxygen.  The researchers created a model for the conditions that are needed for life to exist and thrive on Earth, focusing on how changes to those conditions via different amounts of oxygen produced would be for photosynthetic life.   'The model allows us to change things such as day length, the amount of atmosphere, or the distribution of land to see how marine environments and the oxygen-producing life in the oceans respond,' the study's lead researcher, Stephanie Olson, from Purdue University, said in a statement.  Exoplanets that tilt on their axis like...
    The New York Jets could have a strategy to land Deshaun Watson that includes giving the team an unbeatable offer, the New York Post speculated. Watson has reportedly asked the Houston Texans for a trade after a falling out with the front office over the direction of the franchise. While there are a number of teams that have been connected to him, columnist Steve Serby speculated that the Jets may be able to jump to the front of the pack with a two-pronged approach that includes a massive offer and a pitch to Watson on the direction of the franchise. As the report noted, Jets general manager Joe Douglas has the ability to build a competitive roster around Watson with a strong culture. “Douglas has $63,475,814 in cap space, according to overthecap.com, and he will be a player in the free-agent market for a No. 1 receiver (Allen Robinson, Chris Godwin) to team with Denzel Mims and Jamison Crowder. He’ll find him Playmakers and Protectors,” he wrote, noting that the Jets already have a strong tackle in Mekhi Becton...
    Women over 75 may be more at risk of dementia than men because they had less access to education, scientists say. Those born in the first half of the 20th century, when fewer women finished school, tend to perform worse than male peers in tests showing how the brain has aged. But as education improved over the years, the gap narrowed – and women under 75 now perform better than men. The researchers, from University College London, said the findings showed how important equal access to education was for public health, especially in countries where girls are kept out of school. They looked at 16,000 men and women born between 1930 and 1955 to find out the impact of education on memory and verbal fluency – both linked to the risk of dementia. Those born in the first half of the 20th century, when fewer women finished school, tend to perform worse than male peers in tests showing how the brain has aged (file image) First, the participants memorised a list of words then recalled as many as possible within...
    Another piece of artwork in Spanish has been botched during renovations, sparking laughs from locals, a report showed. Antonio Capel, a local Spanish artist, posted on Facebook showing the before and after photos of a sculpture at what he told Associated Press News was a bank in Palencia. This led locals to flock to the site to take photos of the mistake, AP reported. (RELATED: New Coronavirus Restrictions Enacted Across Europe As New Cases Rise) “It looks like a cartoon character,” Capel wrote in his post.  Las fotos están un poco borrosas, de todas maneras se aprecia la pícia perfectamente. Esta cabeza se cayó de uno de los… Posted by Antonio Capel Artista on Saturday, November 7, 2020 Capel said he was tipped off about the sculpture by a local florist on the same street in Palencia, AP reported. He said it’s likely the renovations were done years ago. Local authorities declined to give details to AP on when the renovation was done and by who, adding that the city will likely investigate. (RELATED: REPORT: Spanish Police Seize Over 2,400 Pounds...
    Scientists say the 'dose' of coronavirus a person is infected with may determine how  ill they become. This means contracting a very low amount of the virus may result in being asymptomatic with no coughing, fever or shortness of breath. However, a modest dose may result in someone have a mild-to-moderate infection and a very high dose could lead to hospitalization, or even death. Dr Erin Bromage, an associate professor of biology at the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth, told CNN there is no certain number of viral particles needed to fall ill - but the more you have increases the odds that at least one will enter and infect cells, thus setting off a series of events. Experts say the amount of coronavirus a person is infected may determine how sick they become with a low 'dose' resulting in asymptomatic illness but a high dose leading to hospitalization. Pictured: Medical personnel attend to a patient at Bellevue Hospital in New York, October 28 Because masks reduce the amount of particles inhaled, two doctors say face coverings could be...
    Aviation experts have claimed they have finally located the crash site of Malaysia Airlines flight 370 which vanished in March 2014 with 239 passengers on board.  Despite a four year, $200million international search effort covering more than 120,000sqm, the plane's wreckage has never been found, sparking the world's biggest aviation mystery.  The experts believe MH370 plunged into the South Indian Ocean, near the co-ordinates of S34.2342 and E93.7875, which is about 1,285 miles (2,070km) off the coast of Perth in Western Australia. A Boeing 777 flaperon cut down to match the one from flight MH370 found on Reunion island off the coast of Africa in 2015, is lowered into water to discover its drift characteristics Catherine Gang, whose husband Li Zhi was on board the missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370, holds a banner as she walks outside Yonghegong Lama Temple after a gathering of family members of the missing passengers in Beijing, on March 8, 2015 Engineer Victor Ianello and his team, based in the United States, this week said 'there are even better odds' the Boeing 777...
    (CNN)Australia's record-breaking 2019-20 bushfires were likely made worse by climate change, an inquiry has found, warning that the such devastating wildfires are likely to happen again. The next time, the fires could even be "potentially worse," according to the report, which was released Tuesday. The New South Wales (NSW) Bushfire Inquiry was formed in January and examined the worst Australian fire season on record. The report categorized the fires as "extreme, and extremely unusual," but warned "it is clear that we should expect fire seasons like 2019-20, or potentially worse, to happen again."Millions of animals are dying from the Australian fires, and the environment will suffer for years to comeIt also said climate change "clearly played a role in the conditions that led up to the fires and in the unrelenting conditions that supported the fires to spread, but climate change does not explain everything that happened."Read MoreFires burned through forested regions at a rate never before seen in recorded history, according to the report. There were 89 fire-generated firestorms -- extremely dangerous phenomena that cause lightning, tornadoes and extreme...
    President Donald Trump’s rally in Tulsa, Oklahoma last weekend had lower attendance numbers than the campaign expected. There could be a number of reasons for the dip in turnout, but at least part of the reason the campaign boasted about a potentially huge rally is because of a trolling campaign from the youths. TikTok users and K-Pop fans filled out a sign-up form for Trump’s rally, with the goal of not coming at all. The push even got the attention of Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-N.Y.) who said the campaign was “ROCKED by teens on TikTok” who “tricked” the campaign into thinking more people were interested in showing up at the event than there actually was. In the wake of the low attendance and focus on the TikTok and K-Pop trick, some people online began speculating that the campaign may have violated a law surrounding the collection of information about children online. That speculation was only fueled by Brad Parscale, Trump’s 2020 campaign director, who tweeted ahead of the rally that the sign-ups had surpassed 800,000 people...
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