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    In December 2019, University of California freshman swimmer Danielle Carter met with Golden Bears head coach Teri McKeever for the final time after a series of heated meetings with the coach and other athletic department employees in which Carter complained that McKeever had routinely bullied her. The bullying, the swimmer said, led to her walking into her dorm bathroom days earlier with the intent of committing suicide. At an earlier meeting with Carter and her parents, Scott and Darla, McKeever said, according to Darla, “‘I’m not dealing with this piece of (expletive) for three years,’ and she pointed right at Dani.” This final meeting between Carter and McKeever was also attended by Jennifer Simon-O’Neill, McKeever’s close friend and who as the executive senior associate athletic director had direct supervision over the Cal women’s swimming program at the time. Upset by how McKeever had treated her daughter and the university’s handling of the case which would result in Danielle Carter transferring to UC Santa Barbara, Darla Carter said she also called Cal athletic director Jim Knowlton about McKeever. “I did get...
    VIDEO20:4320:43Student Loan Forgiveness and the Future of Paying for CollegeFinancial Advisor Events Beyond highlighting the overwhelming burden of student loan debt, the last few years of economic turmoil have also shed light on the sky-high cost of college. "Sometimes students feel the sense of 'My parents are going to make it work,'" said Jennifer Finetti, director of student advocacy at ScholarshipOwl. "I think a lot of students don't realize the financial reality: A lot of them can't." In fact, college has never been more costly than it is today. That's largely due to a convergence of factors including inflation's sudden impact on the tuition tab, rising interest rates on student loans and the market decline's effect on investments families were relying on to cover college bills.  Inflation drives college tuition prices higherDuring the pandemic, increases in tuition and fees largely held steady, according to a report by the College Board, which tracks trends in college pricing and student aid. For the 2021-22 academic year, average tuition and fees rose by just 1.3% to $3,800 for students at two-year schools; 1.6% for in-state...
    In this article ZIPAriel Skelley | Digitalvision | Getty ImagesDespite recession fears and headlines about layoffs, there's no sign of trouble yet in the overall job market. Openings are still near all-time highs and unemployment claims remain low. That means job seekers have the upper hand as employers look to attract talent, according to career experts. "No one should feel paralyzed by the sense of impending doom that is shifting here every few days," said Shayla Thurlow, vice president of people and talent acquisition at career website The Muse. More from Invest in You:Suze Orman has a warning about Great Resignation resignationsThese are the 10 fastest-growing entry-level jobsBefore you start investing, here's what experts want you to know While surveys have shown workers are looking for flexibility, good benefits and work/life balance, compensation is also important. Yet, new graduates are underestimating their salaries by about $10,000, a ZipRecruiter survey of 1,500 job seekers found. The median annual earnings of full-time workers with bachelor's degrees, ages 25-34, was $55,700 in 2019, according to the career website's analysis. Yet when new graduates...
    BALTIMORE (WJZ) — The Baltimore Ravens have selected 20 Baltimore City Public Schools graduates as Ozzie Newsome Scholars, according to team staff. Ravens owner Steve Bisciotti and his wife, Renee, created the scholarship program in honor of Ozzie Newsome, the Ravens’ longtime personnel executive and Pro Football Hall of Famer, staff said.  READ MORE: Where's Marty? Kicking It At Baltimore Blast Soccer CampThe program funds scholarships for public school graduates who attend one of Maryland’s Historically Black Colleges and Universities. Bowie State University, Coppin State University, Morgan State University and the University of Maryland Eastern Shore are on the short list of those higher-education institutions, staff said. Ozzie Newsome Scholars receive an annual scholarship of $10,000 for up to five years of college—a total of $50,000 per scholar.  This year, the Stephen and Renee Bisciotti Foundation made a $4 million gift in his name to Maryland’s HBCUs, providing $1 million in scholarship funds to each, according to team staff. Beginning with this school year, 20 new freshmen scholars will be selected every year for four years, producing a total of...
    Klaus Vedfelt | DigitalVision | Getty Images Months of stock market volatility may deliver a costly surprise to parents sending children to school this fall: smaller-than-expected 529 college savings plan balances.  The average 529 account size was $30,287 in 2021, according to the College Savings Plans Network, but families may now have lower balances, financial experts say. And it may be a "rude awakening" for parents scrambling to make their first payments in August, said certified financial planner Lisa Kirchenbauer, founder and president of Omega Wealth Management in Arlington, Virginia.  More from Personal Finance:Medicare Part B premium reduction won't happen this yearChoice between pre-tax, Roth 401(k) plans can be trickyMoney moves to make before Fed hikes interest rates again Many 529 plans offer age-based portfolio allocations, shifting to more conservative assets as college approaches, such as stocks to bonds. But since bond values and market interest rates move in opposite directions, bond prices have fallen in 2022 amid rate hikes from the Federal Reserve. "You might only have a 4% or 5% spread between what your stocks and your bonds...
    (CNN)After more than 150 years, Lincoln College in central Illinois is closing its doors after significant challenges from Covid-19 and complications stemming from a recent cyberattack.The college is a predominantly Black institution, as designated by the U.S. Department of Education, and according to the Lincoln Heritage Museum, was the only college named for Abraham Lincoln while he was still living. It opened in 1865."Lincoln College has survived many difficult and challenging times -- the economic crisis of 1887, a major campus fire in 1912, the Spanish flu of 1918, the Great Depression, World War II, the 2008 global financial crisis, and more, but this is different," part of a statement posted to Lincoln College's website read."The economic burdens initiated by the pandemic required large investments in technology and campus safety measures, as well as a significant drop in enrollment with students choosing to postpone college or take a leave of absence, which impacted the institution's financial position," the statement continued.But it also singled out a cyberattack in December 2021 that "thwarted admissions activities and hindered access to all institutional data,...
    Carol Yepes | Moment | Getty Images A college education is considered the ticket to a better career and higher pay. And yet, these days there are plenty of good opportunities for job seekers, with or without a degree. In April, employers added 428,000 jobs and wages grew by a solid 5.5% year-over-year. For some currently enrolled college students, that may be too good to resist.Students are choosing to earn over learn right now.Daniel RosensweigChegg CEO"Students are choosing to earn over learn right now," Daniel Rosensweig, CEO of online education company Chegg, recently said in an interview on "TechCheck." They're taking fewer classes so they can work more hours and some are unenrolling altogether, he said. "And you really shouldn't blame them, right? It's a smart, prudent business decision for them at this moment, which is, if their salaries are doubled and tripled, why not take that money and give more hours and take fewer classes or no classes," Rosensweig said. Fewer students went back to school again this year, dragging undergraduate enrollment down another 3.1% from last year, according to a report...
    By Anna Maria Basquez (CBS4) – The favorite bidder in the bid to own the Denver Broncos has net worth that regularly doubles, spends little time in offices because he’s out asking questions to make changes, and has an affinity for cycling, hunting, bio-safari, racing and collector cars, according to Prabook.com, an online biographical encyclopedia. And he has an all-star past as a football player. S. Robson Walton, 77, is expected to make a bid to own the Denver Broncos for $4.5 billion to $5 billion, and is considered the favorite bidder, according to the New York Post. Sports Illustrated wrote recently: “If he makes this offer, it would become the largest bid for an NFL team in history.” Walton is noted for being an all-state football player in his native Oklahoma, went on to play at a small liberal arts college and told Prabook.com, joking, “I was small but slow as a college tackle.” Local and national biographies are profiling the heir more frequently as the American football public waits to find out the next owner of the Denver...
    NEVADA Police are currently on the scene at a reported shooting at Western High School. Metro officers were called to assist Clark County School District police at the Las Vegas high school around 2:16pm on Tuesday, according to authorities. 1Police were called to the high school just after 2pm TuesdayCredit: Google Western High School dismisses its students with the final bell at 2:11pm, according to their website. Bonanza Road is currently closed in both directions and drivers are to avoid the area. Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department said more information will be made available at a later press conference. There is no information available as to whether anyone has been injured. More to follow... For the latest news on this story keep checking back at Sun Online. The-sun.com is your go-to destination for the best celebrity news, sports news, real-life stories, jaw-dropping pictures and must-see video. Like us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/TheSunUS and follow us from our main Twitter account at @TheUSSun.
    By MARK LONG AP Sports Writer GAINESVILLE, Fla. (AP) — Florida is hiring San Francisco’s Todd Golden as its next men’s basketball coach, bringing in the 36-year-old former Auburn assistant to revitalize a program that had grown stale under Mike White. Golden’s hiring is expected to be finalized later Friday, according to a person familiar with the search. The person spoke to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity because the deal was not official. White surprised the Gators by leaving for rival Georgia last weekend. Florida missed the NCAA Tournament for the first time since 2017 under White and was mired in mediocrity. Fans had turned on White, to the point where his wife and kids changed seats during one home game earlier this year. White never lived up to ultra-high expectations that came with following Gainesville legend Billy Donovan, who led the Gators to consecutive national titles (2006-07) and four Final Four appearances before bolting for the NBA. White went 142-88 in seven seasons at Florida, including 72-52 in the SEC. His up-and-down offense was the most consistent...
    Welcome to the Glean, MinnPost’s twice-daily roundup of Minnesota news. For the Duluth News Tribune Dana Ferguson says, “Minnesota county attorneys could face misdemeanor charges if they opt not to prosecute in felony cases where they have enough evidence to establish probable cause under a proposal up for consideration at the Capitol. The bill is one of a set aimed at pushing prosecutors to bring charges — and in many cases stiff ones — for those believed to have committed violent crimes. … County attorneys, along with Democrats on the panel, said they would cause problems for attorneys who are already asked to prioritize certain cases over others due to limited resources.” An AP story says, “Minnesota parents fear for the safety of their adult son in Ukraine who they say was taken by the Russian military. Tina Hauser, of Winona, told KAAL-TV the last time she spoke with her son, Tyler Jacob, was Saturday when he told her he was being forced by the Russian military to board a bus out of Kherson and leave his Ukrainian wife and...
    VIDEO3:2603:26How students can find scholarships and grants to help pay for collegeSquawk Box Between sky-high costs and hefty student loan debt, more students and their families are questioning the value of a college degree. While about 81% of college-bound juniors and seniors still see college as a worthwhile investment, only 42% of families feel confident about covering the cost, according to a report by Sallie Mae. As a result, a growing number are opting out entirely. The number of undergraduates enrolled in college is now down 5.1% compared to two years ago, according to a separate report by the National Student Clearinghouse Research Center — a loss of nearly 1 million students. In fact, getting a diploma is almost always worth it in the long run, according to "The College Payoff," a report from the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce. More from Personal Finance:College enrollment continues to slideWhat to be wary of before taking on private student loansHere are options if you aren't eligible for Navient's settlement Bachelor's degree holders generally earn 84% more than those with just...
    The American woman accused of joining ISIS, spending years leading and training an all-female unit in Syria, and wanting to carry out deadly attacks at a college campus and shopping mall in the U.S., is due to make her first court appearance in Virginia on Monday. Allison Fluke-Ekren, 42, has been charged with providing material support to a terrorist organization, the U.S. attorney announced Saturday. She is scheduled to appear at U.S. District Court in Alexandria, Virginia, on Monday at 2 p.m. ET. TEXAS SYNAGOGUE ATTACKER'S GUN PURCHASE PROMPTS FEDERAL CHARGES AGAINST SELLER, AUTHORITIES SAY Fluke-Ekren, a former resident of Kansas, wanted to recruit operatives to attack a college campus in the U.S. and detailed how she would carry out a terrorist bombing on a shopping mall, prosecutors said.  Allison Fluke-Ekren, a 42-year-old former Kansas resident, allegedly wanted to carry out terrorist attacks on a college campus and shopping mall in the U.S., according to federal authorities. (Alexandria Sheriff's Office) She allegedly described how she could park a vehicle "full of explosives" in the basement or parking garage of...
    40 Animated Christmas Movies for a Perfect Christmas Countdown Sunday Night Football FanDuel Picks: NFL DFS lineup advice for Week 13 Broncos-Chiefs single-game tournaments Lock In Refi Savings Before Rates Get Too High Ad Microsoft $200 Sign Up Bonus Just In Time For The Holidays Ad Microsoft Do This Before Your Next Credit Card Payment (It’s Genius) Ad Microsoft Full screen 1/51 SLIDES © Lawrence Turman 50 best college movies...
    (CNN)University of Notre Dame head football coach Brian Kelly is leaving to take a similar position at Louisiana State University, according to multiple reports. Kelly -- Notre Dame's head coach since the 2010 season -- will replace current LSU head coach Ed Orgeron. LSU announced October 17 that the school and Orgeron will be parting ways after the 2021 season concludes.CNN has reached out to LSU and Notre Dame seeking comment. Notre Dame head coach Brian Kelly says Covid-19 spread like wildfire on his team Under Orgeron, LSU won the national title in the 2019-20 season but has struggled since. The Tigers are 6-6 this season, including 3-5 in Southeastern Conference play. In 2020, a season impacted by the Covid-19 pandemic, LSU went 5-5.Read MoreNotre Dame is 11-1 this season -- with its lone loss to the University of Cincinnati -- and still potentially could reach the four-team College Football Playoff. The Fighting Irish are currently ranked No. 6. The latest College Football Playoff ranking will be released Tuesday.Notre Dame has had a sustained run of success with at least...
    VIDEO3:5503:55How families can use 529 plans to help save for collegeSquawk Box Amid the ongoing pandemic, many high schoolers are rethinking their future plans, and whether that will still include college. A recent survey of high school students found that the likelihood of attending a four-year school sank more than 20% in the last year and a half — down to 48%, from 71%, according to ECMC Group, a nonprofit aimed at helping students find success.  High schoolers are putting more emphasis on career training and post-college employment, the report found. ECMC Group polled more than 1,000 high school students four times since January 2020. Nearly half, or 46%, now say their ideal post-high school plans would require three years of college or less. More from Personal Finance:Here are the colleges with the best return on investmentFewer students are going to college because of the costHow to maximize your college financial aid Even before the pandemic, students were starting to consider more affordable, direct-to-career alternatives to a four-year degree, said Jeremy Wheaton, ECMC Group's president and CEO. Still, most said...
    A California community college announced a program addressing homelessness on campus, allowing students to feel "secure" while sleeping in their vehicles. Long Beach City College unveiled the pilot program, called the Safe Parking Program, to offer students a safe place to "reside" in their cars overnight, according to a statement from the college on Monday. This pilot program is the only known program of its kind in the region at a community college, the statement added. "Our goal for this program is that it will serve as a pathway to housing stability for our students," said Uduak-Joe Ntuk, the president of the LBCC Board of Trustees. "These students would otherwise have to be worrying nightly about their vehicles being broken into, trying not to be seen or bothered, and not having the police called on them, all while keeping up with their coursework." SACRAMENTO RESIDENTS HAVE ACCEPTED THE STATUS QUO OF HOMELESSNESS AND CRIME As part of the program, students who don't have a suitable living option are able to sleep in a "secured" parking...
    VIDEO3:5103:51The student debt crisis is still present, despite pandemic delaysThe Exchange Most Americans see college as excessively expensive, but it wasn't always that way. Over the last decade, the cost of attending a four-year public college or university has grown significantly faster than income. Deep cuts in state funding for higher education contributed to substantial tuition increases and pushed more of the costs of college onto students, according to an analysis by the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, a nonpartisan research group based in Washington, D.C. More from Personal Finance:More education doesn’t always get you more moneyFamilies massively underestimate cost of collegeFewer students are going to college because of the cost At private four-year schools, average tuition and fees rose 26% in a 10-year period. Tuition plus fees at four-year public schools, which were harder hit, jumped 35%. Because so few families can shoulder the higher cost, they have increasingly turned to federal and private aid to cover at least some of the tab. Roughly half of families now borrow, or take out loans, according to Sallie Mae's most recent "How...
    A teen who pleaded guilty to his role in the stabbing murder of Barnard College student Tessa Majors has been sentenced to serve nine years to life in prison. Luchiano Lewis, 16, was sentenced on Thursday in Manhattan criminal court by Justice Robert Mandelbaum, who slammed him for his lack of remorse in the shocking case.  'The defendant has demonstrated in the year and a half since this incident this is not an aberration,' the judge said, according to WNBC-TV. 'The defendant has learned no lessons from his experience in this case.'  Lewis was charged as an adult despite being 14 at the time of the murder, and last month pleaded guilty to second-degree murder and first-degree robbery in a deal with prosecutors. Luchiano Lewis, 16, (seen last month) was sentenced on Thursday in Manhattan criminal court for the murder of Barnard College student Tessa Majors Lewis was sentenced to serve nine years to life in prison for his role in the slaying of Majors, who was stabbed to death during a botched robbery in Morningside Park Tessa's father Inman Majorswalks into Manhattan...
                      by Thomas Catenacci  Amazon will begin paying college tuition for hundreds of thousands of its employees in an effort to attract more workers, the company said Thursday. More than 750,000 hourly Amazon employees nationwide will be eligible to have their full college tuition paid for at one of hundreds of partner universities, according to the announcement. The billion-dollar online retailer said it would also pay for employees’ associate degrees and high school tuition. “Amazon is now the largest job creator in the U.S., and we know that investing in free skills training for our teams can have a huge impact for hundreds of thousands of families across the country,” Dave Clark, CEO of Worldwide Consumer at Amazon, said in a statement. “This new investment builds on years of experience supporting employees in growing their careers.” Amazon said all tuition would be paid in advance to ensure employees don’t need any existing savings to enroll in the program. The program will be available to all Amazon front-line employees 90 days after they start working with the company....
    No. 21 Utah (1-0) at BYU (1-0), Saturday at 10:15 p.m. EDT (ESPN). Line: Utah by 7½, according to FanDuel Sportsbook. Series record: Utah leads 62-34-4 (according to Utes) or 59-31-4 (according to Cougars). WHAT’S AT STAKE? This marks the 101st meeting between the in-state rivals — or the 95th. The reason for the six-game discrepancy has to do with this: BYU officially began playing intercollegiate football in 1922, according to the school. There were six scrimmages or games between the Utes and BYU Academy, a mixture of high school and college athletes from 1896-98. The teams split the series. The Utes are going for their 10th straight win over the Cougars. They didn’t play last season. KEY MATCHUP Utah running back Tavion Thomas made his Utah debut last week with a 107-yard, two-touchdown performance. He had two 100-yard performances while at Cincinnati. Linebacker Keenan Pili led a BYU defense that held Arizona to 80 yards rushing. Pili finished with 17 tackles. PLAYERS TO WATCH Utah: Linebacker Devin Lloyd had a career-high 12 tackles in a win over Weber State....
    Amazon will begin paying college tuition for hundreds of thousands of its employees in an effort to attract more workers, the company said Thursday. More than 750,000 hourly Amazon employees nationwide will be eligible to have their full college tuition paid for at one of hundreds of partner universities, according to the announcement. The billion-dollar online retailer said it would also pay for employees’ associate degrees and high school tuition. “Amazon is now the largest job creator in the U.S., and we know that investing in free skills training for our teams can have a huge impact for hundreds of thousands of families across the country,” Dave Clark, CEO of Worldwide Consumer at Amazon, said in a statement. “This new investment builds on years of experience supporting employees in growing their careers.” Amazon said all tuition would be paid in advance to ensure employees don’t need any existing savings to enroll in the program. (RELATED: Expanded Unemployment Benefits Hindered Main Street Recovery, Small Business Owners Say) The program will be available to all Amazon front-line employees 90 days after they...
    AMERICA’S First Lady Jill Biden is planning to return to the college classroom despite the alarming Delta variant raging around the country.  Jill Biden is heading out of the East Wing to return back to teach for the fall term of college as the country is facing a swelling spike in the global Coronavirus pandemic and contagious Delta variant. 3First Lady Jill Biden is planning to return to the college classroom despite the alarming Delta variant raging around the countryCredit: AP 3Her intention to teach English classes for the fall term comes as there is a swelling spike in the global Coronavirus pandemic and contagious Delta variantCredit: Youtube / Northern Virginia Community College COLLEGE BOUND “Parents, I want you to know that your child, your school, and your family are at the heart of all that my husband, Joe, is doing to help our country defeat and ultimately recover from this pandemic,” Biden explained in a message to families and educators who like her will be returning to in-person learning. After Labor Day, Biden is expected to instruct Northern Virginia...
    ANNAPOLIS, Md. (WJZ) — The U.S. Naval Academy is being recognized for having one of the best college mascots. Quality Logo Products identified 128 mascots from schools with an NCAA Division I football team, then asked more than 1,200 people to score them. Bill the Goat from the Naval Academy ranked fifth. The Bird from the U.S. Air Force came in fourth, Pouncer from the University of Memphis was second, and the number one was Willie the Wildcat from Northwestern University.
    (CNN)When a young man I work with in my therapy practice headed off to college in 2019, his future looked bright. He made friends, joined a fraternity, and reported to his parents that he was adjusting well, thriving socially and doing well in classes. The reality was much darker. He stopped attending classes after the first week. He began smoking weed throughout the day. He started binge-drinking and playing video games nearly all the time, switching up whom he spent time with every few hours to elude detection.He told nobody, at that point, what was really going on in his life.The past seven years or so, up to and through the pandemic, about 35 of my colleagues nationwide and I have witnessed a growing phenomenon -- young men of all races and ethnicities who start college and get very far off track within weeks or a month or two. None of us had run into this phenomenon before. It consistently involves male first-year students (with only one or two exceptions over the years) and it is worsening each year. One...
    What would have been a magical night for a North Carolina family visiting New York City became a tragic one when their vehicle was struck by a drunk driver in New Jersey. Ciara Gee, 20, her dad, Jerry Gee, brother Jerry Gee V and a family friend were 10 miles away from their destination when they were rear-ended by Sergio Seixeiro, 40, on Route 9 in Middlesex County July 18, authorities said. Ciara was pronounced dead at the scene while her dad was hospitalized with a broken vertebrae, broken ribs, a gash the head requiring stitches and a torn aorta, according to a GoFundMe page for the family. "A night of inspiration ended in tragedy," reads the campaign, launched by Kenia Marcelino. Seixeiro, of Monroe, was jailed on charges of vehicular homicide and three counts of assault by auto, according to the Middlesex County Prosecutor's Office. More than $5,300 had been raised for the Gee family on the GoFundMe as of July 28. Ciara was a junior at North Carolina Central University, pursuing her dreams of becoming a physical therapist. "A native...
    Big Box retailer Walmart is expanding a program that would pay the college tuition and book costs of its U.S. workers at certain partner institutions in an effort to attract prospective employees to the company. The program, called the “Live Better U” initiative, will be dropping a previous requirement that required workers to pay $1 a day to participate, virtually making the program free to join, according to a Wednesday report from CNN. The program, which first began in 2018, is reportedly adding four new academic partners, including the University of Arizona and the University of Denver, according to a statement from the company regarding the program. In an effort to help decrease the growing student debt nationwide, Walmart announced it will begin offering free college tuition and books to its 1.5 million U.S. employees, effective Aug. 16. https://t.co/ZQCv8V5d85 — NPR (@NPR) July 28, 2021 Walmart is also pledging to commit around $1 billion of the next five years in “career-driven training and development” for their employees, according to the statement. “We are creating a path of opportunity for...
    More On: russia Russian man reportedly admits to brutally killing ex-US Marine in Russia Iran shuts down nuclear power plant for emergency repairs The media bought Vladimir Putin’s flattering lies: Devine ‘I hope I’m not being abducted’: US law student found dead in Russia after cryptic text An American liberal arts college known for its artsy hipsters and A-list alumni was banned from Russia on Monday after being declared an “undesirable” and “threat” to “order and security,” state media reported. Bard College’s semester abroad in St. Petersburg program “threatens the constitutional order and security of Russia,” the Russian Prosecutor General’s office said in a statement reported by TASS. Russian law prohibits groups with the legally-binding label “undesirable” from operating within the country’s borders, according to the US Mission in Russia. “Following the examination of materials, received on June 21, the Prosecutor General’s Office decided to recognize the Bard College foreign-based educational NGO undesirable on the Russian territory,” the Russian Prosecutor General’s office said. Bard Abroad students in St. Petersburg donned period costumes and learned traditional waltzes.Facebook Notable Bard College...
    An Iowa college student who is charged with killing his parents and younger sister in their home after being told he needed to move out and get a job allegedly told police a masked intruder was to blame for the triple homicide.  Alex Jackson, 20, called 911 on Tuesday to report that he and his dad had been shot by a male intruder at their home in Cedar Rapids, according to a criminal complaint. Officers who responded found 61-year-old Jan Jackson, 68-year-old Melissa Jackson and 19-year-old Sabrina Jackson dead from gunshot wounds in different rooms of the home.  They found Alex suffering from a gunshot wound to his foot. Alex allegedly told police that he woke up to the sound of gunfire and was shot during a struggle with a masked man over the rifle. Alex Jackson, 20, is charged with killing his parents and younger sister in their home in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, on Tuesday before telling police a masked gunman was responsible. It wasn't immediately clear if his gunshot wound was self-inflicted or obtained in a...
    More On: cancel culture Obama claims media stokes ‘fear and resentment’ among white Americans ‘GMB’ ratings plunge to record low following Piers Morgan’s exit 8 times ‘Friends’ would have been canceled by the woke culture cops Stephen King says J.K. Rowling ‘canceled’ him after he supported trans women Students at one of Oxford University’s elite colleges have voted to remove a portrait of Queen Elizabeth II because she “represents recent colonial history,” according to a report. Members of the Middle Common Room at Magdalen College voted to removed the monarch’s portrait by a substantial majority, according to minutes obtained by the popular UK political blog Guido Fawkes. “This is about our communal space and making people feel welcome,” one student reportedly told the meeting at the college, which was long known to be “solidly royalist” and whose alumni include King Edward VIII. Another student insisted that “patriotism and colonialism are not really separable,” according to the minutes. Her Majesty’s image will be replaced with “art by or of other influential and inspirational people” — and the committee needs to...
    (CNN)New York plans to award 50 full scholarships to vaccinated young people as part of an effort to encourage children between 12 and 17 to get their Covid-19 vaccinations. Interest in vaccinations increased after CDC announced new mask guidanceGov. Andrew Cuomo announced the "Get a Shot to Make Your Future" program on Wednesday and said the state would give 10 scholarships a week for the next five weeks, according to a news release from the governor's office.This comes as a number of states are offering prizes and other incentives to encourage residents to get vaccinated.Ohio's Vax-a-Million campaign is giving away five $1 million prizes to adult residents who've gotten at least one dose of the vaccine. Younger residents could win one of five college scholarships. The first winners were announced after a drawing on Wednesday.Gov. Mike DeWine said the lottery program has boosted his state's vaccination rate by 45%.Read MoreMaryland is giving a $40,000 prize to one vaccinated resident each day through July 3 and will award $400,000 in a drawing on the Fourth of July.Winners of New York's random...
    Loading the player... A new report from The Economist reveals that Black Americans are living longer and getting better educations than ever before in the last half-century. The report notes that by the middle of the 20th century, the life expectancy for the average African American was 61 years. In 2017, it was 75.3 years old. However, there remains a gap. The average white American lives 78.8 years. Both are outlived by Hispanics who live to an average of 81.8 years old. Read More: Conservatives say Black-led Defense Department is too ‘woke’ Educationally, gaps have closed between Black and white college graduates. According to the report, in the first year that racially comparative data was available for college graduates only 1.3% of Blacks had graduated from college compared to 4.9% of whites. Today, 26% of Black people hold college degrees compared to 40% of white people. Asian Americans are the only ethnic group where the majority of its members have graduated from college. The report also analyzed homeownership. It shows that 70% of white Americans own a home, but...
    Leaders of an Oxford University college announced Thursday that the school will not remove its statue of imperialist Cecil Rhodes despite outcry, according to The Associated Press. Oriel College “expressed their wish” to have the statue taken down in June 2020, even launching a Change.org petition. This prompted the commission of an independent study of Rhodes’ legacy, the AP reported. While most commission members reportedly supported the removal of the statue, the college decided not to go through with it. “The governing body has carefully considered the regulatory and financial challenges, including the expected timeframe for removal, which could run into years with no certainty of outcome, together with the total cost of removal,” it said, according to the AP. ???? BREAKING: A controversial statue of Cecil Rhodes will remain at Oxford’s Oriel College after dons decided it would take too long and cost too much to remove it https://t.co/OpCh7Ag9Qh — The Telegraph (@Telegraph) May 20, 2021 The college said it would instead focus on “improving educational equality, diversity and inclusion amongst its student cohort and academic community,” according...
    A former private equity executive was sentenced to three months in prison after admitting his involvement in the college admissions scandal, the Associated Press reported.   Former TPG Capital senior executive William McGlashan, Jr. was among 50 people who were arrested in the case known as “Operation Varsity Blues.” The investigations, which first broke in 2019, showed how some wealthy parents were taking illegal actions to try to get their children admitted to top schools. Thirty parents involved in the scheme have already pleaded guilty to crimes.  McGlashan admitted in February that he paid $50,000 to have his son’s ACT scores secretly corrected. Prosecutors also said that McGlashan agreed to pay $250,000 for his son to join USC as a football recruit, but didn’t go through with the plan, according to the AP.  McGlashan pled guilty to two charges of wire fraud and honest services wire fraud. Prosecutors agreed to drop three other charges against McGlashan in exchange for his defense team's agreeing to the three-month prison term. McGlashan gave a tearful apology for his actions in his sentence hearing on...
    (CNN)Two college students in California had to be rescued from the Pacific Ocean this weekend when they floated too far from the shore in a homemade boat, according to police.The duo set sail from Isla Vista at 2 a.m. Saturday, according to Santa Barbara County Fire. Their boat consisted of two connected kiddie pools on top of some sort of board, with 20 five-gallon plastic buckets fastened on the bottom. "They were not engineering students," said Mike Eliason, spokesperson for Santa Barbara County Fire.The men, who are in their early 20s, did have an oar but it was no match for the ocean, said Eliason. He added seas were calm, but the water temperature was in the 50s, and the two men weren't wearing wetsuits.The men were about 300 yards offshore when crews went out on paddleboards and personal watercraft to rescue them, Eliason said.Read MoreAlcohol was not a factor, the fire department said."Still curious as to why they decided to do this at 2 o'clock in the morning," said Eliason.An ambulance was dispatched to the scene but there were...
    This girl’s got goals to the Moon – and beyond. A 12-year-old girl from Arizona who dreams of landing a job as a NASA engineer before she’s old enough to vote is set to start classes at Arizona State University this summer, KPNX in Phoenix reported. When Alena Wicker was just 4 years old, she told her mom that she wanted to work for NASA, according to the report. Eight years later, she’s still working toward that goal, with the aim of getting hired at age 16.  TEXAS MAN DONATES 120 GALLONS OF PLATELETS OVER 37 YEARS "I always dreamed of being an engineer because throughout my life, I liked building," Alena told KPNX. "I just had a goal I wanted to get to," she added. Her mom, Daphne McQuarter, told the TV station that Alena has always been gifted. Alena was homeschooled and aced her classes, according to the report. A 12-year-old girl from Arizona who dreams of landing a job as a NASA engineer before she’s old enough to vote is set to start classes at Arizona...
    Nearly 60 years ago, Calvin E. Tyler Jr. dropped out of college because he couldn't afford it. This week, the same school Tyler once attended announced he had donated $20 million to increase a scholarship fund established in his name.  Tyler enrolled at what was then Morgan State College, a historically Black college in Baltimore, Maryland, in 1961, according to a press release from the school. But he left in 1963 due to lack of funding, and became a UPS driver.  Calvin Tyler, who dropped out of Morgan state in 1963, was able to start a scholarship fund at the school in 2002 – and he just donated $20 million to it. Morgan State University He started out as one of the first 10 UPS drivers in Baltimore, and worked his way up at the company – eventually becoming senior vice president of operations before his retirement in 1998, according to Morgan State. He also joined the board of directors, but never forgot where he started, the school said.  Tyler and his wife Tina are now committed to helping...
    A 25-year-old New York man pleaded guilty to hacking and stealing nude pictures and videos from dozens of college students, according to a Tuesday Department of Justice press release. Nicholas Farber pleaded guilty on Monday for charges of computer intrusion causing damage and aggravated identity theft, the Justice Department said in the press release. Farber acknowledged in his guilty plea that he and co-conspirator Michael Fish worked together from 2017 through 2019 to hack social media accounts from several female college students through obtaining their student emails and using the email accounts’ information, according to the Justice Department. (RELATED: DC Man Who Advertised Child Pornography Sentenced To Over A Decade In Prison, DOJ Says) A woman uses a laptop on April 3, 2019, in Abidjan. (ISSOUF SANOGO/AFP via Getty Images) Farber, who completed his undergraduate degree in 2017 from the State University of New York Plattsburgh (SUNY-Plattsburgh), took the private nude images from the victims’ social media accounts and exchanged them online, according to the press release. “Also, as a result of Faber’s crimes, the university had to allocate money...
    As the nation continues to face the novel coronavirus, we continue to see people—especially women, and especially women of color—leave the workforce. Parents who are working are still struggling to balance child care, work, and virtual schooling, while other families face daily anxieties about whether or not it’s truly safe to send kids back to in-person school. We’ve seen viral photos of cars lined up for assistance at food banks and advocates rallying on behalf of people facing eviction. Losing a home is always a terrifying prospect, but it’s especially so considering what we know about how the coronavirus spreads among homeless communities, which are uniquely vulnerable. This only adds to the fear of losing one’s home.  In all of this, young people are figuring out how to get to their dream colleges. Take, for example, Texas teenager Alondra Carmona. Carmona, as reported by local outlet ABC 7, has been set on attending Barnard College since she was just 15. But, according to Carmona, since her mother broke her ankle and lost her job several months ago, the family has fallen behind on...
    Two cheerleaders connected to the Netflix show "Cheer" were arrested and charged this week in separate cases involving alleged sexual misconduct against minors. Coach and choreographer Robert Joseph Scianna Jr., 25, was arrested Wednesday in Virginia, charged with felony taking indecent liberties with a child and using an electronic communication device to solicit sex, the Chesterfield County Police Department said, according to WRIC-TV of Richmond, Va. Scianna allegedly solicited sex from a minor on social media, WRIC reported. He was being held in the Chesterfield County Jail without bond. He had appeared on the show's fourth episode, People magazine reported. NETFLIX 'CHEER' STAR JERRY HARRIS FACING 7 NEW SEX CRIME, CHILD PORNOGRAPHY CHARGES College cheerleader Mitchell Ryan, 23, also was arrested Wednesday, in Texas, for alleged felony aggravated sexual assault of a child related to a July incident, according to the Dallas County Sheriff’s Department, USA Today reported. Robert Joseph Scianna Jr., left, and Mitchell Ryan (Chesterfield County Police Department/Dallas County Sheriff's Department) Ryan was on the Navarro College cheer team, which was featured on the show, but did not appear on the show himself,...
    A college professor will give a talk on the "demilitarization" of whiteness. Jonathan Miller-Lane, an associate professor of education at Middlebury College in Vermont, will give the hourlong lecture on Tuesday. He will focus on events such as the violent 2017 Charlottesville protests, white dog walker Amy Cooper calling the police on a black bird watcher in New York, and the recent riot at the U.S. Capitol. "In order to make any progress toward establishing and sustaining a genuinely representative democracy in the United States, Whiteness must be demilitarized so that bodies designated as 'White' might become human," according to a description of the lecture, titled "Middlebury’s Opportunity to Facilitate the Demilitarization of White Bodies." Miller-Lane's biography shows he teaches a variety of courses, including "Education in the USA," focusing on the role of schools in society; and "Social Justice and Evolutionary Spirituality," which explores ways to "create intellectually dynamic spaces of regeneration and renewal" while enrolled at a "historically white supremacist institution." Middlebury is a private, liberal arts school founded in 1800 "that prepares students to address the world’s...
    VIDEO4:3004:30Purdue University president on keeping tuition costs flat during the pandemicSquawk Box Until the coronavirus crisis, nothing had been able to slow the pace of annual college tuition increases. Year after year, college costs edged higher, rising 3% to 5%, on average — outpacing inflation and family income. However, in the midst of the pandemic, schools are under pressure to keep these increases in check. Several institutions said they would freeze tuition during the ongoing economic crisis, while a smaller number announced discounts or even more dramatic tuition cuts. As a result, this year increases in tuition and fees were the lowest in three decades, according to the College Board — rising just 1% to 2% in 2020-21 at public and private colleges. And yet, there were schools that raised their prices anyway, including some of the nation's most elite institutions, with healthy enrollment numbers and solid endowments. More from Personal Finance:College can cost as much as $70,000 a yearUnder Biden, free college could become a realityAt Georgetown, tensions rise over distance learning Stanford, Yale, Wellesley, Amherst, Brown, Dartmouth, Rice and Grinnell College all raised undergraduate...
    Students looking to take the SAT will no longer have to worry about the optional essay-writing portion, as the College Board revealed it is dropping that section and will no longer offer any supplementary subject tests. The organization said the coronavirus pandemic "accelerated a process already underway at the College Board to simplify our work and reduce demands on students." "After June 2021, the Essay will only be available in states where it’s required for SAT School Day administrations for accountability purposes," a press release from the organization said. "Students registered for the SAT with Essay this spring can cancel the Essay portion at any time, free of charge." The College Board will also revise the main math and reading portions of the SAT in an effort to make the test "more flexible" and "streamlined" — including providing the option to take the test digitally. College Board chief David Coleman said more information would be coming in April, according to the Washington Post. Nearly 2.2 million students who graduated high school in 2020 took the SAT at least once, according...
    Jan. 6 won’t be the first time partisan lawmakers alleged that a wide conspiracy should nullify the results of a presidential election. As Americans witnessed in 2017, such challenges also have the effect of weakening American trust in institutions. Two out of three Democrats, for example, believed Russia actually changed vote tallies despite no credible evidence, according to a 2018 poll from YouGov. Similarly, Trump’s crusade has led nearly 80 percent of Republicans to believe the election was stolen. Just this week, Republican Missouri Sen. Josh Hawley set off a flurry of criticism when he announced Wednesday his intent to object to the Electoral College certification Jan. 6. Hawley cited suppression from big-tech platforms as interference in the election along with election laws in Pennsylvania. Hawley’s objection isn’t quite on the same level that we’ve seen from elements of the #stopthesteal movement, namely that somehow George Soros teamed up with Venezuela to rig voting machines (another election anxiety with a long history). Still, the sentiment recalls liberal efforts in January 2017 to cast poorly made Russian memes on Facebook and mean...
    (CNN)An 18-year-old college student from Georgia has been sentenced to four months in prison in the Cayman Islands after breaking the British Caribbean territory's Covid-19 protocol while visiting her boyfriend for a jet skiing competition, according to her family.Skylar Mack, a pre-med student at Mercer University, left for the Islands November 27 after testing negative for Covid-19 at home, her grandmother, Jeanne Mack, told CNN.When Mack landed, she was given another Covid-19 test, which came back negative and she was told to remain in isolation for two weeks. Instead, she decided to attend her boyfriend's jet ski competition two days later."In her mind, as long as she stayed away from everybody, she would be OK to go watch her friend's race, it was their big national finals race, the last race of the year, big deal," her grandmother said.Race attendees, who knew Mack, reported her breach of isolation and officials arrested her.Read MoreAccording to her grandmother, Mack acknowledged in court that she had "screwed up." She was initially sentenced to 40 hours of community service and ordered to pay a...
    President Donald Trump speaks with reporters after participating in a video teleconference call with members of the military on Thanksgiving, Thursday, Nov. 26, 2020, at the White House in Washington. AP Photo/Patrick Semansky People who bet thousands of dollars in favor of Trump winning the election are now planning legal action against online gambling sites, according to a report by The Daily Beast. According to The Daily Beast, some European bettors still have hope that Trump has a fighting chance to be victorious and are calling out Betfair— a major online gambling site—for ending bookings after president-elect Joe Biden cemented his win by receiving more than 270 Electoral College votes. "The Next President market rules stipulated that we would settle the market on the candidate that had the most projected Electoral College votes. Following the Electoral College votes being cast, that candidate is clearly Joe Biden," Betfair said in a statement. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. Bettors who wagered thousands of dollars that President Donald Trump would win the 2020 presidential election are now planning legal...
    In his opening prayer on Tuesday, Senate Chaplain Barry Black acknowledged President-elect Joe Biden’s Electoral College win, according to reports. “Lord, we respect the conclusions of the Electoral College and ask you to bless President-elect Joseph Biden and Vice President-elect Kamala Harris,” Black said the day after the electors affirmed Biden’s win, according to The Hill. (RELATED: GOP Senators Acknowledge Biden As President-Elect After Electoral College Vote) Other top Republicans, including Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky and Sen. Rob Portman of Ohio, also recognized Biden’s win. [email protected]: “So, as of this this morning, our country has officially a President-elect and a Vice President-elect… The Electoral College has spoken. So, today I want to congratulate President-elect Joe Biden.” pic.twitter.com/4S7Xv7otsH — CSPAN (@cspan) December 15, 2020 After the prayer, McConnell said, “The Electoral College has spoken, so today I want to congratulate President-elect Joe Biden. The president-elect is no stranger to the Senate. He’s devoted himself to public service for many years,” The Hill reported. “Many of us hoped that the presidential election would yield a different result, but our system...
    Incoming freshmen ask questions at an informational tent while arriving on campus at University of Colorado Boulder on August 18, 2020 in Boulder, Colorado.Mark Makela | Getty Images Even as cases of coronavirus surge nationwide, a growing number of colleges are bringing students back for the spring semester. Georgetown University, Morehouse College, Smith College, the University of Florida and Princeton University, are among the schools that are inviting undergraduates to live on campus come January after being largely virtual in the fall. "We know more today than we did over the summer about what actions we can take individually and collectively to keep our community as secure as possible," Princeton's President Christopher Eisgruber said in a statement. "If we test the campus population regularly, and if everyone on campus rigorously adheres to public health guidance about masking, social distancing and other practices, we can welcome a far greater number of students back." However, at Princeton, instruction will remain largely online even for undergraduates who live on campus and parties and most other social gatherings are prohibited — including participation in...
    Los Angeles may run out of hospital beds by Christmas as mayor urges residents to cancel everything Diaz and Barnes launch campaigns for Florida Democratic Party chair Seniors On Medicare Are Getting a Big Pay Day in 2020 Ad Microsoft Expert: “This credit card is so good I signed up personally” Ad Microsoft The 23 Hottest Gifts of 2020 Ad Microsoft Full screen 1/18 SLIDES © skynesher / Getty Images Fifty-four percent of young American adults who went to college took on some kind of debt — including student loans — to fund their education, according to the Federal Reserve. The average amount of educational debt in 2018 was between $20,000 and $24,999, with the typical monthly payment ranging from $200 to $299. Meanwhile, the cost of college continues to rise. The average tuition and fees...
    Free college tuition is not a viable idea, Education Secretary Betsy DeVos told "Fox & Friends" on Wednesday. “First of all, there’s nothing free. We know somebody has to pay for it,” DeVos said. DeVos said the push for free college was essentially a "government takeover of higher education" that would dissolve quality and choice. “American higher education is the envy of the world," she said. "It has to continue to be an open market place for innovation and creativity and, in fact, we’re seeing more now today than ever before that has to continue to grow and flourish, not be taken over by government and rationed in a way that is really going to stifle the future of too many young people." Meanwhile, President-elect Joe Biden is facing mounting pressure from progressives to cancel student loan debt on his first day in the White House – but doing so may disproportionately benefit wealthy Americans, according to a new analysis. VideoA working paper published Monday by the University of Chicago’s Becker Friedman Institute for Economics shows that erasing all student loan debt would distribute $192 billion to the top 20 percent of earners in...
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