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    SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP/CBS13) — California has now regained more than 91% of the 2.7 million jobs lost back when the first statewide stay-at-home order forced many businesses to close at the start of the pandemic. Employers statewide added 41,400 new jobs in April, dropping the state’s unemployment rate to the lowest its been since the start of the pandemic following 14 consecutive months of growth. READ MORE: 120-Acre Vegetation Fire In Yolo County Now 50% ContainedCalifornia’s labor force — the number of people who either have jobs or are looking for work — added 111,800 people in April, an encouraging sign for employers who have had trouble finding workers to keep up with surging demand for goods and services. “These are encouraging signs indicating that California’s economy is gradually returning to normal,” said Sung Won Sohn, a professor of economics at Loyola Marymount University who closely monitors California’s economy. But there are troubling signs on the horizon. California’s job growth isn’t what it could have been, as indicated by nearly 1.28 million job openings across the state at the end...
    New York (CNN Business)America's job market hasn't fully recovered yet. But some states are already back to normal.In November, Texas and Arizona joined Utah and Idaho in recouping all their pandemic job losses, according to a report by ratings agency Fitch.In comparison, California and New York were at only 70% and 60% of their pre-pandemic employment levels, respectively.This highlights just how uneven the recovery has been. States that were more affected by the waves of the pandemic and had tighter restrictions to fight the outbreak are lagging behind in recovering from their Covid job losses.After record job losses at the start of the pandemic, nearly all states have recovered at least half of those lost jobs, with the exception of Hawaii and Wyoming, according to Fitch.Read MoreStates like Hawaii, which relies on tourism, are still hamstrung by the pandemic. Meanwhile, New York has a more diversified economy but was an epicenter of the outbreak right at the start of the health crisis, which is leaving marks.Overall, the US economy added 249,000 jobs in November — a disappointing number compared with...
                      by Elizabeth Troutman  More than 100% of private sector jobs in Arizona have been recovered since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, according to the August employment report.  The Arizona Office of Economic Opportunity report showed that Arizona has recovered 325,500 private-sector jobs since April 2020, representing 101% of private-sector jobs lost. Between July and August, Arizona’s unemployment fell by about 13,000 people. The unemployment rate dropped from 6.6% to 6.2%, marking the largest rate decline of the year. “The last year and a half have challenged Arizonans like never before,” Gov. Doug Ducey said in a press release Thursday. “But thanks to the ingenuity and perseverance of our hard-working employees and business community, Arizona’s recovery is in full swing, with a real momentum headed in the right direction.” The state is 97% recovered from the pandemic when government jobs are included. This makes Arizona the state with the third-fastest total jobs recovery in the country. The United States, on the other hand, has recovered 79% of private sector jobs. While the...
    MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) — Minnesota’s unemployment rate held steady at 4% in June as the state recorded its first month of job losses since December. The Minnesota Department of Employment of Economic Development reported the new numbers Thursday, explaining that the state lost 600 jobs last month on a seasonally adjusted basis. Officials cautioned that growth has been uneven as the state recovers from the recession caused by the COVID-19 pandemic. Still, when looking at three-month averages, job growth was recorded in each period this year, even if the most recent period was up only 0.3%. “We know that our recovery from the pandemic will take time, both nationally and at the state level,” DEED Commissioner Steve Grove said, in a statement. “The good news is there are lots of great opportunities in our economy right now, and we’re spending every day finding new ways to connect workers with jobs in the industries most in demand.” Many businesses in Minnesota are looking for workers. Just this week, the Minnesota State Fair announced that it’s looking for 1,000...
    A devastating pandemic with massive unemployment, followed by a shortage of workers during the recovery is forming a boon for the automation industry. With all the bad economic news swirling around the COVID-19 pandemic and, more recently, employers are having a hard time filling jobs as the nation begins to slowly return to normal, the United States has somehow been able to produce as much as it did prior to the virus thanks to innovation and automation, the Washington Post reported Tuesday. According to the report, the nation is currently producing the same amount of goods and services with 8.2 million less workers due in large part to companies innovating by using more advanced software, robots, and other artificial intelligence methods of automation. “Universally, they talk about inability to get adequate labor, very high turnover and clear wage inflation at the low end,” Huntington Bancshares Chief Executive Stephen Steinour told the Post. “A consequence of that will be more investment by many of them into automation.” Steinour’s Columbus, Ohio bank has been fielding “dozens” of business customer requests to fund...
    Grant Atkinson, The Western Journal May 7, 2021 0 Comments During the 2020 presidential campaign, Democrat Joe Biden ran largely on the promise that he would handle the COVID-19 pandemic better than then-President Donald Trump. However, a new analysis of unemployment numbers reveals the states that voted for Biden mishandled the pandemic compared with the pro-Trump states. “Between February and December of last year, states that went for Biden saw the total number of people working drop an average of 6.2 percent, versus a 2.5 percent decline in those voting for the Republican,” the Daily Mail reported. Every one of the 13 states that saw the lowest decline in employment is strongly Republican. Alaska even saw its employment increase by 0.7 percent in that time span, and Utah’s employment increased by 0.3 percent. Democrats would argue that decreasing the death rate from the coronavirus was more important than maintaining jobs, which is why they had no problem destroying the economies in their states. However, the draconian restrictions in many blue states were no more effective in decreasing the death...
    States that voted for President Joe Biden in the 2020 election experienced significantly larger declines in total employment during the pandemic than those that went for Donald Trump, a new analysis shows. Between February and December of last year, states that went for Biden saw the total number of people working drop an average of 6.2 percent, versus a 2.5 percent decline in those voting for the Republican, according to a DailyMail.com analysis of federal jobs data. The 13 states that saw the lowest decline in employment all lean strongly Republican, led by Alaska and Utah which actually saw employment increase by 0.7 and 0.3 percent respectively. On the other end of the spectrum, 13 of the 14 states with the most significant pandemic job losses went for the Democratic candidate, led by Nevada with job losses of 10.2 percent, and Hawaii at 9.3 percent. This chart shows the change in the employed civilian labor force between February and December 2020, by state RELATED ARTICLES Previous 1 Next US economy is growing quickly but...
    The White House blasted unemployment reported under former President Donald Trump, glossing over the role the coronavirus pandemic played in job losses. President Joe Biden will be the first chief executive to create 1 million jobs in his first 100 days in office, according to press secretary Jen Psaki. "He's on track for that in our view," she said, touting Biden's $2.25 trillion jobs spending package and ambitious climate agenda. Both proposals face significant congressional hurdles. She added, "And a lot of these critics are the same people who advocated for the policies of the last administration and the last president, who oversaw an economy that lost more jobs than any president since Herbert Hoover." HARRIS-BUTTIGIEG RIVALRY ON FULL DISPLAY AS BOTH PUSH BIDEN INFRASTRUCTURE PLAN Psaki had been asked why the White House wanted to dole out $174 billion in taxpayer dollars on the electric vehicle market, including 500,000 charging stations, when officials, such as climate envoy John Kerry, claimed the private sector was already heading in that direction. That particular investment was pitched in Biden's American Jobs Plan....
                      by Bruce Walker  A new study published by the Mackinac Center for Public Policy concludes states in the Great Lakes region with the strictest lockdown measures also suffered the greatest increases in job losses. “The Costs of Michigan’s Second Lockdown” was authored by Chris Douglas, the department chair of the UM-Flint Economics department. All told, Douglas concluded the costs associated with the state’s second lockdown, which began in mid-November, outweigh the benefits it provided. He also said there was no correlation between the lockdown and a reduction in COVID-19 related fatalities. The job losses in Illinois and Michigan, wrote Douglas, “particularly the large December job losses in Michigan, compared to the surrounding states lends evidence that Michigan’s second shutdown caused the state to experience the largest loss of jobs in the restaurant and bar industry in the region.” In his study, Douglas wrote: “Employment has declined by 36% from February 2020 to January 2021, the largest decline in percentage terms compared to the surrounding Great Lakes states. Only Illinois, by...
    New York is one of the states hardest hit by the coronavirus pandemic and ranks 13th on WalletHub’s list of states most exposed economically. “A significant portion of the state's GDP is generated by some of the highly affected industries like arts, entertainment, recreation and educational services,” said Jill Gonzalez, an analyst with WalletHub. “Plus, a large share of employment comes from these industries and others such as advertising, public relations, transportation and real estate.” WalletHub compared the economic exposure to coronavirus using two metrics. The first is “highly affected industries and workforces” and double weight is given to the accommodations, food service, arts, entertainments and recreation industries. New York ranked 5th in the “highly affected industries and workforce” category. State Comptroller Thomas P. DiNapoli said in a recent report that the job losses during the first three months of the pandemic were “swift and deep.” “New data released by the State Department of Labor show less than half of the jobs lost during that time have been recovered, and employment is still more than 1 million jobs below its...
    The number of Americans applying for jobless aid ticked up last week, signaling that layoffs continue even as the overall economy slowly recovers. Some 719,000 people applied for unemployment benefits in the week ending March 27, the Labor Department said Thursday. That's an increase of 61,000 from the week before. Another 237,000 people applied for Pandemic Unemployment Assistance, a federal program for the self-employed and gig workers. Still, the weekly figures are slowly improving. The four-week average dropped to 719,000, its lowest level in over a year. The average is considered a more reliable sign of the trend in jobless claims, because it strips out weekly fluctuations that may be due to things like extreme weather or technical glitches.  The total number of people receiving jobless aid fell to 18.2 million as of mid-March, down 1.5 million from the prior week. This is a developing story.
    CHICAGO (WLS) -- Many businesses have closed during the pandemic, but despite that, there's been a rise in entrepreneurs.Some people have turned job loss into an opportunity to explore their passions.During the pandemic, a new wine shop popped up in Libertyville."My father was a small business owner [and] my grandfather was a small business owner," said Karl Braun, owners of Lago Enoteca. "It's always been in the back of my mind. I guess I didn't expect it to happen so soon."Braun spent decades in import beer sales but a layoff last year kick-started his dream."Trying to select smaller boutique wines, things you won't see at the grocery stores," he said.He opened Lago Enoteca in his hometown."It really inspired me to move forward with this plan that I've had for years," Braun added.Whatever the reason, those motivated to branch out on their own during that pandemic are in good company.In the last 12 months, new business applications are up 27% across the U.S. and up 61% in Illinois. In the last 12 months, new business applications are up 27% across the...
    California’s winter COVID-19 surge took a grim toll on jobs as the state’s recovery lagged compared with the nation overall, according to recalculated state data published Friday. The Golden State economy may now be poised to turn a corner thanks to accelerating vaccinations, a loosening of restrictions on businesses and schools and massive federal aid, but steep labor losses have delayed recovery: In December and January, the state shed 145,300 payroll jobs, according to a report from the Employment Development Department. “As it turns out, the labor market fallout in 2020 was significantly worse than original estimates suggested,” said Taner Osman, Research Manager at Beacon Economics in Los Angeles. “While we expect a strong recovery in 2021, it would take a hiring surge of unprecedented proportions to regain the lost jobs, as well as the jobs we would have added during normal times.” The losses in December and January reversed the autumn’s upward trend when businesses had begun to reopen and bring back workers, only to be shut down again as the virus spread out of control. By January, California...
    Among the nation’s 10 largest metropolitan areas, the D.C. region lost the fewest number of jobs to the COVID-19 pandemic early on, according to the Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments, or COG. Between March and April 2020, the D.C. area lost more than 300,000 “non-farm” jobs — more than during the entire Great Recession about a decade ago. During the same period, Los Angeles lost nearly 900,000 jobs, and the New York metropolitan area lost almost 1.8 million jobs. “We’ve recovered about 180,000 of those jobs (as of December), so we’ve actually clawed back about three-fifths of what we’ve lost. But, there are still some protracted losses in a number of different sectors,” Paul DesJardin, COG’s director of community planning and services told the COG board Wednesday. Hardest hit have been people working leisure and hospitality jobs, followed by accommodation and food services and educational and health services. An evaluation of census data reveals the pain is being borne fairly evenly. “People who work in the hospitality industry live everywhere throughout the metropolitan area. They might be your neighbor; they...
    Among the nation’s 10 largest metropolitan areas, the D.C. region lost the fewest number of jobs to the COVID-19 pandemic early on, according to the Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments, or COG. Between March and April 2020, the D.C. area lost more than 300,000 “non-farm” jobs — more than during the entire Great Recession about a decade ago. During the same period, Los Angeles lost nearly 900,000 jobs, and the New York metropolitan area lost almost 1.8 million jobs. “We’ve recovered about 180,000 of those jobs (as of December), so we’ve actually clawed back about three-fifths of what we’ve lost. But, there are still some protracted losses in a number of different sectors,” Paul DesJardin, COG’s director of community planning and services told the COG board Wednesday. Hardest hit have been people working leisure and hospitality jobs, followed by accommodation and food services and educational and health services. An evaluation of census data reveals the pain is being borne fairly evenly. “People who work in the hospitality industry live everywhere throughout the metropolitan area. They might be your neighbor; they...
    Among the nation’s 10 largest metropolitan areas, the D.C. region lost the fewest number of jobs to the COVID-19 pandemic early on, according to the Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments, or COG. Between March and April 2020, the D.C. area lost more than 300,000 “non-farm” jobs — more than during the entire Great Recession about a decade ago. During the same period, Los Angeles lost nearly 900,000 jobs, and the New York metropolitan area lost almost 1.8 million jobs. “We’ve recovered about 180,000 of those jobs (as of December), so we’ve actually clawed back about three-fifths of what we’ve lost. But, there are still some protracted losses in a number of different sectors,” Paul DesJardin, COG’s director of community planning and services told the COG board Wednesday. Hardest hit have been people working leisure and hospitality jobs, followed by accommodation and food services and educational and health services. An evaluation of census data reveals the pain is being borne fairly evenly. “People who work in the hospitality industry live everywhere throughout the metropolitan area. They might be your neighbor; they...
    HARRISBURG (KDKA) – The COVID-19 pandemic has been strenuous on many things but especially the job market and left many without employment. Those people are wondering where to turn and the Wolf Administration is looking to help to get Pennsylvanians back to work. READ MORE: Pittsburgh Police Investigating Woman Found Dead Inside Her Home The plan released by Governor Wolf’s office is called “Back To Work PA” and he says in addition to supporting people most significantly impacted by the pandemic, it will also address inequities, support talent development, and focus on high-quality, well-paying jobs that can support a family. How do they plan to carry out the “Back to Work PA” plan? One way is by investing in the training of employees so employers will have competent employees in good jobs that make good money. The Pennsylvania Department of Community and Economic Development Secretary detailed the plan during a news conference. “This plan responds to the state’s dire need for swift, targeted action and allows us the unique opportunity to invest $3 billion...
    MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) — It’s no secret the pandemic is tough on parents. But, Minnesota parents — specifically mothers — are taking an extra hard hit. New research by the Minneapolis Federal Reserve shows fathers and mothers were both hit by pandemic job loss. Fathers mostly rebounded but mothers are not re-entering the job force at nearly the same rate. READ MORE: Science Museum Set To Reopen With Limited Capacity Like most families, Nichole Lelle of Farmington and hers have had some extra quality time together this past year. Nichole Lelle (credit: CBS) “We are so busy in our usual lives that the pandemic does give us that opportunity to really just bond as a family,” she said. That’s been the bright side to a dim year. Lelle lost her job as the catering and events manager for a restaurant. “I got laid off and since then I’ve been searching for something different or trying to find another job and it’s been really hard,” she said. She is a busy mother. She started an online T-shirt company trying to make ends...
    Women have suffered the majority of pandemic-related job losses, especially women of color, as they've been forced to leave their jobs to take care of their kids at home.According to the latest from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, all 140,000 net jobs lost in December were women's jobs.Amy Sanchez, a single mother of four in Riverside County, is one of the many women who had to take on a new responsibility during the pandemic: patiently guiding her children through the distractions that come with learning from home.After 20 years in retail management, Sanchez was forced to leave her full-time job."I didn't have a choice because I don't have anybody to watch my kids or to help them even through virtual learning," Sanchez said."Women are having to pay a really high price in terms ... their livelihood, but their careers, and unfortunately, with their own lives," said Los Angeles City Council President Nury Martinez.Women's unemployment in December was at 6.3%, 8.4% for Black women 9.1% for Latinas, and 11.4% for women with disabilities, according to the National Women's Law Center.Sanchez...
    DALLAS (CBSDFW.COM) – According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the U.S. economy lost a net 140,000 jobs in December, and all of them were women’s. American men gained 16,000 jobs. Experts it say it illustrates how the recession brought on by COVID-19 continues to disproportionately affect women. “It sort of constitutes this perfect storm to really move us back away from all the gains we’ve had in gender equity in the labor force, towards patterns of inequality we haven’t seen for 20 or 30 years now,” said William Scarborough, Assistant Professor of Sociology at the University of North Texas and a leader of the university’s Center for Racial and Ethnic Equity in Health and Society. Many of the industries dominated by women – service jobs like healthcare, retail and tourism – have been hardest hit by the pandemic. Studies also show on average, women do more than two times as much childcare and housework as men. Those demands have only increased with school shutdowns and limited childcare options. “The fact of the matter is that most mothers during this...
    A year ago, a rare thing happened to American women.For three months, [women] held more jobs than men in the U.S. economy - something that had only occurred one other time in history during a short period in 2009 and early 2010.Sure, there were still many other gender gaps: women were more likely than men to work part-time, for example, because of caregiving responsibilities at home, and even among full-time workers, they earned on average only 81 cents for every dollar of their male peers.Nevertheless, women were making gradual gains. The pandemic quickly changed that story. And now, it just got worse.SEE ALSO: Unemployment rate holds steady at 6.7%, employers cut 140,000 jobs last monthAccording to new data released Friday, employers cut 140,000 jobs in December, signaling that the economic recovery from the coronavirus pandemic is backtracking. Digging deeper into the data also reveals a shocking gender gap: Women accounted for all the job losses, losing 156,000 jobs, while men gained 16,000.Meanwhile, a separate survey of households, which includes self-employed workers, showed an even wider gender disparity. It also highlighted...
    PITTSBURGH (KDKA) – As the pandemic rages on, so does its impact on the job market. Women, particularly women of color, were hit exceptionally hard to end 2020. “African American women, Hispanic women have been hit harder by the pandemic,” said Risa Kumazawa, an economics professor at Duquesne University. “So, their unemployment numbers have been higher.” The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reports 140,000 net jobs lost in December. Adding jobs lost and gained for women, they lost a cumulative 156,000 jobs. Using that same math for men, they gained 16,000 net jobs with male-dominated industries like construction seeing a boost. That does not mean men did not lose jobs in December, but when adding jobs gained and lost for men and women, men collectively added jobs while women lost them. Kumazawa says typically female-dominated industries like hospitality and leisure had a difficult December with cases of COVID-19 rising and tougher restrictions put in place in many areas. “These women made up a large proportion of these low wage-earning jobs in the hospitality industry, so...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — Ten months into America’s viral outbreak, low-income workers are still bearing the brunt of job losses — an unusual and harsh feature of the pandemic recession that flattened the economy last spring. In December, the nation shed jobs for the first time since April. Once again, the layoffs were heavily concentrated in the industries that have suffered most because they involve the kind of face-to-face contact that is now nearly impossible: Restaurants, bars and hotels, theaters, sports arenas and concert halls. With the virus transforming consumer spending habits, economists believe some portion of these service jobs won’t return even after the economy has regained its footing. That trend will likely further widen the economic inequalities that have left millions of families unable to buy food or pay rent. Typically in a recession, layoffs strike a broad array of industries — both those that employ higher- and middle-income workers and those with lower-paid staff — as anxious consumers slash spending. Economists had worried that the same trend would emerge this time. Instead, much of the...
    (CNN Business)A year ago, a rare thing happened to American women.For three months, they held more jobs than men in the US economy — something that had only occurred one other time in history, during a short period in 2009 and early 2010. Sure, there were still many other gender gaps: women were more likely than men to work part-time, for example, because of caregiving responsibilities at home, and even among full-time workers, they earned on average only 81 cents for every dollar of their male peers.Nevertheless, women were making gradual gains.The pandemic quickly changed that story. And now, it just got worse.Read MoreAccording to new data released Friday, employers cut 140,000 jobs in December, signaling that the economic recovery from the coronavirus pandemic is backtracking. Digging deeper into the data also reveals a shocking gender gap: Women accounted for all the job losses, losing 156,000 jobs, while men gained 16,000. These are net numbers, which can mask some of the underlying churn in the labor market. Of course many men lost their jobs in December, too — but when...
    The poll also found that 38% of LGBTQ households said they couldn't access or had delayed access to medical care. A new report found that a majority of LGBTQ households have lost a job since the pandemic began, one of a host of economic problems they've faced in the past year. Last week, the Movement Advancement Project, a which provides research on issues of equality, including nondiscrimination protections for LGBTQ people, released the results from a national poll conducted in July and August. It found that, since the pandemic began, 64% of people in LGBTQ households had lost employment compared with only 45% of straight and cisgender households. Sixty-four percent of LGBTQ people in households where they or someone else had to leave their home to work in a job outside of the health care industry also said they "had serious concerns about COVID safety" at work, compared to 46% of people in other households.
    NEW YORK -- Month after dismal month, Americans have been inundated by an ever-rising tide of devastating numbers. Hundreds of thousands of deaths. Tens of million unemployed.By mid-December, five in every 100 Americans - more than 16 million - had been infected by COVID-19.Those numbers testify to a historic tragedy. But they don't fully capture the multitude of ways, large and small, that the virus has upended and reconfigured everyday life in the U.S.For that, there are a host of other numbers. Some may be less familiar than others, yet all are just as telling in calculating the pandemic's sweeping impact:Miles that Americans did not drive because they were unemployed, working or studying from home and traveling less: 35.3 billion (through August)School lunches and breakfasts that went unserved in March and April after schools were closed: 400 millionNumber of participants in meetings on Zoom each day last December: 10 millionNumber of participants daily in Zoom meetings by the end of March: 300 millionEmployment rate of low-wage workers as the year nears its end, compared to January: down 20.3 percentEmployment rate...
    NEW YORK -- Month after dismal month, Americans have been inundated by an ever-rising tide of devastating numbers. Hundreds of thousands of deaths. Tens of million unemployed.By mid-December, five in every 100 Americans - more than 16 million - had been infected by COVID-19.Those numbers testify to a historic tragedy. But they don't fully capture the multitude of ways, large and small, that the virus has upended and reconfigured everyday life in the U.S.For that, there are a host of other numbers. Some may be less familiar than others, yet all are just as telling in calculating the pandemic's sweeping impact:Miles that Americans did not drive because they were unemployed, working or studying from home and traveling less: 35.3 billion (through August)School lunches and breakfasts that went unserved in March and April after schools were closed: 400 millionNumber of participants in meetings on Zoom each day last December: 10 millionNumber of participants daily in Zoom meetings by the end of March: 300 millionEmployment rate of low-wage workers as the year nears its end, compared to January: down 20.3 percentEmployment rate...
    LONDON (AP) — The number of people in the U.K. who lost their jobs hit a record high in the three months through October during the run-up to the planned ending of a government salary support scheme, official figures showed Tuesday. The Office for National Statistics said redundancies reached 370,000 in the August to October period, a record for a three-month period. At the end of October, the British government had been planning to end the Job Retention Scheme, which saw it pay the majority of the salaries of people who had become idle due to the coronavirus pandemic but were kept on payroll by firms. That program was eventually extended until the spring after the government announced a second national lockdown for England during November as infection numbers spiked. Those eligible for support will get 80% of their salaries paid for by the government. “The labour market continued to deteriorate as infections grew — and restrictions increased — in the run-up to the second lockdown,” said Nye Cominetti, senior Economist at the Resolution Foundation think tank. “Hospitality continues to...
    LONDON – The number of people in the U.K. who lost their jobs hit a record high in the three months through October during the run-up to the planned ending of a government salary support scheme, official figures showed Tuesday. The Office for National Statistics said redundancies reached 370,000 in the August to October period, a record for a three-month period. At the end of October, the British government had been planning to end the Job Retention Scheme, which saw it pay the majority of the salaries of people who had become idle due to the coronavirus pandemic but were kept on payroll by firms. That program was eventually extended until the spring after the government announced a second national lockdown for England during November as infection numbers spiked. Those eligible for support will get 80% of their salaries paid for by the government. “The labour market continued to deteriorate as infections grew — and restrictions increased — in the run-up to the second lockdown,” said Nye Cominetti, senior Economist at the Resolution Foundation think tank. “Hospitality continues to...
    Analysis: First U.S. delivery of COVID-19 vaccine will leave out many high-risk workers Live updates: Biden to talk jobs, meet with county leaders; Obama, Pence seek to boost Ga. Senate candidates Americas miserable winter could get worse for laid-off workers: Pandemic benefits are about to expire Eight months into the pandemic, America is still struggling with its devastating economic fallout. The government's November jobs report is expected to show America's job market remains in disrepair. And for millions of laid-off workers already losing hope of returning to the job anytime soon, expiring unemployment benefits could make matters significantly worse. © Nam Y. Huh/AP Economists polled by Refinitiv predict 469,000 jobs were added to the US economy in November, some 169,000 fewer than in the month before. It would nudge the unemployment rate down a smidge to 6.8%, from 6.9% in October. Load Error Experts mostly agree that the jobs recovery slowed further in November, but only a few of them expect net job losses -- so far. Research firm Oxford Economics and Swiss Banque Pictet, according to...
    New York (CNN Business)Eight months into the pandemic, America is still struggling with its devastating economic fallout. The government's November jobs report is expected to show America's job market remains in disrepair. And for millions of laid-off workers already losing hope of returning to the job anytime soon, expiring unemployment benefits could make matters significantly worse.Economists polled by Refinitiv predict 469,000 jobs were added to the US economy in November, some 169,000 fewer than in the month before. It would nudge the unemployment rate down a smidge to 6.8%, from 6.9% in October.Experts mostly agree that the jobs recovery slowed further in November, but only a few of them expect net job losses -- so far. Research firm Oxford Economics and Swiss Banque Pictet, according to Refintiv, expect modest job losses. It would be the first drop in jobs since April.But if the November prediction is correct, America will still be down 9.6 million jobs from February, before the pandemic froze the economy. That would mean the labor market has recovered more than half of its losses after some 22...
    Fiji starting 3 new caps vs Georgia in Autumn Nations Cup Unique and creative holiday gifts on Etsy Americas miserable winter could get worse for laid-off workers: Pandemic benefits are about expire Eight months into the pandemic, America is still struggling with its devastating economic fallout. The government's November jobs report is expected to show America's job market remains in disrepair. And for millions of laid-off workers already losing hope of returning to the job anytime soon, expiring unemployment benefits could make matters significantly worse. © David Paul Morris/Bloomberg/Getty Images Economists polled by Refinitiv predict 469,000 jobs were added to the US economy in November, some 157,000 fewer than in the month before. It would nudge the unemployment rate down a smidge to 6.8%, from 6.9% in October. Load Error Experts mostly agree that the jobs recovery slowed further in November, but only a few of them expect net job losses -- so far. Research firm Oxford Economics and Swiss Banque Pictet, according to Refintiv, expect modest job losses. It would be the first drop in jobs...
    New York (CNN Business)Eight months into the pandemic, America is still struggling with its devastating economic fallout. The government's November jobs report is expected to show America's job market remains in disrepair. And for millions of laid-off workers already losing hope of returning to the job anytime soon, expiring unemployment benefits could make matters significantly worse.Economists polled by Refinitiv predict 469,000 jobs were added to the US economy in November, some 157,000 fewer than in the month before. It would nudge the unemployment rate down a smidge to 6.8%, from 6.9% in October.Experts mostly agree that the jobs recovery slowed further in November, but only a few of them expect net job losses -- so far. Research firm Oxford Economics and Swiss Banque Pictet, according to Refintiv, expect modest job losses. It would be the first drop in jobs since April.But if the November prediction is correct, America will still be down 9.6 million jobs from February, before the pandemic froze the economy. That would mean the labor market has recovered more than half of its losses after some 22...
    Let me offer a sliver of good economic news deep inside a very dark trend: California job losses early in the pandemic may have been smaller than what was initially reported. One of my favorite employment measurements — the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics’ “quarterly survey of employment and wages” — shows California losing an almost unthinkable 10.2% of its jobs in the year ended in 2020’s second quarter. While it’s hard to say anything other than “ugh,” the monthly state data for the same period showed statewide employment was down 12.2%. That gap translates to roughly a 300,000-worker difference in the state’s 16-million job market. How does this gap occur? Well, the monthly jobs stats most folks frequently track is derived from a poll of 700,000 business nationwide. But the numbers from the quarterly census come from analysis of filings made by 10 million-plus U.S. employers for unemployment insurance purposes. The result is the quarterly census is usually a more accurate employment snapshot — with a few caveats. For example, it takes more time to produce. So that’s why...
    A new study suggests that Americans will owe billions of dollars in unpaid rent by December — but that could mean that the nation’s worst fears about the eviction crisis may not come to fruition. Researchers at the Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia used payroll, joblessness and unemployment insurance data to create a more precise estimate of how many households nationwide are behind on their rent. The number they produced is far lower than the figures presented by other studies. The researchers estimated that by December around 1.34 million renter households will be behind on their rent as a result of pandemic-related job losses, which equates to roughly 4.2% of all renter households. Altogether, these households will owe roughly $7.2 billion in rent by December, averaging to around $5,400. These households include 2.8 million adults and 1.1 million children. The study also found they were more likely to be include people of color or have a woman as the head of the household. Previous studies have estimated that as many as 40 million Americans were facing the threat...
    Cop who shot Taylor is crowdfunding to retire Singapore Airlines has cancelled its proposed flights to nowhere after criticism from environmental campaigners Premarket stocks: This could be the worst day of job losses in aviation history Tens of thousands of jobs are being eliminated as the pandemic drags on, with employers announcing massive new cuts ahead of a potentially brutal fall and winter. © Deccio Serrano/NurPhoto/Getty Images American Airlines employees check their plane after landing at La Aurora International Airport, in Guatemala City, Guatemala on Friday, September 18. The airport opens its international flight operations, and remained closed for 6 months to prevent the spread of COVID-19. During the pandemic, 84,344 people were infected and 3,076 died. (Photo by Deccio Serrano/NurPhoto via Getty Images) What's happening: Thursday could be the worst day of layoffs in the history of aviation. After attempts to secure more federal money failed, American Airlines and United Airlines have said they will cut a total of 32,000 jobs. Load Error "Today is a very sad day for all of us here at United," CEO...
    Sen. Kamala Harris sat down with CNN’s Dana Bash for an interview that was released in full on Sunday. The Democratic vice presidential nominee and Bash talked about the novel coronavirus pandemic, police brutality, systemic racism, Russian interference, and of course, Donald Trump. Let’s look at the dialogue, including lots of video clips, below. First, some background. Last week on CNN, Attorney General William Barr refused to acknowledge that there are, indeed, essentially different systems of justice for white people and people of color. In fact, he described the idea as a “false narrative” and suggested we ”have to be a little careful about throwing the idea of racism around.” Barr said “there appears to be a phenomenon in the country where African Americans feel that they're treated, when they're stopped by police, frequently, as suspects before they are treated as citizens,” but that he does not think “necessarily reflects some deep-seated racism in police departments or in most police officers,” and suggested that Black police officers do the “same kind of behavior.” His phrasing that Black Americans feel that they experience this...
    Igor Derysh September 5, 2020 2:00PM (UTC) The spike in wage growth amid the coronavirus pandemic is an "illusion" driven by disproportionate job losses amid low-wage workers, according to a study by the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco. Earnings have steadily risen amid the pandemic despite, or rather because of, an economic crisis that has led to tens of millions of job losses and business closings. But the increase is a "false signal" that is "almost entirely attributable to job losses among low-wage workers," Mary Daly, the head of the San Francisco Fed, and her team said in an letter on Monday. : Data shows that the average weekly earnings for full-time employees has grown by 10.4% over between spring of 2019 and spring of 2020, the fastest rate in nearly 40 years. Wages have grown 6.4% faster over that stretch than during the final three months of 2019. "The median usual weekly earnings measure that we focus on here is not an exception. Other measures of wage growth — like average hourly earnings and compensation per hour — show similar...
    Permanent job losses rose sharply in August, the Labor Department said in its monthly employment report Friday, suggesting that the risk of a long-lasting recession is rising. The number of permanent job losers soared to 3.4 million in August, according to the Labor Department, up from roughly 2.9 million the month before. Earlier in the pandemic, the vast majority of job losses were classified as temporary. Tens of millions of retail workers, bartenders, restaurant servers, and movie theater workers were sent home with the hope that they could be called back. In the best-case scenario, those workers would have been kept afloat with federal government relief and then returned to their old jobs in a matter of weeks or months. In that scenario, both employers and employees would have been spared the disruption that comes when the employer-employee relationship is broken. But that optimistic scenario is slipping out of reach. Of the 22.2 million jobs that were lost from February to April, economywide, only 11.6 million have been regained. “It’s COVID,” said Robert Frick, a corporate...
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