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    Acting Chief of the SEC's Crypto Assets and Cyber Unit Carolyn Welshhans noted, "As the complaint alleges, Forsage is a fraudulent pyramid scheme launched on a massive scale and aggressively marketed to investors." She continued, "Fraudsters cannot circumvent the federal securities laws by focusing their schemes on smart contracts and blockchains." The complaint filed by the SEC in the Northern District of Illinois requests "injunctive relief, disgorgement, and civil penalties." Two of the defendants in the case have agreed to settle without admitting or denying the allegations. They have been ordered to pay disgorgement and civil penalties.
    Thousands of Maryland drivers are still peeved about a bill they got last spring with an unexpectedly high balance. The pandemic delayed the state’s ability to send out invoices for toll payments, but now it’s offering drivers a reprieve. When those bills went out to Maryland drivers starting last March with backlogged balances, most drivers were not happy, but some were unable to pay a lump sum owed for using state toll roads. Gov. Larry Hogan asked the state transit agency to offer relief, and effective immediately, drivers are getting just that. “This civil penalty waiver grace period waives all civil penalties for customers who pay all their unpaid tolls by midnight on Nov. 30, 2022,” said Will Pines, acting director of the Maryland Transportation Authority. In announcing a new customer assistance plan at a board meeting on Feb. 24, Pines said along with offering a nine-month grace period for payment, effective immediately the agency won’t refer any past due balances to collections. “For every unpaid video toll transaction that is paid in full, the corresponding civil penalty would be...
    BALTIMORE (WJZ) — The Maryland Transportation Authority Board approved a customer assistance plan Thursday to help spread out video toll payments and establish a civil penalty grace period. From Feb. 24 until midnight on Nov. 30, customers who pay their video tolls in full will have corresponding civil penalty citations waived. During this grace period, toll bills will no longer be referred to the Central Collection Unit and the Motor Vehicle Administration. READ MORE: Baltimore City Will Lift Indoor Mask Mandate On March 1The board made it clear that this is not a forgiveness program. MDTA will resume those referrals of unpaid toll bills and civil penalties to CCU and MDOT on December 1. There will be no refunds given to those who have already paid civil penalties or were found liable in district court. MDTA will also focus efforts on exploring payment plan opportunities and will increase the number of customer service agents to reduce call and web chat wait times. READ MORE: Maryland Weather: Alert Day Issued For Winter Weather Through Friday MorningIt’s important to note that from...
    Texas is suing Facebook parent company Meta Platforms Inc and seeking billions of dollars in civil penalties, according to a lawsuit filed Monday, claiming that the social media giant's use of facial-recognition technology was in violation of the state's privacy protections. Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton, who filed the lawsuit in state District Court in Marshall, said the company's capture of facial geometry in photographs that users uploaded between 2010 and 2021 resulted in 'tens of millions of violations' of Texas law, according to the Wall Street Journal. 'Facebook has been secretly harvesting Texans' most personal information - photos and videos - for its own corporate profit,' Mr. Paxton said.  'Texas law has prohibited such harvesting without informed consent for over 20 years. While ordinary Texans have been using Facebook to innocently share photos of loved ones with friends and family, we now know that Facebook has been brazenly ignoring Texas law for the last decade.' The lawsuit is the latest crisis faced by the troubled tech giant, which has seen its stock price crater since announcing it lost users last year...
    LOS ANGELES (CBSLA) – On Thursday, officials with LA County announced a lawsuit seeking millions in civil penalties related to the noxious odor that began emanating from the Dominguez Channel and engulfed the City of Carson in October last year. The suit, filed in Superior Court, named 10 defendants, including tenants and property owners of the warehouse in Carson where a massive Sept. 30 fire released illegally-stored chemicals into the Dominguez Channel and created hydrogen sulfide gas odors that caused a public nuisance affecting thousands of residents. READ MORE: 'Hamilton' To Resume At Pantages Theatre On Feb. 9RELATED: Massive Warehouse Fire Likely Caused Foul Odor In Carson, Authorities Say Among the defendants, Liberty Property Limited Partnership, which owns the warehouse, and its parent company, Prologis Inc., were named. According to the county, both the tenants and corporate owners of the warehouse facility were aware of the hazards and danger and could have prevented the conditions that lead to the fire. READ MORE: 2 Arrested After Marijuana Grow Operation Sparks Massive Fire“As a result of the fire, chemicals from the site...
              by Mary Stroka   The state of Iowa on Friday sued the city of Sioux City regarding discharge of wastewater. In the lawsuit, the state asks the Iowa District Court for Woodbury County to make the city pay up to $5,000 per day of violations of state wastewater treatment regulations (Iowa Code section 455B.186(1), 567 Iowa Admin. Code 64.3(1)) and the city’s National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit. It seeks a permanent injunction preventing Sioux City from further violations of these state laws and the treatment permit requirements. The state said that for periods between March 15, 2012, and June 8, 2015, Sioux City’s treatment facility would only properly disinfect water discharges on days it collected and submitted samples for E. coli contamination to the Iowa Department of Natural Resources, the lawsuit said. “At the same time the fraudulent testing procedure was utilized, the City was touting the effectiveness of the WWTF’s system to the IDNR in an attempt to convince the IDNR to re-rate the WWTF to increase its treatment capacity, which would allow the City to recruit more...
    TSA officers at LaGuardia Airport nabbed a Connecticut man trying to carry a gun aboard a flight on Monday, authorities said. A Transportation Security Administration officer spotted the unloaded .38-caliber Sig Sauer P238 pistol in a carry-on bag as it passed through the checkpoint X-Ray machine’s monitor at the Queens, NY airport, the TSA's Lisa Farbstein said.  Officers immediately alerted the Port Authority police, who detained the Darien man for questioning before arresting him on weapons charges, she said. Travelers cannot carry guns onto planes under any circumstances, Farbstein noted. You can travel with firearms only in checked baggage and if they're properly packaged and declared at their airline ticket counter, she said.  Firearms must be unloaded in a hard-sided locked case that's packed separately from ammunition, she added. The locked case should be taken to the airline check-in counter to be declared. TSA has details on how to properly travel with a firearm posted on its website: Transporting Firearms and Ammunition (TSA.gov) Civil penalties for bringing a handgun into a checkpoint can stretch into the thousands of dollars, depending on various circumstances, Farbstein said. This applies...
    Georgia Republican Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene expressed support for penalizing those who move from Democratic-controlled states to Republican-controlled states by temporarily stripping their right to vote or imposing an extra tax. The idea, she said, would be possible in a “National Divorce scenario,” though Greene appeared to be musing about the idea rather than promoting a specific piece of legislation. “After Democrat voters and big donors ruin a state like California, you would think it wise to stop them from doing it to another great state like Florida,” Greene said. Pedro Gonzalez, an editor at Chronicles magazine with populist views, proposed a transplant penalty in response to a viral Twitter thread from a man moving from the Bay Area to Miami, Florida, who criticized California's policies but was “apprehensive” about his destination’s “worse politics.” LAWMAKERS NEW AND OLD, LEFT AND RIGHT, REMEMBER HARRY REID “This guy is moving from California to Florida because he can't stand living in the mess that lib politics created and he *still* has the audacity to talk down to Floridians...
    A West Chester closed-door pharmacy has been ordered to pay $225,000 in civil penalties for illegally selling drugs after receiving warnings from the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), authorities announced. A civil lawsuit alleges that Source One Pharmacy Services LLC -- which operates as a pharmacy that is not open for business to the general public --  improperly documented and distributed drugs including opioids, Acting United States Attorney Jennifer Arbittier Williams said. The complaint further alleges that Source One distributed some drugs to locations where the recipients were not authorized to receive them and that a DEA audit revealed pills were missing from Source One’s records for seven different drugs, Williams said. Source One agreed to resolve its civil liability by paying $225,000 in civil penalties under the Controlled Substances Act and would be subject to several heightened accountability and monitoring measures for three years, including the requirement that Source One report its dispensing to the DEA, Williams said. “Pharmacies that handle dangerous controlled substances like opioids must be held to the highest standards in order to ensure that the drugs...
      The California Department of Finance is proposing an amendment to an education bill which would impose civil penalties on counties, including Santa Clara County, for improperly reporting student enrollment, and misallocating property tax revenues that should have gone to K-12 schools. Santa Clara County was notified of the accounting error in January, and the state has requested $145 million to correct the error. But the county has already spent the money, and would now need to cut spending to meet the state’s demand. One area Santa Clara County supervisors should consider cutting is the “excess benefit plan” which funds pensions for county employees that exceed the IRS limit of $230,000 a year. In contrast, my father’s teacher’s pension from SJUSD is $43,241 and the maximum Social Security benefit (retiring age 66) is $36,132. Related Articles Letter: This hurts — ‘We hold these truths to be self evident’ is a lie Letter: US must provide security from true threats we face Letter: Gauge our success by poverty, crime rates, not the Dow Letter: Redirect the resources of police and the...
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