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    (CNN)James Franco as Fidel Castro has at least one advocate.Alina Fernández, daughter of the former Cuban dictator who died in 2016, has told Deadline she supports Franco playing her father in the forthcoming independent film "Alina of Cuba.""James Franco has an obvious physical resemblance with Fidel Castro, besides his skills and charisma," she told the publication. There had been public outcry from some over Franco's casting, including from actor John Leguizamo, because the actor is not Latino."How is this still going on? How is Hollywood excluding us but stealing our narratives as well?" Leguizamo posted on his verified Instagram account.Read More"No more appropriation Hollywood and streamers! Boycott! This F'd up!," he wrote. "Plus seriously difficult story to tell without aggrandizement which would b wrong! I don't got a prob with Franco but he ain't Latino!" The film tells the story of Fernández, who was born as the result of a love affair between Cuban-born socialite Natalia "Naty" Revuelta and Castro. "I'm sure that Mía Maestro, an actress I admire, will understand and interpret Naty, my mother, in a unique...
    More On: john leguizamo John Leguizamo on bringing the ‘intellectual hustle’ of chess to life John Leguizamo and Patrick Swayze nearly fought on ‘To Wong Foo’ set John Leguizamo would quit acting to run for office ‘Waco’ is coming to the small screen No thank you, Franco. On Friday, John Leguizamo took to Instagram to call out the entertainment industry for casting yet another white actor in the role of an explicitly non-white character. The reproach followed the news that James Franco would portray infamous Cuban dictator Fidel Castro in the upcoming film “Alina of Cuba.” “How is this still going on? How is Hollywood excluding us but stealing our narratives as well? No more appropriation Hollywood and streamers!” the “Encanto” star wrote of the decision to give the role to Franco, 44, who is of Jewish, Portuguese and Swedish descent. “Boycott! This F’d up! Plus seriously difficult story to tell without aggrandizement which would b wrong! “I don’t got a prob with Franco but he ain’t Latino!” the comedian concluded of the “Spring Breakers” actor, whose...
    Sen. Catherine Cortez Masto made history nearly six years ago as the first Latina elected to the U.S. Senate following a hard-fought, expensive race that she won by less than 3 percent. Her re-election is looking just as difficult and one demographic is especially key to maintaining her seat: Latinos. Republicans, emboldened by their gains with Latinos in South Texas and Florida in recent elections, are eying Nevada as their next opportunity to make inroads with a voting demographic that’s been trending in the right’s direction. GOP nominee and former Nevada Attorney General Adam Laxalt, through his “Latinos for Laxalt” coalition, is pitching those voters that his MAGA-brand candidacy is an opportunity for change. “The only thing we have to look forward to is that people are waking up to it,” Laxalt said at a Latinos-focused campaign stop in Las Vegas earlier this month, according to a dispatch from The Nevada Independent. “They’re throwing the Democrats off. They know these policies are dangerous and toxic for our kids, for our country.” But left-leaning Latino organizing groups and Cortez Masto’s campaign...
    (CNN)James Franco has reportedly been cast as Cuban revolutionary Fidel Castro, and many Latino actors aren't happy.Most notably, the prolific John Leguizamo, who recently voiced Bruno in Disney's "Encanto," blasted Franco's casting on Instagram. Leguizamo argued that the role should have gone to a Latino actor instead. "How is this still going on?" Leguizamo asked on Friday. "How is Hollywood excluding us but stealing our narratives as well? No more appropriation Hollywood and streamers! Boycott! This F'd up! Plus seriously difficult story to tell without aggrandizement, which would (be) wrong! I don't got a (problem) with Franco but he ain't Latino!" Franco is set to star as Castro in the upcoming "Alina of Cuba," with production set to start later this year, per reports. The movie follows the life of Alina Fernandez, Castro's daughter.Leguizamo isn't the only Latino star angered by the casting. Read More"Wtf is this...." wrote actress Jess Darrow, who voiced Luisa Madrigal in "Encanto," in response to Leguizamo's post."I'm sorry but what in the actual f**k?" wrote actor Raúl Castillo in an Instagram story."Not me reading that...
    John Leguizamo has slammed the decision to cast American actor James Franco as the Cuban revolutionary Fidel Castro in an upcoming film.  It was revealed earlier this week that Franco, 44, will be playing Castro in the indie project Alina of Cuba, and Lequizamo, 62, took to his Instagram on Friday to speak out over the casting choice.  'How is this still going on? How is Hollywood excluding us but stealing our narratives as well?' Leguizamo began in his rant, that received almost 10,000 likes.  'No more appropriation Hollywood and streamers! Boycott! This F’d up! Plus seriously difficult story to tell without aggrandizement which would b wrong!' 'He ain't Latino!' John Leguizamo has slammed the decision to cast James Franco as Fidel Castro and demands fans to boycott the film over 'appropriation' Adding: 'I don't got a prob with Franco but he ain't Latino!' The View co-host Ana Navarro then commented under the post, telling Leguizamo that she would 'join' him in boycotting the film. Navarro wrote: 'I’d like to think no Latino actor worth their salt would sign up...
    When legendary Los Angeles Dodgers broadcaster Vin Scully passed away yesterday, I didn’t need to turn on the television, look at social media or hit up sports bars to know how much Southern California was mourning. I just checked my text messages. My brother sent over a slew of crying emojis. My cousin Vic admitted he had tears in his eyes while breaking the news to his wife. My cousin Plas — an Angels fan, somehow — added a video of someone pouring out whiskey from a flask, captioning it “RIP to the God.” My good friend Bobby texted a black-and-white photo of Scully — nothing else. My sister Elsa, who owns a Yorkie named Vinny, told me to mention in anything I might write that Scully died on the feast day of Our Lady, Queen of Angels — the devotional title of the Virgin Mary that’s the namesake of Los Angeles. And my sister Alejandrina — for some reason, an Angels fan — countered with a link to a YouTube video of Scully, a devout Catholic, reciting the Rosary,...
    George Santos is a private equity executive who pledged in his Congressional campaign video to not take a salary on Capitol Hill if elected House Republicans' campaign arm is pouring resources into suburban Long Island ahead of the November midterm elections, where a seat being vacated by outgoing Democrat Rep. Tom Suozzi has set up an opportunity for the GOP to add one more lawmaker to its New York Congressional delegation. From that vacuum of New York's Third Congressional District emerged George Santos, a Republican private equity executive who proudly billed himself as a 'walking contradiction.'  'It's just me being authentic, authentically me. I am gay, yes. I am Latino, yes. I am a Republican, unapologetically,' Santos told DailyMail.com in a phone interview. The son of Brazilian immigrants, he said the American Dream his family experienced is being 'threatened by a lot of the stuff that is being peddled in Congress and state houses.' 'I think it’s threatened but it’s not too late, that's why I'm running for Congress,' he said.  He also described facing hostility from Democrats over his...
    In the spring of 1980, Julian Nava found himself about to become a pioneer again. The Boyle Heights native had gone through his life as a man of firsts. First Mexican American student body president at East Los Angeles College. One of the first Mexican Americans to earn a doctorate from Harvard. The first Latino elected to the Los Angeles Unified School District board of trustees. One of the masterminds behind a pivotal television series about the Chicano experience. Now, President Carter had appointed Nava as the first-ever Mexican American U.S. ambassador to Mexico. He sat down with The Times for an interview shortly after the Senate approved his nomination. Nava told this paper that while the choice of him for the role was “historically significant... after the novelty wears off, all that really matters is what kind of job you do.” President Carter, right, and Secretary of State Cyrus Vance, left, introduce Ambassador Julian Nava, the new U.S. envoy to Mexico, during a session with reporters in Washington on April 21, 1980. (Harvey Georges/Associated Press) It was an apt...
    One person on Twitter commented, "this might be the worst ad i've ever heard. woof. without the tag it could be a republican spot." \u201cthis might be the worst ad i've ever heard. woof. without the tag it could be a republican spot\u201d — Christopher Hooks (@Christopher Hooks) 1659025117 "First of all, this ad is terrible. But more importantly, it represents the terrible position in which Democrats find themselves in South Texas and the RGV. The Dem brand is ruined--completely destroyed. They have to attack both parties. This means they are going to lose," someone else tweeted. In a press release, the DCCC announced that it is shelling out a seven-figure sum for digital, print, and radio ads to attract Latino support in "battleground districts." "The first radio advertisements will run in Arizona, Nevada, New Mexico, and Texas, and will spotlight Republicans’ extreme plans for America and highlight the historic accomplishments Democrats have delivered to communities," the press release declared. "Democrats refuse to take Latino voters for granted and this latest investment will join the DCCC’s cycle-long commitment to court,...
    SACRAMENTO —  The recent spike in gasoline prices took the greatest financial toll on Black and Latino Californians, though more than half of all adults in the state reported suffering at least moderate economic hardship, according to a new poll by the Public Policy Institute of California. Californians living in the Inland Empire and Central Valley, where distant commutes or long drives for work and daily chores are commonplace, also felt a far greater pinch due to steep prices at the pump compared with those living in the state’s densely populated urban landscapes, especially the San Francisco Bay Area. State Republicans have used high gas prices, which have been on the decline since peaking in the late spring and early summer, to attack Gov. Gavin Newsom and the California Legislature’s Democratic leadership for refusing to temporarily suspend the state’s highest-in-the-nation gas tax. But neither Newsom nor Democratic lawmakers appear to have suffered politically due to the high gas prices or other economic turbulence around the nation, the poll showed. Politics In another pandemic fallout, used-car prices are way up,...
    As Los Angeles residents decide who will be their mayor, Rep. Karen Bass is trying to build on her seven-point advantage in the primary over billionaire developer Rick Caruso. But in precincts with large Latino populations, the primary results were different — Caruso generally came out ahead of Bass, according to a Times analysis. While Latino voters in L.A. have historically leaned progressive, they can have a conservative streak on some issues, including policing. Party affiliation is relatively weak among Latinos, with some identifying as Democrats but willing to cross over for candidates who speak to them on issues, experts said. With homelessness, crime and affordable housing on voters’ minds this year, Caruso’s pitch that he is an outsider who can fix these problems appealed to Latino voters in the primary and could do so head-to-head with the more liberal Bass. But turnout is expected to be much higher in the November general election. City Councilman Kevin de León, the only major Latino candidate, had strong support among Latinos in the primary, and it is unclear where those...
    SAN FRANCISCO (KGO) -- Despite Latinx making up 15% of San Francisco's population, the latest monkeypox data shows that 30% of infections in this city are among this group."For us that is another alarm that is sounding in the community that we are responding to," said Ivan Corado-Vega, Latino Task Force manager.For over two years, the Latino Task Force gained the communities trust with COVID testing and vaccinations.As the monkeypox virus continues to spread disproportionately among LGBTQ Latinos, the hope is to begin vaccinating at their COVID sites.RELATED: LGBTQ activists call on Biden to address the rapid rise in monkeypox cases "It's disheartening, it is a call to action but because we did well in our response to COVID we have the infrastructure to do well to respond to how monkeypox is affecting our community," said Corado-Vega.The Latino Task Force is asking San Francisco's Department of Public Health to give them monkeypox vaccines, but the supply is still limited."We also have undocumented population in our community and sometimes they just don't want to speak out and they don't want to...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Justice Department said Friday it is investigating illegal dumping in the city of Houston — including dead bodies — that officials said are left in Black and Latino neighborhoods in the nation’s fourth largest city. The investigation will be led by the department’s civil rights division and will examine whether city police and other departments discriminate against Black and Latino residents in violation of federal civil rights laws. Besides bodies, items dumped in majority Black or Latino neighborhoods include appliances, furniture, tires, medical waste and vandalized ATM machines, Assistant Attorney General Kristen Clarke said at a news conference Friday. “Illegal dumping is a longstanding environmental justice issue, and like many other environmental justice issues, it often disproportionately burdens Black and Latino communities,” said Clarke, who heads the department’s civil rights division. The investigation is the first publicly announced environmental justice action since Attorney General Merrick Garland created an office of environmental justice within the agency in May. The new office is focused on “fenceline communities” in Houston, New Orleans, Chicago and other cities that have...
    Airbrushed in Dodger blue and white, the paint lay fresh on a black T-shirt as clothing designer Kacey Lynch whipped out his phone to snap photos of his new creation. About one week later, Los Angeles outfielder Mookie Betts would step onto the Dodger Stadium field for MLB All-Star Game batting practice, taking swings and fielding interviews while wearing Lynch’s shirt, which carried a bold message: “We Need more Black People at the Stadium.” The original airbrushed version of the T-shirt that Mookie Betts wore to the All-Star Game is shown on the floor of the Bricks & Wood office. (Kacey Lynch) Lynch, owner and founder of Bricks & Wood, a streetwear brand created in his native South-Central Los Angeles, grew up going to Dodgers games with his grandfather. Lynch’s colleague, Malik Coney, who at one point interned for the Dodgers, also grew up a baseball fan in L.A. The pair wanted to call out what they saw as a lack of Black fans at Dodger Stadium, but also a lack of Black representation in a sport that...
    In what would be a first for California, the city of Santa Ana will consider whether to classify attacks against street vendors as hate crimes, which could offer additional safeguards for vendors in the predominantly Latino city. Councilman Jonathan Ryan Hernandez, 29, said that he’s noticed an increase in attacks against street vendors and that viral videos seem to show a pattern of verbal and physical assaults with an undercurrent of anti-Latino racism. “These aren’t robberies. These people are not having their food stolen; they’re not having their shopping carts taken from them,” Hernandez said. “They’re getting beaten up and spit at, and then these people are walking away.” At Tuesday’s regular City Council meeting, Hernandez will propose the ordinance, which he said will let street vendors know that the city is willing to fight for them. Growing up in Santa Ana, Hernandez was close with his neighborhood ice cream man, or paletero. Hernandez, whose family is from Jalisco, Guadalajara, in Mexico, said there is not enough support for street vendors and the immigrant community in Santa Ana. He...
    Five local Latino-led startups received welcome news this week — each of their ventures received $100,000 from Google’s Startups Latino Founder Fund. Chicago-based winners OnebitA platform that automates financial tracking for independent business owners; ConnectCare HeroesIt creates online communities for seniors, their families and health care providers; SanaraiA site for Spanish mental health services; Road, a digital cleaning operating system; And Grapefruit healthA health technology company that uses technology services to help healthcare providers reach patients. The announcement comes at a time when only 2% of US firms’ venture capital funding went to startups with Latino founders last year, according to one study. Crunchbase – Although Latinos make up 17% of small business founders. Advertising “A lot of the things we come across don’t involve conventional investment, but these are big issues that we’re addressing within our communities,” said Osvaldo Montelongo, founder and CEO of ConnectCareHero. The origins of Montelango’s business came from his own life experiences – his father was 57 when he was born. “In my early 20s, I had to take care of my father...
    Rep. Ruben Gallego (D-AZ) blasted Republican candidate Tanya Contreras Wheeless, accusing her of using her Hispanic maiden name to boost her congressional campaign as both parties seek to win the crucial voting bloc in the midterm elections. Contreras Wheeless fired back on Wednesday, calling his accusations that she is “not sufficiently Latina” both “sexist and racist.” The comments come two weeks before Wheeless is set to face four primary opponents to secure the GOP nomination for Arizona’s newly redrawn 4th Congressional District, with the winner facing incumbent Rep. Greg Stanton (D-AZ) in November. DEMOCRATS TOUT ‘HISTORIC’ INVESTMENT IN MIDTERM ADS TARGETING LATINO VOTERS “Ruben Gallego’s claim that I am not sufficiently Latina because I don’t always use my full name is disappointing, but not surprising,” she wrote in a statement. “Many women change their last name when they get married, but that doesn’t change who they are or where they came from. Attacking me for using my married name is sexist and racist.” “Well give her credit for being honest she [is] admitting to using her...
    Days before First Lady Dr. Jill Biden’s rhetorical flop comparing Latino voters to a variety of breakfast tacos, recently elected Rep. Mayra Flores criticized references to “tacos” as tired pandering during a wide-ranging interview with Breitbart News. The Mexican-born congresswoman managed to flip a Democrat stronghold seat in South Texas and now argues that more Latinos began to realize their values were not represented in Washington. She especially criticized longstanding pandering about cuisine and music to score votes. Flores won her election in June to replace Rep. Filemon Vela (D) who quit his position for private sector work. Flores will have to compete in November against Congressman Vicente Gonzalez (D) due to redistricting. Flores told Breitbart News: They think that with just their little face, people will vote for them … They think that because they hand out tacos, people will vote for them. They think that because they play regional music, norteño music, the people will keep voting for them. But NO, they are going to have to do much more. People will no longer vote for them just...
    Dr. Jill Biden stood before a packed hotel banquet room this week in San Antonio and tried to inspire everyone by talking about her husband’s record on Latino issues. Instead, the first lady joined an ever-growing club: the pantheon of pandering politicians who have tried to use Mexican food to win votes. Speaking at the national convention of UnidosUS, a civil rights organization known for decades as the National Council of La Raza, the first lady praised the vision of longtime president Raul Yzaguirre to build a nonprofit that didn’t focus on just one Latino group. “Raul helped build this organization with the understanding that the diversity of this community — as distinct as the bodegas of the Bronx, as beautiful as the blossoms of Miami and as unique as the breakfast tacos here in San Antonio — is your strength,” she said, mispronouncing “bodegas.” Biden giggled after delivering the line, as if she expected rousing applause from the city where breakfast tacos — like breakfast burritos, except they’re tacos — are gospel. Instead, there was nervous laughter and...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — First Lady Jill Biden apologized Tuesday for saying Latinos are “as unique” as San Antonio breakfast tacos during a speech to the nation’s largest Hispanic civil rights and advocacy organization. “The first lady apologizes that her words conveyed anything but pure admiration and love for the Latino community,” tweeted Jill Biden’s spokesperson, Michael LaRosa. READ MORE: Sacramento Man Found Guilty Of Sex Trafficking OperationThe first lady flew to San Antonio on Monday to address the annual conference of UnidosUS, a Latino civil rights and advocacy group formerly known as the National Council of La Raza. She also spoke at a Democratic Party fundraiser at a private home before she returned to Washington. But Biden’s attempt at a compliment floundered when she described Latino diversity “as distinct as the bodegas of the Bronx, as beautiful as the blossoms of Miami and as unique as the breakfast tacos here in San Antonio.” She also badly mispronounced “bodegas,” small stores in urban areas typically specializing in Hispanic groceries. The National Association of Hispanic Journalists and others registered their offense on social media,...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — Jill Biden apologized Tuesday for saying Latinos are “as unique” as San Antonio breakfast tacos during a speech to the nation’s largest Hispanic civil rights and advocacy organization. “The first lady apologizes that her words conveyed anything but pure admiration and love for the Latino community,” tweeted Jill Biden’s spokesperson, Michael LaRosa. The first lady flew to San Antonio on Monday to address the annual conference of UnidosUS, a Latino civil rights and advocacy group formerly known as the National Council of La Raza. But her attempt to compliment Latino diversity didn’t go over very well when she said that the community is “as distinct as the bodegas of the Bronx, as beautiful as the blossoms of Miami and as unique as the breakfast tacos here in San Antonio.” She also badly mispronounced “bodegas,” small stores in urban areas typically specializing in Hispanic groceries. The National Association of Hispanic Journalists and others registered their offense on social media, with the journalists’ organization tweeting that, “We are not tacos.” “Using breakfast tacos to try to demonstrate the uniqueness...
    First Lady Jill Biden’s staff issued an apology Tuesday on behalf of the First Lady after she compared Latinos to breakfast tacos. “The First Lady apologizes that her words conveyed anything but pure admiration and love for the Latino community,” wrote Press Secretary to the First Lady Michael LaRosa. The First Lady apologizes that her words conveyed anything but pure admiration and love for the Latino community. — Michael LaRosa (@MichaelLaRosa46) July 12, 2022 The First Lady made her remarks off of prepared text during a speech at the Latinx IncluXion Luncheon in the Texas city Monday. She said: Raul helped build this organization with the understanding that the diversity of this community—as distinct as the bodegas of the Bronx, as beautiful as the blossoms of Miami, and as unique as the breakfast tacos here in San Antonio—is your strength. The first lady’s remarks shocked many in the Latino community, who viewed her remarks as out-of-touch and even racist. Jill Biden, who works as a professor in a college English department, also mispronounced the word “bodega,” further demonstrating her ignorance...
    (CNN)First lady Jill Biden's office issued an apology Tuesday morning after Biden faced criticism for citing "bodegas" and "breakfast tacos" to praise Latino diversity.Biden made the comments on Monday during a conference in San Antonio for the Latino civil rights and advocacy organization UnidosUS, where she commented on diversity of the community and the work of Raul Yzaguirre, the former president and CEO of the organization who just last week was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation's highest civilian honor. "Raul helped build this organization with the understanding that the diversity of this community -- as distinct as the bodegas of the Bronx, as beautiful as the blossoms of Miami, and as unique as the breakfast tacos here in San Antonio -- is your strength," Biden said, while mispronouncing the word "bodega." "The first lady apologizes that her words conveyed anything but pure admiration and love for the Latino community," Michael LaRosa, the first lady's spokesman, said.In a statement Monday, the National Association of Hispanic Journalists called on the first lady and her speech writing team "to take...
    (CNN)Conservatives are heralding them as "real deal" Republican candidates. They are seen as proof that the GOP can win over Latino voters. They are three Latinas from South Texas: Mayra Flores, who won a special election to represent part of the Gulf Coast, and Monica De La Cruz and Cassy Garcia, who are in congressional races in districts along the Mexican border. Raul A. ReyesFlores made history as the first Mexican-born woman to be elected to Congress. These women have drawn national attention for seeming to shatter the myth that Latinos generally vote Democratic. As Garcia recently told The New York Times, "The red wave is here." But the rise of Flores, De La Cruz and Garcia deserves to be seen in context. While these Latinas may be having a moment in the spotlight, they hold views outside the Latino mainstream. Their current prominence is more of a publicity coup for the GOP than an authentic reflection of Latino voters. Like most other Republicans, these Latinas hold conservative positions on abortion, gun control and immigration. Good riddance to this...
    First Lady Jill Biden told a group of progressive Texas Hispanic voters they were as “unique” as “breakfast tacos” during a speech Monday in San Antonio. Biden addressed a crowd assembled for the UnidosUS Annual Conference, which began on Saturday. According to video of her remarks obtained by Jorge Bonilla of the the conservative Media Research Center, she compared attendees to breakfast tacos. She also mispronounced the word “bodega” when she said “bogeda.” “[Raul Yzaguirre] helped build this organization with the understanding that the diversity of this community, as distinct as the bogedas of The Bronx, as beautiful as the blossoms of Miami, and as unique as the breakfast tacos here in San Antonio, is your strength,” Biden said. Once again, Dr. Jill Biden butchers the Spanish language in furtherance of pandering to a client constituency (the org FKA National Council of La Raza). I hereby bless your timelines with Dr. Jill’s rendering of “bodega”. pic.twitter.com/Z4FSXtlUMe — Jorge Bonilla (@BonillaJL) July 11, 2022 KENS reported the annual conference was titled “Siempre Adelante: Our Quest for Equity.” The outlet noted: The...
    PHOENIX (AP) — Latino students should be a federal funding priority after they fell behind during the coronavirus pandemic despite making notable educational gains in recent decades, leaders with the largest U.S. Hispanic civil rights and advocacy group said Monday. “There is funding there,” said Amalia Chamorro, who oversees educational policy for UnidosUS, formerly the National Council of La Raza. “We need to make sure it is directed to students with the most needs.” An Associated Press analysis of state and U.S. data last year found the federal government had provided $190 billion in pandemic aid to schools, four times more than what the U.S. Education Department spends on K-12 schools in a typical year. A new report on Latino student access released by UnidosUS at its current gathering in San Antonio says students of color and low-income students faced the most daunting challenges during the pandemic because of problems like a lack of internet access in their homes when classes were being taught online. This report comes while schools across the nation struggle to recover from the...
    NEW YORK CITY (WABC) -- In this episode of Tiempo, we highlight a free summer academic program that is helping Latino students prepare for college.Educators at Montclair State University in New Jersey created the 'Hispanic Student College Institute.'They've been featured on 'Tiempo' before, but the coronavirus pandemic prompted some changes to the program.Co-founder Katia Paz Goldfarb details the deadline to apply and what to expect from the program this time around.On this episode, we also talk to folks at the organization Pa'Lante Harlem Inc.Their mission is to empower New York City tenants and hold negligent landlords and property managers accountable for unsafe living conditions.Elsia Vasquez walked us through some of the programs and resources they have available to New York City tenants.WATCH Tiempo on our Connected TV apps for Fire, Roku, Apple TV and Android TV. Click here to learn more.MORE: Watch more episodes of Tiempo here!Tiempo airs Sunday mornings at 11:30 a.m. on Channel 7.
    by Jennie Taer   A majority of Latinos agree with Title 42, a Trump-era policy used to quickly expel migrants due to the COVID-19 pandemic, according to a poll released Thursday by Axios-Ipsos Latino in partnership with Noticias Telemundo. Of the Latinos polled, 51%  strongly agreed or somewhat agreed with Title 42 remaining, while 44% are opposed to keeping it, according to Axios. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) announced on April 1 that Title 42 would end May 23, but due to a court order, the policy remains in place. Title 42 has resulted in the expulsion of 751,795 migrants so far in fiscal year 2022, according to U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP). BORDER REPORT: The first group of migrants I encountered last week in Yuma, AZ were from China, Peru, Georgia, Venezuela, Cuba, and India Only a few dozen migrants out of the ~1,500 crossing each day into the Yuma border sector are being returned under Title 42 pic.twitter.com/iqdwAX0QKH — Jennie Taer (@JennieSTaer) May 31, 2022 “I think because it’s a COVID mitigation thing, we do see sort of higher support...
    CHICAGO (WLS) -- A new program will give Latino families $30 a month off their internet bill.On Tuesday, the League of United Latin American Citizens will have an event at its Cicero office at 5822 Cermak Road from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. to help people sign up for the discount.It will be the first of two enrollment events.The second will be held from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. at the public library at 6238 South Archer Avenue in suburban Summit.According to the organization, only 67% of Latinos have internet access at home.They also said the money will be guaranteed for a year.
    Gun violence and crime are the top concerns among Latino voters ahead of November's midterm elections and could erase gains Republican candidates have made campaigning on a sagging economy and soaring inflation costs, according to a new poll released by Axios and Ipsos on Thursday. Worries over gun violence and crime surged ahead of inflation for the first time and rose sharply following last month's massacre at Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas, where an 18-year-old fatally shot 21 people and wounded 17 others. BIDEN 'DEEPLY DISAPPOINTED' WITH SUPREME COURT GUN RULING: 'LIVES ARE ON THE LINE' The mid-June survey was conducted two weeks after Uvalde and underscored how deeply that tragedy, as well as another mass shooting the week prior in Buffalo, New York, shook the public and forced lawmakers to take on the politically potent concern. Democrats' generic advantage over Republicans among Latino adults has dropped since March, with meteoric rises in inflation fueling the dissatisfaction, according to the survey. "Going into this poll, inflation and the economy was the dominant issue," Ipsos Senior Vice President Chris...
    The Congressional Hispanic Caucus, an exclusively Democratic entity consisting of some of the most left-wing lawmakers in the Capitol, published a letter it sent to the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) on Tuesday pressuring it to approve the sale of 18 Spanish-language radio stations to a newly established left-wing media corporation. The “Latino Media Network,” led by two Democrat party activists with ties to former President Barack Obama, announced in early June that it had raised $80 million and would use $60 million to buy 18 Spanish-language radio stations from the UnivisiónTelevisa conglomerate. Former Obama outreach director Stephanie Valencia and Obama and Hillary Clinton campaign veteran Jess Morales Rocketto have both emphasized that their intent in purchasing the outlets is to combat “misinformation” among the Hispanic community — a common complaint among Democrats as rates of support for their party among Hispanic Americans have plummeted since Joe Biden became president. Initial reports on the purchase named an investment fund called Lakestar Finance as one of the funders of the effort. The fund reportedly has ties to the Soros Fund Management, run by...
    A sea of audience members cheered as Ridge and Toni Garcia belted out their rendition of “Vamanos,” a ranchera immortalized by the late Mexican-Costa Rican singer Chavela Vargas. They called the song — which details the pain of being in love despite harsh social judgment — the “lesbian anthem.” Facing a crowd of nearly 300 friends, activists and leaders of L.A.'s Latino LGBTQ community gathered Thursday at Studio-MLA, a landscape architecture firm, they turned their acoustic guitars toward one of the night’s honorees, Nancy Valverde. “This is for you ,Nancy,” Ridge said. Garcia and Ridge have been friends with Valverde for nearly three decades. In the 1960s, the Chicana lesbian was arrested several times by the Los Angeles Police Department for wearing men’s clothing in public spaces throughout L.A., a violation of so-called masquerade laws. By working with her lawyer, she was able to put a stop to the arrests. But, she said, she continued to face harassment from police officers taunting her outside her barbershop by knocking their nightsticks on the windows. At the Purple...
    "A memorial for the 19 children and two adults killed on May 24th during a mass shooting at Robb Elementary School is seen on May 30, 2022 in Uvalde, Texas." Latino voters in more than half a dozen battleground states are firmly in support of gun violence reform and abortion access, a survey of more than 1,000 registered voters said. The online polling, commissioned by Voto Latino and conducted by Change Research, found that 86% of Latinos feel that mass shootings are “either a crisis or major issue,” and support background checks on all guns, banning the sale of high-capacity magazines, and banning the sale of assault weapons.  “Latinos also fear for their reproductive freedoms as the conservative majority on the Supreme Court indicates it is prepared to overturn Roe v. Wade,” Voto Latino said (polling results were released just hours before the Supreme Court’s right-wing justices overturned Roe v. Wade and ended federal protection for abortion rights). “Over two-thirds of Latinos support the right to an abortion in all or most cases.” RELATED STORY: Uvalde community isn't getting Spanish-language updates from Texas Department of Public Safety Campaign...
    (CNN)Civil and reproductive rights groups say the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade is yet another attack on communities of color which will leave millions of Black and brown women without access to abortion care.Since the ruling became public Friday, leaders of Black, Latino, Asian American and Native American groups have condemned the court's decision. Their communities would be among the hardest hit by abortion restrictions, leaders say, due to myriad issues, including existing health care access disparities, financial hardship and a long history of criminalization."We are not surprised. The courts have never served our communities," said Lupe M. Rodríguez, executive director of the National Latina Institute for Reproductive Justice. "Once again, the Supreme Court has gone against the will of the people."Their comments came as protests erupted across the country and several states prepared to quickly implement their abortion "trigger" laws, created to ban abortion if Roe v. Wade fell.In many states, Black and Latino women receive abortions at higher rates than White women, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, which collects data from...
    Just hours after the Supreme Court voted to overturn Roe v Wade, late night host Bill Maher shot back at Democrats, who he says are losing the abortion debate with their woke politics - specifically calling out woke Rep. Alexadria Ocasio-Cortez who has defended using the term 'latinx.' In the closing monologue of his show Real Time with Bill Maher on Friday, Maher told viewers that abortion is a 'difficult issue for the Democrats to lose, but they're trying. 'For decades, liberals have said, "If only men could get pregnant, this wouldn't even be an issue," and "abortion rights are women's rights." Well, that's wrong now. 'When the woke end of the progressive spectrum talks about abortion now, they shy away from the word "women" and prefer terms like "birthing people" or "people who menstruate" because somewhere there's a trans man who's pregnant and I say good for him - and I'll be looking for his story somewhere in a future issue of Ripley's Believe it or Not.' 'Oh Democrats, let's take the first f****** word a human understands: "mama"...
    "Gordita Chronicles" is a new HBO-MAX series about a Dominican family, trying to find an American dream that embraces a Latino culture.Actress Eva Longoria is at the helm of the creative team. She and some of her cast talk to Hosea Sanders about the lively comedy.It's the 80s, and a 12-year-old and her immigrant family are trying to make a new home in Miami. Executive Producer Eva Longoria directed the first episode of "Gordita Chronicles."Sanders: "Why is it so important to have something like this for cultural representation?"Longoria: "This is at the heart of family comedy. It's things that parents deal with all the time, that kids deal with, it happens to be in the 80s, but I think so many people are going to find humor in these situations. They're fish out of water, they're trying to raise kids [and] they're trying to have a marriage.To see our brown faces in front of the camera, obviously makes me extra proud, and that representation matters, you should be able to see these families. We live normal lives, like everybody else,...
    CHICAGO (WLS) -- Vice President Kamala Harris travels to the Chicago area Friday.First, she'll join Democrats Senator Dick Durbin and US Representatives Lauren Underwood and Robin Kelly in Plainfield to highlight efforts to address the maternal health crisis.Friday afternoon, she'll be in Chicago to speak at the 39th annual conference of the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials.The event is billed as the nation's largest gathering of Latino policymakers and will be the first in-person conference NALEO has hosted since 2019,Governor JB Pritzker, Mayor Lori Lightfoot and US Rep. Jesus "Chuy" Garcia are also expected to address the conference.Stay tuned to ABC7Chicago.com and ABC7 Eyewitness News for more on this breaking news story.
    Editor’s note: This story is part of the annual Mosaic Journalism Workshop for Bay Area high school students, a two-week intensive course in journalism. Students in the program report and photograph stories under the guidance of professional journalists. In a primary election with dismal turnout in Santa Clara County, in which only about a third of eligible voters cast a ballot, even a smaller portion of Latino voters made their voices heard. Only 27% of registered Latinos in the county voted in the June 7 primary election, marking the lowest turnout among any ethnic or racial group in the region, according to the Pew Research Center. Fabiola Ramirez, a 22-year-old Latina resident of San Jose, didn’t vote in the election.“I chose not to vote because I wasn’t too aware or informed of the policies that were being advocated,” Ramirez said. She has voted in the past when she was enrolled at San Jose State University, where teachers and students often discussed the issues and the need to vote. “I was in college when I did vote so I think it was more...
    (CNN)A Latino officer in a suburban Cleveland police department became the second officer to speak out publicly after filing a complaint earlier this year with the Ohio Civil Rights Commission about alleged racist actions by former Sheffield Lake Police Chief Anthony Campo. Officer A.J. Torres filed his complaint with the state civil rights commission on February 8, 2022. The filing with the commission is a step required by state law before filing an employment discrimination lawsuit. Officer A.J. Torres.At a news conference Tuesday in Sheffield Lake, Ohio, an attorney for Torres said the officer was regularly harassed by Campo due to his religion and race. Torres said he is a "devoted Catholic" and should not have to hide his religion at work. "I don't put away my nationality and my heritage when I come to work, I shouldn't have to hide my religion either," he said. Attorney Ashlie Case Sletvold, who also represents Torres, said Campo placed a picture of Torres with two children, taken while on a missionary trip, and placed it on a bottle of hot sauce...
    More Californians are gaining access to broadband internet, but Black and Latino households still lag behind their white counterparts, according to an analysis of the latest available American Community Survey data. The Public Policy Institute of California, which recently presented the findings, noted that the U.S. Census Bureau survey paints a picture of expanding but unequal access to high-speed internet service in the state at a time when reliable internet service became a necessity for remote work and school. The data come from the 2020 American Community Survey, which the institute said was limited by “substantial nonresponse bias” because of the COVID-19 pandemic. “We present these ACS findings cautiously, and we do not make direct comparisons with prior years,” the institute wrote. According to those “experimental data,” 85% of California households had high-speed internet in 2020 while 94% had internet access of any kind, including cellphone data plans. Eighty-seven percent of white households had access to high-speed internet, compared with 83% of Black households and 80% of Latino ones. The divides were not only among racial groups; households headed by...
    The 18-year-old flew in from Miami wearing jeans and a denim jacket in the dead of winter. Outside, Washington was so snowy and frigid that Jorge Zamanillo had to buy a hat, gloves and scarf from a street vendor. But inside the many Smithsonian museums he visited that week, Zamanillo discovered a world that was warm and inviting. And for him, it was all completely new — and life-changing. “I fell in love with museums,” Zamanillo says. “I changed my major immediately from music to anthropology.” Before long, the one-time trumpet player who’d never set foot in a major museum went on to become an archaeologist, and later a curator. Fast forward three and a half decades and Zamanillo once again has just arrived in Washington from Miami, this time as the muggy summer days are beginning in the nation’s capital. He’s back at the Smithsonian. And it’s not only the weather that’s different. Zamanillo is no longer a mere visitor stopping by the storied institution’s museums. He’s been hired to run one — and to help raise $500 million...
    Civil rights group have filed a lawsuit alleging that Riverside County’s new voting districts disenfranchise Latino voters. The ACLU Foundation of Southern California, local advocacy group Inland Empire United and five residents filed the lawsuit Tuesday in Riverside County Superior Court. The group is alleging that the county’s new supervisor districts, adopted in December, violate state redistricting laws. The group is seeking a court order that would require the county to adopt a new voting district map. The lawsuit was filed against Riverside County and its five-member Board of Supervisors, as well as the county’s registrar of voters. “For months, Riverside residents demanded the county to do the right thing and adopt maps that would lead to equitable and fair representation,” Michael Gomez Daly, executive director of Inland Empire United, said in a press release. “Instead, the supervisors ignored the community and adopted maps that would ensure they had easier reelections.” About half of Riverside County’s 2.4 million residents identify as Latino, but Latinos are only reflected in one member on the county’s board of supervisors, the lawsuit says. Entertainment...
    CHICAGO (WLS) -- ABC7 is teaming up with Cook County Treasurer Maria Pappas for another Black and Latino Houses Matter Phone Bank Wednesday.This Black and Latino Houses Matter Phone Bank has connected homeowners to more than $26 million so far. The amount of money that has been claimed Wednesday is is $3.3 million.The previous five have led to $23 million in exemptions and refunds. One woman in Dolton discovered she was owed $11,000.WATCH: Dolton woman gets $11K thanks to Black and Latino Houses MatterEMBED More News Videos It all started when Cook County Treasurer Pappas launched the Black and Latino Houses Matter Phone Bank. Between high gas prices, sticker shock at the grocery store and just about everything going up. Dolton homeowner Sandra Davis is one of many who's feeling the pinch.Cook County treasurer, ABC7 Chicago will host 6th 'Black and Latino Houses Matter' Phone Bank"There's so many hurting people out here," Davis said. "This inflation is hitting everyone. I don't care what color you are I think it's hitting every family."That, on top of property taxes that continue to...
    CNN political director David Chalian repeatedly called the Republican Party victory on Tuesday in the special election in Texas’ 34th Congressional District “a warning sign for Democrats.” Republican Mayra Flores won the race over Democrat Dan Sanchez to become the first Mexican-born woman elected to Congress. She will succeed Filemon Vela Jr., a Democrat, who took a job in the private sector. Appearing on CNN Newsroom, Chalian described the significance of the election: I think this race is important to pay attention to. It’s down here in the Brownsville area of Texas, down in the Rio Grande Valley. Mayra Flores, a Republican, wins this race. It’s a special election. This was a Democratic-held seat. This district is one Joe Biden won it by four points in 2020. The Democratic congressman left Congress to become a lobbyist. The special election now produces a flip for Republicans. Nancy Pelosi’s Democartic majority in the House shrunk by one seat in advance of this tough midterm cycle. The thing that’s key to watch here … we talk about it all the time: Republicans have...
    (CNN)The Kansas City Chiefs were not the only winners at the Super Bowl, as Shakira and Jennifer Lopez brought Latin rhythms to one of the world's largest stages in their halftime performance. The bilingual show included medleys of their hits, scores of backup dancers, costume changes, a children's choir, and a dual-sided sequined cape featuring the flags of Puerto Rico and the United States. JLo's daughter Emme even performed alongside her mother, singing Bruce Springsteen's "Born In The USA." Raul ReyesBeyond its entertainment value, the Super Bowl halftime show mattered because it put Latino performers center stage, celebrating their contributions to popular culture. It reflected a smart marketing strategy by the NFL and it was a win for diversity and inclusion. The Super Bowl is one of the few events that Americans gather together to collectively experience. Last year's Super Bowl drew about 98 million viewers, and even at that, it was one of its least-watched games in more than a decade. While the ratings for this year's event are not known yet, it is certainly true that this was...
    DOLTON, Ill. (WLS) -- ABC7 is teaming up with Cook County Treasurer Maria Pappas for another Black and Latino Houses Matter Phone Bank Wednesday.The previous five have led to $23 million in exemptions and refunds. One woman in Dolton discovered she was owed $11,000.Between high gas prices, sticker shock at the grocery store and just about everything going up. Dolton homeowner Sandra Davis is one of many who's feeling the pinch.Cook County treasurer, ABC7 Chicago will host 6th 'Black and Latino Houses Matter' Phone Bank"There's so many hurting people out here," Davis said. "This inflation is hitting everyone. I don't care what color you are I think it's hitting every family."That, on top of property taxes that continue to go up in Cook County, money is tight. But Davis had no idea she had thousands of dollars out there waiting for her to claim it."I wasn't expecting to get it, but I did," she said.It all started when Cook County Treasurer Pappas launched the Black and Latino Houses Matter Phone Bank.The goal is to prevent residents from losing their home...
    SAN FRANCISCO (KGO) -- On the steps of City Hall, community leaders urged the Mayor of San Francisco to reassess her budget proposal that would cut five COVID test sites in some of the most vulnerable neighborhoods."Please keep the Mission open, keep Excelsior open, keep the Bayview open," said Ivan Corado-Vega, manager for the Latino Task Force.The upcoming budget would cut $9.5 million dollars in COVID funds. The Latino Task Force wants the Mayor to consider health equity in the upcoming budget."Just two years ago we had long discussions with city leaders about racial justice, divestment from failed systems and the promise of equitable investment particularly in communities of color."Susana Rojas with the Latino Task Force, the group facing closures, said essential workers will be the most impacted.RELATED: Amid COVID surge, San Francisco cuts community test site budget in vulnerable neighborhoods"It is hurtful and it is disappointing," said Rojas and added, "If all our essential workers get sick what is going to happen to our businesses. What is going to happen to any of the industries that we have in...
    America's first openly transgender bishop resigned last week amid allegations of racism after firing the Puerto Rican pastor of a predominantly Latino congregation during an important Hispanic holiday. Rev. Megan Rohrer, 42, who uses the pronouns 'they,' said that the 'constant misinformation, bullying and harassment' led to their resignation from the Sierra Pacific Synod, overseeing 200 congregations in the Evangelical Lutheran Church in Northern California and norther Nevada. Rohrer was elected in May 2021 to serve a six-year term. The ex-bishop had been found by a church 'listening panel' to have engaged in racist behavior by threatening to call the police on a church member and her child, which church investigators called 'an egregious action especially when dealing with the vulnerable communities of Black, Indigenous and People of Color.' Bishop Megan Rohrer, left, America's first transgender bishop, resigned under investigation for mishandling the termination of Pastor Nelson Rabell-Gonzales, who was ousted for bullying Rohrer was also accused of wearing a bulletproof vest when announcing the dismissal of a popular priest, Pastor Nelson Rabell-Gonzales, whom they had fired from the Mision...
    PHOENIX (AP) — Students at a largely Hispanic elementary school in Phoenix have long lined up for morning classes on a dusty patch of dirt under a broiling sun. So when Tony Mada learned of plans to plant 75 young trees at Borman Elementary School, the 30-year-old and his daughter Lilyth, 10, joined scores of volunteers to increase shade on campus. Desert willows, oaks and mesquites just a few feet tall were among trees planted at the event organized by the local nonprofit Trees Matter and the environmental organization The Nature Conservancy, which is expanding its focus beyond the wildlands to urban areas impacted by climate-fueled heat. “I’ll do anything to cool things down for my kids in this hot neighborhood,” Mada said one Saturday this spring as he and Lilyth, a student at the school, freed an acacia tree from the wooden box holding its roots. After experiencing global warming’s firsthand effects, U.S. Latinos are leading the way in activism around climate change, often drawing on traditions from their ancestral homelands. “There has been a real national...