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    Ask Phillips neighborhood resident Sam Eagle Hawk how it’s going for Native people in Minneapolis, and he puts it this way: It’s OK. But it used to be a lot better.  “Housing, jobs, gangs, liquor, drugs” are all things that have gotten worse, in his view, since he first moved to Minneapolis from Denver in the 1990s, said Eagle Hawk, a member of the Sioux nation. “Now there are also other things coming up like homelessness,” he said.   When he first arrived in Minneapolis, Eagle Hawk, 50, said he and his cousin had little trouble finding jobs and paying rent. But, recently, he’s been unable to keep work. And he sees other Native people struggling with drug addiction.  While life has been hard for everyone during the COVID-19 pandemic, Eagle Hawk said, the struggles are more pronounced in his Native community. And despite a 20-year-old agreement between Native community leaders and Minneapolis city officials to improve people’s lives, there’s more work to be done.  Article continues after advertisement “We have some of the worst disparities in the city and the...
    SAN FRANCISCO (KGO) -- To help the members of our Asian American, Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander communities, we have gathered resources from across the Bay Area, as well as national resources. You can find help and how to help others in the lists below.MORE: ABC7 Honors Asian Pacific American Heritage Month with special presentationHelp Track Anti-Asian HateReport a hate incident: Stop AAPI Hate (available in 12 languages)Document hate incidents, read their stories: Stand Against Hatred (English, Chinese, Vietnamese, Korean)File a report: OCA Asian Pacific American AdvocatesTrack hate crimes against South Asian, Sikh, Muslim, Arab communities: South Asian Americans Leading TogetherReport hate crimes: Anti-Defamation LeagueEducate Yourself and OthersBystander intervention training: Hollaback & Asian Americans Advancing Justice (FREE!)ADL Table Talk GuideTips to Stop Hate Crimes Against Asian AmericansCare for Your Mental HealthNational Asian American Pacific Islander Mental Health AssociationSan Francisco Community Health CenterAsian Americans for Community Involvement advocates for and serves the marginalized and vulnerable ethnic communities in Santa Clara County. Call (408) 975-2730Richmond Area Multi-Services is committed to advocating for and providing community based, culturally-competent and consumer-guided comprehensive services, with...
    NEWARK, New Jersey (WABC) -- Newark is hoping a new transformative residential complex with some star power backing will be a slam dunk for the city.NBA legend, entrepreneur and Newark native Shaquille O'Neal is back in his hometown Monday to reveal two projects to improve the community.The Shaquille O'Neal Foundation is unveiling a new basketball and multi-use court off Hawthorne Avenue.'ALSO READ | Family searching for answers after 21-month-old dies at NJ day careEMBED More News Videos A family is searching for answers after a 21-month-old girl tragically died at a daycare center in New Jersey. Then, in the afternoon, Governor Phil Murphy will be on hand for a topping-off ceremony for a new 33-story mixed income residential tower on Edison Place.The building will provide 370 affordable apartments to the community, making it the largest mixed income project in New Jersey.Informally called "Shaq Tower 2," a penthouse apartment in 777 McCarter will become Shaq's home.The building will have a range of amenities, including a roof deck lounge, fifth-story gym and outdoor pool, 24/7 concierge, and 12,000 square feet of retail...
    A tundra wildfire continued to creep closer to an Alaska Native community in southwest Alaska, but mandatory evacuations have not been ordered, fire officials said Sunday. The East Fork fire was within 3.5 miles (5.6 kilometers) of St. Mary’s, a statement from Alaska Wildland Fire Information said. Even though it had moved 1.5 miles (2.4 kilometers) closer to the Yup’ik community since Saturday, fire managers said the progress has slowed somewhat because of favorable weather conditions. The temperatures were slightly cooler with rising humidity, which could help moderate fire conditions. However, winds are expected to remain steady out of the north, helping move the fire toward populated areas. The fire is burning in dry grass and shrubs like alder and willow in the mostly treeless tundra in southwest Alaska. The fire was started by lightning May 31. Firefighters are working to strengthen primary and secondary fire lines protecting St. Mary’s and the nearby communities of Pitkas Point and Mountain Village and properties, including cabins, between them. No structures have been lost in the fire. The fire is also 10...
    TO'HAJIILEE, NM - NOVEMBER 2: Elsie Werito, 84, a member of the To'hajiilee Chapter of the Navajo Nation, waits in line to cast her ballot at the Desiderio Center Nov. 2, 2004, in To'hajiilee, New Mexico. Werito said she has been voting all her life and has never missed an election. by Jordan Oglesby and Aidan Graybill This article was republished from Prism, and originally published by The PUBLIC. In 1974, three Navajo men—Herman Dodge Benally, John Earl Harvey, and David Ignacio—were brutally murdered on the outskirts of Farmington, New Mexico, by three white teenagers. In response to the murders, many advocacy organizations—including the University of New Mexico Kiva Club, the American Indian Movement (AIM), and the NAACP—mobilized in Farmington. The high schoolers responsible for the murders were sentenced to a few years at the state reformatory after closed-door proceedings. Many in the Farmington community felt this punishment wasn’t sufficient and multiple marches and protests ensued. Following a march in May 1974, a list of demands was presented to the Farmington mayor that addressed “basic community problems affecting Indians, and calls for increased...
    SCOTT COUNTY, Minn. (WCCO) – In Minnesota, a Native American community in Scott County is restoring land using fire. Friday morning, they conducted a controlled burn at Tewapa prairie located southeast of County Road 82 and Mniowe Trail in Scott County. “Fire is a really good thing if you use it in appropriate ways. We are striving to rebuild our connection with fire and to educate the community about the benefits of it,” Environmental Sciences Supervisor for the Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Community said. READ MORE: Boating Season Begins, But Lake Water Temps Are Pushing Off SwimmingIn the Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Community, firefighters set the dry prairie grass on fire, as part of a century’s old tradition of controlled burns, once restricted by settlers. (credit: CBS) “We had a historical relationship and that was disturbed after European settlement and so we are here to bring that back to the landscape. A lot of these ecosystems are evolved with fire, so they need it to stay healthy,” Anderson said. READ MORE: U.S. Interior Secretary Deb Haaland Visits...
    SAN JOSE — Flor Martinez knows what it’s like to grow up in a family where a trip to the movie theatre is as much of a luxury as going to Disneyland. As an undocumented Mexican immigrant who came to America at age 3, she remembers her family relying on the kindness of strangers for help in navigating a new country, food banks to feed them and free community events to keep the kids entertained. Flor Martinez poses for a portrait at the warehouse space for the non-profit Celebration Nation Foundation in Santa Clara County, Calif. The non-profit Celebration Nation Inc. sets up events for farmworker families that donÕt have much.(Photo by Jordan Hayes/Celebration Nation)  Since the onset of the pandemic, Martinez has worked diligently to bring the community back to her Latino neighbors from Silicon Valley to San Martin and Salinas through her new non-profit Celebration Nation Inc, which sets up events for farmworker families that don’t have much. After a viral video she posted on Instagram gave her thousands of new followers, she used her newfound national influence...
    Video is from an August 2021 feature of Hockey Niñas MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) — A Minneapolis woman is being recognized for her positive impact on her community through the sport of hockey. Meredith Lang is a finalist for the National Hockey League’s Willie O’Ree Community Hero Award. Lang is the co-founder of two organizations, Hockey Niñas and Minnesota Unbounded, which seek to grow the sport for female players and make the sport more diverse and inclusive. “Through her work with Minnesota Unbounded, a league comprised entirely of girls and women of color from the players on the ice to the coaches behind the bench, Lang has helped grow the number of competitive girls hockey teams from 31 girls in U10 and U12 teams, to more than 50 families from 20 different hockey organizations on U10, U12, U14 teams, as well as pilot programs for U6 and U8 teams,” the NHL said. Other finalists include Noel Acton of Baltimore, Maryland and Ryan Francis of Cole Harbour, Nova Scotia. See more about the NHL award here.
    ST. PAUL, Minn. (WCCO) — People from more than a dozen Native American nonprofits are calling on state legislators to pass a new bill that would pay for the construction of new community facilities in the Twin Cities. Groups rallied Friday at the Minnesota State Capitol, asking for nearly $84 million. The money would be used to build 12 new facilities around the metro that would provide child care, health care, and housing and workforce development. The groups say, with a budget surplus and federal dollars available, it’s long overdue. “We stand here before this legislature saying, ‘Empower us with the resources that were derived from the land and exploited labor of the state, to allow us to continue forward doing this work that the city and the county and the state governments can not do,'” Dr. Joe Hobot said, speaking at the rally. They say expanding services would address disparities in the community. The initiative is named in honor of Clyde Bellecourt.
    D.C. native, Award-winning author and literary activist Marita Golden says the strong lack woman complex dates back to slavery and is “deeply embedded in African American life and culture.” (Courtesy of Marita Golden) This is part of WTOP’s continuing coverage of people making a difference from our community authored by Stephanie Gaines-Bryant. Read more of that coverage. Each morning she puts on her superwoman cape and heads out the door to save her family, her community and even the world. That’s a belief that many women of color have adhered to for hundreds of years, one that continues to threaten their mental health. Award-winning author and literary activist, Marita Golden says the strong Black woman complex dates back to slavery and is “deeply embedded in African American life and culture.” “Because of the horrors and harshness of our conditions, we had to be strong,” Golden says. The author said there was little time to think about their emotional needs, so Black women adopted the persona of the strong Black woman. A DC native and co-founder of the Zora Neale Hurston/Richard Wright...
    LONG BEACH, Calif. (KABC) -- Last year the NCAA started to allow athletes to make money on their image and likeness. Now, a football player from Long Beach is using this option to start a scholarship for disadvantaged students.20-year-old Alex Austin was born and raised in Long Beach. He's currently a student and football player at Oregon State University. He also played football in high school at Long Beach Polytechnic high school.Alex Austin says he comes from a family who volunteers often."I would say community service is a part of our DNA as a family. We are constantly doing something in the community," said Al Austin, Alex Austin's father.Al Austin is a Long Beach city council member and his wife, Daysha Austin, is the district director for assembly member Reggie Jones-Sawyer.Alex Austin says his parents have been his biggest inspiration and now he's giving back by creating a scholarship."It really just came from me wanting to give back to the community. I've always been a hand in the community starting with turkey giveaways and back to school give always at...
    South Jersey native and community college student Samuel Reber died unexpectedly on Monday, Jan. 24. He was 26. Born in Bridgeton, Reber previously worked at Van Dyke's in Millville and attended a local community college, his obituary says. Reber was known for his highly intellectual personality — he was fluent in Spanish, played three different instruments, and was “no stranger to hard work,” according to his memorial. Meanwhile, Reber was a believer in the gospel of Christ and enjoyed singing traditional Christian hymns, his obituary says. Reber was also remembered for fostering a 14-year-long relationship with his loving canine companion, Moe. Reber leaves behind his heartbroken parents, Frederick and Celina Reber; sister, Lydia; brother, Jonathan; niece, Ana, as well as numerous extended family members and dear friends. Reber’s funeral was held Saturday, Feb. 12 at New Hope Presbyterian Church on Hitchner Avenue in Bridgeton. “Samuel was a vivacious, gregarious, intelligent, and talented young man,” reads his memorial. “We are no longer privileged to have him in our midst.” Click here for the full obituary of Samuel Reber.
    JUNEAU, Alaska (AP) — A pep club’s “country” theme, for which some student fans dressed like cowboys for a basketball game against a school from Alaska’s only Indian reserve, wasn’t intended to be “racially provocative,” but it had a negative effect that was “predictable and should have been prevented,” according to the findings from an investigation of the incident released Friday. The investigation was conducted by the Ketchikan Gateway Borough School District following a Feb. 5 game between the Ketchikan Kings and the Metlakatla Chiefs. The report from the borough school board and district administration said the Ketchikan High School pep club has long planned themed outfits for home games as a way to show school spirit. For the “country” theme, students wore outfits that included cowboy hats and plaid shirts, leading to an “association with a ‘Cowboys vs. Indians’ theme” that was foreseeable and should have been prevented, the report says. “For this we must take accountability,” it said. The situation was “escalated” by the behavior of some Ketchikan students that “included inappropriate racist remarks and sounds...
    CHICAGO (CBS) — Normally, a restaurant breaking ground in Chicago isn’t news. But consider what one long-time chef is about to. It’s something North Lawndale hasn’t seen in 50 years. CBS 2’s Suzanne Le Mignot report on a story you’ll see only on 2. READ MORE: Chicago, Cook County To Lift Mask And Vaccine Mandates On Feb. 28, But Masks Will Remain For CPS; 'We're Seeing Ourselves On The Downward Slope Of This Omicron Surge'Right now, this will be the only business on a specific stretch of W. Roosevelt Rd. for three blocks here in North Lawndale. The woman behind this restaurant, now under construction, hopes with the opening of her second Soule’s location, the community will change in many ways. Bridgette Flagg’s excitement is on full display, as she walks through this construction site on W. Roosevelt Rd. near S. Central Park Avenue. “This is the bar area. We’re putting in fireplaces. It’s going to be very, very nice.” Flagg bought a crumbling church that was once on this spot that had to be torn down. She’s now building...
    (Reuters)An indigenous language from South America's extreme south has all but vanished after the death of its last living speaker and guardian of its ancestral culture.Cristina Calderon died on Wednesday, aged 93. She had mastered the Yamana language of the Yagan community and after the death of her sister in 2003, was the last person in the world who could speak it. She worked to save her knowledge by creating a dictionary of the language with translations to Spanish."With her an important part of the cultural memory of our people is gone," said Lidia Gonzalez, Calderon's daughter, on Twitter. Gonzalez is one of the representatives currently drafting a new constitution in Chile. How film is putting Indigenous languages in the spotlightThe dictionary, however, meant there was hope of preserving the language in some form, she said."Although with her departure a wealth of especially valuable empirical knowledge is lost in linguistic terms, the possibility of rescuing and systematizing the language remain open," she said.Read MoreAlthough there are still a few dozen Yagans left, over the generations people from the community stopped...
    PHILADELPHIA (CBS) – From mesmerizing metals to colorful textiles and hand-hugged pottery, this weekend marks the beginning of how you can explore the traditions of Southwest Native art at the Barnes Museum. So dive in, take a deep inhale, and enter their newest exhibit “Water, Wind, Breath.” “This exhibition tells the story of Dr. Albert Barnes’ trips to the Southwest – New Mexico and Arizona in 1929, 1930, and 1931,” said Co-Curator Lucy Fowler Williams. “He eagerly attended Pueblo dances and he just experienced the community. This is just another window into Dr. Barnes. What was inspiring to him was to see how Navajo and Pueblo people were living with this art in their day-to-day.” READ MORE: George Pollydore, Anthony Clark Held Family Hostage Inside Holmesburg Home For Entire Weekend: Prosecutors“Many of the pieces in the Barnes collection were the first to ever be used in households. They were used in communities for different reasons, and that shows that transformation from things being used largely in communities and things being made or sale,” said Co-Curator Tony Chavarria There are 100...
    BALTIMORE (WJZ) — A Baltimore native is channeling her experience surviving domestic violence into a celebration of life through a fragrance line. Monique Plair has made it her mission to celebrate women like herself who are emerging from abusive circumstances. She not only wants to honor fellow survivors’ courage but also recognize those who are no longer here to have a voice. READ MORE: January Is Projected To Be The Deadliest COVID-19 Month In MarylandShe is doing that through a fragrance line called BU, which stands for beautiful unapologetically. “I want to make sure I’m doing everything I can to let someone know we’re a community out here, and you’re not alone,” Plair told WJZ. As a child, Plair said, she witnessed domestic abuse both inside and outside of her home. She said that abuse continued once she got married. “When a woman goes through something so traumatic, she feels beautiful, she looks beautiful,” she said. “She deserves a scent just as beautiful to celebrate her, so we are no longer suffering in silence.” But, Plair said, it’s more than...
    PALO ALTO — Racist found at an elementary school over the weekend is being investigated as a hate crime, according to authorities. The vandalism was reported at 4:18 p.m. Monday at El Carmelo Elementary School, according to a Palo Alto Police Department news release. Authorities said that between Saturday and Monday, someone wrote a racial epithet directed at Black people on school property. School officials also found a sign that displayed two non-white children that had also been crossed out and removed it. There haven’t been any recent, similar graffiti incidents reported at Palo Alto schools, according to police. Anyone with information on the incident can contact Palo Alto police’s 24-hour dispatch center at 650-329-2413, email [email protected] or send a text or voicemail to 650-383-8984. Related Articles Opinion: Envision a community where hatred has no sanctuary San Jose Jewish community attempts to rebuild after destructive synagogue fire Fremont native Michelle Go’s death hasn’t been labeled a hate crime but it adds to the fear that Asian Americans feel Owner of car painted with...
    A Pennsylvania school board overturned two previous rulings on its use of a Native American Mascot and using the term "Red," returning to its racist roots. Less than nine months after removing the mascot of a Native American man in a feathered headdress, the Bellefonte Area School District of Centre County will return to being known as the “Red Raiders," which the school had been known as for 80 years prior to the two April 2021 motions. The lively debate between the community members and the board over the issues took place over a four-hour long Zoom meeting. "For the last few years you have been presented with overwhelming and factual research on this injustice and inequity,” said Kathy Fletcher of Walker Township, said to the board during the Zoom meeting. “White culture must stop using Native American or indigenous symbolism in irresponsible and ignorant ways. Your students don’t even know what tribes or nations these people claim they’re trying to honor. This is regionally incorrect and very offensive.” But only 10 community members voiced similar opinions. Ultimately the board...
    LOS ANGELES (KABC) -- There are tens of thousands of American Indians living in Los Angeles, yet their stories are rarely told.But in an alley tucked away between Skid Row and downtown Los Angeles' bustling Main Street, there's a colorful world of dissent and reclamation.American Indian art is splashed on the walls there - a tribute to voices who've long been silenced.Pamela J. Peters helped bring American Indian artists to Indian Alley. It's also the title of her latest film. In it, she reveals there are more than 70,000 tribal members living in Los Angeles today.Many are descendants of Native peoples who moved from their reservations to urban areas like Los Angeles as part of a government relocation program that started in the early 50s."I think the intent for the relocation program was really to help. The more I learned about it, it was actually a deceitful program that the government wanted to do," Peters said.The relocation program aimed to get Native peoples off their reservations and into urban areas, so the government could then sell tribal land."The United States...
    For Native Americans living in the San Francisco Bay Area, feeling invisible is common.From the forced relocation acts of the 1950's to today, many indigenous people feel as though they were and are still being stripped of their culture.RELATED: 1969 Occupation of Alcatraz: How Native Americans took over former prison and ignited a movementThrough the spirit of the occupation of Alcatraz, a coalition of native groups are creating a cultural hub known as 'The Village.'EMBED More News Videos Trailblazing Native American Chef Crystal Wahpehpah opens new woman-owned restaurant offering authentic indigenous foods with modern twist in East Bay Located in the heart of the American Indian cultural district of San Francisco, the first of it's kind in the US, 'The Village' will provide indigenous people a way to receive essential services and regain a connection to their community.Native people in San Francisco are using the foundation of past activism to fight for the future they deserve.EMBED More News VideosThis Native American Heritage Month, ABC Localish Studios presents "Our America: Indigenous and Urban." Celebrate Native American Heritage Month with "Our America:...
    SAN FERNANDO VALLEY (KABC) -- If you're looking for community at its strongest, it helps to look north."The Valley gets left out of a lot of things. It's not by design, it just kind of happens. And so we have to come together and provide for ourselves," said Ellsworth James, who has dedicated part of his life's work to bridging inequities.Most recently, work has taken him to the Valley's first families, like that of Rudy Ortega, Jr., Tribal President for the Fernandeño Tataviam Band of Mission Indians.Its charitable wing, called Pukúu, is the tribe's word for "One.""We're here to provide community services," said Ortega, Jr. "Working with many different organizations to bring the wellbeing of our community."MORE | United American Indian Involvement: Serving LA's Native American community for nearly 50 yearsEMBED More News Videos In honor of Native American Heritage Month, we're getting to know an organization that started focusing on the health of its community well before the pandemic: the people making a difference at United American Indian Involvement. Rarely has the wellbeing of any community been tested like...
    CHICAGO (CBS) — Instituto del Progreso Latino recently unveiled a new community mural honoring the Native American roots of many in the Chicago Latino community this Native American Heritage Month. The mural, called “The Dreamer,” was unveiled this past Friday at the school’s Instituto Health Sciences Academy location at 2520 S. Western Ave. in Little Village. READ MORE: 2 Men Charged In Shooting That Killed One Armored Car Guard And Wounded Another, And With Later Shooting, Killing 2 Of Their Own Suspected AccomplicesThe mural was painted by internationally-known artist Diske Uno, and incorporates themes of hope, spirituality, and natural healing as well as Native American heritage, the school said. The mural was made possible a collaboration over the past few months between Instituto del Progreso Latino, Instituto Health Sciences Academy, Frida Kahlo Community Organization, and the Brown Wall Project. READ MORE: South Side Residents Hope Red Line Extension Will Bring 'Activity And Hopefully Development'A select group of students from Instituto Health Science Academy helped Uno with the mural. “Pilsen has always had a rich history of art and self-expression. This...
    Members of the Ute Mountain Ute Tribe and the Navajo Nation march in protest against White Mesa uranium mill in Utah. Finally, after four years of nothing but lying, race-baiting, and removing much-needed federal protection of land and wildlife,  we have a president who cares about the Indigenous land we stand on and the people who were slaughtered on it by the colonizers.  Monday, during the White House Tribal Nations Summit, President Joe Biden signed an executive order directing the departments of Justice, Interior, Homeland Security, and Health and Human Services to create a “comprehensive strategy to improve public safety and justice for Native Americans and address the “epidemic of missing and murdered indigenous people.”  Biden additionally proposed a 20-year ban on federal oil and gas leases in Chaco Canyon and surrounding areas in northwest New Mexico, a sacred tribal site that contains valuable oil and gas.  Campaign Action “Chaco Canyon is a sacred place that holds deep meaning for the Indigenous peoples whose ancestors lived, worked, and thrived in that high desert community,” Interior Secretary Deb Haaland, the nation’s first Native American Cabinet...
    A five-year, $19.4 million grant from the National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities will help researchers and community activists from around Minnesota understand and develop ways to address the impact of racism on the cardiovascular health of members of the state’s people of color.   The grant will be administered by the Center for Chronic Disease Reduction and Equity Promotion Across Minnesota (C2DREAM), a new research center based at the University of Minnesota and the Mayo Clinic that will conduct its work in collaboration with a number of community-based health organizations across the state.  In Minnesota, Black, Indigenous and People of Color (BIPOC) communities experience the highest rate of health inequities in the U.S. The grant’s goal is to use the knowledge and experience of community based organizations to narrow that gap, gaining a deeper understanding of strategies that can effectively address health needs based on community ways of knowing.  Michele Allen, University of Minnesota Medical School associate professor of family medicine, director of the school’s Program in Health Disparities Research and one of C2DREAM’s principal investigators, said that...
    ESPN’s Major League Baseball reporter Jeff Passan took to Twitter on Friday to make a case for stopping the “Tomahawk Chop” practice long performed by Braves fans by citing the “truly racist” American policies of the early 20th century. It wasn’t really received all that well. Passan led off by explicitly addressing those with “deeply ingrained” opinions who find the tomahawk chop issue “disingenuous” and to make them understand the “mistreatment of indigenous people in Georgia.” Its important, especially for those whose opinions on the matter are deeply ingrained and think any discussion of the tomahawk chop is disingenuous, to understand the mistreatment of indigenous people in Georgia and why the chop is so bothersome to many. So, a history lesson. — Jeff Passan (@JeffPassan) October 29, 2021 Passan then delved into the specific origin of the Braves’ nickname. Today, there are zero federally recognized tribes in Georgia. Zero. A truly racist American policy eradicated them. Remember, the Braves aren’t called the Braves to honor history. They got that nickname when they were in Boston as an homage to the...
    ATLANTA, Ga. (KABC) -- When the Braves finished off their NLCS win over the Dodgers, the packed Atlanta home crowd did what they have done for decades: a tradition Braves fans call the tomahawk chop.It's a move many Native Americans have decried as degrading and damaging for years.In an era where large corporations like Major League Baseball are moving away from offensive stereotypes, Atlanta's continued use of "the chop" was a topic reporters asked MLB commissioner Rob Manfred about just before the World Series started."It's important to understand that we have 30 markets around the country. They're not all the same," said Manfred. "The Braves have done a phenomenal job with the Native American community. The Native American community in that region is wholly supportive of the Braves' program, including 'the chop.' For me, that's kind of the end of the story. In that market, taking into account the Native American community, it works."But in a statement, the National Congress of American Indians responded saying, " ... the tomahawk chop that the team exhorts its fans to perform at home...
    (CNN)Native groups and advocates are demanding that the Atlanta Braves eliminate the "Tomahawk chop" symbol and gesture from its branding and game day traditions, saying the team is perpetuating racist stereotypes as the Braves take the national stage in the World Series. Leaders from the Native community said this week it's past time for the Braves to join other professional sports teams such as the Cleveland Guardians and Washington Football Team in removing offensive imagery and mascots which they say reduce Native people down to caricatures. Cleveland, formerly the Indians, and Washington, formerly the Redskins, announced last year they were changing their mascots when the nation faced a reckoning on racism. That reckoning was a catalyst not only for sports teams, but also for companies like Quaker Oats, for example, which changed branding and logos that it believed promoted racist stereotypes. The Braves' name and "Tomahawk chop" have long garnered criticism from Native groups and tribal communities, but the team has stopped short of eliminating the name and Tomahawk symbol or chopping gesture that has been a game day tradition...
    National Congress of American Indians sounds off after MLB commissioner Rob Manfred defends Atlanta Braves “tomahawk chop” tradition. The Atlanta Braves have received some significant criticism in recent years for their “tomahawk chop” tradition and now MLB commissioner Rob Manfred is catching heat for defending it. In part, Manfred said “the Native American community in that region is wholly supportive of the Braves program, including the chop. For me, that’s kind of the end of the story. In that market, we’re taking into account the Native American community.” Manfred also added that “the Native American community is the most important group to decide whether it’s appropriate or not.” In a statement, NCAI President Fawn Sharp spoke out against how Atlanta’s team’s name, “the tomahawk adorning the team’s uniform, and the ‘tomahawk chop’ that the team exhorts its fans to perform at home games are meant to depict and caricature not just one tribal community but all Native people.” National Congress of American Indians responds to Rob Manfred’s assertions about the Braves and the tomahawk chop: "Nothing could be further from...
    Alice Evans Accuses Estranged Husband Ioan Gruffudd of Cheating as He Confirms New Relationship From Gen Z to Boomers: A Generational Guide to Social Security Rob Manfred said on Tuesday that the Atlanta Braves' local Native American community is full supportive of the team, including its infamous tomahawk chop. It took less than 24 hours for one of the country's largest Native rights organizations to contradict him. The MLB commissioner spoke with reporters ahead of Game 1 of the World Series between the Braves and Houston Astros, an event that has revived discussion around one of the most controversial fan behaviors in sports. As he has in the past, Manfred defended the Braves' use of the chop and cited support from the local Native American community as evidence that it isn't racist. From The New York Times' James Wagner: "It's important to understand that we have 30 markets around the country. They're not all the same. The Braves have done a phenomenal job with the Native American community. The Native American community in that region is wholly supportive of...
    MLB commissioner Rob Manfred doesn’t like being political. He’s admitted that’s become tougher of late, especially in a season where he moved the All-Star Game for political reasons. But no topic is of greater consequence at this year’s World Series than the Atlanta Braves, and a looming name change that could be coming as the franchise gets more unwanted attention. Along with a name change, the tomahawk chop, which some find offensive due to its Native American imagery, could become a mantra of the past as well. “The Native American community in that region is wholly supportive of the Braves program, including the chop,” Manfred said. “For me, that’s kind of the end of the story. In that market, we’re taking into account the Native American community. …In Atlanta, they’ve done a great job with the Native Americans. The Native American community is the most important group to decide whether it’s appropriate or not.” Is the Braves Chop racist?The chop has been criticized by some people of Native-American decent, including MLB players. St. Louis Cardinals relief pitcher Ryan Helsey called it...
    The Atlanta Braves will host Game 3-5 of the Major League Baseball World Series later this week and on the sport’s biggest stage, the team’s fanbase will undoubtedly partake in its controversial tomahawk chop gesture. Prior to Game 1 of the World Series in Houston, MLB commissioner Rob Manfred met with reporters, where he defended “The Chop” and the Braves name, citing the organization’s work with local Native American groups. More from MLB Commissioner Rob Manfred talking on possible work stoppage, politics intersecting sports & more. #WorldSeries #ForTheH pic.twitter.com/Wsw3ikPmX3 — SportsTalk 790 (@SportsTalk790) October 26, 2021 “It’s important to understand that we have 30 markets around the country. They’re not all the same,” Manfred said. “The Braves have done a phenomenal job with the Native American community. The Native American community in that region is wholly supportive of the Braves program, including “The Chop.” For me, that’s kind of the end of the story. In that market, we’re taking into account the Native American community.” Some Native American groups have deemed “The Chop” offensive, even St. Louis Cardinals...
    Edgar Wright Responds to Stephen King’s ‘Last Night in Soho’ Tweet: “I Am Truly Humbled” How Much Should I Save for Retirement? © Provided by Sports Illustrated Ahead of Game 1 of the World Series in Houston, Manfred said Atlanta has "done a phenomenal job with the Native American community." Ahead of Game 1 of the World Series, MLB commissioner Rob Manfred defended the Braves' name and fan celebration 'The Chop,' saying the franchise has "done a phenomenal job with the Native American community." "It’s important to understand that we have 30 markets around the country," Manfred said, per The Athletic. "They aren’t all the same. ... The Native American community in that region is wholly supportive of the Braves program, including 'The Chop.' For me, that’s kind of the end of the story. In that market, we’re taking into account the Native American community." 'The Chop' mimics the motion of throwing a tomahawk, which has been widely criticized by members of the Native American community including St. Louis Cardinals reliever Ryan Helsey.  "I think it's a misrepresentation of the Cherokee...
    A university in Nevada updated its communication guidelines and asked those on campus to refrain from using the term "Native Nevadan" due to its insensitive nature to Native Americans . The University of Nevada, Reno's Office of Marketing and Communication began its Inclusion, Diversity, Equity, and Access Language guide to ensure an equal and inclusive environment for every member of the Wolf Pack community. Another change is for those in the University of Nevada, Reno community to refrain from using "Native Nevadan," according to the IDEAL guidelines. CALIFORNIA TEACHER PLACED ON LEAVE FOR 'OFFENSIVE' MATH LESSON INVOLVING NATIVE AMERICAN HEADDRESS Despite its colloquial use to describe a person born and raised in the Silver State, it "is not respectful to Indigenous people who truly are native to the land here in Nevada," according to the guide. When referring to those who call Nevada home, members of the Wolf Pack are encouraged to use maxims such as "born and raised" or "lived in Nevada their whole life." "A pack is about inclusion , about...
    MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) — Families in one of Minnesota’s Native American communities now have a new place to play. The Minnesota Timberwolves and Lynx refurbished a basketball court for the Prairie Island Indian Community, which was unveiled Monday, coinciding with Indigenous Peoples Day. MORE: Minnesota Marks Indigenous Peoples Day With Sunrise Service In Mpls., Peace Pole Raising In St. Paul (credit: CBS) Lynx star Rachel Banham was on hand for the fun. “I love it. I think it’s so fun, especially just playing basketball with the little kids, I just enjoy it,” Banham said. “Just run around, have fun. You see how happy they are and how much fun it is for them, so I really enjoy it.” MORE: Minnetonka Moccasin Issues Apology For Appropriating Native Culture, Makes Commitment To Native Community The tribal council says the court and additional play space is needed and appreciated. The teams worked with Treasure Island Resort & Casino to make it happen.   More On WCCO.com: 3 Men Arrested After ‘Hellish’ Mass Shooting At St. Paul Bar Leaves 1 Dead, 14...
    MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) — On Indigenous Peoples Day, Minnetonka Moccasin issued an acknowledgement and apology for benefitting from the appropriation of Native American culture. The company also made a commitment of support to the Native American community. The family-run Minneapolis company of nearly 75 years says it first publicly acknowledged the appropriation in the summer of 2020, but that it was “long overdue.” The company also dropped “moccasin” from its logo and began referring to itself as Minnetonka beginning in 2008. READ MORE: Split Rock Lighthouse To Allow Visitors Again For Fitzgerald Memorial“We deeply and meaningfully apologize for having benefited from selling Native-inspired designs without directly honoring Native culture or communities,” Minnetonka said in a statement. As part of the company’s commitment to taking a more active and public stance in supporting Native communities, Minnetonka says it hired Adrienne Benjamin, a Mille Lacs Band of Ojibwe citizen, to be the company’s reconciliation advisor. Jori Miller Sherer, Minnetonka President (Left), Adrienne Benjamin, Reconciliation Advisor (Center), David Miller, Minnetonka CEO (Right) (credit: Minnetonka Moccasin) READ MORE: St. Paul Mass...
    Old-school Nintendo games wed like to see rebooted 25 Tips for Saving Money With Your Spouse The more Verna Volker scrolled through the social media feeds of different running-related companies, the more frustrated she got. © Stew Milne, AP Runners cross the start line of the 123rd Boston Marathon. A member of the Navajo Nation, Volker knew from personal experience that there were many other Indigenous runners. But the runners in ads didn’t look like her. The athletes being profiled and highlighted by running magazines and websites didn’t have stories like hers. Even when she went to races, she’d look around and rarely find anyone like her. From NFL plays to college sports scores, all the top sports news you need to know every day. “I remember seeing the image of the same type of runner: beautiful, blonde, fit,” Volker said. “I just remember thinking, `There has to be more.’” In January 2018, Volker founded Native Women Running, an online community designed to amplify, support and encourage Indigenous runners. Its Instagram account now has almost 26,000 followers, and Hoka,...
    Support is surging for the family of Morristown native, social advocate and “visionary” Matthew Haskell King, who died suddenly on August 30 at the age of 35. Born in Morristown, King served as the captain of the Morristown Colonials football team in high school before graduating and earning a Bachelor’s Degree in Multidisciplinary Studies from West Virginia University, his obituary says. King then attended Kaplan University / Purdue University Global, where he earned a Master of Business Administration degree. He was currently pursuing a Master of Science degree in Nonprofit Management and Social Entrepreneurship at the University of Baltimore, his memorial says. King was known for his fierce and relentless passion for helping others and advocating for the underprivileged. “His willingness to care for those in his neighborhood was deep, for he believed that he was destined to be the voice that would lead underprivileged communities to opportunities to thrive economically,” his memorial says. Nearly $17,000 had been raised as of Wednesday on a GoFundMe to assist with King’s funeral expenses. “Matt’s life was dedicated in servitude of others; particularly...
    SAN FRANCISCO (KPIX) — A native of San Francisco’s Bayview District uses her connections to rally the faith-based community to make sure underserved African Americans live a healthier life. Volunteers working with the San Francisco African American Faith-Based Coalition help distribute hundreds of boxes of fresh produce and poultry from local food banks to dozens of churches in San Francisco and beyond. READ MORE: COVID: Berkeley To Require Proof Of Vaccination At Indoor Restaurants, Gyms, Large Events The churches then deliver the food to 800 families in need each week. Assistant Pastor Siakimotu Mauga helps volunteer, and gives away food boxes to his congregation at First Samoan Full Gospel Pentecostal Church in East Palo Alto. “That’s what puts a smile on our faces at the end of the day. Knowing that we were able to help somebody,” he said. The food giveaway is just part of the work of the Coalition, a nonprofit founded by Veronica Shepard in 2016. It partners with dozens of churches to tackle health problems among the city’s underserved African Americans. “Every one of these churches...
    ELLICOTT CITY, Md. (WJZ) — Howard County is giving away 2,000 Maryland-native trees for residents to put on their property. The annual tree giveaway’s goal is to help keep the county green and healthy, but also for beautification. READ MORE: Fire Rages Through Southwest Baltimore Block, 25 Displaced “Since 2019, we’ve helped plant more than 50,000 trees in Howard County – one of the most effective tools to support our environment,” said Howard County Executive Calvin Ball. “We will continue to work hand in hand with Howard County residents to plant more trees in the county than ever before to improve our community’s health, sustainability, and beauty.” Residents can choose from four species: Redbud, Flowering Dogwood, Black Gum, and Red Maple. Native trees are acclimated to the climate and benefit local pollinators and wildlife, the county said. Residents can take up to two trees, which come in five-gallon containers, and they will be responsible for planting and maintaining the trees. READ MORE: Baltimore Man Sentenced In Home Invasion, Carjacking Reservations begin at 9:00 a.m. on August 30. To register, visit https://www.howardcountymd.gov/park-rangers#forestry and click on the “Annual Tree Giveaway”...
    Carissa Moore wore a white and yellow plumeria pinned next to her ear for her victory-lap interviews after making history as the first Olympic gold medalist at surfing’s historic debut. Her mother — crowned the Honolulu Lei Queen in 2016 — had given her the flower hair clip before she left for Tokyo to remind the only Native Hawaiian Olympic surfer of where she came from. At this pinnacle point, Moore is still in disbelief when she's compared to Duke Kahanamoku, the godfather of modern surfing who is memorialized in Hawaii with a cherished monument. CLICK HERE FOR MORE SPORTS COVERAGE ON FOXNEWS.COM "I don’t think I’ll have a statue," Moore said, grinning from ear to ear while her body bobbed into a quiet giggle at the suggestion. "Gosh, there’s only a few people in Hawaii that I think deserve that." As celebrated at home as she is loved by fans and peers around the world, it was a characteristically modest statement from one of the world’s greatest surfers after she took home gold in the sport’s inaugural Olympic competition....
    Carissa Moore wore a white and yellow plumeria pinned next to her ear for her victory-lap interviews after making history as the first Olympic gold medalist at surfing’s historic debut. Her mother — crowned the Honolulu Lei Queen in 2016 — had given her the flower hair clip before she left for Tokyo to remind the only Native Hawaiian Olympic surfer of where she came from. At this pinnacle point, Moore is still in disbelief when she's compared to Duke Kahanamoku, the godfather of modern surfing who is memorialized in Hawaii with a cherished monument. “I don’t think I’ll have a statue,” Moore said, grinning from ear to ear while her body bobbed into a quiet giggle at the suggestion. “Gosh, there’s only a few people in Hawaii that I think deserve that.” As celebrated at home as she is loved by fans and peers around the world, it was a characteristically modest statement from one of the world’s greatest surfers after she took home gold in the sport’s inaugural Olympic competition. The methodical Moore found her rhythm with the...
    Carissa Moore wore a white and yellow plumeria pinned next to her ear for her victory-lap interviews after making history as the first Olympic gold medalist at surfing’s historic debut. Her mother — crowned the Honolulu Lei Queen in 2016 — had given her the flower hair clip before she left for Tokyo to remind the only Native Hawaiian Olympic surfer of where she came from. At this pinnacle point, Moore is still in disbelief when she’s compared to Duke Kahanamoku, the godfather of modern surfing who is memorialized in Hawaii with a cherished monument. “I don’t think I’ll have a statue,” Moore said, grinning from ear to ear while her body bobbed into a quiet giggle at the suggestion. “Gosh, there’s only a few people in Hawaii that I think deserve that.” As celebrated at home as she is loved by fans and peers around the world, it was a characteristically modest statement from one of the world’s greatest surfers after she took home gold in the sport’s inaugural Olympic competition. The methodical Moore found her rhythm with the...
    Photo by Dave Kaup/Getty Images The Kansas City Chiefs are saying goodbye to an Arrowhead Stadium fan-favorite in 2021. The Kansas City Chiefs are officially saying goodbye to a beloved member of the pregame team ahead of the 2021-22 season. On Monday, president Mark Donavan announced that Warpaint the horse will no longer be a part of gameday festivities due to the Native American imagery of its name and appearance. The longtime exec explained why to reporters: Chiefs President Mark Donovan says Warpaint will no longer run at Arrowhead Stadium. #ChiefsKingdom pic.twitter.com/4C6EJTX9xq — Rob Collins (@RCFOX4KC) July 26, 2021 “A lot of reasons for that,” Donovan said. “We just feel like it’s the right thing to do. So Warpaint won’t be running at Arrowhead anymore. And we’ll continue the conversations. We’ll continue to take the path that we’ve taken.” The latest Chiefs news straight to your inbox! Join the Heavy on Chiefs newsletter here! Donavan also went on to add that they’ve been in conversations with members of the American Indian community and will continue to educate themselves while also...
    The Washington Football Team’s president announced on Monday that the team is moving forward with no ties to Native American imagery. In a statement, President Jason Wright, who the team hired to be the first Black man to hold the president position for an NFL franchise, said on Monday that since the team dropped their “Redskins” moniker last July, they believe that moving forward without ties to Native American imagery is “the right thing to do.” "We are proudly forging ahead in this journey with a promise to our community -- a promise to continue to be inclusive in our process and collaborative with our fans."From the desk of @whoisjwright:— Washington Football Team (@WashingtonNFL) July 12, 2021 “We recognize that not everyone is in favor of this change. And even the Native American community offers a range of opinions about both our past and path forward,” Wright said in the statement. “But in these moments, it is important to prioritize the views of those who have been hurt by our historical use of Native American language, iconography and imagery.”...
    LEAP Into Action 2021: Feeding Native Families, Empowering Native Youth is the Division of Indian Work’s annual fundraiser to support its Horizons Unlimited (HU) Food Shelf and Youth Leadership Development Program (YLDP). HU has provided food for the Twin Cities American Indian community since 1952 and remains the only culturally-sensitive food shelf serving the west metro American Indian population; YLDP has worked to empower American Indian youth since 1980. For 68 years, the Division of Indian Work (DIW) has served our Twin Cities American Indian community with programs that have helped stabilize families and work toward establishing lives that are productive and contribute to our small, close-knit community. The LEAP online silent auction begins on Sept 20 and culminates on Sept. 27 with an exciting live streamed event that begins at 7pm which will feature fund-a-need, speakers, and pre-recorded entertainment. Register now on our event website at: https://e.givesmart.com/events/lrM/
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