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    SAN FRANCISCO (KGO) -- To help the members of our Asian American, Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander communities, we have gathered resources from across the Bay Area, as well as national resources. You can find help and how to help others in the lists below.MORE: ABC7 Honors Asian Pacific American Heritage Month with special presentationHelp Track Anti-Asian HateReport a hate incident: Stop AAPI Hate (available in 12 languages)Document hate incidents, read their stories: Stand Against Hatred (English, Chinese, Vietnamese, Korean)File a report: OCA Asian Pacific American AdvocatesTrack hate crimes against South Asian, Sikh, Muslim, Arab communities: South Asian Americans Leading TogetherReport hate crimes: Anti-Defamation LeagueEducate Yourself and OthersBystander intervention training: Hollaback & Asian Americans Advancing Justice (FREE!)ADL Table Talk GuideTips to Stop Hate Crimes Against Asian AmericansCare for Your Mental HealthNational Asian American Pacific Islander Mental Health AssociationSan Francisco Community Health CenterAsian Americans for Community Involvement advocates for and serves the marginalized and vulnerable ethnic communities in Santa Clara County. Call (408) 975-2730Richmond Area Multi-Services is committed to advocating for and providing community based, culturally-competent and consumer-guided comprehensive services, with...
    PHILADELPHIA (CBS) – From mesmerizing metals to colorful textiles and hand-hugged pottery, this weekend marks the beginning of how you can explore the traditions of Southwest Native art at the Barnes Museum. So dive in, take a deep inhale, and enter their newest exhibit “Water, Wind, Breath.” “This exhibition tells the story of Dr. Albert Barnes’ trips to the Southwest – New Mexico and Arizona in 1929, 1930, and 1931,” said Co-Curator Lucy Fowler Williams. “He eagerly attended Pueblo dances and he just experienced the community. This is just another window into Dr. Barnes. What was inspiring to him was to see how Navajo and Pueblo people were living with this art in their day-to-day.” READ MORE: George Pollydore, Anthony Clark Held Family Hostage Inside Holmesburg Home For Entire Weekend: Prosecutors“Many of the pieces in the Barnes collection were the first to ever be used in households. They were used in communities for different reasons, and that shows that transformation from things being used largely in communities and things being made or sale,” said Co-Curator Tony Chavarria There are 100...
    LOS ANGELES (KABC) -- There are tens of thousands of American Indians living in Los Angeles, yet their stories are rarely told.But in an alley tucked away between Skid Row and downtown Los Angeles' bustling Main Street, there's a colorful world of dissent and reclamation.American Indian art is splashed on the walls there - a tribute to voices who've long been silenced.Pamela J. Peters helped bring American Indian artists to Indian Alley. It's also the title of her latest film. In it, she reveals there are more than 70,000 tribal members living in Los Angeles today.Many are descendants of Native peoples who moved from their reservations to urban areas like Los Angeles as part of a government relocation program that started in the early 50s."I think the intent for the relocation program was really to help. The more I learned about it, it was actually a deceitful program that the government wanted to do," Peters said.The relocation program aimed to get Native peoples off their reservations and into urban areas, so the government could then sell tribal land."The United States...
    SAN FERNANDO VALLEY (KABC) -- If you're looking for community at its strongest, it helps to look north."The Valley gets left out of a lot of things. It's not by design, it just kind of happens. And so we have to come together and provide for ourselves," said Ellsworth James, who has dedicated part of his life's work to bridging inequities.Most recently, work has taken him to the Valley's first families, like that of Rudy Ortega, Jr., Tribal President for the Fernandeño Tataviam Band of Mission Indians.Its charitable wing, called Pukúu, is the tribe's word for "One.""We're here to provide community services," said Ortega, Jr. "Working with many different organizations to bring the wellbeing of our community."MORE | United American Indian Involvement: Serving LA's Native American community for nearly 50 yearsEMBED More News Videos In honor of Native American Heritage Month, we're getting to know an organization that started focusing on the health of its community well before the pandemic: the people making a difference at United American Indian Involvement. Rarely has the wellbeing of any community been tested like...
    GARY, Ind. (WLS) -- Dena Holland-Neal couldn't be prouder of her daughter, Mia Neal, who made history at the Oscars."I was just elated and so grateful to be able to actually see that happen." she said.Her daughter, along with Jamika Wilson, became the first black women to win in the Best Makeup & Hairstyling category for their work on "Ma Rainey's Black Bottom." Neal headed the hair department of the film."I also stand here as Jamika and I break this glass ceiling with so much excitement for the future," said Mia Neal during her Sunday night acceptance speech.Holland-Neal, who lives in Gary, hosted a Zoom watch party for family and friends."I dressed up like I was really going to the Oscars," she said. "I had two televisions, one that I could actually watch and another I could take pictures of."In her acceptance speech Neal paid tribute to her grandfather, James Holland. He served as the deputy mayor of Gary in the 1970s and 1980s. He was also a Tuskegee airman."He represented the US in the first Pan Am Games in...
    SACRAMENTO (CBS13) – The San Francisco 49ers have named defensive end and Sacramento-native Arik Armstead as the team’s nominee for the 2020 Walter Payton NFL Man of the Year award. The winner of the award, which is given annually to players demonstrating excellent community service, will be announced in February the week before Super Bowl LV. The Armstead Academic Project has raised over $200,000 for the community, according to the 49ers, and was built to ensure all students have direct access to quality education and resources to help them thrive in a positive learning environment. The Boy From Sacramento Who Changed the World For his storied impact in the community & embodying what it means to be #FTTB, we are proud to recognize @arikarmstead as the 49ers 2020 Walter Payton NFL Man of the Year nominee presented by @Nationwide ????#WPMOYChallenge Armstead pic.twitter.com/TBMepJEokL — San Francisco 49ers (@49ers) December 10, 2020 As the pandemic brought on more struggles and challenges for families, Armstead donated $50,000 and delivered 350 Chromebooks with pre-paid internet service to multi-student families through Sacramento’s Mercy...
    BOYLE HEIGHTS, LOS ANGELES (KABC) -- An Emmy award is one of the most prestigious recognitions within the television industry.That's why Boyle Heights native, Miguel Puga, took his first Emmy award on a photoshoot throughout East Los Angeles and Boyle Heights."It's something that I never knew I was gonna get. And, you know, I do pinch myself. I did sleep with it ... I take it everywhere," said Puga. "It was something that was like you know, just showing kids that this is attainable."Puga is a co-executive producer on the show 'The Casagrandes,' which won a Daytime Emmy award for Outstanding Main Title for an Animated Program this year.The show is about a Mexican-American family."I'm drawing kids that, you know, represent where I'm from," said Puga. "Casagrandes ... it's kind of like Boyle Heights meets Bronx. So there's a lot of storefronts that you see driving down Whittier Boulevard or Cesar Chavez." When Casagrandes meets ABC7! ???????????? Im working on a story about Miguel Puga who won his 1st Emmy trophy as co-executive producer for the show The Casagrandes and...
    With a history of colonialism, broken treaties and genocide, the Native American community in Minnesota has a long and troubled relationship with the State of Minnesota and the United States government when it comes to economic policy, equality, and equity.  Patrice KuneshWhich is where Patrice Kunesh comes in. “Across the board, we’re seeing a real increase in Native scholars, in terms of economics, and history, and political science, and they’re out there really telling the story,” said Kunesh, a Boulder, Colorado-based law, policy, and economic development consultant who is a descendent of the Standing Rock Lakota tribe, and a founder of the advocacy organization Pehin Haha. “When I go on Twitter or Facebook they’re really bringing their work alive and more out to the community.” The founder and former leader of the Center for Indian Country Development at the Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis, Kunesh will deliver the keynote address at the Center for Economic Inclusion’s virtual event, “2020 Powering Inclusion Summit, Marching For Racial Equity and Economic Justice,” this week. The title of Kunesh‘s address is “Native Economic Renaissance,...
    As protests swept through a south Minneapolis neighborhood, flames and destruction found their way to the home of Native American nonprofit MIGIZI. The organization’s 2-year-old building was reduced to rubble. The fire was a setback but not a roadblock for the organization. Binesikwe Means, lead media instructor at MIGIZI, said the community came together for a healing event after the fire. She said, “We did everything to be able to find a place of healing for our community and then we went back into moving mode. We have to continue. MIGIZI is so much more than a building. Although our building went down, it doesn’t mean as an organization that we were going to stop serving our youth, so we came together.” The nonprofit was founded in 1974 and incorporated in 1977. It started as a journalism program to teach Native American people how to tell their own stories in the media. At the time of its founding, mainstream media was overwhelmingly made up of white men. Since then, MIGIZI has branched out to cover more topics than journalism. It...
    Myron Lizer, vice president of the Navajo Nation, said on Tuesday at the Republican National Committee’s 2020 convention that, until President Donald Trump was elected, Native Americans were ignored by Washington. “Many of our ancestral leaders sought to govern and lead a nation within a nation,” Lizer said. “They sought to lead their people into the promises of a better way of life for their children’s children.” “It is also where they have not been as successful as the rest of America,” Lizer said. “Our first nation’s people — the host people of the land — we are still here. Our creator placed us here and he knew that for such a time as this we would have the opportunity for an appeal to heaven.” “You see our people have never been invited into the America Dream,” Lizer said. “We for years fought past battles with congressmen and senators that were part of a broken system that ignored us. That is until President Trump took office.” Lizer went on to list the things that Trump has done for the Native...
    New York — Clubs with references to Native American peoples have been at the center of the controversy The â € œTomahawk Chopâ € is one of the most distinctive choreographies in baseball. Photo:Streeter Lecka / . While the Washington Redskins in the NFL have been under strong pressure from their sponsors to change the name of their team and Cleveland Indians in the Major Leagues already consider having a new nickname, Atlanta Braves do not plan to make changes to their identity. In recent days, the controversy regarding name of sports teams with allusions to the native peoples of the United States has been rising as an extension of the anti-racist movement “Black Lives Matter”, which is not only being adopted by the Afro-descendant community, but also by other minorities that feel confronted. According to the Braves, their organization honor, support and value the Native American community, while working to create a stronger bond with various American tribes, both in the Georgia area and in the rest of the country. “We have held meetings...
    (CNN)Terry Francona, the manager of Major League Baseball's Cleveland Indians, told reporters on Sunday that he thinks it's time to change the team's name."I've been thinking about it and been thinking about it before we put out that statement," Francona said. "I know in the past, when I've been asked about, whether it's our name or the Chief Wahoo, I think I would usually answer and say I know that we're never trying to be disrespectful. And I still feel that way."But I don't think that's a good enough answer today. I think it's time to move forward. It's a very difficult subject. It's also delicate," he said.Sports teams with names based on Native Americans, including MLB's Cleveland Indians and Atlanta Braves and the NFL's Washington Redskins and Kansas City Chiefs, are facing pressure to re-examine their names as Americans more directly grapple with issues of racism.Cleveland previously removed its "Chief Wahoo" logo, a racist caricature of a Native American character, from their uniforms after the 2018 season. On Friday, the team said it was looking into the path forward...
    The MLB franchise released a assertion Friday, expressing the team is “committed to engaging our neighborhood and suitable stakeholders to ascertain the most effective path ahead with regard to our group identify.” The Indians removed the “Main Wahoo” brand from their uniforms following the 2018 period finished. “We are committed to earning a good effects in our local community and embrace our obligation to advance social justice and equality. Our corporation totally acknowledges our crew title is among the most obvious techniques in which we join with the neighborhood. “We have experienced ongoing discussions organizationally on these problems. The recent social unrest in our group and our nation has only underscored the need to have for us to hold strengthening as an firm on issues of social justice. “With that in mind, we are committed to participating our community and proper stakeholders to determine the greatest path forward with regard to our group identify. “Whilst the target of the baseball globe shifts to the pleasure of an unprecedented 2020 season, we identify our exclusive place in the local community and...
    The Cleveland Indians could soon be known by a new name. The team released a statement on Friday staying it was undergoing the process of considering a name change amid a growing national movement to address systemic racism. The statement noted that the team was committed to making a positive impact in the community and said that they “embrace our responsibility to advance social justice and equality.” In a statement posted to Twitter, the team said they recognize that the team name itself is one of the most visible ways it connects with the community, and would be working with community and stakeholders about whether the name will remain the same. “We have had ongoing discussions organizationally on these issue,” the statement read. “The recent social unrest in our community and our country has only underscored the need for us to keep improving as an organization on issues of social justice. With that in mind, we are committed to engaging our community and appropriate stakeholders to determine the best path forward with regard to our team name.” The move comes...
    (CNN)The Cleveland Indians are taking a hard look at their own name.The MLB franchise released a statement Friday, saying the team is "committed to engaging our community and appropriate stakeholders to determine the best path forward with regard to our team name."Washington Redskins will review name, team saysThe Indians removed the "Chief Wahoo" logo from their uniforms after the 2018 season ended.The full statement from the Indians is as follows:"We are committed to making a positive impact in our community and embrace our responsibility to advance social justice and equality. Our organization fully recognizes our team name is among the most visible ways in which we connect with the community.Read More"We have had ongoing discussions organizationally on these issues. The recent social unrest in our community and our country has only underscored the need for us to keep improving as an organization on issues of social justice. How the Kansas City Chiefs got their name, and why its so controversial "With that in mind, we are committed to engaging our community and appropriate stakeholders to determine the best path forward...
    Native Son, a Black gay men’s empowerment organization, presented a virtual event to discuss how to be prepared in a COVID-19 infected society. Founder Emil Wilbekin hosted “The Black Gay Leadership Forum COVID 19: Rebuilding Our Brave New World,” providing a general forum for those interested in topical events with a heavy emphasis on creating a dialogue in light of the pandemic. The event is a series of national and international annual gatherings since the inception of Native Son four years ago. With most public events shuttered due to safety concerns, it was decided that the Black Gay Leadership Forum would be done remotely and centered around the disease.  READ MORE: Remembering my mentor, Black gay activist and community pillar Dr. Ron Simmons “The initial idea was COVID-19 focused; [it was] about how can I bring together a group of Black gay leaders to come up with ideas on how we sustain and support the Black gay community,” Wilbekin told theGrio. Emil Wilbekin accepts the Advocate Award at the 13th Annual ADCOLOR Awards at JW Marriott Los Angeles at L.A....
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