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    Eight months after the U.S. Department of Justice ordered San Jose State University to overhaul the way it responds to sexual misconduct, students are demanding the administration rebuild trust with the campus community and make it safe to report harassment and abuse in the wake of the school’s botched investigations of sex assault allegations against its former athletic trainer. The pressure comes at a pivotal point for the California State University system, which is already under fire for its mishandling of Title IX-related cases. State lawmakers have requested an audit of CSU’s 23 campuses to examine their sexual harassment policies and all settlements issued to staff, among other Title IX procedures and processes. The San Jose State sex abuse scandal involving Scott Shaw, a former head athletic trainer who is suspected of abusing nearly two dozen former female students, and the administration’s neglect under former President Mary Papazian’s leadership, illuminates a fraction of the Title IX cases recently brought to light around the state. The fallout went all the way to the top. In February, CSU Chancellor Joseph Castro resigned...
      Members of the Nashville Metro Council are scheduled to vote on Tuesday on appointing or reappointing open seats on the city’s Community Oversight Board (COB). Several social justice advocates who are critical of law enforcement serve on the Nashville COB. “One thing council members will be considering at Tuesday’s meeting is whether each nominee can be fair when reviewing cases that could be controversial, including investigations into a record-setting 10 shootings by police last year,” according to the Nashville-based WPLN. The public radio station reported Monday that Jamel Campbell-Gooch is one nominee. He has said many controversial things during his current tenure. Campbell-Gooch has asserted that any police responses that challenge the COB are “a normal racist response to Black people.” Campbell-Gooch suggested that sharply reducing police funding and making law enforcement officers subordinate to civilian oversight will stop riots. Campbell-Gooch, speaking of a Metro Nashville Police (MNPD) budget increase, said in June that society founded the police “to catch slaves.” Another nominee, Walter Holloway, is a retired police officer. He has previously accused the Metro Nashville Police Department (MNPD) of trying to destroy the credibility...
    KABUL, Afghanistan (AP) — Outside a Shiite shrine in Kabul, four armed Taliban fighters stood guard as worshippers filed in for Friday prayers. Alongside them was a guard from Afghanistan’s mainly Shiite Hazara minority, an automatic rifle slung over his shoulder. It was a sign of the strange, new relationship brought by the Taliban’s takeover of Afghanistan in August. The Taliban, Sunni hard-liners who for decades targeted the Hazaras as heretics, are now their only protection against a more brutal enemy: the Islamic State group. Sohrab, the Hazara guard at the Abul Fazl al-Abbas Shrine, told The Associated Press that he gets along fine with the Taliban guards. “They even pray in the mosque sometimes,” he said, giving only his first name for security reasons. Not everyone feels so comfortable. Syed Aqil, a Hazara visiting the shrine with his wife and 8-month-old daughter, was disturbed that many Taliban still wear their traditional garb — the look of a jihadi insurgent — rather than a police uniform. “We can’t even tell if they are Taliban or Daesh,” he said,...
    (CNN)"It's a simple basic proposition" President Joe Biden said Wednesday night during his CNN town hall, arguing that getting a Covid-19 vaccine was an easy decision. Roxanne Jones After all, he reminded us, more than 600,000 Americans have died, more people than in all the US wars combined. Riffing off stats, Biden told the invite-only crowd at at Mount St. Joseph University in Cincinnati, Ohio, that recent data on Covid-19 deaths tells us that an overwhelming majority of them are of people who have not been vaccinated. "We have a pandemic, for those who haven't gotten a vaccine," Biden said.Read More That may well be, but for many Black Americans, who, according to the Kaiser Family Foundation, have some of the lowest vaccination rates, the decision to vaccinate, or not, is far from easy. Across every age, education and economic level, the Black folks I know are torn. Torn between getting vaccinated, which means trusting a government that has for generations sanctioned violence, killings and the disenfranchisement of Black bodies, or, skipping the vaccine, donning a mask, and leaning...
    TULSA, OKLAHOMA - There's been undeniable progress in the relationship between the Tulsa police and the city's Black community in the past 100 years. Then again, it's hard to imagine it could have gotten worse. Complaints about police bias and a lack of enough minority officers remain. But the police chief is now a Black man from north Tulsa, the area that includes what once was America's wealthiest Black business district. In 1921, decades before the Civil Rights Movement, even the thought of a Black police chief would have been inconceivable. That year, Greenwood, the Black Tulsa neighborhood that includes the area known as Black Wall Street, was burned to the ground with assistance from the virtually all-white Tulsa Police Department.  FILE - In this photo provided by McFarlin Library at the University of Tulsa, two armed men walk away from burning buildings as others walk in the opposite direction during the Tulsa Race Massacre, June 1, 1921, in Tulsa, Okla.Sparked by accusations that a 19-year-old Black man had assaulted a 17-year-old white girl in an elevator, the Tulsa...
    By Cliff Brunt | Associated Press TULSA, Okla. — There’s been undeniable progress in the relationship between the Tulsa police and the city’s Black community in the past 100 years. Then again, it’s hard to imagine it could have gotten worse. Complaints about police bias and a lack of enough minority officers remain. But the police chief is now a Black man from north Tulsa, the area that includes what once was America’s wealthiest Black business district. Back in 1921 — decades before the Civil Rights Movement — even the thought of a Black police chief would have been inconceivable. That year, Greenwood — the Black north Tulsa neighborhood that includes the area known as Black Wall Street — was burned to the ground with assistance from the virtually all-white Tulsa Police Department. Sparked by accusations that a 19-year-old Black man had assaulted a 17-year-old white girl in an elevator, the Tulsa Race Massacre left as many as 300 Black people dead and thousands of Black residents displaced. Thirty-five square blocks were torched and damages spiraled into the millions. Tulsa’s...
    TULSA, Okla. (AP) — There’s been undeniable progress in the relationship between the Tulsa police and the city’s Black community in the past 100 years. Then again, it’s hard to imagine it could get worse. Read More: Russell Westbrook ‘Tulsa Burning’ documentary takes in depth look at race massacre Complaints about police bias and a lack of enough minority officers remain. But the police chief is now a Black man from north Tulsa, the area that includes what once was America’s wealthiest Black business district. Back in 1921 — decades before the Civil Rights Movement — even the thought of a Black police chief would have been inconceivable. That year, Greenwood — the Black north Tulsa neighborhood that includes the area known as Black Wall Street — was burned to the ground with assistance from the virtually all-white Tulsa Police Department. Sparked by accusations that a 19-year-old Black man had assaulted a 17-year-old white girl in an elevator, the Tulsa Race Massacre left as many as 300 Black people dead and thousands of Black residents displaced. Thirty-five square blocks were...
    CHICAGO (AP) — In a makeshift vaccination center at a safety-net Chicago hospital, a patient services aide ushers an older woman with a cane toward a curtained cubicle. “Here, have a seat right here,” Trenese Bland says helpfully, preparing the woman for a shot offering protection against the virus that has ravaged their Black community. But the aide has doubts about getting her own inoculation. RELATED: 1 Killed, 2 Seriously Injured In Head-On Crash In Joliet “It’s not something that I trust right now,” says Bland, 50, who worries about how quickly the COVID-19 vaccines were developed. “It’s not something that I want in me.’’ Just 37% of the 600 doctors, nurses and support staff at Roseland Community Hospital have been vaccinated even though health care workers are first in line. Many holdouts come from the mostly Black, working class neighborhoods surrounding the hospital, areas hard hit by the virus yet plagued with vaccine reluctance. Dr. Rita McGuire, an obstetrician and infection control specialist at Roseland Community Hospital talks Friday, Jan. 29, 2021, with staff members about taking the COVID-19...
    A healthcare worker in protective face mask and goggles looks at paperwork as she administers free COVID-19 tests to people in their cars in the parking lot of the Columbus West Family Health and Wellness Center in Columbus, Ohio, on November 19, 2020. While both Latinos and Black Americans have been disproportionately impacted by the pandemic, a survey commissioned by the COVID Collaborative reveals that a history of racist medical abuse and a mistrust of government is leading both populations to be anxious about taking a vaccine, The Washington Post reports. About 48% of Black people said they would probably or definitely take the vaccine if offered, while 66% of Latinos said they would, according to the survey. “On one hand in this country, you have the anti-vaxxers and the unfounded disinformation they push,” Johns Hopkins University sociology and history of epidemic response expert Alexandre White said in the report. “But what you see from minorities is a hesitancy that is quite rooted in historical reality.” Advocates now hope that the survey results—and an understanding of deeply painful and violent history—can help lead to...
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