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Georgia Attorney General’s Office:

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    Sketch provided by GBI The Georgia Attorney General’s Office is seeking the public’s help in identifying a person of interest who has a tattoo on his chest that matches, or is similar to, the sketch on the flyer below. Anyone with information is asked to contact Crime Stoppers Greater Atlanta. Tipsters can remain anonymous and may be eligible for cash rewards. Call the tip line at 404-577-TIPS (8477) Text CRIMES (274637) Submit a tip online by visiting www.STOPCrimeATL.com To further assist with the identification process, the Attorney General’s Office is also asking tattoo parlors and law enforcement entities in both Georgia and Florida to share the sketch.
    Mum is is the word from the Georgia Attorney General’s office after several of its counterparts this week cut ties with its national organization, called the National Association of Attorneys General (NAAG). Attorney General Chris Carr’s office did not return several comment requests from The Georgia Star News seeking clarification about whether the state intends to remain a part of NAAG. The AGs of Texas, Missouri and Montana sent a letter to Iowa Attorney General Thomas Miller (D), the president of NAAG, announcing that they would be leaving the group over its left-wing shift. They followed Alabama Attorney General Steve Marshall, who last year severed his state’s ties with NAAG. “The attorneys general of Texas, Missouri and Montana have decided to withdraw our states’ membership from NAAG,” said a letter penned by Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton (R). “While we have been a driving force for NAAG’s success – both financially and on key issues – the Association’s leftward shift over the past half-decade has been intolerable. Indeed, this liberal bent has fundamentally undermined NAAG’s role as a ‘nonpartisan national forum’ that...
    Attorney General Chris Carr is recognizing March 13-19, 2022, as National Sunshine Week and reinforcing to all public officials the importance of continuing to operate openly and transparently. “We take very seriously our long-standing role in defending and protecting open government in Georgia,” said Carr. “Government officials are simply trustees of the people’s documents. Ensuring access to government records and meetings is essential to keeping the public informed and holding elected officials accountable. During National Sunshine Week and year-round, we will continue to promote good open government standards that are built on sound judgment and the rule of law.” Department of Law Open Government Mediation Program: The Department of Law is a leader in promoting an ethical culture and transparency in government. One of the main ways the office protects the public’s interest is by reinforcing Georgia’s Open Records Act (ORA) and Open Meetings Act (OMA). Through our office’s Open Government Mediation Program, led by Assistant Attorney General Jennifer Colangelo, we help mediate local government disputes by addressing complaints from Georgia...
    Attorney General Chris Carr is encouraging all Georgians to join in recognizing this January as Human Trafficking Awareness Month. Throughout the month, the Office of the Attorney General will share information and resources to help support victims and to ultimately raise awareness of the state’s ongoing efforts to combat human trafficking in Georgia. “Our Human Trafficking Prosecution Unit works vigorously to rescue victims and put buyers and traffickers behind bars,” said Carr. “Our efforts are further strengthened by the support provided by the Governor, First Lady and members of our Georgia General Assembly, and we value these partnerships. We would encourage all Georgians to take this month to learn more about human trafficking and what you can do to help end this criminal industry here in Georgia.” Formed in 2019, the Attorney General’s Human Trafficking Prosecution Unit works closely with local, state and federal law enforcement officials to investigate and prosecute human trafficking cases. In 2021 alone, the Unit initiated 25 cases, arrested 9 individuals, investigated and prosecuted 51 defendants,...
    Attorney General Chris Carr today announced that former Paulding County District Attorney Donald Richard “Dick” Donovan has pleaded guilty in Paulding County Superior Court to one count of unprofessional conduct. Senior Judge J. Stephen Schuster accepted the plea on Jan. 6, 2022, and sentenced the defendant to 12 months of probation under the First Offender Act. Pursuant to his sentence, Donovan has resigned his position as district attorney and is required to surrender his license to practice law. “As independently-elected public servants, Georgia’s district attorneys must fulfill their solemn obligation to uphold the rule of law no matter the circumstance,” said Carr. “When these same individuals abuse their power with complete disregard for their sworn duties, they harm the very justice system they are put in place to defend and protect. We will not hesitate to hold accountable public officials who violate the law and their oaths of office and hope this case sends a message that public corruption of any kind will not be tolerated here in Georgia.” Specifically, Donovan pleaded guilty to...
    The Office of the Attorney General announced that Clarence Dean Alford, a former member of the Board of Regents representing Georgia’s 4th Congressional District, pleaded guilty to Racketeering today.  He pleaded guilty before Chief Superior Court Judge Robert F. Mumford. After presentations from the Attorney General’s Office and Alford’s attorney, Judge Mumford sentenced the Defendant to 15 years.  He will serve 8 years in prison and spend the remainder on probation.  As a condition of his probation, Alford may not conduct any business with the State. “I applaud the work of the Prosecution Division,” said Chief Deputy Attorney General Wright Banks. “Our office is committed to prosecuting those who perpetrate fraud on businesses– regardless of their position in society.  Alford tried to steal from a company, and he is paying a steep price for his crime.” Alford is alleged to have exploited a common industry practice referred to in the financial services sector as “factoring.” Factoring is a financial transaction in which a business may sell its accounts receivable...
    The district attorney in Georgia who initially handled the investigation of the February 2020 shooting death of Ahmaud Arbery was charged on Thursday for allegedly showing favor to one of Arbery’s accused killers and obstructing the case. Former Brunswick District Attorney Jacquelyn Lee Johnson was charged with violating her oath as a public officer and obstruction of a police officer, according to a statement by the Georgia Attorney General’s office. Johnson did not immediately respond to a request for comment. On Feb. 23, 2020, Arbery, a 25-year-old unarmed Black man in Brunswick, was pursued by Travis McMichael, his father Greg McMichael, and William “Roddie” Bryan and shot and killed. The indictment alleges that on the day of the shooting, Johnson allegedly showed “favor and affection” to Greg McMichael during the subsequent investigation into Arbery’s death. It also alleges she “knowingly and willfully” stopped two officers with the Glynn County Police Department from arresting McMichael after the shooting. The Glynn County Police Department did not immediately reply to a request for comment. Greg McMichael had worked as an investigator in Johnson’s...
    Attorney General Chris Carr today provided an update on his office’s work to prosecute criminals and protect Georgians and their taxpayer dollars: “It is the paramount duty of the government to protect person and property,” said Attorney General Chris Carr. “My approach to public safety is simple. I will not waiver when it comes to keeping people safe. It is and will always be our office’s top priority to stop criminals and protect Georgians.” In addition to the traditional responsibilities of the Office of the Attorney General, since taking office, Carr has identified five key public safety issues for the office to focus on: human trafficking, gang activity, public corruption, opioid abuse and elder abuse. Human Trafficking Carr identified combatting human trafficking as priority number one on his first day in office. From a policy perspective, the office works with local, state and federal officials to ensure that prosecutors and law enforcement have the strongest possible tools to build cases against buyers and traffickers and providers and rehabilitation specialists have...
    Governor Brian Kemp announced the appointment of Scott McAfee to the Office of Inspector General. McAfee is an attorney who has spent his legal career in public service, working the last eight years as an Assistant United States Attorney for the Department of Justice in the Northern District of Georgia and as an Assistant District Attorney in Fulton County. As an AUSA, McAfee investigated and prosecuted major drug trafficking organizations, fraud, and illegal firearms possession. In the Fulton County District Attorney’s Office, McAfee handled hundreds of felony cases ranging from armed robbery to murder. The Office of Inspector General is charged with preventing, detecting, identifying, exposing and eliminating fraud, waste, abuse, and corruption. The Inspector General investigates complaints regarding management and operation of state agencies within the executive branch to determine if wrongful acts or omissions have been, or are being committed by state officers or employees. “Scott McAfee is a strong addition to my administration,” said Governor Kemp. “His experience as a tough prosecutor equips him to search out fraud,...
    DETROIT (AP) — A Georgia man has been charged with threatening a Michigan judge after she said absentee ballots arriving after the Nov. 3 election still could be counted. Clinton Stewart of Douglas, Georgia, left a threatening voicemail for Judge Cynthia Stephens on Sept. 18, claiming "activist judges" were favoring Joe Biden with decisions to make it easier to vote through the mail, Michigan authorities said Tuesday. Stephens' decision, which would have allowed the counting of Michigan ballots that were postmarked by Nov. 2 and delivered within two weeks, was overturned by a higher court. The alleged threat was discovered on Oct. 2 by a member of the judge's staff, the attorney general's office said. Stewart, 43, was charged in a Detroit court with a misdemeanor. He couldn't immediately be reached for comment; no phone number is listed for him. Separately, the attorney general's office filed misdemeanor charges against a Michigan man who is accused of making threatening calls to U.S. Sen. Debbie Stabenow, D-Mich., U.S. Rep. Elissa Slotkin, D-Mich., and Slotkin's staff. Copyright 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved....
    By KATE BRUMBACK, Associated Press ATLANTA (AP) — Georgia's attorney general on Tuesday denied a request from a newly elected district attorney to reassign the prosecution of two high-profile cases in which Atlanta police officers were accused of using excessive force, including the shooting death of Rayshard Brooks. In a letter to Attorney General Chris Carr last month, Fulton County District Attorney Fani Willis raised concerns that actions by her predecessor, Paul Howard, called into question the appropriateness of having her office continuing to handle the cases. Carr rejected that argument, saying the concerns Willis raised have to do with Howard's potential violation of a state bar rule and a potential criminal investigation into Howard's actions. “Both appear fairly obviously to be matters that are personal to your predecessor in office and that do not pertain to you or your office,” Carr wrote. “Therefore, from the concerns raised in your letter, it appears abundantly clear that your office is not disqualified from these cases by interest or relationship.” None of the officers in either case have been indicted, though they...
    ATLANTA (AP) — Georgia’s attorney general on Tuesday denied a request from a newly elected district attorney to reassign the prosecution of two high-profile cases in which Atlanta police officers were accused of using excessive force, including the shooting death of Rayshard Brooks. In a letter to Attorney General Chris Carr last month, Fulton County District Attorney Fani Willis raised concerns that actions by her predecessor, Paul Howard, called into question the appropriateness of having her office continuing to handle the cases. Carr rejected that argument, saying the concerns Willis raised have to do with Howard’s potential violation of a state bar rule and a potential criminal investigation into Howard’s actions. “Both appear fairly obviously to be matters that are personal to your predecessor in office and that do not pertain to you or your office,” Carr wrote. “Therefore, from the concerns raised in your letter, it appears abundantly clear that your office is not disqualified from these cases by interest or relationship.” None of the officers in either case have been indicted, though they were arrested last...
              Georgia Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger said he entered into the controversial Compromise Settlement Agreement and Release with Stacey Abrams because members of the Georgia Attorney General’s Office recommended he do so. In a letter dated January 6, Raffensperger told former U.S. Sen. Kelly Loeffler (R-GA) that the agreement strengthened Georgia’s signature verification system. Members of the Georgia General Assembly passed a law in 2019 that made it harder for county election officials to reject absentee ballots. A source inside the Georgia Secretary of State’s office referenced this law while speaking with The Georgia Star News this week. The source did not speak on record. Raffensperger, in his letter, defended the agreement. “Much has been made of a Signature Match Settlement Agreement entered into on the advice and recommendation of the Georgia Attorney General’s office in order to protect Georgia’s signature verification laws on both absentee ballots and absentee ballot applications,” Raffensperger wrote. Staff members in Georgia Attorney General Chris Carr’s office did not return repeated requests for comment this week. National Public...
    As candidates and activists rally voters – registered and those yet to be registered – for the January 5th runoff election, some have vocalized concerns about individuals moving to Georgia solely for the purpose of registering to vote and helping tip the scales for a particular candidate or party. The concerns have only been exacerbated by social media rumor mills which have encouraged the idea due to Georgia not requiring any amount of residency tenure before one can register to vote. The Georgia Republican Party sent a letter to the Secretary of State’s Office Thursday expressing those fears, specifically saying there are organizations that are ‘inciting unlawful voting by non-Georgians on a massive scale,” and that immediate action must be taken to protect the integrity of the voting process. [The full letter is below] But officials with the Attorney General’s Office and the Secretary of State’s Office are trying to squash fears amid a climate already ripe with skepticism. Rahul Bali of Oconee Radio Group posted audio on Twitter of GA...
    Georgia’s State Election Board referred a number of longstanding voter fraud cases to the Attorney General’s office during a hearing Friday. Chaired by Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger, the State Election Board processed 98 outstanding cases involving various voting administration and integrity issues dating as far back as 2014. Among the cases are individuals accused of double-voting during the 2016 presidential election, and individuals investigated for submitting absentee ballots on behalf of children or the deceased. “Protecting the integrity of the vote is my highest priority as Georgia’s chief elections official,” said Secretary Raffensperger. “A fraudulent vote dilutes the power of those voters who follow the rules and undermines the fundamental democratic idea of one person, one vote. As Secretary of State, I will investigate any and all attempts to delegitimize elections in Georgia.” On September 10, 2020, the Georgia’s State Election Board met to discuss 98 outstanding investigations conducted by the Secretary of State’s office dating as far back as 2014 but extending through 2020. Three new rules, including...
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