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    Cindy Le, the operations director at Almanac Beer Co. in Alameda, had customers lining up for her Black Magic IPA and Peaceful Pils this spring. She was just running out of ways to sell it. Cans are in short supply nationally, creating an unforeseen headache for brewers and driving up prices for drinkers. A variety of factors are driving the shortage, including pandemic lockdowns that curtailed manufacturing, supplier upheavals and a canned cocktail boom that increased demand for aluminum. Another reason: California’s creaking recycling system can’t collect enough cans, one consequence of a program that has been crippled by redemption center closures and out-of-date policies that have made it harder for people to recycle effectively. The chronic shortage highlights how an overlooked link in the supply chain — trash — can hamstring a beloved, and booming, industry. About 73% of an aluminum can comes from recycled scrap. As demand for canned beverages boomed in recent years, the state’s patchwork of recycling centers and recovery facilities just couldn’t keep pace. In the last five years, California’s recycling rate for aluminum cans...
    Mother Jones illustration; Getty Facts matter: Sign up for the free Mother Jones Daily newsletter. Support our nonprofit reporting. Subscribe to our print magazine.Wait, what is this all for? Starting this week, the House’s January 6 Committee will hold a series of hearings, at least two of which will be in “prime time,” on the blitz of the Capitol by protesters egged on President Donald Trump on January 6. As my colleague David Corn has reported, the hope is to “convey the full significance of the insurrectionist assault on Congress.” At some point, the medium becomes the message. The seven Democrats and two Republicans on the panel face a massive undertaking to convince the American public, many of whom largely believe the news has exaggerated the affair, that something went dreadfully wrong on January 6, that American democracy was fundamentally harmed. It is an attempt to lay down for history what occurred. Which is why it was odd this morning when the New York Times described the hearings as aimed at something else: winning the 2022 midterms. NYT headline about violent coup...
    Thousands of nurses rallied in D.C. Thursday for the National Nurses March 2022, culminating in National Nurses Week. Marchers used the opportunity to spread awareness about the hardships many nurses are facing on the job,  including staffing shortages, pay caps and limited time off. “DMV Download” podcast hosts WTOP’s Luke Garrett and Megan Cloherty spoke with a nurse at Inova Fairfax Hospital, who asked not to be identified. She said the coronavirus pandemic has been a very difficult time for the nursing profession. “It’s definitely not been a great 2 1/2 years,” she said, recalling the early days of the pandemic when personal protective equipment was in short supply, and nurses were, in her words, panicking. “When we would panic and bring those concerns to managerial staff, their response was kind of like, ‘Well, this just is the situation, so everyone needs to learn to be comfortable with it,’ and that has kind of been the tone.” That tone has not changed, she said. “When you really boil it all down, as passionate as a lot of nurses and physicians...
    Donald Trump compared the United States to a 'third world country,' complaining that grocery, jewelry and hardware stores were all missing items during a Tuesday evening interview. The former president appeared on Just The News, a show on right-wing network Real America's Voice, where he was asked about what he would 'triage' among the multiple crises plaguing the country if he were to run for office and win in 2024. 'These things -- we would've never been talking about -- I'll give you an example. Supply chain,' Trump began. 'You go to a store, you don't have bread. We're like a third world country. They don't have things. You go to buy something at Tiffany, you go to buy something at a hardware store -- high, low -- they don't have product.' 'Tiffany' is likely Tiffany & Co., a jewelry retailer that briefly leased space at a Trump Organization building in New York City in 2018 despite attacking the former president for pulling the US out of the Paris Climate Agreement the year before.  'They say -- even me, when...
    Tucker Carlson delivered a message to Democrats on Wednesday that just as easily could have been directed at the 45th president and many of his supporters: losing an election doesn’t mean “the system is broken.” Carlson torched Democrats in his opening monologue and accused them of being unable to grapple with the “terror” they feel at the thought of relinquishing power. “It’s not just a bad outcome,” he said. “It is the end of democracy.” The Fox News host played a montage of pundits and politicians on various shows saying democracy is under attack in the United States. Those appearances came in the broader context of a violent mob of Donald Trump supporters storming the Capitol on Jan. 6, 2021 in order to stop the certification of Joe Biden as the winner of the 2020 presidential election. Trump had falsely claimed for weeks the election results were rigged. Trump even tried to convince his vice president to overturn the results as the presiding officer in a harebrained attempt to stay in office. To this day – indeed, today – Trump...
    \u201cTo me, capitalism\u2026 is the absolute pursuit of profit at all human, environmental, and social cost.\u201d Rep. @AOC says. \u201cWhat we\u2019re also discussing is the ability for a very small group of actual capitalists\u2026 [to] capture governments. \u2026 That is not a redeemable system for us\u2026\u201dpic.twitter.com/U7RS2hkiJs — Yahoo Finance (@Yahoo Finance) 1643914241 AOC proclaimed that she wants to break up Facebook, which she accused of having "completely corrosive ways." "Facebook should be broken up," Ocasio-Cortez declared. "We should pursue antitrust activity on Facebook." She said Facebook acts as a communication platform, advertiser, platform, and vendor. "And so because they are so many businesses and industries in one, the case is, I believe, right there in and of itself as to why they should be subject to antitrust activity," she remarked. AOC blamed Facebook for exporting disinformation, which she said has "absolutely slowed and frankly sabotaged the global effort to fight against the coronavirus." $FB "should be broken up," Rep. @AOC says. "We should pursue antitrust activity on Facebook, and there are so many different reasons why." Full comments:\n\nhttp://finance.yahoo.com/\u00a0pic.twitter.com/m7EBCe6fmo...
    CHICAGO – According to the Chicago Citywide Literacy Coalition, an estimated 882,000 adults in Chicago possess low basic literacy skills. If the children of these adults do not receive in-depth academic intervention in pre-kindergarten, they are 60% more likely to require costly remedial and specialized education classes. There are many families on the South Side of Chicago where Pastor Corey Brooks ministers that have passed along illiteracy through several generations, what he believes is a heartless cycle that profoundly damages individuals, families and society-at-large.  This problem is one key reason why the pastor climbed onto the top of a roof on Nov. 20, 2021, and will not come down for 100 days. Years earlier, he started a charter school within his church to help reverse the illiteracy trend. He paired students of all ages with after school tutors, yet he said his efforts feel like a drop in the bucket when neighborhood public schools pump out illiterate graduates year after year. That is why he went to the roof with the hope of raising enough funds to build a massive...
    Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images Fight disinformation. Get a daily recap of the facts that matter. Sign up for the free Mother Jones newsletter.Speaking with candor on Meet the Press on Sunday, Department of Homeland Security Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas acknowledged that “we are working in a completely broken system.” No kidding. After a week in which Border Patrol agents on horseback corralled Haitian migrants at the Texas border with whip-like cords and shipped thousands back to the island country—leading to the resignation of the US Special Envoy for Haiti—Mayorkas’ admission seems like a bit of an understatement.  But Mayorkas doesn’t appear ready to fix that broken system. In the same interview, Mayorkas defended the decision to send 2,000 migrants back to Haiti, though many of them have not stepped foot in their home country for years. Mayorkas said the expulsion was necessary under Title 42, a public health policy invoked by President Trump as justification to turn asylum seekers away at the border. “The Centers for Disease Control has a Title 42 authority that we exercise to protect the migrants themselves, to...
    Fifteen years ago, the Department of Defense established a program to combat sexual assault and rape in the ranks. Since then, the military has spent hundreds of millions of dollars on prevention efforts with a stated policy of zero tolerance.  A year-and-a-half-long investigation by "CBS Evening News" anchor and managing editor Norah O'Donnell and the CBS News Investigative Unit into sexual assault within the U.S. military uncovered failures by leaders to address the issue. Over the course of the investigation, CBS News spoke with nearly two dozen survivors of sexual assault, whistleblowers who worked for the military's Sexual Assault Prevention and Response program and families of suicide victims who say the military grossly mishandled reports of sexual assault.  In the military's most recent survey, more than 20,000 service members said they had experienced sexual assault. Over the course of a year-and-a-half investigation, CBS News spoke to nearly two dozen sexual assault survivors from all branches of the military who say their allegations were brushed aside and they were retaliated against for reporting their assaults. "We're supposed to feel safe with our...
    SACRAMENTO (CBS13) — Sacramento Mayor Darrell Steinberg and Councilmember Katie Valenzuela say they are pushing to changes to the prison release system after the killing of a Land Park woman by a parolee. Troy Davis, 51, is accused of sexually assaulting and killing 61-year-old Mary Tibbitts and her two dogs before setting the home on fire. READ MORE: Police Warn Of Uptick In Credit Card Skimmers Found In Roseville He was reportedly seen on a neighbor’s surveillance camera just a day before the killing. Davis was recently released from prison under California’s zero bail policy – despite his criminal history including charges of violent crimes like assault with a deadly weapon and robbery. In a joint statement released on Wednesday, Steinberg and Valenzuela called for changes to the reentry program. READ MORE: Caldor Fire Grows To 217,569 Acres, 50% Contained “We cannot simply release people from jail onto the streets without working harder to ensure that they are getting the treatment and services they desperately need to prevent them from harming themselves or others,” Steinberg and Valenzuela wrote. Steinberg and...
    Olympic gymnast Simone Biles is pushing back against critics of her response to an Instagram post that said, “Abortion is wrong.” Biles recently asked for her Instagram followers to post their unpopular opinions. One such follower responded by saying, “Abortion is wrong.” Biles responded to the post with a lengthy defense of abortion and criticized adoption by citing her experiences in the foster care system. (LOIC VENANCE/AFP via Getty Images) Biles’s response to the follower was captioned in the following tweet. “I already know this is going to start the biggest argument and may even lose followers BUT… I’m very much pro-choice,” Biles tweeted. “Your body. Your choice.” “Also for everyone gonna say ‘just put it up for adoption,’ it’s not that easy and coming from someone who was in the foster care system TRUST me… foster care system is broken and it’s tough, especially on the kids and young adults who age out, and adoption is expensive, I’m just saying,” Biles tweeted. I assume this is what this person is talking about. Nothing about being better off dead....
    (CNN)A Tokyo public health expert says the Olympic bubble system "is kind of broken" just three days before the sporting spectacle is set to begin. "Visitors, athletes, journalists, delegates, of course they are supposed to be within the bubble, but it's not working well," Dr. Kenji Shibuya said in an interview with Reuters."It's obvious that the bubble system is kind of broken, so there seems to be some sort of interaction between guests and visitors and also local people."The International Olympic Committee (IOC) and Tokyo 2020 organizers did not immediately respond to CNN's request for comment. Tokyo 2020 will host about 11,000 athletes -- representing more than 200 countries -- and they will be staying in 21 residential buildings.Read MoreHowever, not all of these athletes will be in Tokyo for the whole duration of the Games. Organizers say athletes will be expected to arrive in the Olympic Village five days prior to their competition, and depart a maximum of two days afterwards.As they have started to arrive, the number of Covid-19 cases in Japan linked to Tokyo 2020 is now...
    This narrative in the Unheard Voices of the Pandemic series from Voice of Witness is published with permission, as part of a partnership with Prism, where the piece was originally published. Interview and editing by Annaick Miller and Ela Banerjee. Salvador Guerrero grew up in Lima, Peru, and migrated to New York in his twenties, later moving to the Bay Area where he has lived for the past 12 years—a period of skyrocketing rents and costs in the region. Here, Salvador shares his experiences with housing insecurity, disability, and isolation while living in a shelter-in-place hotel in San Francisco, which the city provides for unhoused individuals and essential workers during the pandemic. Due to unsafe living conditions, Salvador had to leave his prior housing at the beginning of the pandemic and has since struggled to access affordable, independent housing. Salvador works for an organization that provides services to senior centers. He used a pseudonym to protect his privacy. Since June 2020, I’ve been living in one of the shelter-in-place hotels that the city and county of San Francisco provides for essential workers and the...
    Demonstrators outside the Georgia Department of Labor in Atlanta on Friday protested Georgia's decision to end federal unemployment benefits early, according to local reports. Photos posted to social media show people camping in tents outside the state labor department with signs that read, "Black workers matter"; "Stop the war on the poor"; and "We demand affordable childcare." EXTRA UNEMPLOYMENT BENEFITS ENDING FOR 2.5M AMERICANS THIS WEEKEND "The process of actually applying for unemployment has been disastrous for all Americans," Nicole Fears, one of the demonstrators who was laid off from her job as a flight attendant after 26 years, told 13WMAZ, a local CBS-affiliated station. "We're calling for reform, we're needing Congress to step up to the plate and look out for these workers." Fears expressed that there are "lots of issues" and "the system is broken." Another group of four Georgia residents sued the state this week over delayed unemployment benefits, according to Fox 5 Atlanta. THESE 26 STATES ARE ENDING $300 UNEMPLOYMENT BENEFITS THIS SUMMER Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp and Labor Commissioner Mark Butler announced this week that...
    Former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin, center, is taken into custody as his attorney, Eric Nelson, left, looks on, after the verdicts were read at Chauvin's trial for the 2020 death of George Floyd, Tuesday, April 20, 2021. In laying the groundwork to push for competing sentencing outcomes, attorneys in the case of Derek Chauvin painted quite different pictures of the former Minneapolis police officer who a jury found murdered George Floyd in May 2020. “The State respectfully requests a sentence of 360 months, or 30 years ...” the prosecution wrote in its sentencing memorandum filed Wednesday with the District Court of Hennepin County. The state argued that Chauvin, who a jury convicted on April 20 of second-degree murder, third-degree murder, and second-degree manslaughter, did not commit a “typical” version of each offense and therefore, should receive a lengthier sentence. A Black father, Floyd was unarmed when Chauvin kneeled on his neck for more than nine minutes and caused his slow but eventual death. “As this Court put the point, the ‘slow death of George Floyd occurring over approximately six minutes of his...
    FS1’s Marcellus Wiley ripped LeBron James for his attacks on America’s “broken system” while pointing out the same “system” allowed James to become a billionaire. The Fox Sports 1 analyst and one-time all-pro NFL defensive end spoke out to condemn James after the L.A. Lakers star tweeted and then deleted an attack on an Ohio police officer with the caption “you’re next.” The Speak For Yourself analyst began by criticizing James for jumping to judgment on the police-involved shooting of Ma’Khia Bryant in Columbus, Ohio. “Who in the hell is looking at this situation any different?” Wiley said of the Ohio shooting. “The cop has an impossible choice, which is to save a life I’m going have to take a life. And it’s just that simple. Like I get where we want to say, but this happened over here, but that ain’t this. I’m talking about right here.” [email protected] responds to LeBrons controversial tweet. pic.twitter.com/VbEov9rW1B — Speak For Yourself (@SFY) April 23, 2021 Wiley also scoffed at James for his later tweet, lamenting that people were using his attack on...
    Black Lives Matter co-founder Patrisse Cullors has said Derek Chauvin's conviction was a 'victory in accountability' but George Floyd's murder and the cop killing of Ma'Khia Bryant prove the criminal justice system is 'broken' and should be abolished.  Cullors, who set up BLM with Alicia Garza and Opal Tometi back in 2013, posted a video on Instagram Thursday where she told her 371,000 followers that now was the time to 'fight for more' and 'get us closer to a place where there are no jails or prisons or surveillance' in America.   Chauvin was found guilty of all charges Tuesday in the murder of Floyd, after the white cop knelt on the black man's neck for more than nine minutes during an arrest in Minneapolis last May.  Just minutes before he was convicted of second-degree unintentional murder, third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter, black 16-year-old Bryant was shot dead by a cop in Columbus, Ohio.    Black Lives Matter co-founder Patrisse Cullors said in a social media video (above) Derek Chauvin's conviction was a 'victory in accountability' but George Floyd's murder and the cop...
    It is not unknown that the pandemic outbreak threw the world into disarray. Consequently, tennis players also faced many challenges such as extensive cuts in prize money. Only recently, Tennis Australia successfully organized the Australian Open 2021. However, it cost them a fortune, and hence, they had to make prize cuts for top players. The same will also continue in the first Master’s 1000 tournament of the season, the 2021 Miami Open. For this reason, John Isner was furious and blamed the ATP for it. Read More: Australian Open Semifinalist Reveals Her Abdominal Muscle Tear was More Serious than Novak Djokovic John Isner compares Tennis with NBA, MLB, NHL, PGA Isner’s complaint came as a response to Miami Open’s decision to make a 60% cut in prize money. Moreover, the champions of the tournament will see an 80% cut compared to 2019. MIAMI GARDENS, FLORIDA – MARCH 24: John Isner of the United States reacts during his match against Albert Ramos Vinolas of Spain during Day 7 of the Miami Open Presented by Itau at Hard Rock Stadium on March 24,...
    Many of the cruelties inherent in factory farming stem from the sheer number of animals packed onto each farm. Pigs and cows are confined by the thousands — and birds by the hundreds of thousands. Overcrowded conditions heighten animals’ stress, lower their immunity, and allow diseases to spread like wildfire as the recent avian flu epidemic illustrates. Antibiotics routinely administered to animals through their feed and water do little to prevent illnesses; in fact, we now know this practice breeds deadly superbugs that threaten both animal and human health. Animals on factory farms live nearly their entire lives without ever feeling the sun on their backs or the grass beneath their feet. Instead, they spend months on end crammed inside barren, often windowless sheds, standing in their own feces and urine and breathing in toxic, choking fumes from accumulated waste. The least fortunate animals — egg-laying hens, mother pigs, and baby cows — spend most or all of their days inside cages so small they can barely move. The Harsh Reality of Life for Factory Farmed Animals Egg-Laying Hens On egg farms,...
    College Football Playoff expansion is needed to make the college football postseason more exciting because the current four-team model is broken. By the end of the first half, it was clear that the Notre Dame Fighting Irish did not belong on the same field as the Alabama Crimson Tide. It was not just the 19.5-point spread at the start of the game. It was the mere fact that the Irish were outmatched and outmuscled. Furthermore, the game sent a message to the playoff committee — a message of expansion. Notre Dame’s loss is eerily similar to what they endured in Miami back in 2013 against Alabama. Furthermore, is it fair to ask that another team likely give the Crimson Tide a fight that the Irish couldn’t? How about Texas A&M or Cincinnati or Coastal Carolina, the latter of which went undefeated in the regular season but had zero respect from the committee? Additionally, given that it seems to be the same four teams for the past few years who make it, why not expand to give other teams a shot...
    CHICAGO — On the heels of a scathing report from the city’s top watchdog, three aldermen are calling for a hearing on how the city handles recycling in large buildings. The city’s recycling ordinance requires owners of commercial buildings and residential complexes with at least five units to hire private contractors to haul their tenants recyclables, but many of them don’t, in part because the city doesn’t bother enforcing the rules. On Dec. 2, Chicago’s Inspector General Joe Ferguson, issued an audit saying the city’s Streets and Sanitation Department doesn’t “thoroughly enforce” the recycling ordinance and even lacks the capability to issue tickets to those who violate it. Inspired by reporting from the Better Government Association, Ferguson’s audit was the latest withering assessment of the city’s recycling programs. Currently, the city recycles at a rate of 8 to 9 percent, lower than the national average of 25 percent and far lower than large cities on the West Coast. Stating “the time is now for Chicago to take action against climate change by stepping up and ensuring that the Chicago...
    President-elect Joe Biden’s Department of Homeland Security nominee called the U.S. immigration system “broken,” and provided few details on how he would approach reform, the Miami Herald reported Thursday. Alejandro Mayorkas said that the reforms will require support from both parties during a Zoom call hosted by the American Business Immigration Coalition, the Herald reported. “Today, our immigration system is badly broken — and we all know it,” Mayorkas said, the Herald reported. (RELATED: Top Biden Contender For Homeland Security Chief ‘Exerted Improper Influence’ On Foreign Visa Program, Watchdog Report Found) “The cost of that broken system is incalculably high. It represents a profound toll not only on families seeking to contribute to our nation and forge their own American dream, but on our economic prosperity and our moral authority as well,” Mayorkas added. [email protected]‘s intended nominee to head the Department of Homeland Security, @AliMayorkas, describes the U.S. immigration system as “broken.” He calls for the creation of a new one to stimulate the economy as it recovers from the pandemic.https://t.co/vcPHt4oW6f — Washington Examiner (@dcexaminer) December 4, 2020 Mayorkas...
    The 2020 presidential election results are still technically outstanding due to irregularities and voter fraud allegations, and this should frustrate every American after four years of uneven treatment between political parties by the media, “Hannity” host Sean Hannity argued Thursday. Hannity reminded viewers that President-elect Joe Biden was let off easy by the mainstream press during the campaign and given a pass while hiding from coronavirus in his basement. Meanwhile, the same media pummeled President Trump “every single minute” of every day, Hannity said. “So it’s no surprise that so-called journalists now have no interest in looking into cases of American citizens saying that these are serious abuses of power here,” he said. “They got the outcome they wanted ... They don’t really care what happened.” HANNITY: 'WHAT THE HELL IS HAPPENING IN GEORGIA?' On Election Day, Hannity pointed out, more than 73 million Americans voted for President Trump, 11 million more votes than in 2016. “Every American should be tired and fed up at the double standard,” he said.  “It’s gone on for four years: the lies, the conspiracy theories, breathless hysteria reporting and corruption. They...
    Deaths per day from the coronavirus in the U.S. are on the rise again, just as health experts had feared, and cases are climbing in nearly every single state.Rick Bowmer/AP Let our journalists help you make sense of the noise: Subscribe to the Mother Jones Daily newsletter and get a recap of news that matters.The United States is confronting its worst surge in coronavirus cases since the start of the pandemic. Governors are rushing new lockdowns into place as hospitals nationwide burst at the seams. The death toll is, yet again, setting daily records. Maybe by the time you listen to this episode of the Mother Jones Podcast, below, the US will have passed another dire milestone (of so many): a quarter of a million coronavirus deaths. Inside our newsroom, reporters and editors are determined to put science—and the voices of scientists—at the heart of our ongoing coronavirus coverage. That’s why, early in the outbreak, we launched a series called “Pandemic Proofing America”, an evolving oral history collection featuring incisive interviews with the nation’s top scientists and public health experts....
    Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) speaks during a news conference concerning the extension of eviction protections in the next coronavirus bill, at the U.S. Capitol on July 22, 2020.Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images The real takeaway from President Donald Trump's reported $750 federal income tax payments, according to Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., is that the U.S. tax system is not working. "The problem here is that the system itself is broken and you've got to ask why," Warren said in an interview with CNBC's Jim Cramer during the virtual Delivering Alpha conference Wednesday. "And you want to know why? The reason is because of the Donald Trumps of the world. The people who have used their money and used their influence to get Congress to keep rewriting those laws." Warren referenced the blockbuster New York Times report published Sunday that claimed Trump had paid $750 in federal income tax in the year he won the presidency and in his first year in office. The report also found that Trump had paid no federal income tax in 10 of the previous 15 years. CNBC...
    New York City elementary schools reopen for in-person classes, but new outbreaks threaten The UKs biggest grocery chain Tesco is targeting a sales surge for plant-based burgers, sausages, and quiches I made $10,500 as a freelancer in 2018 — and still paid more taxes than Trump. The system is broken. © John Moore/Getty Images Then Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump delivers a speech during the evening session on the fourth day of the Republican National Convention on July 21, 2016 at the Quicken Loans Arena in Cleveland, Ohio. John Moore/Getty Images The New York Times got its hands on decades of President Trump's tax information, and it paints a portrait of a man who used every tool at his disposal to avoid a bill from the IRS.   According to the Times, he paid $750 in federal income taxes in 2016 and 2017 — $76 dollars less than the $826 I paid when I made $10,500 as a freelance writer in 2018. But while it may seem like Trump is an outlier, he's simply part of a system that...
    REUTERS/Tom BrennerAccording to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, democracy is no longer hard — if you have a president of your own party in the White House.Of course, this kind of hypocrisy among politicians is hardly surprising, but that doesn’t mean it shouldn’t be noted when it occurs. In 2014, when Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell was busy blocking legislation that President Barack Obama sought on immigration, Obama explored whether he could use executive authority to accomplish some of what he favored in the stalled bill. Article continues after advertisement Commented McConnell (the 2014 version when a Democrat was president): Look, as the president has said, democracy is hard…. Imposing his will unilaterally may seem tempting. It may serve him politically in the short term. But he knows it will make an already broken system even more broken. Now President Donald Trump is frustrated that he can’t get the Democratically controlled House to agree to some things he favors, like a cut in payroll taxes that might possibly boost his re-election chances. Trump is entitled to want that. He is...
    A Newsweek tweet went viral last week: “ICE agents complain about Nazi comparisons, say they’re only enforcing the laws,” read the headline. It was framed to make everyone point out the obvious: Nazis said the same thing. But in the new Netflix series Immigration Nation (which the tweet was referencing), Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) officers do little to convince people that they’re simply enforcing the law.  Hide Immigration Nation RELEASE DATE: Aug. 3, 2020 CREATOR: Christina Clusiau and Shaul Schwarz STREAMING: Netflix The six-part series is a real-time examination of America’s war on immigrants. Hide You hear some variation of “I’m just doing my job” or “It’s the law” multiple times in Immigration Nation, and filmmakers Christina Clusiau and Shaul Schwarz don’t press ICE agents on why they believe that. The psychological onboarding and collective delusion become apparent; you see it in how excited officers get about rounding up undocumented immigrants—or “collaterals,” people who weren’t targets but happened to be there—or treating human lives like a numbers game. The very first scene shows ICE agents knocking on the...
    Report: Multiple coaches, GMs believe NFL season amid pandemic is ‘dead wrong’ Three Things to Know Before Buying a Label Maker Why unemployment is a broken system: It really is an experiment out of control Unemployment systems pay less aid to fewer people and for a shorter period of time than in decades past, research shows. Some states, mostly in the South, are less generous than others. The dynamic is playing out during an unemployment crisis fueled by the coronavirus pandemic, and while Congress figures out whether to extend a $600 weekly boost in pay. © Provided by CNBC Demonstrators rally near the Capitol Hill residence of Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., to call for the extension of unemployment benefits on Wednesday, July 22, 2020. The unemployment system is fraying. Load Error Unemployment benefits are less generous than in decades past, in key metrics like duration, amount paid and the share of unemployed who receive aid. The aggregate result is less money going to fewer people for a shorter amount of time. This dynamic is...
    Demonstrators rally near the Capitol Hill residence of Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., to call for the extension of unemployment benefits on Wednesday, July 22, 2020.Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images The unemployment system is fraying. Unemployment benefits are less generous than in decades past, in key metrics like duration, amount paid and the share of unemployed who receive aid. The aggregate result is less money going to fewer people for a shorter amount of time. This dynamic is playing out during an unemployment crisis fueled by the coronavirus pandemic, when nearly 32 million people are collecting jobless benefits. More from Personal Finance:GOP propose second round of $1,200 stimulus checksGOP plan slashes unemployment by 43% for average workerHow the eviction crisis across the U.S. will look Federal aid, namely an extra $600 a week, has provided a temporary stopgap since late March. But expiring relief now puts the generosity of the system front and center. "The [unemployment insurance] program is a broken system and should be rethought," Stephen Wandner, a senior fellow at the National Academy of Social...
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