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    HAVING grown tired of men promising us “it’s coming home” for the last 56 years, women just went out and brought it home themselves. And they did it only four years into existence as a fully-professional sport. 2England's Lionesses thrilled the nation with their Euro 2022 winCredit: Getty 2Karren Brady says the WSL must reap the benefitsCredit: PR Handout - Free to use They threw themselves into celebrations in ways I have never seen from men. In total abandonment, they danced, jigged, sang, laughed and hugged in a feast of excitement at becoming European winners. Oh, what a night! I know only too well male players would be dancing if they won a Euros or World Cup final. READ MORE FOOTBALL NEWSROYAL RECOGNITION Russo's Euros boots worn for iconic backheel protected in Tower of LondonELL OF A PLAYER Toone's school coach on how he celebrated Euros goal before it hit net I’d join in with them 100 per cent. But many men are almost frightened of letting themselves go in the uninhibited way Sarina Wiegman’s players did. Can you imagine...
    (CNN)In videos that show George Floyd's killing in Minneapolis police custody, an officer holding down the Black man's ankles says, "I just worry about excited delirium or whatever." Another officer responds: "That's why we have the ambulance coming."But Floyd did not meet any of the 10 criteria used by many to diagnose "excited delirium," a police surgeon testified later in the murder trial of the second officer, Derek Chauvin. And an independent autopsy found the 46-year-old died during the 2020 encounter of "asphyxiation from sustained pressure" when his neck and back were compressed. That same year, Elijah McClain was diagnosed with "excited delirium" by paramedics in Aurora, Colorado. McClain was placed in a carotid hold by police and injected with ketamine when paramedics arrived. The medics never checked the 23-year-old Black man's vital signs, talked to him or touched him before making the diagnosis, a Colorado grand jury found. McClain was declared brain dead three days later.Two strangers, with the same first name, and a terrifying story about ketamine in policingAnd "excited delirium" was among the causes of death listed...
    A BIZARRE Omicron symptom has been flagged as one to watch out for in patients. Doctors have warned if you develop confusion it could mean you need medical treatment. 2Sudden new confusion or delirium is thought to be a sign you need medical helpCredit: Getty - Contributor The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has said it is an "emergency warning sign". They suggest seeking out help "immediately" if you or someone in your household starts to seem confused while suffering with Covid. The CDC also says anyone experiencing trouble breathing, persistent pain or pressure in the chest, inability to stay awake or pale or blue skin, lip or nail beds, should get urgent help. While it's important to watch out for warning signs of serious illness, a string of hugely positive studies show Omicron is milder than other strains in the vaccinated. Covid booster jabs protect against Omicron and offer the best chance to get through the pandemic, health officials have repeatedly said. Most read in Health NewsTHINK TWICE Don't mistake this 'very strange' Omicron symptom for common cold, doctors...
    DOCTORS have described how Covid caused a woman to strip naked “inappropriately”, wash her clothes in a toilet and drink shower gel. The 30-something, who has not been identified, spent several days acting bizarrely in a rare complication of the virus. 1A woman in her 30s suffered a side effect of Covid that caused her to strip naked "inappropriately", wash her clothes in the toilet and drink shower gelCredit: Getty A relative brought her into hospital, concerned about her behaviour in the four days since she had tested positive.  “She had been agitated, required less sleep and had been talking excessively,” doctors wrote in the British Medical Journal Case Reports.  “In addition, she had appeared confused, talking to people who were not there (suggesting she was responding to hallucinations), calling family members by the wrong name and on one occasion taking her clothes off for no reason. “On the day of admission, she impulsively drank 100 mL of body wash which was the final factor leading her relative to bring her to hospital.” Doctors in Doha, Qatar, described the woman as...
    Of the over 200 million recorded survivors of SARS-CoV-2 infection, many millions suffered in an ICU for weeks and months before being discharged. Their return home, often the result of cutting-edge medical care, is cause for celebration. And yet many of these patients are now living with massive and likely life-long disabilities that include dementia-like cognitive impairment, PTSD, depression, and muscle and nerve disease. This devastating form of Long COVID fits under the medical umbrella of something called Post-Intensive Care Syndrome (PICS), a near-invisible epidemic of cognitive and physical impairment that often follows an extended ICU stay. These two entities, Long COVID and PICS, have many overlapping forms of suffering that must be acknowledged by health-care professionals and loved one for survivors to feel validated and heard. People throughout society in all our communities are now struggling with new disabilities following COVID-19 that are due to both the disease itself and the unintended side effects of ICU management. Over the past 25 years, we in critical care learned that many of our standard treatment protocols—including sedating and immobilizing patients and...
    The death of an Antioch man who went unconscious while police restrained him was attributed to “excited delirium,” a controversial diagnosis that the American Medical Association criticized as too frequently used to shield police brutality. That determination in the death of 30-year-old Angelo Quinto was made by Dr. Ikechi Ogan, a forensic pathologist who contracts with Contra Costa County, according to Ogan’s testimony at a coroner’s inquest Friday. Ogan attributed Quinto’s “excited delirium syndrome” to modafinil, a prescription drug used to treat narcolepsy, that was found in Quinto’s system. But as recently as June, the AMA has denounced “excited delirium syndrome” as a charged term too frequently used in cases with excessive force by police, and “opposes its use until a clear set of diagnostic criteria has been established.” Testifying in a packed Martinez courtroom Friday, Ogan admitted it is a “poorly understood condition” but said he stands by it and consulted with too other physicians in his medical group before making his finding official. Ogan’s testimony has been long anticipated as police and Quinto’s family have put forth drastically...
    This article was medically reviewed by  Jeffrey Ditzell, D.O. a psychiatrist at JD Psychiatry in New York City.  Medically Reviewed Reviewed By Check Mark Icon A check mark. It indicates that the relevant content has been reviewed and verified by an expert Our stories are reviewed by medical professionals to ensure you get the most accurate and useful information about your health and wellness. For more information, visit our medical review board. Alcohol withdrawal can be painful and dangerous, which is why you should always detox under medical supervision. D-Keine/Getty Images Most people do not die from alcohol withdrawal, but many will experience symptoms like tremors, headaches, and nausea.  Though rare, it is possible to die from alcohol withdrawal if you experience delirium tremens, a condition that occurs in 5% of withdrawal cases.  To safely detox from alcohol, you should do it under medical supervision and go to the doctor immediately if you experience hallucinations, confusion, or seizures.  Visit Insider's Health Reference library for more advice. Physical dependence on alcohol occurs over time as a result of excessive...
    NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) — Could playing games help your mind recover after surgery? A new study says playing simple games can do just that, CBS2’s Dr. Max Gomez reported Thursday. You’ve heard of rehab to help you recover after surgery and now doctors encourage patients to do “pre-hab” to prepare their bodies before surgery by eating right, exercising and controlling any chronic conditions. It turns out preparing your brain for surgery is just as important by using games. Sarah Sieling has always enjoyed games like solitaire and sudoku, so when she was asked to participate in a study that required playing brain games leading up to her back surgery, she was happy to help. “It was to hopefully stop me from having delirium after the surgery,” Sieling said. MORE: Cognitive Computer Games May Ward Off Decline In Brain Function In The Elderly Post-operative delirium is especially common in older patients and can have serious consequences, including longer hospital stays, slowed recovery and even an increased risk of death. Yet experts don’t have many tools to prevent it. MORE FROM CBS...
    These 2 Moves in Your 20s Could Make You a Millionaire in Your 60s Talus Expedition Gear: An RV in a Box Do you know these lucrative Social Security secrets? Ad Microsoft Full screen 1/5 SLIDES © Provided by Best Life This Scary Symptom Is Affecting the Most Vulnerable COVID Patients As if the novel coronavirus wasn't frightening enough, some seniors are facing a particularly troubling symptom of COVID-19: delirium. In addition to the virus's more apparent threats to a person's health (respiratory failure and lung damage chief among them), delirium complicates an already confounding and terrifying disease. A September study from King's College London found that delirium—an acute state of confusion brought on by illness or intoxication—is a key COVID symptom among the frail and elderly. Patients exhibited incoherent thought or speech, confusion or memory loss, as well as restlessness, making it that much harder for doctors to reach a diagnosis by hindering the patient's ability to communicate their symptoms. On top of this, CNN...
    Matthew Rozsa October 6, 2020 9:05PM (UTC) In order to help treat COVID-19, President Donald Trump is taking a steroid that can cause mood swings, confusion, depression, delirium and nervousness. Trump was prescribed the drug, known as dexamethasone, after being diagnosed with COVID-19 and staying at the Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Washington, D.C. for four days. Despite being released on Monday, there is no indication that Trump will stop taking dexamethasone, which can cause a number of psychological side effects. The more common psychological side effects include mood swings, nervousness and insomnia, according to WebMD. Less common side effects include hallucinations, delirium, confusion, depression and paranoia. The medical website also says that the mood swings are the only common psychological side effect that can express itself severely. : Though rare, WebMD reports that paranoia, delirium and hallucinations "tend to have a Severe expression" when exhibited by dexamethasone users. Scrutiny over Trump's drug regimen increased yesterday after the president returned to the White House after being treated for COVID-19 in Walter Reed Medical Center. After returning to the White House, the president...
    Suddenly feeling confused and delirious is a common symptom of Covid-19 among frail older people, scientists have found. Officials in the UK don't recognise any symptoms other than coughing, fever and a lost sense of taste or smell, but there are many others that people suffer regularly. Experts who run the Covid Symptom Tracker app, from King's College London, have now found that large proportions of elderly people get delirious when they're ill. Delirium is a state that comes on suddenly in which people get confused, struggle to think clearly and may hallucinate, become agitated or have mood swings.  The condition is caused by problems in the brain and can make people more likely to get seriously ill or die in hospital because their bodies become generally weaker and less able to recover, and the effects on the brain can be long-lasting or permanent. Using self-reported symptoms from around 850 over-65s, the King's researchers found people official considered 'frail' were three times as likely to become delirious.  And of over-65s who ended up in hospital because of Covid-19, one in...
    (CNN)Elijah McKnight admits he was drunk. The 25-year-old says he'd had a fifth of Jim Beam with a buddy before passing out on his way home on a sidewalk just outside Aurora, Colorado. That is where sheriff's deputies found him.They nudged him awake and the conversation was calm for the first several minutes. Deputies told him they were just checking to see if he was all right. But the encounter ended with McKnight on life support after being injected with a high dose of a drug called ketamine. "I was out cold for three days on life support," he said. "My family didn't know where I was."When McKnight finally woke up in an Aurora hospital, he couldn't believe what he was seeing on the news. His eyes widened when he saw a story about another young black man named Elijah. Elijah McClain was in a coma and near death after a police encounter that also involved a ketamine injection -- the same drug McKnight had been given before everything went dark. The two incidents happened just 10 miles apart and...
    Kanye West declared himself on Twitter to run for president of the United States. New delirium or serious intention? The post Kanye West says he is a candidate for President of the United States: new delirium or serious intention? appeared first on Analogik.
    Coronavirus patients are battling “hospital delirium” through “nightmarish visions,” delusions and “paranoid imaginings,” according to multiple reports. Delirium entails a “serious disturbance in mental abilities that results in confused thinking and reduced awareness of the environment,” according to the Mayo Clinic webpage. The onset is said to be rapid, within hours or several days. CLICK HERE FOR FULL CORONAVIRUS COVERAGE Delirium is usually more common in the elderly, sometimes occurring among cognitively impaired individuals with dementia. In an interview with Fox News' Trace Gallagher, Johns Hopkins University physician and professor of public health Dr. Marty Makary said the delirium is fairly common. "It is common in the ICU (intensive care unit.)," said Makary, a Fox News medical contributor. "When people are in the ICU they're hearing beeps and alarms and people are coming in to stick you with needles, you lose sense of reality, you lose sense of day and night and people get delirious." Makary said a study will come out Tuesday in the New England Journal of Medicine which says two-thirds of COVID-19 patients -- including young people -- in the ICU...
    (CNN)Doctors are fighting not only to save lives from Covid-19, but also to protect patients' brains.Although Covid-19 is best known for damaging the lungs, it also increases the risk of life-threatening brain injuries — from mental confusion to hallucinations, seizures, coma, stroke and paralysis. The virus may invade the brain, and it can starve the brain of oxygen by damaging the lungs. To fight the infection, the immune system sometimes overreacts, battering the brain and other organs it normally protects.Yet the pandemic has severely limited the ability of doctors and nurses to prevent and treat neurological complications. The severity of the disease and the heightened risk of infection have forced medical teams to abandon many of the practices that help them protect patients from delirium, a common side effect of mechanical ventilators and intensive care.Like Riding a Roller Coaster in the Dark: Dr. Sanjay Guptas coronavirus podcast for June 1And while Covid-19 increases the risk of strokes, the pandemic has made it harder to diagnose them.When doctors suspect a stroke, they usually order a brain MRI — a sophisticated type...
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