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    Hackers have targeted companies that distribute the COVID-19 vaccine to a degree previously unreported, according to research from IBM Security. Starting last year, attackers attempted to access sensitive information about the vaccine's "cold chain" distribution system. IBM Security said the phishing attack targeted 44 companies in 14 countries across Europe, North America, South America and Asia. It is unclear if the hackers were successful in breaching systems. The hacking victims include high-ranking executives at a petrochemical firm, a solar energy manufacturer, several IT companies and a department at the European Commission.  The cyberattack was first discovered in late 2020. Researchers initially believed the hacking campaign targeted UNICEF's GAVI alliance, a coalition of governments and companies that help developing countries distribute vaccines. At the time, it was unclear if the campaign was successful, according to IBM's global lead for threat intelligence, Nick Rossmann. But the new IBM research shows the operation's scope was larger than previously thought, requiring significant "premeditated planning," Rossmann said. "This was a very well-calibrated, complex and precise campaign." Although his team cannot conclusively attribute the cyberattack...
    CHICAGO (WLS) -- If you've noticed you're spending more on groceries, you're not alone. The Consumer Price Index shows food prices have been rising during the challenges of the COVID pandemic.As of February, the average price of fruits and vegetables are up 3.4% compared to 12 months ago. The price of meat, poultry, fish and eggs are up 5.2%.At Supermercado El Ranchito, a family-run market and restaurant in Brighton Park, manager Sanra Trujillo said just about all her wholesalers are charging more.Experts say some of the rising costs should ease soon."We should see some easing of that as people get vaccinated," said Maciek Nowak, associate dean of Loyola University's Quinlan School of Business.Nowak studies supply chain, and explained the demands for goods are increasing, but there's a transportation capacity issue that preceded the pandemic."We still have trucking companies that don't have the same manpower that they had before the pandemic, and the warehouse ports," he said. "All of these are working at diminished capacity."Jesse Iniguez, who co-founded Back of the Yards Coffee, said his supplies are more expensive and taking...
    By CHRIS PERKINS, South Florida Sun Sentinel FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. (AP) — It’s that time of year when fresh Florida strawberries are in season and plentiful on store shelves. But it’s a rotten feeling to get them home, only to have them turn to mush in a day or two. Don’t feel bad — it’s probably not your fault. And new research shows you may be able to keep your strawberries plump for longer. The research done by two Florida scientists found that your berries were most likely predestined to go bad some time between when they were picked and arrived on your kitchen counter. That’s a 7- to 10-day journey in which the strawberries may have gotten too warm. Jeff Brecht, a horticultural sciences professor at Florida, says strawberries should be kept around 34 degrees — just above freezing. He warns that breaking the so-called cold chain could ruin the batch. But grocery stores often break that critical cold chain when they display strawberries in unrefrigerated cases, said Brecht, who recently wrote a paper along with his University of...
    Star Refrigeration’s Dr Rob Lamb will advise on the latest developments affecting the phase down of HFC refrigerants with high Global Warming Potential (GWP) LONDON, Jan. 16, 2021 /PRNewswire-PRWeb/ — Group Sales and Marketing Director of Star Refrigeration, Dr Rob Lamb, will take to the stage at the Cold Chain Federation’s Compliance Week event to shed light on the impact that the F-gas phase down will have on the Temperature Controlled Storage & Distribution and food manufacturing industries, as the UK remains aligned to the EU F-gas regulation and European safety standards, post Brexit. Running from Tuesday 26 to Wednesday 27 January 2021, the event, which is set to focus on health and safety, legislative and food safety compliance challenges in the cold chain, will provide attendees with the opportunity to hear from live guest speakers from Food Storage and Distribution, BRCGS, British Standard Institution (BSI), Goldfreeze and Star Refrigeration amongst others. The Compliance Week conference will feature real-time discussions about areas of key focus for the sector post-Brexit, the F-gas regulations latest updates, the Covid-19 led PPE increase, the...
    The Conversation Spain Covid-19 vaccines: The cold supply chain does not reach everywhere, preventing its equitable administration Bringing vaccines to rural and hard-to-reach areas is essential for ethical and public health reasons. Hector Roqueta Rivero / Moment via . To serve as an instrument for reducing health inequalities and promoting social justice, coronavirus vaccines must also be distributed among populations that have fewer services and among those communities that are difficult to access. While there aren’t too many places in the United States that can’t be reached by road, there are other challenging circumstances. Thus, for example, many hospitals in rural areas have an unstable power supply, or cannot afford freezers that cool to extremely low temperatures. However, if there is will on the part of the Government and the necessary resources are allocated, these difficulties can be overcome. But this is not the case in most countries in the rest of the world. One of our team members, Tim Ford, is a global health researcher and has conducted a large number of international studies on water and sanitation in...
    The Conversation Spain Covid-19 vaccines: The cold supply chain does not reach everywhere, preventing its equitable administration Bringing vaccines to rural and hard-to-reach areas is essential for ethical and public health reasons. Hector Roqueta Rivero / Moment via . To serve as an instrument for reducing health inequalities and promoting social justice, coronavirus vaccines must also be distributed among populations that have fewer services and among those communities that are difficult to access. While there aren’t too many places in the United States that can’t be reached by road, there are other challenging circumstances. Thus, for example, many hospitals in rural areas have an unstable power supply, or cannot afford freezers that cool to extremely low temperatures. However, if there is will on the part of the Government and the necessary resources are allocated, these difficulties can be overcome. But this is not the case in most countries in the rest of the world. One of our team members, Tim Ford, is a global health researcher and has conducted a large number of international studies on water and sanitation in...
    Covid-19 vaccines: The cold supply chain does not reach everywhere, preventing its equitable administration
    FRANKFURT (Reuters) - Germany's coronavirus vaccination campaign faced delays in several cities on Sunday after medical staff found potential irregularities in the cooling of the shot produced by BioNTech and Pfizer. The European Union launched a mass COVID-19 vaccination drive on Sunday with pensioners and medics lining up to get the first shots to see off a pandemic that has crippled economies and claimed more than 1.7 million lives worldwide. "When reading the temperature loggers that were enclosed in the cool boxes, doubts arose about the compliance with the cold chain requirements", the District Office of Lichtenfels in the north of Germany's largest state Bavaria said in a statement. The Pfizer vaccine, which uses new so-called mRNA technology, must be stored at ultra-low temperatures of about -70 degrees Celsius (-112°F) to remain effective before being shipped to distribution centres. Pfizer has designed special shipping containers filled with dry ice to keep the vaccine from spoiling while in transit. Shots can be kept in an ultra-low temperature freezer for up to six months, or for five days at 2C to 8C...
    London (CNN Business)It's one of the biggest logistical challenges in modern history: How will millions of Covid-19 vaccine doses that must be kept at incredibly cold temperatures be quickly shipped across continents and oceans?One company is using its experience with tuna as a guide.Thermo King — which revolutionized the transportation of food through advances in temperature-controlled shipping before World War II — is working with pharmaceutical companies, governments and logistics firms to ensure vaccines are preserved as they travel to clinics and hospitals. To make this happen, they've reworked containers typically used to transport fresh tuna to Japan, which requires similar frigid conditions."We took that product and we amended it," Francesco Incalza, president Thermo King Europe, Middle East and Africa, told CNN Business.Tuna must be stored at -60 degrees Celsius, or -76 degrees Fahrenheit, to maintain its quality and deep red hue when it reaches supermarkets and restaurants, Incalza said. The coronavirus vaccine developed by Pfizer (PFE) and BioNTech has to be stored at -70 degrees Celsius, or -94 degrees Fahrenheit, while in transit.Read MoreSo Thermo King, which is part...
    SAN JOSE, Calif. (KGO) -- As we get closer and closer to a COVID-19 vaccine release, there are major online security concerns.Tuesday we learned that a major US cybersecurity company, FireEye, based here in the Bay Area was hacked and that may be the tip of the iceberg.RELATED: Can companies force employees to take the COVID-19 vaccine?"What is the biggest target we're looking at right now? The whole world is talking about the vaccine, there is nothing else," says Cybersecurity expert Ahmed Banafa.Banafa is a professor at San Jose State University and says with the release of the coronavirus vaccine happening in some countries and coming soon in others, cyber criminals have already gone to work."The health sector in the industry in the economy is the weakest one when it comes to any protection against hacking or cyberattacks," says Banafa.In the most recent attack, FireEye, a company that has worked with the US government, confirmed they were hit by a government with "world class capabilities." It's unclear today what government that was.EXCLUSIVE: Here's how millions were stolen in CA EDD...
    Hackers are targeting the coronavirus vaccine supply chain, IBM warned Thursday, saying it had uncovered a series of cyber attacks against companies involved in the effort to distribute doses around the world. It was "unclear" if the attacks were successful, IBM said, adding they were potentially carried out by state actors. "Our team recently uncovered a global phishing campaign targeting organizations associated with a COVID-19 cold chain," Claire Zaboeva and Melissa Frydrych, analysts for IBM X-Force, a cyber security working group, wrote in a blog post. The European Commissions Directorate-General for Taxation and Customs Union was one target, as were energy and IT companies based in Germany, Italy, the Czech Republic, South Korea and Taiwan. The hackers impersonated an executive from Haier Biomedical, a Chinese-owned cold chain supply company working with the World Health Organization and the United Nations, IBM said. "Disguised as this employee, the adversary sent phishing emails to organizations believed to be providers of material support to meet transportation needs within the COVID-19 cold chain," Zaboeva and Frydrych wrote. The purpose "may have been to harvest credentials,...
    The hackers impersonated an executive with Haier Biomedical, a Chinese company that styles itself as “the world’s only complete cold chain provider.” They sent meticulously researched phishing emails that included an HTML attachment asking the recipient to input their credentials. They could have used that information later to gain access to sensitive networks. The campaign, which IBM says has “the potential hallmarks” of a state-sponsored effort, cast a wide net. The company only named one target explicitly — the European Commission’s Directorate-General for Taxation and Customs Union — but said the campaign targeted at least 10 different organizations, including a dev shop that makes websites for pharmaceutical and biotech companies. The company doesn’t know if any of the attacks were ultimately successful in their goal.  Clearly, this is an evolution of the coronavirus-related cyberattacks we’ve already seen. In June, the UK’s GCHQ security and intelligence agency said hackers had been repeatedly trying to access sensitive data related to the country’s coronavirus response, including work it had done on a COVID-19 vaccine. The fact hackers are now targeting the cold chain...
    Cyber hackers have targetted coronavirus vaccine 'cold chain' distribution firms in a global campaign that has the hallmarks of a nation state, according to IBM. The US tech giant said it had uncovered a 'global phishing campaign' it believes started in September, targeting those associated with the 'cold chain' for storing and transporting vaccines at the right temperature.  It comes after suspected North Korean hackers targeted the British coronavirus vaccine producer AstraZeneca with multiple attempts to access staff computers last week.  It is not clear who carried out the latest attack but security researchers said it had the 'hallmarks' of being a nation state. Pfizer has already created a staging ground at its Michigan facility (pictured above) complete with 350 large freezers to hold the vaccines, which need to be stored at -94F, once they're created and ready to ship The attempt spanned six countries linked to the Cold Chain Equipment Optimisation Platform (CCEOP) of Gavi, the international vaccine alliance which helps distribute jabs to some of the world's poorest countries. RELATED ARTICLES Previous 1 Next ...
    Hackers likely backed by foreign powers have initiated a global phishing attack on companies involved in the shipping of the coronavirus vaccine, according to a cybersecurity report. The hackers disguised themselves as a business executive from Haier Biomedical, a legitimate cold storage company involved in the coronavirus vaccine supply chain, in emails sent to organizations also associated with the supply chain, according to the IBM Research report released Thursday. The emails included fraudulent links, which would help give hackers access to sensitive information regarding the vaccine supply chain. “Today’s report highlights the importance of cybersecurity diligence at each step in the vaccine supply chain,” Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) chief strategist for healthcare Josh Corman told The Daily Caller News Foundation in a statement. (RELATED: UK Approves Pfizer Coronavirus Vaccine For Emergency Use) “CISA encourages all organizations involved in vaccine storage and transport to harden attack surfaces, particularly in cold storage operation, and remain vigilant against all activity in this space,” he continued. Trucks are loaded at a Pfizer factory in Puurs, Belgium where coronavirus vaccines are being produced...
    BOSTON - IBM security researchers say they have detected a cyberespionage effort using targeted phishing emails to try to collect vital information on the World Health Organization's initiative for distributing COVID-19 vaccine to developing countries. The researchers said they could not be sure who was behind the campaign, which began in September, or if it was successful. But the precision targeting and careful efforts to leave no tracks bore "the potential hallmarks of nation-state tradecraft," they said in  a blog post Thursday. The campaign's targets, in countries including Germany, Italy, South Korea and Taiwan, are likely associated with the development of the "cold chain"  needed to ensure coronavirus vaccines get the nonstop sterile refrigeration they need to be effective for the nearly 3 billion people who live where temperature-controlled storage is insufficient, IBM said. "Think of it as the bloodline that will be supplying the most vital vaccines globally," said Claire Zaboeva, an IBM analyst involved in the detection.   Whoever is behind the operation could be motivated by a desire to learn how the vaccines are best able...
    BOSTON -- IBM security researchers say they have detected a cyberespionage effort using targeted phishing emails to try to collect vital information on the World Health Organization's initiative for distributing COVID-19 vaccine to developing countries.The researchers said they could not be sure who was behind the campaign, which began in September, or if it was successful. But the precision targeting and careful efforts to leave no tracks bore "the potential hallmarks of nation-state tradecraft," they said in a blog post Thursday.The campaign's targets, in countries including Germany, Italy, South Korea and Taiwan, are likely associated with the development of the "cold chain" needed to ensure coronavirus vaccines get the nonstop sterile refrigeration they need to be effective for the nearly 3 billion people who live where temperature-controlled storage is insufficient, IBM said."Think of it as the bloodline that will be supplying the most vital vaccines globally," said Claire Zaboeva, an IBM analyst involved in the detection.Whoever is behind the operation could be motivated by a desire to learn how the vaccines are best able to be shipped and stored -...
    BOSTON – IBM security researchers say they have detected a cyberespionage effort using targeted phishing emails to try to collect vital information on the World Health Organization's initiative for distributing COVID-19 vaccine to developing countries. The researchers said they could not be sure who was behind the campaign, which began in September, or if it was successful. But the precision targeting and careful efforts to leave no tracks bore "the potential hallmarks of nation-state tradecraft,” they said in a blog post Thursday. The campaign’s targets, in countries including Germany, Italy, South Korea and Taiwan, are likely associated with the development of the “cold chain” needed to ensure coronavirus vaccines get the nonstop sterile refrigeration they need to be effective for the nearly 3 billion people who live where temperature-controlled storage is insufficient, IBM said. “Think of it as the bloodline that will be supplying the most vital vaccines globally," said Claire Zaboeva, an IBM analyst involved in the detection. Whoever is behind the operation could be motivated by a desire to learn how the vaccines are best able to...
    By Raphael Satter WASHINGTON (Reuters) - IBM is sounding the alarm over hackers targeting companies critical to the distribution of COVID-19 vaccines, a sign that digital spies are turning their attention to the complex logistical work involved in inoculating the world's population against the novel coronavirus. The information technology company said in a blog post published on Thursday that it had uncovered "a global phishing campaign" focused on organizations associated with the COVID-19 vaccine "cold chain" - the process needed to keep vaccine doses at extremely cold temperatures as they travel from manufacturers to people's arms. The U.S. Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency reposted the report, warning members of Operation Warp Speed - the U.S. government's national vaccine mission - to be on the lookout. Understanding how to build a secure cold chain is fundamental to distributing vaccines developed by the likes of Pfizer Inc and BioNTech SE because the shots need to be stored at minus 70 degrees Celsius (-94 F) or below to avoid spoiling. IBM's cybersecurity unit said it had detected an advanced group of hackers working...
    (Reuters) - Beijing's Xinfadi market, which was linked to a coronavirus outbreak in June, has suspended sales and storage of cold-chain and aquatic products, state-backed Beijing News reported. Several infections in recent months in Qingdao and Tianjin cities involved handlers of imported frozen food. Refrigerated meat, seafood and frozen products in the market were disposed, and the market has disinfected over a hundred cold storages and shut down their power, Beijing News reported on Wednesday. Workers in a particular environment who repeatedly come into contact with cold-chain products polluted by the coronavirus might be infected without proper protection, a Chinese official said earlier on Wednesday. However, officials cautioned that the risk to consumers of catching the virus from cold chain food products was "very low". China has ramped up testing of frozen foods after saying it has repeatedly discovered the coronavirus on imported products and their packaging, triggering mass scale testing of food and related personnel, suspension of certain imports and disruptions to trade flows. (Reporting by Colin Qian, Roxanne Liu and Gabriel Crossley; Editing by Toby Chopra and Michael...
    Some are bigger than the fridge in your kitchen. Others are as small as the cooler you lug to the beach. They’re way colder than the Arctic, in extremely high demand and absolutely essential for getting the first wave of some coronavirus vaccines — “the proverbial light at the end of this very long, dark tunnel,” as Gov. Gavin Newsom said — from the manufacturer into the bodies of those who need protection. Most of these specialized freezers cost $7,000 to $15,000 each, with the most imposing models topping out at $26,000 — and California governments and health care providers are snapping them up as they lay the complex groundwork for a massive COVID-19 vaccination campaign that, they hope, marks the beginning of the pandemic’s end. “We’re seeing a very significant surge in orders — a 50 percent increase over January — with very significant backlogs that we’re trying to address,” said Dusty Tenney, CEO of Stirling Ultracold in Ohio, which makes freezers that can keep Pfizer’s vaccine at minus-80 degrees Celsius, an unusually cold temperature for a vaccine, and...
    (CNN)Vaccines like to be kept cool, none more so than the Pfizer candidate for Covid-19, which has to be deep-frozen. And that's going to be an issue for developing countries -- and for rural areas in the developed world. The "cold chain" is just one of the challenges in distributing vaccines worldwide.There are plenty of others: decisions about priority populations and databases to keep track of who's received what vaccine, where and when. Additionally, different vaccines may have more or less efficacy with different population groups; and governments will need PR campaigns to persuade people that vaccines are safe.But the logistics of transporting and storing vaccines -- getting them from the factory gate to the patient's arm -- are critical. And as most vaccines are likely to require two doses, the whole chain needs must be repeated within weeks.Unique challengesRead MoreThe Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine needs to be kept at around -70 degrees Celsius (-94 degrees Fahrenheit) while it's transported. That's 50 degrees Celsius colder than any other vaccine currently used.Moderna says its vaccine can be kept in freezers typically available in...
    GENEVA, Nov 10 (.) – The head of the World Health Organization (WHO) said on Tuesday that they hope to have a vaccine against COVID-19 by the end of the year and that the experimental Pfizer remedy is “very promising”, although more are expected. But the vaccine, based on a novel technology that uses synthetic mRNA to activate the immune system against the virus, presents special challenges, as it must be stored at minus 70 degrees Celsius or even lower, which is equivalent to an Antarctic winter. The director general of the WHO, Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, reiterated the call of the United Nations agency for an equitable distribution of vaccine doses once they are available. Pfizer said Monday that its COVID-19 vaccine was more than 90% effective in revealing successful interim data from a large-scale clinical trial. Safety data for your BioNTech SE vaccine could be released this month. “As we have been predicting, we will have a vaccine by the end of this year. And Pfizer’s is very promising,” Tedros told the WHO annual ministerial...
    By Rocky Swift, Sangmi Cha and Neil Jerome Morales TOKYO/SEOUL/MANILA (Reuters) - With tropical heat, remote island communities and a dearth of ultra-cold freezers, many Asian countries aren't betting on Pfizer's experimental vaccine solving their COVID-19 crisis any time soon. The world cheered on Monday when Pfizer Inc announced its shot, jointly developed with BioNTech SE, was more than 90% effective based on initial trial results. Yet health experts cautioned that the vaccine, should it be approved, was no silver bullet - not least because the genetic material it's made from needs to be stored at temperatures of minus 70 degrees Celsius (-94 F) or below. Such requirements pose a particularly daunting challenge for countries in Asia, as well as in places like Africa and Latin America, where intense heat is often compounded by poor infrastructure that will make it difficult to keep the "cold chain" intact during deliveries to rural areas and islands. That is a problem for everyone in the world, given the World Health Organization estimates about 70% of people must be inoculated to end the pandemic,...
    How long will it take to protect the entire world from the coronavirus? Only now is it becoming clear that, in the best-case scenario, it will take at least 18 months, beginning early in 2021, for vaccines to reach every part of the world where they are urgently needed. One measure of the magnitude of the task is that to deliver a single dose of vaccine to the world population of 7.8 billion people would take the equivalent of 8,000 flights by the world’s largest cargo airplane, the Boeing 747. The whole program depends on whether there will be enough airplanes to deliver the vaccine doses—and whether the will and means exist to build a global network able to meet the exacting standards required to keep vials of vaccine at critical temperatures, from when they leave the manufacturer to when they finally reach the places where they will be administered, no matter how far and remote. This infrastructure involves special handling via dedicated warehouses, moving through airports where customs and border controls, a frequent choke point, must allow...
    SACRAMENTO (CBS13) – The National Weather Service issued on Sunday a Frost Advisory for the Sacramento Valley and northern San Joaquin Valley lasting overnight through Monday morning. The NWS Sacramento said the freezing temperatures in the areas will reach as low as the high 20s to low 30s The advisory comes as a result of a cold front that has moved into Northern California over the weekend. The winter-like weather has produced the first major snowfall in the Sierra and briefly caused chain controls on Interstate 80, Highway 50 and other highways between the Sacramento Valley and Truckee areas. Caltrans said at 6:10 p.m. on Sunday that chain controls were in place from Twin Bridges to Meyers. Chain control conditions changed consistently on Sunday. The exact timeframe for the Frost Advisory is 3 a.m. to 9 a.m. on Monday, Nov. 9. The freeze warning stretches from up north in Redding down south through Merced.
    GAMPELA, Burkina Faso – From factory to syringe, the world’s most promising coronavirus vaccine candidates need nonstop sterile refrigeration to work. But despite great strides in equipping developing countries to maintain the vaccine “cold chain,” nearly 3 billion of the world's 7.8 billion people live in places with insufficient temperature-controlled storage for an immunization campaign to bring COVID-19 under control. CORONAVIRUS CASES SURGE PAST 40 MILLION INFECTIONS WORLDWIDE The result: Poor people around the world are likely to be the last to emerge from the pandemic. The cold chain hurdle is just the latest disparity of the pandemic weighted against the poor, who more often live and work in conditions that allow the virus to spread and whose health systems are not equipped for large-scale testing. Maintaining the cold chain for coronavirus vaccines won’t be easy in the richest of countries, especially when it comes to the handful of candidates that require ultracold temperatures of around minus 70 degrees Celsius (minus 94 F). Logistics experts say most of Africa and much of Southeast Asia, Central Asia and Latin America lack the infrastructure to preserve even more conventional vaccines....
    GAMPELA – The chain breaks here, in a tiny medical clinic in Burkina Faso that went nearly a year without a working refrigerator. From factory to syringe, the world’s most promising coronavirus vaccine candidates need non-stop sterile refrigeration to stay potent and safe. But despite enormous strides in equipping developing countries to maintain the vaccine “cold chain,” nearly 3 billion of the world’s 7.8 billion people live where temperature-controlled storage is insufficient for an immunization campaign to bring COVID-19 under control. The result: Poor people around the world who were among the hardest hit by the virus pandemic are also likely to be the last to recover from it. The vaccine cold chain hurdle is just the latest disparity of the pandemic weighted against the poor, who more often live and work in crowded conditions that allow the virus to spread, have little access to medical oxygen that is vital to COVID-19 treatment, and whose health systems lack labs, supplies or technicians to carry out large-scale testing. Maintaining the cold chain for coronavirus vaccines won’t be easy...
    GAMPELA, Burkina Faso (AP) — From factory to syringe, the world’s most promising coronavirus vaccine candidates need nonstop sterile refrigeration to work. But despite great strides in equipping developing countries to maintain the vaccine “cold chain,” nearly 3 billion of the world’s 7.8 billion people live in places with insufficient temperature-controlled storage for an immunization campaign to bring COVID-19 under control. The result: Poor people around the world are likely to be the last to emerge from the pandemic. The cold chain hurdle is just the latest disparity of the pandemic weighted against the poor, who more often live and work in conditions that allow the virus to spread and whose health systems are not equipped for large-scale testing. Maintaining the cold chain for coronavirus vaccines won’t be easy in the richest of countries, especially when it comes to the handful of candidates that require ultracold temperatures of around minus 70 degrees Celsius (minus 94 F). Logistics experts say most of Africa and much of Southeast Asia, Central Asia and Latin America lack the infrastructure to preserve even...
    By LORI HINNANT and SAM MEDNICK, Associated Press GAMPELA, Burkina Faso (AP) — The chain breaks here, in a tiny medical clinic in Burkina Faso that went nearly a year without a working refrigerator. From factory to syringe, the world’s most promising coronavirus vaccine candidates need non-stop sterile refrigeration to stay potent and safe. But despite enormous strides in equipping developing countries to maintain the vaccine “cold chain,” nearly 3 billion of the world’s 7.8 billion people live where temperature-controlled storage is insufficient for an immunization campaign to bring COVID-19 under control. The result: Poor people around the world who were among the hardest hit by the virus pandemic are also likely to be the last to recover from it. The vaccine cold chain hurdle is just the latest disparity of the pandemic weighted against the poor, who more often live and work in crowded conditions that allow the virus to spread, have little access to medical oxygen that is vital to COVID-19 treatment, and whose health systems lack labs, supplies or technicians to carry out large-scale testing. Maintaining the...
    Photo Illustration by The Daily Beast / Photos Getty How long will it take to protect the entire world from the coronavirus? Only now is it becoming clear that, in the best-case scenario, it will take at least 18 months, beginning early in 2021, for vaccines to reach every part of the world where they are urgently needed. One measure of the magnitude of the task is that to deliver a single dose of vaccine to the world population of 7.8 billion people would take the equivalent of 8,000 flights by the world’s largest cargo airplane, the Boeing 747. The whole program depends on whether there will be enough airplanes to deliver the vaccine doses—and whether the will and means exist to build a global network able to meet the exacting standards required to keep vials of vaccine at critical temperatures, from when they leave the manufacturer to when they finally reach the places where they will be administered, no matter how far and remote. The Big COVID Vaccine Challenge Is Keeping Them Super-Cold This infrastructure involves special handling...
    By Anna Nagurney, The Conversation Just like a fresh piece of fish, vaccines are highly perishable products and must be kept at very cold, specific temperatures. The majority of COVID-19 vaccines under development—like the Moderna and Pfizer vaccines—are new RNA-based vaccines. If they get too warm or too cold they spoil. And, just like fish, a spoiled vaccine must be thrown away. So how do companies and public health agencies get vaccines to the people who need them? The answer is something called the vaccine cold chain: a supply chain that can keep vaccines in tightly controlled temperatures from the moment they are made to the moment that they are administered to a person. Ultimately, hundreds of millions of people in the U.S. and billions globally are going to need a coronavirus vaccine—and potentially two doses of it. This mass vaccination effort is going to require a complex vaccine cold chain on a scale like never before. The current vaccine cold chain is not up to the task, and expanding the supply chain is not going to be easy. Most...
    In terms of revenue, the global Cold Chain market was valued at US$ 207,510. 8 million in 2019 and is projected to reach US$ 398,723. 4 million by 2027 and is expected to grow at a CAGR of 10. 8% during the forecast period. New York, Sept. 15, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Reportlinker.com announces the release of the report “Cold Chain Market Forecast to 2027 – COVID-19 Impact and Global Analysis by Offering ; Temperature ; Industry Vertical,” – https://www.reportlinker.com/p05967878/?utm_source=GNW At present, with a rapid modernization, there is increase in purchase of perishable food items from marts and retail stores.However, the increasing demand for perishable food needs a sophisticated management of the supply chain. The attrition rate of perishable food can reach 15% in retail stores, which results in the loss of billions of dollars.Thus, with the rise of demand for perishable goods, the market for cold chain is also set to increase, in order to prevent food from spoilage. With the development of modern identification and sensory technologies, such as temperature and humidity sensors and RFID technology, it...
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