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state laws on abortion:

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    "Want to know why some people are moving to Florida? Because their communities are no longer safe, thanks to prosecutors that think they know better than the people's representatives, and they get to pick and choose which laws that they're enforcing," the Republican governor of Florida said. “State attorneys have a duty to prosecute crimes as defined in Florida law, not to pick and choose which laws to enforce based on his personal agenda,” DeSantis declared. “It is my duty to hold Florida’s elected officials to the highest standards for the people of Florida." "We believe this is a law-and-order state; we are not going to back down," DeSantis proclaimed. DeSantis claimed that money from outside Florida is "really trying to push an agenda" in the state. "I don't think the people of Hillsborough County want to have an agenda that is basically woke, where you're deciding that your view of social justice means that certain laws should be enforced," the governor said. DeSantis referred to how progressive, George Soros-backed San Francisco District Attorney Chesa Boudin was...
    Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis on Thursday announced he’s suspended Hillsborough County State Attorney Andrew Warren for refusing to enforce some of the state’s laws—including the recent 15-week abortion ban. In a news conference in front of Hillsborough County Sheriff’s Office deputies, the Republican governor said Warren has “put himself publicly above the law” by stating he will not enforce some of Florida’s most controversial laws. “State Attorneys have a duty to prosecute crimes as defined in Florida law, not to pick and choose which laws to enforce based on his personal agenda,” DeSantis said on Thursday. “It is my duty to hold Florida's elected officials to the highest standards for the people of Florida. I have the utmost trust that Judge Susan Lopez will lead the office through this transition and faithfully uphold the rule of law.”
    CVS Health is asking pharmacists in some states to verify that a few of the prescriptions they provide will not be used end a pregnancy. A spokesman said Thursday that the drugstore chain recently started doing this for methotrexate and misoprostol, two drugs used in medication abortions but also to treat other conditions. Spokesman Mike DeAngelis said the policy started the first week in July in Alabama, Arkansas, Idaho, Oklahoma, and Texas. The drugstore chain’s request comes after the U.S. Supreme Court last month overturned Roe v. Wade, the 1973 decision that had provided a constitutional right to abortion. The ruling is expected to lead to abortion bans in roughly half the states. DeAngelis said state laws that restrict the dispensing of medications used for abortions have forced the company to start the validations. He noted that some of the laws come with criminal penalties. The drugstore chain, which is based in Woonsocket, Rhode Island, is asking care providers to help by including their diagnosis on the prescriptions. DeAngelis said CVS Health will still fill prescriptions...
    Majorities of young men and women say state abortion laws will at least “somewhat” impact where they choose to live and that such laws could impact their sexual behavior as well, a new Generation Lab/Axios poll found.  More than 60 percent of women between 18-29 years old and roughly 50 percent of men in that age group said how states handle abortion would at least “somewhat” affect where they choose to live. Combined, 58 percent of men and women said state abortion laws would impact where they live “somewhat” or “a lot.”  Unsurprisingly, Democrats (67 percent) were more likely than Republicans (36 percent) to say state abortion laws would impact where they choose to live.   “The fact that people are going to change where they live based on something like this tells you how important they think it is,” Generation Lab’s Cyrus Beschloss told Axios.  Women, if you are having a tough time with the #sexStrike and #abstinence just picture Mitch McConnel naked. pic.twitter.com/S5TcyK0axO — AJ (@HopeOverFear99) June 24, 2022 The potential for some states to outlaw or restrict abortion...
    Now that the Supreme Court has removed the right to obtain an abortion and handed the control of wombs over to state politicians, conservatives are moving onto the next step: How can they compel forced birth if there’s even one blue state out there still making abortion available? The answer they’ve found is based on the Texas law paying bounties for anyone who has “aided and abetted” obtaining an abortion.  That Texas bounty law was specifically upheld by the Supreme Court in a ruling last December. That included the court greenlighting the bounty scheme; one where anyone, absolutely anyone, is empowered to accuse their relative, neighbor, or a complete stranger of assisting in obtaining an abortion. It “deputizes” everyone with the power to sue and it provides a big payday, allowing them to collect a cash judgement of $10,000, plus all legal costs, from those they sue. And if they happen to lose, or if it turns out the person accused had nothing at all to do with providing an abortion for anyone, the vigilante deputy who lodged the suit in the first place...
    SACRAMENTO —  A proposal that cleared the California Assembly on Monday seeks to guard against so-called fetal heartbeat laws and abortion restrictions imposed by other states amid uncertainty over the landmark ruling in Roe vs. Wade. The bill reinforces California’s pro-abortion rights status as federal protections are in jeopardy and after Texas and almost a dozen other states have passed laws to ban the procedure as early as the sixth week of pregnancy. Texas law allows civil lawsuits to be filed against abortion providers or anyone who otherwise “aids or abets” a person receiving an abortion after a heartbeat has been detected — a hard-to-define timeline that significantly limits abortion access. California Newsom, lawmakers want California Constitution to explicitly protect abortion rights California’s Constitution includes broad rights of privacy but has no explicit protection for abortion services. Abortion rights supporters worry that California-based providers could be subject to lawsuits filed in other states. Assembly Bill 1666 would prohibit California courts from taking up any cases based on out-of-state laws, which a bill analysis called “a unique and menacing approach...
    Minimum wage increases, animal protections, police accountability, cutting and increasing taxes are all part of a series of new laws taking effect across the country on Saturday, the first day of 2022. Some of the laws such as abortion restrictions in New Hampshire or police reform measures passed in Illinois, Oregon and North Carolina address some of the most contentious issues of our time. Others, such as a Maine law passed in the aftermath of a September 2019 explosion that killed a firefighter and injured a number of others, are more narrowly focused and were passed to remedy specific situations. The Connecticut Parentage Act allows unmarried, same-sex or nonbiological parents to establish parenting rights through a simple form that gives parents legal capabilities immediately after a child is born. In Kansas, people will be allowed to buy specialized license plates featuring the “Don’t Tread on Me” and coiled snake symbol featured on what’s known as the Gadsen flag. Critics suggested that the Gadsen flag has become a racist symbol that has been adopted by some far-right groups. Here...
    (CNN)At stake in the Mississippi abortion case heard by the Supreme Court December 1 is access to the procedure for millions of people across the country. As Justice Brett Kavanaugh made clear at Wednesday's hearing, the justices are not considering whether to outlaw abortion nationwide. But a decision that overturns current Supreme Court precedent on abortion rights -- and one that specifically reverses the landmark 1973 Roe v. Wade opinion -- could lead to bans on abortions being implemented in several states across the country. Takeaways from the historic Supreme Court arguments on abortion rightsSuch a scenario would further cement an environment where a person's access to the procedure depended on the state she lived in, as state legislatures and state courts would get to decide how much abortion should be restricted. RELATED: John Roberts has a plan that would gut -- yet save -- Roe v. Wade. Can it work?A dozen states already have on the books so-called "trigger" laws, where bans on abortion would be put into force by a Supreme Court decision reversing Roe. Where legislators are...
    Americans have started factoring a state's political ideology into their decision to move as the nation grows increasingly polarized. A survey from Redfin, a real-estate brokerage firm based in Seattle, predicted more people would vote with their feet in 2022, moving to states that align with their political beliefs about abortion, civil rights, mask mandates and critical race theory.  'Now that workers have more control over where they live, more people will seek out areas where there are like minded people with laws that fit their political beliefs,' wrote Daryl Fairweather, chief economist for Redfin.  'We will also see more blue enclaves grow within red areas and vice versa, as parents select school districts that align with their preferences regarding mask mandates, critical race theory and other controversial issues.'  A Redfin survey found about 25 per cent of its Los Angeles users preferred to stay in a blue state while nearly 10 per cent have chosen to go red in the third quarter of 2021 More and more people are moving to states that have abortion laws that fit their...
    This story was first published at The Progressive. For supporters of abortion rights, the stakes could not be higher than they are this term at U.S. Supreme Court. With conservatives holding a 6-3 advantage on the bench, Roe v. Wade is on the chopping block. Should Roe fall, abortion will lose its status as a federally protected Constitutional right. Even worse, abortion could become a crime, as it was in nearly every state before Roe was decided in 1973. It's even possible—if Republicans capture the House, the Senate, and the presidency in 2024—that abortion could become a federal felony. Pregnant people, doctors, nurses, and other "aiders and abettors" could be prosecuted and go to jail for conduct that has been perfectly legal for the last four decades. This is not hyperbolic. The Supreme Court is considering three high-profile abortion cases this session that pose existential threats to Roe. Two of the cases—United States v. Texas and Whole Woman's Health v. Jackson—are from Texas and were argued on November 1. The other, Mississippi's Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health...
    Caitlyn Jenner on Tuesday said she supports Texas's new abortion law, saying that while she supports "a woman's right to chose," she also supports Texas. Jenner, who is running for governor of California in a recall election that will bring voters to the polls next week, said she did not anticipate a change to her state's law. "I am for a woman's right to choose. I am also for a state having the ability to make their own laws," Jenner said during an appearance on CNN's "New Day." "So I support Texas in that decision, that's their decision," Jenner said. "But as far as being a woman's right to choose, I don't see any changes in our laws in California in the future." California gubernatorial recall candidate Caitlyn Jenner (R) on Texas law effectively banning abortions:"I am for a woman's right to choose. I am also for a state having the ability to make their own laws. So I support Texas in that decision, that's their decision." pic.twitter.com/CpK3TwQJbZ— The Recount (@therecount) September 7, 2021 Texas's law would essentially outlaw abortions...
    (CNN)As more Republican-led states pass abortion bans with the easing of the Covid-19 pandemic, a heated debate has returned to center stage with abortion rights supporters warning of a looming threat to access and anti-abortion activists determined to keep up the momentum.But one key person has been noticeably quiet on the issue: President Joe Biden. Irked advocates want the President to make more noise, but historians tell CNN that he's facing a unique moment at the intersection of history and day-to-day politics that helps explain the relative silence from 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue. It may cause consternation within his party, but the Democratic President is likely to stay mum on the new laws unless he's forced to take a stand because of a potentially momentous decision out of a staunchly conservative Supreme Court that has expressed an interest in addressing abortion rights. Despite expressing vocal support for reproductive rights on the 2020 campaign trail and making a series of federal policy changes advancing abortion access in his first few months in office, Biden has stayed notably quiet on the state-level bills...
    INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — An Indianapolis abortion clinic is suing the state of Indiana, challenging provisions of a state law upheld last year by the U.S. Supreme Court requiring fetal remains to be buried or cremated after an abortion. The federal lawsuit, filed Monday, contends that requirement and other Indiana statues requiring the same disposition method for fetal remains following a miscarriage violate the Constitution because they force the state’s definition of a person onto women who might not share the same beliefs. The suit was filed in U.S. District Court in Indianapolis on behalf of the Women’s Med Group abortion clinic in Indianapolis, its owner, two nurse practitioners who work at the clinic and three women listed only as Jane Does, The Indianapolis Star reported. The complaint states that Indiana’s “Tissue Disposition Laws coerce pregnant people who obtain abortion and miscarriage management care to engage in rituals that are associated with the death of a person.” “These laws also send the unmistakable message that someone who has had an abortion or miscarriage is responsible for the death of a person,”...
    By DAVID A. LIEB, Associated Press A nationwide push to relax drug laws took a significant step forward Tuesday as more states legalized marijuana for adults and voters made Oregon the first state to decriminalize the possession of small amounts of street drugs such as cocaine, heroin and methamphetamine. The drug measures were among 120 proposed state laws and constitutional amendments that were on the ballot in 32 states. They touched on an array of issues that have roiled politics in recent years — voting rights, racial inequalities, abortion, taxes and education, to name a few. But none directly dealt with the dominant theme of 2020 — the coronavirus pandemic. That’s because the process to put measures on the ballot began, in most cases, before the virus surged to the forefront. The Oregon drug initiative will allow people arrested with small amounts of hard drugs to avoid going to trial, and possible jail time, by paying a $100 fine and attending an addiction recovery program. The treatment centers will be funded by revenues from legalized marijuana, which was approved in...
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