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    Thunderstorms on Friday brought a renewed threat of flooding to parts of Kentucky ravaged by high water a week ago. The National Weather Service issued a flood watch through Sunday evening for nearly the entire state. As residents continued cleaning up from the late July floods that killed at least 37 people, rain started falling on already saturated ground in eastern Kentucky late Friday morning. Some places could receive up to 3 inches of rain by Friday night, and the storm system wasn’t expected to let up until at least Saturday evening, the weather service said. Due to unsafe travel conditions, Gov. Andy Beshear canceled visits to two flood-ravaged counties Friday. Last week’s storm in eastern Kentucky sent floodwaters as high as rooftops. In the days afterward, more than 1,300 people were rescued as teams searched in boats and combed debris-clogged creekbanks. Many residents are still waiting for their utilities to be restored. About 3,000 Kentucky customers remained without electricity on Friday. Some entire water systems were severed or heavily damaged, prompting a significant response from the National Guard and...
    (CBS DETROIT) – The Michigan Department of Health and Human Services and the Environment, Great Lakes, and Energy are urging residents in Monroe, Oakland, Livingston, Wayne, and Washtenaw counties to avoid the Huron River after a chemical spill. Officials say that hexavalent chromium was released from Tribar Manufacturing in Wixom, to the Wixom Sewage Treatment Facility, which discharges to the Huron River system. READ MORE: Michigan Reports 55 Monkeypox CasesAccording to officials, hexavalent chromium is a carcinogen that could cause a variety of negative health effects in people, through ingestion, skin contact, on inhalation. On Monday, at about 3:21 p.m., Tribar notified EGLE that it had released several thousand gallons of a liquid containing 5% hexavalent chromium into the sewer system. Although officials at Tribar said they discovered the chemical release on Monday, they believe that it could’ve started spilling into the water system on Saturday morning. Due to the spill, the MDHHS is recommending that all people and pets avoid contact with the Huron River between North Wixom Road in Oakland County and Kensington Road in Livingston County. This...
    Nearly 1 million residents in California are living with contaminated drinking water that is considered unsafe for consumption and harmful to human health. Source: KCRA News/Youtube The California state auditor, Michael S. Tilden, issued a report addressing the state’s officials, including Governor Newsom. The report identified over 370 failing water systems across the state that exceed the maximum contaminant levels and provide water to 920,000 people. The report also states that two-thirds of the failing water systems are in disadvantaged communities. The audit found that 150 of the systems have been failing for at least five years and hundreds of others are at the risk of failing. If any water system exceeds maximum contaminant levels (MCLs), California’s State Water Resources Control Board is required to notify consumers with an explanation of the contaminant and its potential health effects. They must also state the steps being taken to correct the violation and where alternative water supplies should be used. The report found that 70 public water systems in the state exceed the contaminant levels for arsenic, which can cause...
    LOWER MORELAND TOWNSHIP, Pa. (CBS) — Water woes in parts of Bucks and Montgomery Counties. Residents are complaining their water smells musty and doesn’t taste very good. It turns out the problem has been linked to an algal bloom in the Neshaminy Creek. READ MORE: Sharon Hill Borough Council Releases Heavily Redacted Report On Fatal Police Shooting Of 8-Year-Old Fanta BilityTalking with neighbors out here, they say that water smells musty, earthy and literally tastes like dirt. The complaints started coming in about two weeks ago. The water is safe to drink but we’ve learned mother nature is to blame. As some people turn on the tap in Lower Moreland Township, Montgomery County, they say their water smells and tastes like dirt. “It just smells bad. We can run it and as soon as you run it for a couple minutes in our sink it starts to smell bad,” Larry Posey said. The water supplying east Montgomery County and parts of lower Bucks County comes from a reservoir fed by the Neshaminy Creek. “There must be something going on because...
    Angelenos can stock up again on gallons of recycled water to irrigate their trees, plants and lawns — and free of charge through a Los Angeles Department of Water and Power program. Mayor Eric Garcetti announced the reopening of two recycled water fill stations Thursday at the Los Angeles-Glendale Water Reclamation Plant and the L.A. Zoo parking lot. The city’s Residential Recycled Water Fill Station Program will offer up to 300 gallons of disinfected water per person per visit, the agency said. Participants can bring their own containers with water-tight lids to a water fill station. To qualify for the program, they must be an active customer with the Department of Water and Power, complete an application form and take training classes available at the sites. “As we approach the hottest days of the year, we need to help Angelenos build on recent reductions to conserve even more — and that means providing real solutions, alternatives, and incentives to cut back on their water use,” Garcetti said in a statement. Climate & Environment August is coming....
    (CNN)By just 7 a.m. Tuesday, St. Louis residents found themselves experiencing the wettest day in the city's recorded history, as roads filled with water and widespread flooding overtook cars, highways and homes -- and the day had just begun.As the hours stretched on, the rain continued to pour and floodwaters inundated the city and surrounding areas, forcing people to flee or wait for rescue crews to find them. Jessica Perez was woken by her son at about 3:30 a.m. to find her basement flooded with several inches of water, she told CNN. Video taken by Perez shows the basement blanketed by murky water, soaking the legs of furniture as Christmas ornaments and other items float about. At least 1 killed as record rainfall causes widespread flash flooding in St. Louis area The water had completely receded by 9 a.m., revealing a layer of debris and black sludge and leaving everything in the basement ruined, Perez said. "Never in my life have I experienced something like this," she said.Between midnight and 7 a.m. Tuesday, more than 8 inches of rain...
    DIXMOOR, Ill. (WLS) -- A boil water order has been lifted and water pressure has returned for most residents in south suburban Dixmoor, village officials said Saturday.The video featured is from a previous report.Two water main breaks, less than a mile apart from each other, initially impacted water pressure for about 375 people in town, but the work to repair that problem forced the village to shut off all water. Village officials said late Thursday night that the two broken water mains had been repaired and water service was been restored, but advised residents to continue to boil their water.However, people in the Modern Estates trailer park continue to be under a boil water order until further notice."Everything is working properly in the Village, but there are still some ongoing issues in the privately owned Modern Estates that still need to be resolved," Dixmoor Village President Fitzgerald Roberts Saturday.Thursday, Roberts said the village has checked the main lines delivering water to Modern Estates and no problems have been identified. He said the village will continue to work with Modern Estates...
    When it’s this hot, nothing beats a dip in a cool pool or splashing in a spray park. D.C. has them scattered throughout the city. Ten D.C. pools have extended their hours from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. through Sunday. “We also have 11 additional outdoor pools and nine indoor pools which will be open this weekend during our regular operating hours,” said Monique McSween of the D.C. Department of Parks and Recreation. “Additionally, we have 34 spray parks, just like this fun spray park here at Turkey Thicket Recreation Center, which our kids just love and enjoy,” she said. A full list of DPR pools and spray parks is on the city’s website. Don’t be tempted to fool with fire hydrants: D.C. Fire and EMS Sgt. Holly O’Byrne said that can damage equipment and compromise the water supply if it’s ever needed to battle a blaze. “Pressure from the hydrant can cause very, very serious bodily injury,” O’Byrne said. “We don’t want anyone to get hurt because of improper usage.” D.C. outreach workers will be conducting wellness checks and...
    (CBS DETROIT) – The Michigan Department of Health and Human Services announced that more than 20,000 pounds of empty water bottles have been recycled through a program offered while water is distributed. Volunteers distribute bottled water to residents at the Abundant Life Church of God in Benton Harbor, Michigan, U.S., on Tuesday, Oct. 19, 2021. Governor Gretchen Whitmer ordered a whole-of-government response to elevated levels of lead in tap water in the southwestern Michigan city of Benton Harbor and vowed to accelerate the replacement of its lead pipes, reported the Associated Press. Photographer: Matthew Hatcher/Bloomberg via Getty Images READ MORE: Michigan Gov. Whitmer Urges FDA To Remove Barriers To Medication AbortionOfficials say more than 16 million water bottles have been distributed to Benton Harbor residents since September 2021. Nine trailers filled with empty water bottles have been processed, and according to officials a tenth trailer is currently accepting empty water bottles. READ MORE: Michigan Zoo Welcomes Binturong BabiesFree water bottles have been given to residents to use for cooking, drinking, brushing teeth, rinsing foods and mixing powdered infant...
    CAMDEN, N.J. (CBS) — The city of Camden is trying to help residents stay cool and healthy in this dangerous heat. The Camden County Health Officer has issued a heat advisory for the region effective Wednesday, July 20 through Sunday, July 24 from 12 p.m. to 7 p.m. on each day. During a heat advisory, the combination of hot temperatures and high humidity will combine to create a situation in which heat illnesses are possible. READ MORE: Sixers Announce Plans To Explore Building New Arena In Center City“As much of the world is experiencing right now, temperatures are expected to rise dramatically this week,” County Commissioner Virginia Betteridge said in a release. “When temperatures rise to dangerous levels, remember to stay inside as much as possible, drink plenty of water, and contact a physician if you or a loved one is showing signs of heat stress. It is important that residents continue to check on vulnerable friends, family and neighbors to ensure that they are safe and able to stay cool.” The latest weather forecast obtained by the health department...
    DIXMOOR, Ill. (WLS) -- South suburban Dixmoor has a state of emergency because of low water pressure.People in the Modern Estates trailer park are under a boil water order until further notice."The only area with low pressure is the trailer park at this point," Dixmoor Village President Fitzgerald Roberts said. "We have been in contact with the IEPA and others to find the problem and resolve it. The residents in Modern Estates are under a boil water order until further notice."RELATED: Village of Dixmoor receives $2M to help solve water issuesRoberts said the village has checked the main lines delivering water to Modern Estates and no problems have been identified. He said the village will continue to work with Modern Estates to help find the source of the problem.Food and water are available at Village Hall, located at 170 W. 145th St. in Dixmoor. The number to reach Village Hall is 708-389-6121.Dixmoor has been working to fix water supply issues for the past several years.
    LOS ANGELES (KABC) -- Los Angeles residents apparently have no patience for water-wasters during the current drought.During the first six months of the year, the city's MyLA311 system received 1,643 reports about water waste or people violating irrigation rules, more than double the number from the first half of last year, according to data released today by a nonprofit news organization.Data compiled by Crosstown at USC, a nonprofit news organization based at the USC Annenberg School of Communication and Journalism, showed that 589 reports of water waste or other violations were made to the MyLA311 system in June alone, up from 314 in May.Prior to March, the system had never received more than 200 water-waste complaints in a single month, according to Crosstown. During the first six months of 2021, only 752 such reports were made to the system, which is accessible online or by calling 311.The Department of Water and Power's separate online portal for customers to file complaints has also seen a spike, receiving 672 such complaints between June 1 and June 14 -- 14% more than the...
    PHILADELPHIA (CBS) — Residents are preparing as dangerous heat heads for the Philadelphia region this week. The Philadelphia Health Department issued a heat caution alert for Tuesday from 12 p.m. to 8 p.m. “I hate summer running,” one woman said. READ MORE: Investigators Solve 1975 Cold Case With DNA From Coffee Cup Collected At Philadelphia International Airport It’s rise and grind if you want to work out in this weather. Runners like Stacey started early Tuesday morning to beat the heat — well aware of the heatwave coming our way. “I knew that tomorrow is going to be even hotter than today, and I had speed work to do. So I might as well do it Tuesday when it’s cooler, so I’m not killing myself out here even more than I should,” Stacey said. Others had the same idea but opted for an activity that’s a little more laidback. “It’s gonna be hot,” Cordero Shorter, a scooter rider, said. “It’s gonna be like 95 and above all week. So I was trying to get down here early, so it’s much cooler...
    Pittsburg water customers will soon see a 5% increase in their water rates for each of the next five years as a result of council action this week. Paul Rodriguez, city finance director, cited increases in the cost of energy and raw water, and the need to make capital improvements – at a $76.5 million price tag – in the water treatment plant as reasons for the increases. Both commercial and residential customers will be affected, but seniors will pay less, seeing only a 2% increase each year. “It’s very important to have safe water,” Rodriguez said. “As we all know, providing safe water comes with a cost, and in the simplest of terms, as we all know, the cost of providing everything lately has gone up, including the cost of operating and maintenance costs, the cost of capital improvement projects.” The increase in monthly bills will amount to about $4 for an average customer using about 250 gallons a day, going from $74 to $78. But, because water rates are structured in tiers, those who use more than 295...
    ONCE a seaside destination, a celebrated place of culture and a beacon of healthcare, the Ukrainian city of Mariupol has now been thrown back into the Middle Ages.  As you walk through the devastated city, bodies and pieces of bodies are still strewn on the ground, amongst debris and putrid stagnant water pools. 16Horrifying pictures show the devastation in Mariupol - where 90 per cent of the city has been damaged or destroyedCredit: AFP 16Human remains were discovered in this courtyardCredit: Super Marik 16Mariupol residents wash their clothes in stagnant water on the streetCredit: Sun exclusive Queues of Mariupol residents wait in the scorching sun to collect water in plastic buckets, bulldozers try to clear devastated buildings, while the injured and the ill make their way to the hospital, where there is no help to be received.  Some residents are forced to drink sewage as there is little to no clean water, and bodies are now often left to rot in piles of rubbish rather than being buried in graves. And there is chronic lack of medicines, with doctors...
    LOS ANGELES (CNS) -- Recent water usage restrictions placed upon Los Angeles residents in hopes of combating a historic drought appear to be working, the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power announced Wednesday.Last month saw the all-time lowest water use for any month of June on record in the city of Los Angeles, with usage dropping by 9% compared to last June, according to the DWP.Mayor Eric Garcetti praised residents in a statement, noting that "it's clear that Angelenos have heeded our call.''The restrictions went into effect June 1. They included restricting outdoor watering to two days per week, down from the three, with watering permitted at odd-numbered street addresses on Mondays and Fridays, and at even-numbered addresses on Thursdays and Sundays.
    SACRAMENTO (CBS13) — As California’s drought worsens, local water agencies have been given level two regulations with the intention of cutting water usage by twenty percent. Residents are answering the call but it still may not be enough as Gov. Gavin Newsom mulls the idea of a statewide mandate. “It is what it is,” says West Sacramento resident Erica Souvannarth. READ MORE: Nearly $5M Worth Of Marijuana Seized From Illegal Grow Sites In Calaveras CountyThe lifelong Californian has curbed her water usage substantially but wonders if she and her neighbors are doing enough. Local agencies like the Sacramento County Water Agency (SCWA) have been trying to help people be proactive and ready for what could come later this summer. “We have to just make sure that people are prepared and we have been preparing them for the last couple of years and the public has responded,” said Matt Robinson, a spokesperson for the SCWA. Currently, the state has taken a localized approach hoping agencies can work with their constituents to reduce usage. READ MORE: 'He Was All About His Kids':...
    Despite California’s worsening drought, and Gov. Gavin Newsom warning six weeks ago that major water agencies need to do more to cut water use or face mandatory statewide restrictions, Californians are still missing conservation targets by a large margin, new numbers released Friday show. Last July, Newsom declared a drought emergency and asked Californian residents to voluntarily cut urban water use by 15% compared to 2020 levels. But in May, the most recent month for which data is available, residents reduced use just 3.1% statewide compared to May 2020. And cumulatively since Newsom declared the drought emergency, from last July through May, residents, businesses and government agencies reduced water use statewide by only 2% compared to the same period in 2020, according to the State Water Resources Control Board. Is a crackdown coming, with mandatory conservation targets for each city, as former Gov. Jerry Brown imposed during California’s last drought? Newsom’s office wasn’t saying on Friday. “While this is a positive trend in response to the governor’s latest actions and local measures that took effect on June 10,” said Newsom...
    MOUNTAIN VIEW — As California continues to deal with a worsening drought after three long years of dry conditions, Mountain View has become the latest city to approve new water restrictions for residents. At its Tuesday meeting, the Mountain View city council declared a water shortage emergency to restrict the wasting of water by residents and assigned specific irrigation days based on street address. Mountain View’s latest measures to curb water wasters come a month after Santa Clara County announced residents could face fines of up to $500 — and in extreme cases, $10,000 — for wasting water under new drought rules which are among the toughest of any urban area in California. Citing the worsening drought, dwindling local water supplies and residents’ failure to hit conservation targets, the board of the Santa Clara Valley Water District, a government agency based in San Jose that serves as the wholesale water provider to 2 million residents, voted unanimously to set up an enforcement program to warn, and then fine, property owners who are violating outdoor watering rules. Under a water shortage emergency,...
    MALIBU, Calif. (KABC) -- The city of Malibu is asking its residents to cut back their water usage by at least 30%.Like the rest of Southern California, the city of 10,000 residents is dealing with drought conditions."Southern California is in deep trouble," said Malibu Mayor Paul Grisanti. "Our sources of water have been shut off entirely or greatly restricted. The Colorado River water is no longer a factor for us. We all got to pull together on this so that we can survive until the next rainy season. We hope we actually have a rainy season this winter."On Wednesday, the Los Angeles City Council voted to have the department of water and power to come up with plans on how to deal with the water crisis facing the city."We need a new normal of policy making to meet the new normal of the water crisis that we're facing right now," said City Councilman Paul Krekorian.Southern California water districts have told us most of our water usage, as much as 70%, is for outdoor watering.Malibu is recycling water it uses for...
    CHICAGO (WLS) -- ABC7 Eyewitness News has compiled a list of open Chicago-area water parks and public swimming pools, including daily admission rates, dates and hours of operation for the summer 2022 season.May not include all municipalities. To add yours - Contact Us.COOK COUNTYArlington Heights Park District PoolsVarious locations and hours and admission rulesArlington Heights, IL 60005Burbank Park District Water ParkOpen from May 28 to Aug. 28Regular hours: Monday-Friday noon to 7 p.m., Saturday Sunday 11:30 a.m. to 7:30 p.m.Admission: $7 (ages 2 and under) $9 (ages 60+) or $12 for residents, $9 (ages 2 and under) $12 (ages 60+) or $16 for non-residents6100 W 85th St.Burbank, IL 60459Burr Ridge: Woods PoolOpen from June 4 to Aug. 14Regular hours: Monday Wednesday Friday-Sunday noon to 6 p.m., Tuesday Thursday noon to 8 p.m.Admission: $8 for non-members711 Tomlin Dr.Burr Ridge, IL 60527Calumet City: Green Lake Family Aquatic CenterOpen from May 28 to Sept. 5Regular hours: Noon to 7 p.m.Admission: $5 (ages 4-12) or $71100 River Oaks Dr.Calumet City, IL 60409Chicago Park District Pools37 of the city's indoor and outdoor pools are expected...
    Less than a month after sweeping water restrictions took effect across Southern California, early indications suggest residents are finally heeding calls to conserve as officials report a noticeable drop in demand throughout the region. Officials at the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California reported that demand was 5% lower than what they hoped to see under the first three weeks of restrictions. At the same time, water waste complaints have soared throughout Los Angeles, signaling perhaps that many residents have taken conservation to heart. Although the initial indications were encouraging, officials stressed that the savings must continue as regional reservoirs continue to dip toward perilous lows. They also stressed it is still too soon to tell whether residents have truly turned a corner after months of backsliding. “We must continue to conserve,” Joaquin Esquivel, chairman of the State Water Resources Control Board, said during a board meeting this week. “We have a long way to go. It is still a long summer that we have before us and a lot of work.” California Unprecedented water restrictions...
    MONTERREY, Mexico (AP) — The industrial hub of Monterrey has long been one of Mexico’s most prosperous cities, so its almost 5 million residents were shocked when they lost the most basic of services: water. A combination of an intense drought, poor planning and high water use has left residents of Mexico’s industrial powerhouse to resort to extreme measures that call up images of isolated, poorer areas: storing water in buckets to use a scoopful at a time. “We are panicked, because we don’t know when the water will come back on,” said 60-year-old Monterrey resident María del Carmen Lara. “We finally got them to send us a water truck, but we still don’t have running water.” Local authorities began restricting water supplies in March, as the three dams that help supply the city dried up. They currently hold only 45%, 2% and 8% of their capacity, and city authorities say the two lowest dams had only a few days’ worth of water left. Earlier this month, they declared water would be available only between 4a.m. and 10a.m, recently...
    In 2019, Mayor Eric Garcetti unveiled an ambitious plan to plant 90,000 trees in Los Angeles by 2021 as part of L.A.’s Green New Deal. To accomplish this, he appointed the city’s first forest officer, Rachel Malarich, to head the Urban Forestry Division, and authorized a network of non-profits and “community ambassadors” to aid and encourage residents in planting much-needed trees. But more than a year after Garcetti’s deadline, it turns out that planting trees in Los Angeles is a lot more difficult than it sounds — particularly when it comes to targeting those neighborhoods most in need of tree cover. With just over 65,000 trees planted to date, officials are finding that their reliance on city residents to plant and care for the trees comes with significant limitations: Residents in poorer neighborhoods who don’t own land can find it difficult to actually plant trees, or they encounter problems caring for a new trees during their critical three-year establishment phase. In some areas — such as canopy barren downtown — new trees are often destroyed by vehicles or...
    (CNN)Every day, Morris Malambile loads his wheelbarrow full of empty plastic containers and pushes it from his home to the nearest running tap. It's much further than the usual walk to the kitchen sink — just a little under a mile away — but it's not the distance that bothers him. It's the bumpy road — which runs between tightly packed shanty dwellings and beige public-funded houses — that makes balancing containers filled with 70 liters of water on his return a pain. "Home feels far when you are pushing 70 kilograms of water in a wheelbarrow," said the 49-year-old resident from the impoverished South African township of Kwanobuhle. Taps ran dry in parts of Kwanobuhle in March, and since then, thousands of residents have been relying on a single communal tap to supply their households with potable water. And the township is just one of many in Gqeberha city's Nelson Mandela Bay area that rely on a system of four dams that have been steadily drying up for months. There hasn't been enough heavy rain to replenish them.A week...
    ODESSA, Texas (AP) — Residents of the West Texas city of Odessa who have been without safe tap water this week amid scorching temperatures may be able to drink safely straight from the faucet as early as Saturday afternoon, city officials said Friday. Samples from the Odessa area water utility pipes were sent off for testing Friday afternoon, said Odessa Public Works Director Thomas Kerr. If the test results come back clean, the city’s weeklong boil-water notice could be lifted by 1:30 p.m. Saturday, he said. Temperatures approached 100 degrees Fahrenheit (38 degrees Celsius) in Odessa daily this week as Texas and much of the United States faced extremely hot and humid conditions. And while the city typically sees hot weather in June, the timing of the break made dealing with this week’s heat more difficult. The city said taps in 165,000 homes and businesses lost pressure or went completely dry after a 24-inch (61-centimeter) main broke Monday afternoon. Odessa’s water treatment plant was back online by about 8 a.m. Wednesday, but workers have conducted a “recharging” process since...
    A city in Montana is still recovering from shutting down its water treatment plant in response to "unprecedented" amounts of flooding at Yellowstone National Park. Officials from Billings, Montana, told residents of the city on Wednesday night that the water plant has enough water to supply the city for more than 24 to 36 hours if they continue to ration and save water. "Tonight, the plant is operating at a level that can meet the community’s essential needs," city spokeswoman Victoria Hill said in a press statement. "If residents continue to refrain from watering their grass or taking part in other activities that use a significant amount of water, we will be able to continue providing the city with basic water services." YELLOWSTONE CLOSES ALL ENTRANCES TO PUBLIC DUE TO 'UNPRECEDENTED' RAINFALL Hill encouraged residents to continue conserving water because the city's water treatment plant was operating at a "very low capacity." She also thanked local power providers, noting how the substation that powered the treatment plant was flooded, forcing the plant to rely on...
    SOUTHAMPTON, Pa. (CBS) — A local study is searching for 1,000 adults, and 300 children from Bucks and Montgomery Counties. They may have been exposed to dangerous chemicals in their drinking water. “I grew up right down the street, we drank well water our whole life,” PFAS study participant Renee Frugoli said. READ MORE: Philadelphia Flyers Offer Head Coaching Job To John Tortorella: ReportFrugoli is one of many Southampton residents who grew up unknowingly drinking well water contaminated with high levels of PFAS. “Streets of people that we went to school with had kids that had cancer. It touched almost everyone in this area, at least one family member,” she said. It’s a heartache that hit her family in 2007 when her then 3-year-old daughter Felicia was diagnosed with stage 5 kidney cancer. “When you realize it’s because you were doing something you thought was helpful, giving them water that is supposed to be the best thing to drink, and you realize that you were giving them poison it makes you feel terrible,” Frugoli said. “We definitely know that PFAS...
    THOUSANDS in Texas could be without water for several days as sky-high temperatures scorch the state bringing dangerous conditions. A water pipeline in the West Texas city of Odessa broke on Tuesday morning, leaving over 160,000 residents in and around the area with no water potential for two days. 6Thousands of residents in the North Texas city of Odessa may be without running water for two daysCredit: AP 6Millions across the Midwest and South are facing record temperaturesCredit: AP 6Millions of Americans are under a 'heat dome' advisoryCredit: The Weather Channel As of Wednesday, the city said the Odessa Water Treatment plant is in the "recharging" stage, meaning workers are slowly adding water back into the system. The process will allow experts to ensure there are no leaks. The process could take anywhere from 12-14 hours to complete. Once the recharge is done, the city will test the water for infection. However, even if the water is restored to homes and businesses, folks must boil the water before using it for consumption. Read more weather storiesTEMPEST TERROR Tornadoes & softball-sized...
    Big Bear Lake has become the latest Southern California city to crack down on people watering their lawns.The city is now severely limiting outdoor water use to just two days a week as a means of battling California's worsening drought.Residents and businesses with even-numbered addresses can water outdoors on Wednesdays and Saturdays.Those with odd-numbered addresses can water on Thursdays and Sundays.Violators will be hit with $500 daily fines.The city of Los Angeles has similar water use restrictions after the city council approved the measures 13-0.RELATED | New restrictions on outdoor watering take effect for Los Angeles residents amid droughtEMBED More News Videos People in the city of Los Angeles will be limited to two-day per week outdoor watering schedules based on street addresses as part of an effort to conserve water amid a historic drought. The areas dependent on water from the State Water Project have the most restrictive measures with the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California limiting outdoor water use to just one day a week.
    DENVER (CBS4)– Record-tying heat in Denver had people searching for ways to cool off. Denver tied its earliest calendar day for 100 degrees on Saturday. (credit: CBS) Confluence Park is a hot spot (no pun intended) for people to go to cool off in the city. Dozens were there in the water, taking a dip to beat the June heat. People were tubing and splashing around in the water on Saturday afternoon. (credit: CBS) “We’re having a picnic. It’s nice! I wish there was more shade but it’s good,” said one person. (credit: CBS) Health experts urge people to drink a lot of water and stay hydrated during hot days. Heat stroke is especially dangerous for older adults and children.
    SAN FRANCISCO (KGO) -- ABC7 News is learning new details about what went wrong at the San Francisco luxury apartment building 33 Tehama last Friday.On Thursday, Paul Paradis, Senior Managing Director of Hines the real estate development and management firm that owns the building explained."We do know that a water main that is part of the building fire sprinkler system failed at the top of the building. How it happened and why it happened is also part of our ongoing effort right now," said Paradis.The building has been shut down since Friday. Over 600 residents are still displaced.RELATED: More than 600 residents at SF luxury apartment displaced by flood; some left without hotel"It's very bad. We had thousands of gallons of water pour down through the building. In doing that, it got into the electrical system, the elevator system, tenant units, and so the entire building had to be totally shut down. So this is catastrophic," said Paradis.Multiple residents are claiming this is not the first time there have been flooding issues in the building.Resident, Tyler Patterson said there have...
    ST. LOUIS PARK, Minn. (WCCO) – Neighbors who’ve been forced to dry out their homes twice now are going directly to their city leaders to find out how repairs are getting paid. A water main broke twice in two weeks in St. Louis Park. Homeowners say it caused several feet of sewage to back up into their homes, costing tens of thousands of dollars to fix. Many showed up at a city hall meeting on Monday night demanding answers. “I’m shaking because I’m so mad,” said Jennifer Snyder. “I have two young boys who haven’t been able to live in our home, we have been displaced this entire time with no water or furnace.” There’s also the emotional loss; families lost photo albums and memorabilia that can’t be replaced. “I had my photo albums from my parents, photo albums from my daughter, you know all her baby pictures. Yeah, that’s the tough stuff,” said Gretchen Detra. With bills and frustration mounting, the city proposed a new financial package. Between city insurance and reimbursement, those affected by the first water main break...
    ST. LOUIS PARK, Minn. (WCCO) – Neighbors who’ve been forced to dry out their homes twice now are going directly to their city leaders to find out how repairs are getting paid. A water main broke twice in two weeks in St. Louis Park. Homeowners say it caused several feet of sewage to back up into their homes, costing tens of thousands of dollars to fix. Many showed up at a city hall meeting on Monday night demanding answers. “I’m shaking because I’m so mad,” said Jennifer Snyder. “I have two young boys who haven’t been able to live in our home, we have been displaced this entire time with no water or furnace.” There’s also the emotional loss; families lost photo albums and memorabilia that can’t be replaced. “I had my photo albums from my parents, photo albums from my daughter, you know all her baby pictures. Yeah, that’s the tough stuff,” said Gretchen Detra. With bills and frustration mounting, the city proposed a new financial package. Between city insurance and reimbursement, those affected by the first water main break...
    (CBS DETROIT) –Tenants at the Sapphire Apartments in Southfield say they were excited to move in because they thought they were moving in luxury units in the center of Metro-Detroit. But they say the conditions are far from plush. READ MORE: Buttigieg, At Least 15 Others Test Positive For COVID-19 After Event On Mackinac Island“It’s like living in purgatory. I have had no hot water, I have two bathrooms with no hot water,” said Sapphire resident Pamela Jackson. “We can’t shower and bathe.” CW50 aired resident complaints last fall and in February. They claim there’s no heat in the winter and no central air in the summer. And it gets worse. Jackson says she’s complained about the elevators for months. The retired senior says she and her husband have mobility issues and are often left stuck in their apartment because they say the elevators are not dependable. “I have no feeling in my feet.I can’t walk so if something catastrophic happens, a fire or anything else, I’m stuck because I can’t,” Jackson said. “There’s no way for me to get...
    A RECORD-breaking heatwave is expected to toast parts of the US this week as meteorologists warn locals of the potential life-threatening outdoor conditions. A heat advisory is in effect for several Southwestern states, including Texas, Arizona, Nevada, New Mexico and parts of California, with temperatures expected to hit triple digits and intensify throughout the week. 3A record-breaking heatwave is expected to bring dangerous conditions to parts of the Southwest US and TexasCredit: Weather Channel 3Texas residents will see temperatures climb over 100-degrees during the weekCredit: Weather Channel 3Experts are advising residents to limit their outdoor activity during the hottest part of the dayCredit: AFP According to AccuWeather, the affected areas will experience their hottest temperatures of the year so far. "A northward bulge in the jet stream will expand and strengthen late in the week, especially from Thursday through Saturday," AccuWeather Meteorologist Brian Thompson said. Residents in Phoenix and Palm Springs, California, will see their first 110-degree day late this week. In Texas, record high temperatures for early June typically hit around 90-degrees; however, conditions are expected to climb above...
    Southern California officials have started to install devices to limit the water flow to homes that are using too much. According to KABC, the Las Virgenes Municipal Water District, which serves communities in western Los Angeles like Calabasas and Agoura Hills, has installed four water flow restrictors since last Wednesday. Source: CBS Los Angeles/Youtube Once the device is installed, it stays at the home for two weeks while the customer works on conserving water methods. If customers attempt to remove the device, they could face a $2,500 fine. In April this year, the water district announced that the amount of water for outdoor use would be reduced from 75 percent down to 50 due to the drought and the historic three-month stretch of the driest winter months on record. “Outdoor water uses, such as filling pools and landscape irrigation, account for up to 70% of all residential water usage, so here lies the greatest opportunity for savings. Much of the low-hanging fruit to reduce water use indoors has already been ‘picked,'” the water district said in a statement....
    ST. LOUIS PARK, Minn. (WCCO) — With two water main breaks in less than two weeks, some Twin Cities homeowners say they’re ready to take their city to court. The first break happened on May 21 and the second on June 3, both in the same area of St. Louis Park. More than 50 homes were impacted, with many sharing photos and videos of feet of sewage in their basements. READ MORE: Dozens Of Homes Flooded After Water Main Breaks In St. Louis Park“We were almost at 2 feet of sewage water,” Jennifer Snyder said. The Snyder family will never forget May 21. It’s when their basement playroom flooded damaging nearly everything from the ground up. “Furnace was gone, washer and dryer, shower, toilet, sink, carpet, walls, all of my boys’ toys. Everything down here was gone,” Snyder said. City officials said a 12-inch water main broke, spilling more than a million gallons into more than 50 homes in St. Louis Park. A second break occurred less than two weeks later in the same location. The city said the pipe...
    More than six million California residents have been hit with “unprecedented” water restrictions on Wednesday as the state manages the worst drought in recorded history. The Metropolitan Water District of Southern California, which supplies water to nearly 19 million Californians, declared a water shortage emergency in April and unanimously voted to impose water restrictions. “Metropolitan has never before employed this type of restriction on outdoor water use. But we are facing unprecedented reductions in our Northern California supplies, and we have to respond with unprecedented measures,” said the water district’s general manager, Adel Hagekhali. “We’re adapting to climate change in real time.” California is facing its third year of drought, which has reportedly produced the driest conditions in the state in at least 1,200 years. As a result, Governor Newsom (D) pleaded with all California water agencies to “take more aggressive actions to communicate about the drought emergency and implement conservation measures,” last week. “Californians made significant changes since the last drought but we have seen an uptick in water use, especially as we enter the summer months. We all have to be more...
    SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico (AP) — Puerto Rico’s water and sewer company was hit by a federal lawsuit on Thursday demanding that it provide services to thousands of residents who lack potable water on a daily basis. The class-action lawsuit was filed by Carmen Maldonado, mayor of the northern town of Morovis, who requested that a judge issue an injunction to force Puerto Rico’s Aqueducts and Sewer Authority to provide immediate service to residents in need. The lawsuit represents nearly 1,600 residents and seeks $1,000 for every day spent without water as compensation, alleging that the lack of water has caused more than $55 billion in damages. Maldonado said daily interruptions in water service have long been a problem in Morovis that grew worse after Hurricane Maria hit in September 2017 as a powerful Category 4 storm and razed the U.S. territory’s electric grid. The lawsuit states that every day on average at least three wards within the municipality have no water service. It also noted that the town has spent more than $1 million in hiring and deploying water...
    Paul Ramirez, 54, waters the front lawn at his home on St. Louis St. in Boyle Heights, as his dog Bandit, a 2 year old Yorkshire terrier, jumps for joy.Mel Melcon | Los Angeles Times | Getty Images Unprecedented restrictions on outdoor water use go into effect on Wednesday for more than 6 million residents in Southern California as officials try to conserve water during a severe drought. The conservation rules, among the strictest ever imposed in the state, were set by the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California, one of the largest water distributors in the country. Households are now forbidden from watering their lawns more than once a week in many jurisdictions. The goal is to slash water use by 35% as the state enters its third straight year of drought. The rules come after California water officials in March announced they were cutting State Water Project allocations from 15% to 5% of normal amid declining reservoir levels and reduced snowpack. California's two largest reservoirs have already dropped to critically low levels, and the state this year experienced its driest...
    LOS ANGELES (CNS) -- People in Los Angeles will be limited to two-day per week outdoor watering schedules starting Wednesday based on street addresses as part of an effort to conserve water amid a historic drought.The restrictions, approved by a 13-0 City Council vote after being announced by Mayor Eric Garcetti, are more lenient than the one-day limit ordered earlier by the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California for areas that are dependent on water from the State Water Project.Effective Wednesday, outdoor watering is restricted to two days per week, down from the current three, with watering permitted at odd-numbered street addresses on Mondays and Fridays, and at even-numbered addresses on Thursdays and Sundays.Watering with sprinklers will be limited to eight minutes per station. Sprinklers with water-conserving nozzles will be limited to 15 minutes per station. All watering will have to be done in the evening or early morning, with no watering permitted outdoors between 9 a.m. and 4 p.m."We were given two paths ... and we chose path two, to go with a budgeted volumetric limit for the city...
    ST. LOUIS PARK, Minn. (WCCO) – Dozens of homeowners packed a community center in hopes of learning what caused a costly water main break and how the city plans to help pay for the damage. The main ruptured over the weekend, leaking out 1.1 million gallons of water with immense pressure. The city said the water found its way into a sanitary sewer manhole, and from there rushed into homeowner’s basements. READ MORE: Minneapolis Settles With Journalist Blinded During 2020 Unrest For $600,000Most of that information was divulged in an emergency city council meeting Wednesday night. It was repeated with more detail Thursday at the community meeting that was meant to give more residents a chance to ask questions. One aspect that was clarified involved how much homeowners would be compensated for damage. The city approved Wednesday giving homeowners up to $30,000 to cover clean-up and “immediate health hand safety issues.” That includes replacing hot water heaters and furnaces. It does not include replacing lost items like couches, freezers, or flooring. “It’s anything that keeps your house safe and functional....
    Originally published May 25 ST. LOUIS PARK, Minn. (WCCO) – Dozens of homeowners are still cleaning up from flooding, days after a water main break. The city of St. Louis Park said that a 12-inch water main broke early Saturday morning. More than 50 homes south of Minnetonka Boulevard had sewer water pouring into their basements. Residents are left wondering who is going to pay for the damage. Jennifer Snyder had to throw out everything in her basement. Her home on Quebec Avenue South is one of the homes that flooded on Saturday. “Our entire neighborhood is a disaster,” Snyder said. “We are still getting no help from our own city.” “The city water flowed from 6:30 in the morning at our house to almost 10 a.m.,” said neighbor Joanne Lefebvre. The city’s website says that staff have been helping residents file claims with the League of Minnesota Cities Insurance Trust. WCCO-TV reached out to see if city officials would answer questions, but were told no one was available. An official with the league said the flooding was still under investigation...
    SACRAMENTO, Calif. (KABC) -- One day after Gov. Gavin Newsom said the state might impose mandatory water restrictions if residents don't use less on their own, the California State Water Resources Control Board will consider stricter limits on water use amid the state's ongoing drought.The board on Tuesday is expected to vote on a pair of new conservation efforts.One effort is a statewide ban on watering non-functional turf at commercial, industrial and institutional locations - that refers to green areas that are not used recreationally and are generally only there for the purpose of beautifying an outdoor space.The second effort that the board is considering would require local water agencies to implement water-use restrictions, something that the city of Los Angeles has already moved on.EMBED More News Videos Gov. Newsom threatened Monday to impose mandatory water restrictions if residents don't use less on their own as a drought drags on and the hotter summer months approach. Starting June 1, L.A. residents will only be allowed to water outdoor spaces two days a week, reduced from three days.On Monday, Newsom said...
    SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — Californian governor: Drought is deepening, residents must conserve more or state may enact mandatory water restrictions. Copyright © 2022 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.
    (CBS4) – Plans to build a canal in northeastern Colorado that would divert water from the South Platte River into Nebraska continue to move forward. (credit: CBS) Nebraska Gov. Pete Ricketts announced his desire to build the waterway in January and said a one-hundred-year-old compact between the two states allows for it. Colorado Gov. Jared Polis through a spokesperson responded to those plans, calling it a canal to nowhere that is unlikely to be built. While the debate between politicians heats up, those who live and work in the targeted area say they knew it was a possibility. Julesburg, Colorado, a small town just a few miles from the Nebraska state line, may stand the most to lose given it’s built on the land that surrounds it. “The farming, it’s our lifeblood. If we don’t have those, we don’t have the grocery stores, we don’t have gas stations, insurance agencies, all those things,” Jay Goddard said. Like a vein through the community, the South Platte River has been pumping water into the area for decades. “We are all concerned about...