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    Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images Who among us? A trigger-happy ABC News editor apparently jumped the gun on Friday, publishing a pre-written story assuming that July’s jobs report would reveal a hiring slowdown — despite the fact that the report would soon reveal the U.S. added a shocking 528,000 jobs. The error came just weeks after the news outlet accidentally published a pre-write on the death of former President Donald Trump’s first wife Ivana Trump. On Friday, the July jobs report was released, surpassing expectations by adding 528,000 jobs last month. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the unemployment rate also fell to 3.5%. In a screenshot posted to Twitter, comedian and political commentator Hal Sparks noted ABC accidentally published a draft story on the jobs report that was “amazingly wrong.” The story published to ABC included “XYZ” to fill in for the numbers that had not yet been released, as well as an angle that assumed the jobs report would have bad news for President Joe Biden’s White House along with the general public. According to the...
    By Martine Paris | Bloomberg With recession fears mounting—and inflation, the war in Ukraine and the lingering pandemic taking a toll—many tech companies are rethinking their staffing needs, with some of them instituting hiring freezes, rescinding offers and making rounds of layoffs. Amazon.com Inc. was the latest company to discuss its belt-tightening efforts this week. During its quarterly earnings call Thursday, the e-commerce giant said it’s been adding jobs at the slowest rate since 2019. After relying on attrition to winnow its staff, Amazon now has about 100,000 fewer employees than in the previous quarter.Here’s a look at the companies tapping the brakes. Alphabet Inc., Google’s parent company, has been decelerating its recruiting efforts. Chief Executive Officer Sundar Pichai told employees this month that—although the business added 10,000 Googlers in the second quarter—it will be slowing the pace of hiring for the rest of the year and prioritizing engineering and technical talent. “Like all companies, we’re not immune to economic headwinds,” he said. The hiring pause is part of that slowdown, Google said, “to enable teams to prioritize their roles and hiring plans for the rest of the year.” It had nearly 164,000 employees...
    VIDEO2:2302:23Invest in companies that 'think twice' about hiring during a Fed-mandated slowdown, Jim Cramer saysMad Money with Jim Cramer CNBC's Jim Cramer on Wednesday advised investors to buy stock of companies that are adjusting their hiring efforts to fit the economic environment. "If you want to invest with profligate companies, be my guest. I want to invest in well-run companies … with very smart CEOs. That means buying the stocks of those companies that think twice about continuing to hire in this environment," he said. The "Mad Money" host's comments come after Google said in an email to employees that it will pause hiring for two weeks, according to The Information. Parent-company Alphabet said last week in a memo to employees that it plans to slow down the pace of hiring through next year, citing economic headwinds. Shares of Alphabet closed slightly up on Wednesday. "It is still ridiculous that anyone is freaking out over these stories, still. These stories about a hiring slowdown, as unfortunate as they are. … When you hear 'Fed-mandated slowdown,' that means less hiring and...
    LOS ANGELES (KABC) -- Looking for employment in Southern California? Here's a list of companies currently hiring:CARE TAKERS AND COUNSELORSEasterseals Southern California offers indispensable resources to individuals and families living with a disability and currently has more than 200 job openings across Southern California.For more information, please visit: https://careers-essc.icims.com/. 9/21/21The Village Family Services is a leader in providing trauma-informed, culturally sensitive services to children, homeless youth and families so that they can lead safe, healthy and productive lives around Los Angeles County. We are currently hiring for various positions such as Foster Care Social Workers, Adult LVN, Peer Support Specialists, Administrative Assistant and DIC Case Managers. For more information, please visit: https://www.thevillagefs.org/about-our-village/careers/. 7/21/2124 Hour Home Care is looking for Caretakers. Duties include: Personal care, meal preparation, companionship, medication reminders & light housekeeping; Follow client care plan and provide updates as needed. Requirements: 2 caregiving references; Proof of negative TB test (will pay if need test); ID compliant with I-9 requirements; Registered Home Care Aide (HCA) - will pay if not registered (exclusions apply). Benefits: Competitive pay, paid orientation, trainings, and...
    NEW YORK (AP) — After going on a frenzied hiring spree for a year and a half to meet surging shopper demand, America’s retailers are starting to temper their recruiting. The changing mindset comes as companies confront a pullback in consumer spending, the prospect of an economic downturn and surging labor costs. Some analysts suggest that merchants have also learned to do more with fewer workers. The nation’s top employer, Walmart, said it recently over-hired because of a COVID-related staffing shortage and then reduced its head count through attrition. In April, Amazon said it, too, had decided that it had an excess of workers in its warehouses. And FedEx, whose customers include big retailers, said late last month that it was hiring fewer people. In addition, new data shows that retailers in recent months have been scaling back sign-on bonuses and are no longer relaxing job requirements — a sign that they no longer feel compelled to expand their applicant pool, according to the labor analytics company Emsi Burning Glass. And Snagajob, an online marketplace for hourly work, reports...
    In this article MMATSan FranciscoCompassandcamera | Getty ImagesU.S. employers added more jobs than expected in April amid a tight labor market, the Bureau of Labor Statistics reported Friday. But the tech sector, which boomed during the pandemic, is showing signs of contraction. Facebook parent company Meta is pausing hiring and scaling down some recruitment plans, Insider reported last week based on an internal memo it had viewed. "We regularly re-evaluate our talent pipeline according to our business needs and in light of the expense guidance given for this earnings period, we are slowing its growth accordingly," a spokesperson confirmed to CNBC. Amazon's CFO told analysts on the company's earnings call that its warehouses have become "overstaffed," following a large hiring spree during widespread lockdowns that drove consumers more and more to online shopping. It's not just the biggest tech firms. Uber's CEO told employees in a message obtained by CNBC that the company would "treat hiring as a privilege and be deliberate about when and where we add headcount," adding, "We will be even more hardcore about costs across the...
    The U.S. economy gained or regained just 199,000 jobs in December, down from 249,000 in November, according to the Department of Labor, marking the smallest monthly jobs gain in a year. The slowdown in hiring includes the otherwise high-paying, red-hot information technology industry. More Business News Alexandria, Virginia-based trade group TechServe Alliance reports the IT sector added just 2,000 jobs in December, little changed from the previous month. On a year-over-year basis, IT employment was up 2.72%, a growth of 142,800 professionals. The IT sector ended 2021 with 5.39 million Americans working in the field. “We expect a continued slowdown in hiring with a flat employment growth rate in the IT and engineering sectors for some time to come,” said Mark Roberts, CEO of TechServe Alliance, the national trade association of the IT and Engineering staffing and solutions industry. “With the tech unemployment rate dropping to 2%, it is clear the slowdown is more a function of companies struggling to find qualified talent, rather than a lack of demand,” he said. TechsServe recommends its members revisit compensation and...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden promised an economy that could be firing on all cylinders next year, but Friday’s disappointing jobs report suggests a slowdown in growth could instead loom atop voters’ minds in the 2022 elections. Republicans quickly seized on the modest gains of 194,000 jobs in September as evidence that Biden’s $1.9 trillion coronavirus relief package, enacted more than six months ago, has failed to deliver as promised. Biden instead chose to highlight a drop in the unemployment rate to 4.8% as proof of “real economic progress” — even if it wasn’t the boom he was touting months ago. And Democrats further offered the latest jobs report as a reason to pass their proposed multitrillion-dollar tax and spending program to help with infrastructure, school, child care, family leave and health care, saying it is needed to improve prospects for continued growth. Biden, taking note of the rancorous debate over his spending plan in Washington, pleaded for patience after the jobs report came out. “Turn on the news and every conversation is a confrontation. Every disagreement is...
    WASHINGTON -- U.S. employers added a modest 559,000 jobs in May, rebounding from April's hiring slowdown, with unemployment falling to 5.8%.This is a breaking news update. A previous version of this report is below.With U.S. businesses scrambling to fill millions of jobs as the economy reopens much faster than many had expected, Friday's jobs report for May will help show whether their efforts are succeeding.The fading of the pandemic has released substantial pent-up demand among consumers to eat out, travel, shop, attend public events and visit with friends and relatives. But it has also produced a disconnect between companies and the unemployed. Businesses are rushing to add workers immediately. Yet many of the unemployed are either seeking better jobs than they had before the pandemic, still lack affordable child care, worry about contracting COVID-19 or have decided to retire early.That disconnect resulted in a sharp slowdown in hiring in April, when employers added far fewer jobs than economists had forecast and many fewer than had been hired in March.Analysts have predicted an improvement for May, with 650,000 jobs added, compared...
    Private payrolls grew at their slowest pace since July amid a deceleration in large business hiring for November, according to a report Wednesday from ADP. Companies hired 307,000 workers for the month, well below the 475,000 estimate from a Dow Jones survey of economists. The total represented a decline from the upwardly revised 404,000 in October and is the smallest gain since the 216,000 increase in July, according to the report, which is compiled in conjunction with Moody's Analytics. Most of the hiring came from firms with 50 to 499 workers, which added 139,000 hires. Small companies added 110,000 while big business trailed with just 58,000 after adding 116,000 in October. "While November saw employment gains, the pace continues to slow," said Ahu Yildirmaz, vice president and co-head of the ADP Research Institute. "Job growth remained positive across all industries and sizes." As is usually the case, service industries provided the bulk of jobs, with 276,000. Leisure and hospitality, which has been battered during the pandemic, added 95,000 workers despite increasing restrictions placed on bars and restaurants as coronavirus cases...
    Fewer firms are looking to add new workers in the fourth quarter, according to polling released Monday, making it harder for the economy to regain the millions of jobs lost in the pandemic. On net, only 1% of respondents expect to increase hiring in the fourth quarter, according to a survey by the National Association for Business Economics, down from 6% the quarter before. “The employment picture is less rosy, with many firms still holding back on wage and staff increases,” said Holly Wade, NABE's survey chairwoman and the director of research and policy analysis for the National Federation for Independent Business. Wade said that the worsening picture for hiring is due to the uncertainty businesses face with the pandemic. “The uncertainty element of it will persist until the health crisis is more resolved,” she said. More than two-thirds of respondents noted that they have imposed hiring freezes to cope with the uncertainty caused by the pandemic, according to Lester Jones, a NABE survey analyst and chief economist for the National Beer Wholesalers Association. “It’s a...
    First-time claims for unemployment benefits totaled 840,000 last week, higher than expected in another sign that the spike in job growth over the summer has cooled heading into the final part of the year. Economists surveyed by Dow Jones had been expecting 825,000 new claims. Though the total was a bit worse than Wall Street expected, it still represented a modest decline from the upwardly revised 849,000 from a week ago. Claims have been above 800,000 every wee since mid-March, the same month the World Health Organization declared the coronavirus a pandemic, leading to the shutdown of the U.S. economy. This is breaking news. Please check back for updates.Related Tags Breaking News: Markets Unemployment Markets Breaking news Economy
    Forecasters expect the Labor Department to report that about 1.6 million jobs were added to payrolls in July and that the unemployment rate dropped to 10.6% from June’s 11.1%. Before the pandemic, 1.6 million new jobs in a month would have been a record. Given the cataclysmic job separations of the spring, however, it would suggest that the recovery has fallen off the pace needed to return the labor market back to normal and avoid a deep and lasting recession. In comparison, 5 million jobs were created in May and June. It's also possible that job creation has stalled out. Payroll processor ADP reported on Wednesday that just 167,000 jobs were created in July. The company reported that more than 7 million jobs were created in May and June. One issue hindering the recovery is the spike in coronavirus infections in several states. The country has more than 4 million cases, with over 1,200 new coronavirus deaths, and 53,726 new cases were reported in the United States on Wednesday. Several states have either rolled back or paused reopening their...
    NEW YORK  — LinkedIn is laying off nearly 1,000 employees, approximately 6% of its workforce globally, with unemployment in the U.S. above 13% and national economies from Europe and Asia, to the Americas, shrinking due to the pandemic. The outbreak has disrupted commerce globally, closing thousands of businesses while forcing others to furlough large numbers of employees as they await a recovery. Hiring has slowed dramatically. The number of people applying for unemployment aid has remained stubbornly high in the past several weeks, a sign that many businesses are still shedding jobs and clouding the outlook for jobs. The overall U.S. unemployment rate in May was 13.3%, a decline from 14.7% in April, according to the Labor Department. In a note to employees at the professional networking site, CEO Ryan Roslansky said that the job cuts will hit global sales and hiring sections of the company. He said no further layoffs are planned. LinkedIn employees in the U.S. will receive at least 10 weeks of severance pay and a year of continuing health coverage through COBRA. Those being laid off...
    NEW YORK (AP) — LinkedIn is laying off nearly 1,000 employees, approximately 6% of its workforce globally, with unemployment in the U.S. above 13% and national economies from Europe and Asia, to the Americas, shrinking due to the pandemic. The outbreak has disrupted commerce globally, closing thousands of businesses while forcing others to furlough large numbers of employees as they await a recovery. Hiring has slowed dramatically. The number of people applying for unemployment aid has remained stubbornly high in the past several weeks, a sign that many businesses are still shedding jobs and clouding the outlook for jobs. The overall U.S. unemployment rate in May was 13.3%, a decline from 14.7% in April, according to the Labor Department. In a note to employees at the professional networking site, CEO Ryan Roslansky said that the job cuts will hit global sales and talent acquisition sections of the company. He said no further layoffs are planned. LinkedIn employees in the U.S. will receive at least 10 weeks of severance pay and a year of continuing health coverage through COBRA. Those being...
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