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    DHAKA, Bangladesh (AP) — Business leaders and officials from eight developing nations meeting in Bangladesh on Tuesday said more cooperation was needed among them to overcome dwindling foreign currency reserves, a growing energy crisis and supply chain disruptions. Representatives from Egypt, Iran, Malaysia, Nigeria, Pakistan, Turkey and Bangladesh under the banner of D-8, or developing eight countries, were discussing alternative trade financing such as cross currency swap, barter and blockchain to address their foreign currency reserves vulnerabilities, according to organizers. Bangladesh’s Foreign Minister A.K. Abdul Momen said the group, with a $5 trillion economy among its members, was working to implement a free trade agreement while also increasing the volume of trade. Organizers said the participants were exploring ways to boost energy security with members such as Iran and Nigeria among the world’s top oil producers. Bangladesh, a nation of 160 million people and the world’s 41st largest economy, has suspended operations in diesel-run power plants to ease pressure on the cost of imports, The country’s central bank has also taken measures to reduce the imports...
    U.S. climate envoy John Kerry said that President Joe Biden is committed to increasing U.S. funding to developing countries to help with climate change.   U.S. climate envoy John Kerry said Wednesday he thinks rich countries can finally meet their pledge to provide $100 billion annually to help poor nations cope with climate change beginning this year — and will definitely reach that amount in 2023. That would be at least two years later than the 2020 target set by developed countries at a U.N. climate summit in Copenhagen in 2009 for providing that funding to help developing countries adapt to global warming and mitigate further rises in temperature. Kerry told an informal U.N. Security Council meeting on "Climate Finance for Sustaining Peace and Security" that President Joe Biden is committed to increasing U.S. funding to developing countries to help with climate change. Last September, he said, Biden promised to increase annual U.S. climate finance to over $11 billion, quadrupling the funding from the 2009-2017 presidency of Barack Obama, when Biden was vice president. "And that increase is going to...
    UNITED NATIONS (AP) — U.S. climate envoy John Kerry said Wednesday he thinks rich countries can finally meet their pledge to provide $100 billion annually to help poor nations cope with climate change beginning this year — and will definitely reach that amount in 2023. That would be at least two years later than the 2020 target set by developed countries at a U.N. climate summit in Copenhagen in 2009 for providing that funding to help developing countries adapt to global warming and mitigate further rises in temperature. Kerry told an informal U.N. Security Council meeting on “Climate Finance for Sustaining Peace and Security” that President Joe Biden is committed to increasing U.S. funding to developing countries to help with climate change. Last September, he said, Biden promised to increase annual U.S. climate finance to over $11 billion, quadrupling the funding from the 2009-2017 presidency of Barack Obama, when Biden was vice president. “And that increase is going to help us to deliver on $100 billion,” Kerry said. “We’re doing just a little bit shy of that for 2022. It...
    Pfizer and Moderna, manufacturers of the two most popular used vaccines in the United States and much of the rest of the world, are expecting to bring in $51 billion in vaccine sales this year, according to earnings statements published by the companies. Pfizer expects to lead the way, with $32 billion in expected sales, with Moderna projecting $19 billion in revenue from its Covid shots. Almost all of these sales are coming from the developed world, with major nations like the U.S., the UK, Germany and others having surplus of vaccines while many developing countries struggling to get their hands on the shots. The wide disparity between the developing and developed world has been noted by organizations like the World Health Organization (WHO) and the People's Vaccine Alliance (PVA) who are continuing calls for the companies to make their shots more widely available in the developing world.  Pfizer and Moderna project a combine $51 billion in revenue from their Covid vaccines this year Large vaccine manufacturers have been criticized by the global health community for prioritizing profits over health....
    Culture wars have taken hold of school board elections. Students say their well-being is at risk. Live: Election Day updates on Virginia and New Jersey gubernatorial races, NYC mayor, more GLASGOW, Scotland — Speaking during and immediately after a meeting of the High Ambition Coalition, a group of roughly 60 countries that advocate for the strongest possible policies to address climate change at the U.N. Climate Change Conference, special presidential envoy for climate John Kerry hinted Tuesday that major announcements on climate finance are in the offing. © Provided by Yahoo! News “A hundred billion dollars doesn’t do it folks,” Kerry said to a gaggle of press following the meeting at the conference, also known as COP26. Kerry was referring to the promise of $100 billion per year in financing for adapting to and mitigating climate change for developing countries, from developed countries at the last major round of climate negotiations in Paris in 2015. “It’s trillions of dollars that are needed. And the only way that we will get this done is if trillions of dollars are forthcoming....
    Pfizer - distributor of the world's most commonly used COVID-19 vaccine - has been accused of using its large control over the life-saving jabs to 'bully' the governments of developing nations in purchase negotiations. The bombshell report, published by Public Citizen on Tuesday, alleges the New York City-based company worked to silence governments, restricted nations' access to vaccine donations, forced governments to pay out lawsuits they may face for breaking intellectual property laws (IP), and to seize public assets in case of missed payments such as foreign bank accounts. Countries including Albania, Brazil, Colombia, Chile, the Dominican Republic and Peru were subject to these terms in order to acquire the vaccine. Public Citizen reports that high income countries, such as the U.S., have assisted Pfizer in these bullying tactics by staunchly protecting their IP and allowing the company to form a 'monopoly.' Pfizer has been accused of 'bullying' developing nations in COVID-19 vaccine purchase negotiations in a recent report published by Public Citizen. The company pushed countries to make public assets available to pay outstanding costs and for the donations...
    Developing nations have made requests from wealthier nations to fund climate initiatives far exceeding previous commitments ahead of the upcoming United Nations conference. A coalition of African countries recently asked the developed world for $1.3 trillion per year by 2030 while South Africa alone requested $750 billion, The Wall Street Journal reported. The requests, made in the weeks leading up to the high-level UN conference on climate change in November, represented a sum of money significantly greater than current international climate finance efforts. “We cannot be talking about ambition on the one hand, and yet you show no ambition on finance,” Zaheer Fakir, a negotiator representing 77 developing countries during next month’s conference, told the WSJ. During the 2015 UN climate conference in Paris, the most recent meeting of its kind, wealthy nations reiterated a 2009 pledge to collectively give $100 billion per year to poor countries for climate change mitigation efforts through 2025. However, the developed world has consistently fallen short of its pledges and isn’t expected to achieve the goal even with boosted funding from the Biden administration....
    (CNN)President Joe Biden announced Tuesday he will work with Congress to double again the United States' financial commitment to help developing nations confront the climate crisis. Biden pledged in April the US would increase its contribution to global climate financing to $5.7 billion a year, putting his new commitment around $11 billion a year.This is a developing story and it will be updated.
    Search continues for missing 6-year-old Isabella Kalua EU commissioner hopeful people vaccinated with AstraZeneca can enter US British Prime Minister Boris Johnson called on wealthier nations to do more to address the impacts of climate change and phase out the use of fossil fuels, as a recent report projects those countries will miss their $100 billion climate finance goal. © Getty Johnson calls on wealthy nations to meet climate finance goals as analysis projects shortfall At a meeting in New York with world leaders and U.N. Secretary-General António Guterres, Johnson said the leaders of major economies must increase their financial contributions to the goals of the Paris Climate Agreement. Ahead of the agreement, developed nations agreed to contribute a total of $100 billion a year toward such efforts beginning in 2020, but an analysis from the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development released last week found they mobilized just under $80 billion in 2019. Load Error "In coming together to agree the $100 billion pledge, the world's richest countries made an historic commitment to the world's poorest -...
    Four African countries with low vaccination rates will soon receive 1.2 million donated COVID-19 vaccine doses from the United States. Vaccines were shipped to the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Uganda, Guinea and Seychelles on Friday, a White House official confirmed to Reuters. The doses are being donated through COVAX, a program run by the World Health Organization to help create a more equitable distribution of Covid vaccines. Africa has lagged sharply behind other regions in vaccinating its citizens, with most countries reporting single-digit vaccination rates, compared with much higher double-digit rates in advanced economies such as the United States. The U.S. will be donating 1.2 million COVID-19 vaccine doses to four African nations: Uganda, The Democratic Republic of the Congo, Seychelles and Guinea. Pictured: A man in Uganda received a COVID-19 vaccine last month Uganda, which was shipped received 657,080 doses, and the Congo, 250,320 doses, will each receive the two-shot Moderna vaccine. Seychelles will receive 35,100 doses of the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine, which is also two shots. Guinea will receive 302,400 doses of the one-shot Johnson & Johnson...
    As states cut unemployment benefits, some debate if aid discourages work CDC: Fully vaccinated students and teachers do not need to wear masks in school * G20 ministers urged to deliver after G7 disappoints Load Error * Green groups warn of COP26 failure if no fresh funds * G20 gives $297 billion to support fossil fuels since 2020 (Adds comments from UN chief, detail of Sunday climate conference) By Beh Lih Yi July 9 (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - The world's 20 largest economies faced mounting calls to boost climate finance for poorer nations as ministers met on Friday in Italy, with green groups warning a failure to deliver fresh money could throw November's key climate talks into doubt. Developed nations are under pressure ahead of the COP26 climate conference in Scotland to deliver a promised $100 billion a year for vulnerable countries to adopt clean energy and adapt to a warmer planet, up from about $80 billion in 2018. After a June summit of G7 leaders ended with a commitment to meet the $100-billion goal but lacked detail...
    Many turned to libraries during the pandemic. Will these venerable public institutions get the credit they deserve? How Joe Manchin speaks for a lot of Americans By Elizabeth Piper © Reuters/POOL G7 summit in Cornwall CARBIS BAY, England (Reuters) -G7 leaders will commit on Sunday to increase their climate finance contributions to meet an overdue spending pledge of $100 billion a year to help poorer countries cut carbon emissions and cope with global warming. Load Error As part of plans billed as helping speed the finance of infrastructure projects in developing countries and a shift to renewable and sustainable technology, the world's seven most advanced economies will again pledge to meet the target. At the G7 summit in southwestern England, there was a clear push by the leaders to try to counter China's increasing influence in the world, particularly in developing nations. They signalled their desire to build a rival to Beijing's multi-trillion-dollar Belt and Road initiative but the details were few and far between. Some green groups were unimpressed with the climate pledges, with Greenpeace UK saying...
    Looking for Uncle Allan: A queer odyssey Pulse Nightclub to become a national memorial, says President Biden CARBIS BAY, England (Reuters) - G7 leaders will commit on Sunday to increase their climate finance contributions to meet an overdue spending pledge of $100 billion a year to help poorer countries cut carbon emissions and cope with global warming. © Reuters/POOL G7 summit in Cornwall As part of plans billed as helping speed the finance of infrastructure projects in developing countries and a shift to renewable and sustainable technology, the world's seven most advanced economies will again pledge to meet the target. Load Error Some green groups were unimpressed, with Greenpeace UK saying the G7 host, British Prime Minister Boris Johnson, had "simply reheated old promises" and that it would take "nothing for granted" until nations came up with the money. "Protecting our planet is the most important thing we as leaders can do for our people," Johnson said in a statement. "As democratic nations we have a responsibility to help developing countries reap the benefits of clean growth through...
    I Lead a Troop of Girl Scouts Living in NYC Shelters SpaceX docks at ISS on recycled rocket and capsule (Adds U.S. climate finance plan, comments from summit, updates throughout) Load Error By Megan Rowling BARCELONA, April 22 (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - The U.N. chief called for rich countries to make good on their promises of climate finance for developing nations at the G7 meeting in June, warning at a Thursday summit hosted by the U.S. president that the world is "at the verge of the abyss". Addressing the virtual summit on Earth Day, U.N. Secretary-General Antonio Guterres said "dangerous greenhouse gases are at levels not seen in 3 million years". He noted that global warming had already hit 1.2 degrees Celsius and is "racing toward the threshold of catastrophe". Climate heating - which governments agreed in 2015 to try to hold to a ceiling of 1.5C - is already causing "ever rising sea-levels, scorching temperatures, devastating tropical cyclones and epic wildfires", Guterres added. "We need a green planet - but the world is on red alert," he...
    Miami women surprise homeless teen with magical quinceanera Washington Gov. Jay Inslee: Time to Seize the Moment on Climate Change, Clean Energy By Megan Rowling Load Error BARCELONA, April 22 (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - The U.N. chief called for rich countries to make good on their promises of climate finance for developing nations at the G7 meeting in June, warning at a Thursday summit hosted by the U.S. president that the world is "at the verge of the abyss". Addressing the virtual summit on Earth Day, U.N. Secretary-General Antonio Guterres said "dangerous greenhouse gases are at levels not seen in 3 million years". He noted that global warming had already hit 1.2 degrees Celsius and is "racing toward the threshold of catastrophe". Climate heating - which governments agreed in 2015 to try to hold to a ceiling of 1.5C - is already causing "ever rising sea-levels, scorching temperatures, devastating tropical cyclones and epic wildfires", Guterres added. "We need a green planet - but the world is on red alert," he said. "We must make sure the next step...
    Hong Kong (CNN)The COVAX initiative for equitable global access to Covid-19 vaccines has announced its plan to distribute more than 330 million doses to developing nations in the first half of 2021.In an interim distribution plan published Wednesday, the COVAX vaccine-sharing facility said the doses will cover an average of 3.3% of the total population of the 145 countries participating in the initial round of distribution.The COVAX initiative was launched in April last year to ensure the rapid and equitable distribution of coronavirus vaccines to rich and poor countries alike and the vaccination of high-risk groups. Led by the World Health Organization and numerous other international health groups, it has since been joined by 190 countries, but was shunned by the United States, partly because former President Donald Trump did not want to work with WHO.The first round of distribution includes 336 million doses of the AstraZeneca-Oxford vaccine -- 240 million made by the Serum Institute of India and 96 million by AstraZeneca -- as well as 1.2 million doses of the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine.A health worker in Nepal holds up...
    BEIJING (AP) — China announces plan to provide 10 million coronavirus vaccine doses to developing nations through global COVAX facility. Copyright © 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.
    Key Prominent Players Covered in the Contraceptive Pills Market Research Report Are Janssen Pharmaceutical Company, Piramal Enterprises, Allergan, plc, Mylan N.V., Pfizer, Inc., Bayer AG, Teva Pharmaceutical Industries, HLL Lifecare Limited, Merck & Co., Inc. and other key market players. Pune, India, Nov. 26, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — The global contraceptive pills market size is projected to reach USD 20.55 billion by 2026, exhibiting a CAGR of 5.8% during the forecast period. High degree of unfulfilled contraceptive needs in rural areas in emerging economies is expected to be one of the key drivers for the growth of this market. Data gathered under the Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS) conducted between 2005 and 2014 in 52 developing countries revealed that around 8% to 38% of married rural women, aged between 15 and 49 years, faced unmet contraceptive needs. North America is slated to dominate the contraceptive pills market share, since the region generated USD 4.09 billion in revenue in 2018. The primary reason for this is the rising uptake of short-acting reversible contraceptives in the U.S. and patient-friendly reimbursement policies for...
    National Review Spain’s Government Declares War on the Spanish Language It might seem like a headline from a satirical newspaper, but it is not: Spanish will no longer be the official language of the Spanish State or the lingua franca in education. It is part of the socialist-Communist government’s new education law. This war on the Spanish language is the ransom that socialist prime minister Pedro Sánchez has to pay the Catalan nationalists of ERC (a party that represents 3 percent of Spanish voters) in exchange for their vote to pass a general state budget of which Chávez would have been proud. Sánchez will do anything to stay in power, even trample on Spain’s greatest treasure, one that is shared with 500 million people: the Spanish language.Thanks to this new law, the only lingua franca in Catalonia will be Catalan.As a Spaniard, it is difficult for me to explain to people outside my country what is happening here without sounding dire. But in many cities in Spain, children will not be able to study primarily in Spanish. In Catalonia, mathematics,...
    Millions of used cars, vans, and motor vehicles exported to the developing world are causing significant air pollution according to a new report by the UN Environment Programme (UNEP). Used Vehicles and the Environment – A Global Overview of Used Light Duty Vehicles: Flow, Scale and Regulation, the first-ever report of its kind, shows that between 2015 and 2018, 14 million used light-duty vehicles were exported worldwide. About 80 percent went to low and middle-income countries with more than half ending up in Africa, the report finds. The cars exported from Europe, the United States and Japan are typically old and poor quality which contribute to air pollution. Globally, the transport sector is responsible for nearly a quarter of energy-related global greenhouse gas emissions. Specifically, vehicle emissions are a major source of fine particulate matter and nitrogen oxides that are both causes of urban air pollution, the report notes. “Cleaning up the global vehicle fleet is a priority to meet global and local air quality and climate targets,” Inger Andersen, Executive Director of UNEP, said in a statement. “Over the...
    VIDEO5:3905:39Debt overhang will be a challenge for developing countries: David MalpassClosing Bell World Bank President David Malpass on Wednesday expressed concerns about the consequences of the coronavirus pandemic on school-aged children in developing countries, especially if there is another spike in infections that prolongs the health crisis. In an interview on CNBC's "Closing Bell," Malpass said there also are educational challenges in wealthy countries like the U.S. as schools shift to virtual classes that potentially keep parents from returning to work. However, he said his worries are more pronounced about other nations. "The learning goes backward. That's a particular problem in the developing world," Malpass said. "We think there are ...1 billion children out of school in the developing world waiting, really, for the recovery to take hold. So if there's the second wave, that's a concern." Malpass is not the first to sound the alarm about the detrimental impact of the pandemic on children. Last month, the United Nations warned that at least 24 million students across the world could drop out of school as a consequence of the Covid-19 outbreak. "The...
    Tiger Woods commits to play back-to-back weeks at BMW Championship What Happens to Your Body When You Eat a Bag of Potato Chips World Bank Looking for Ways to Trim Poor Nations’ Debt Stock (Bloomberg) -- The World Bank is looking at ways to reduce the amount of debt owed by poor countries -- rather than simply delaying payments -- to attract more investors in the wake of the global pandemic and recession, President David Malpass said. © Bloomberg David Malpass The coming months and the annual meetings of the World Bank and International Monetary Fund in October present a good time horizon for action, Malpass said Wednesday in a Bloomberg Television interview with Tom Keene. Malpass said he also sees an opportunity to extend relief under the Debt Service Suspension Initiative that started in May into 2021, an option that he believes will have support from the Group of Seven and Group of 20 leading economies. Load Error “The next step is harder -- agreement to actually do haircuts or writedowns,” Malpass said. “But that has happened...
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