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    On Tuesday’s broadcast of the Fox News Channel’s “Your World,” Transportation Secretary Pete Buttigieg stated that, despite receiving billions to keep people employed, airlines pushed “a lot of their pilots and experienced crews into early retirement.” Which, while it technically didn’t break the terms of receiving the money, “what these buyouts and retirements did was they left these airlines unprepared to service those routes and now that’s coming back to bite the entire system.” But defended the spending by stating, “I don’t think it was a mistake to keep the U.S. aviation sector in business.” Buttigieg said, “I was very concerned with what happened over the Memorial Day weekend, got the airlines together, asked them what steps they were taking and anything that we could do collaboratively to see improvements by the July Fourth holiday travel weekend. The good news is, this last travel weekend went better than Memorial Day did in terms of delays and cancellations. We saw an improvement to the tune of about 10%.” Buttigieg added, “So, we saw about 3% of flights canceled. In a normal...
    Hawaii Airlines is the first major airline Have signed a deal with Starlink, A subsidiary of SpaceX, is in the process of deploying a network of satellites to provide Internet connectivity anywhere on the planet. Ultimately, the company wants to equip all flights flying between the Hawaiian Islands and the United States, Europe and Oceania and provide its passengers with a free quality Wi-Fi network. The company notes that only outbound flights, not flights from one island in the archipelago to another, should be of concern. A Hawaiian Airlines flight (photo) Tomas del Goro (CC BY-SA 2.0)) It should be noted that although Hawaii Airlines was the first to formalize this announcement, nothing has been done at this stage and other airlines have the same opinion. It’s logical, moreover, that satellites are the best way to bring internet connectivity to aircraft and Starling is not a leading player in this category. The difference should come from the quality of the connection and its speed, but also from its very low cost, which makes it possible to provide internet access to...
    In this article HAHawaiian Airlines planeLouis Nastro | ReutersSpaceX will start providing wireless internet on Hawaiian Airlines flights from the Starlink satellite network as early as next year, a service the airline told CNBC it plans to offer to passengers for free. The deal marks the first for Elon Musk's space company with a major airline. Starlink is SpaceX's network of about 2,000 satellites in low Earth orbit, designed to deliver high-speed internet to consumers and businesses anywhere on the planet. Hawaiian's plan for complimentary connectivity with Starlink could increase pressure on rivals to offer free Wi-Fi for travelers, something currently available on JetBlue Airways. For example, Delta Air Lines CEO Ed Bastian said in 2018 that the airline wants to offer complimentary, high-speed Wi-Fi on its planes. It tested it on some flights in 2019. The installation of Starlink terminals, also known as antennas, is expected to start next year on Hawaiian planes. The airline has yet to begin testing Starlink on an aircraft, and there are "certification issues that need to be worked through before we're ready to...
    NORTH TEXAS (AP) – Ordinary Americans and the nation’s airlines are combining to donate miles and cash to help Afghan refugees resettle in the United States. Organizers said Tuesday they have raised enough donations pay for 40,000 flights, but they’re hoping to nearly double that amount. The flights generally carry Afghans from temporary housing at U.S. military bases to new homes around the United States. The campaign was started by Miles4Migrants, which uses donated miles and credit card points to help refugees. Airlines have gotten involved, with the biggest donations coming from United Airlines and American Airlines, according to organizers. The effort has the backing of the White House as well.
    Billionaire entrepreneur Elon Musk disclosed in a tweet Thursday morning that he is in talks with airlines to provide Starlink internet for in-flight Wi-Fi service. "We are talking to airlines about installing Starlink," Musk said , referring to the satellite-based internet service project of his aerospace manufacturer and space organization, SpaceX. "Please let them know if you want it on your airliner." He did not disclose which airlines are currently in these talks. AVOIDING CELESTIAL TRAFFIC JAMS Yes, we are talking to airlines about installing Starlink. Please let them know if you want it on your airliner. Low latency ~half gigabit connectivity in the air!— Elon Musk (@elonmusk) October 14, 2021 SpaceX said in April 2020 that it was starting Starlink to "provide high-speed, low-latency broadband connectivity across the globe, including to locations where internet has traditionally been too expensive, unreliable, or entirely unavailable," with a goal of using a web of orbital satellites "generally invisible to the naked eye within a week of launch." In October 2020, Musk announced the internet service...
    Delta Air Lines will become the first carrier to help the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention trace international travelers who fly while infected with COVID-19. The project is aimed at keeping “international customers informed of potential COVID-19 exposure.” "Along with our nine global airline partners, we are working with government agencies, health officials and aviation authorities to offer safer travel at every point in your journey," the company said in a news release issued Thursday. Delta will start asking customers to provide information for tracing beginning Dec. 15. The information includes the passengers’ full names, email address, U.S. address, primary phone number and secondary phone number. The information will be sent to the CDC. “Independent studies have shown that the many layers of protection Delta has already put in place are effectively minimizing the risk of COVID-19 transmission, and contact tracing adds one more important layer to our efforts to ensure safety throughout travel,” said Bill Lentsch, Delta’s Chief Customer Experience Officer. “We want customers to feel safe when they return to travel, and this voluntary program is another way...
    Southwest Airlines has announced it will resume fully seating their airplanes starting Dec. 1, having previously limited the number of passengers onboard flights due to the coronavirus pandemic. "Today, aligned with science-based findings from trusted medical and aviation organizations, we will resume selling all available seats for travel beginning Dec. 1, 2020," Gary Kelly, Southwest chairman and chief executive, said in a press release Thursday. Passengers will have the option of switching to a less crowded flight, the same offer being made by American and United Airlines. This move will make Delta Air Lines and Alaska Airlines the only domestic American airlines that will block the middle seats during the upcoming holiday season. Southwest also recently announced it will be expanding its route network to include several new cities, focusing specifically on Miami, Palm Springs, and Montrose. "Our schedules for these new cities on the Southwest network thoughtfully link them to relevant nonstop destinations that also provide great connections, a comfortable journey with our unmatched flexibility, and our friendly policies," Andrew Watterson, Southwest Airlines Chief Commercial Officer & Executive Vice...
    Reuters October 7, 2020 0 Comments U.S. President Donald Trump said late on Tuesday Congress should quickly extend $25 billion in new payroll assistance to U.S. passenger airlines furloughing thousands of workers as air travel remains down sharply amid the coronavirus pandemic. Trump’s new demand came hours after he announced his administration would abandon talks with congressional Democrats over proposals to spend at least $1.6 trillion in additional coronavirus relief funds, a move that appeared to scuttle a new $25 billion bailout for U.S. passenger airlines to keep tens of thousands of workers on the job for another six months. But Trump later issued a call on Twitter, urging Congress to “IMMEDIATELY Approve 25 Billion Dollars for Airline Payroll Support…. I will sign now!” he wrote, saying Congress could tap unused funds from prior coronavirus relief to fund airlines and a separate program for small business. American Airlines and United Airlines last week began laying off 32,000 workers, but had said they would reverse course if lawmakers reach a deal on a new government program to fund payroll costs....
    House Transportation and Infrastructure Chairman Peter DeFazioPeter Anthony DeFazioCentrist Democrats got their COVID bill, now they want a vote House Democrats to include more aid for airlines in coronavirus package Anxious Democrats amp up pressure for vote on COVID-19 aid MORE (D-Ore.) attempted to pass a stand-alone bill that would give relief to airlines on the House floor Friday. The attempt was unsuccessful after the Oregon congressman was denied a request for unanimous consent, which would preclude the need for members to participate in a recorded vote. His bill would extend the airline Payroll Support Program (PSP) by six months. “The Republican majority killed this legislation, plain and simple. If they had just agreed, tens of thousands of workers for the airlines— flight attendants, they don’t get paid a heck of a lot of money, pilots, yeah they do well, mechanics, gate agents— tens of thousands of those people have been furlough as of yesterday,” DeFazio said on the House floor.  PSP, which allocated $25 billion in aid for airlines, was part of the massive $2.2 trillion Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic...
    House Democrats' emergency coronavirus relief package, which has not yet been unveiled, includes additional funding for the struggling airline industry, according to a Democratic aide on the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee. Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiPelosi slams Trump executive order on pre-existing conditions: It 'isn't worth the paper it's signed on' On The Money: Anxious Democrats push for vote on COVID-19 aid | Pelosi, Mnuchin ready to restart talks | Weekly jobless claims increase | Senate treads close to shutdown deadline Trump signs largely symbolic pre-existing conditions order amid lawsuit MORE (D-Calif.) had tasked committee heads with drafting a package this week and Ways and Means Chairman Richard NealRichard Edmund NealPelosi asks panels to draft new COVID-19 relief measure AARP endorses Democrats' measure to overturn Trump payroll tax deferral Pelosi, Democrats unveil bills to rein in alleged White House abuses of power MORE (D-Mass.), who is leading the charge, said the package could receive a vote by Oct. 2. Under the terms of the CARES Act relief funding that passed this spring, airlines are prohibited from firing or laying off any employees until Oct. 1....
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