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    Five Chinese state-owned companies announced Friday they would delist from the New York Stock Exchange amid a refusal to adhere to US auditing regulations and growing tensions between the two global economies. Washington has warned over 270 Chinese companies, like Alibaba Group, of possible removal from stock exchanges if Beijing continues to refuse regulations, according to a report by ABC News. Beijing cites foreign inspection of audit documents from local accounting firms as a national security concern, leading to the dispute over regulations.  All five companies were identified in May as having not met US regulators' auditing standards, which required regulators to see records of corporate auditors. PetroChina Ltd., China Life Insurance Ltd. and China Petroleum & Chemical Co. did not refer to disputes between the two countries over Taiwan, after a recent trip by U.S. House of Representatives Speaker Nancy Pelosi sparked tensions, in their decision to delist. Oil giant Sinopec announced Friday that it would delist from the New York Stock Exchange after refusing audit regulations by the US Disputes arise amid growing tension between the two global...
    by Sebastian Hughes   In light of the West’s united front against Russia amid its invasion of Ukraine, China will likely be forced to reexamine its plans for making Taiwan a part of the communist country, experts on the region told the Daily Caller News Foundation. “I think that the military planners in Beijing, as well as politicians in Beijing, have to be very concerned at a deeper level about their assumptions and plans regarding Taiwan,” David Sacks, a research fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations, told the DCNF. “The democratic world has really come together behind this and … the narrative would be very similar with a Chinese attack.” “They’re now starting to see the United States mobilize itself and I think they’re probably not very happy with that,” Gordon G. Chang, author of “The Coming Collapse of China,” told the DCNF. “We’ve had these decades of old lethargy and we might, we might, be coming out of it.” China has increasingly sent aircraft into Taiwan’s defense zone, and it flew nine People’s Liberation Army planes over the...
    A year after the U.S. withdrawal from Afghanistan, the CIA is quietly pivoting its focus towards China, alarmed by its aggression towards Taiwan and spying activities around the world. Although officials say they will continue to prioritize fighting terrorists - and cite the drone strike that killed Al Qaeda chief Ayman al-Zawahiri - money and resources are being shifted to counter China. That was the message delivered recently by CIA deputy director David Cohen at a closed door meeting of the agency's counterterrorism center. It follows a structural overhaul last year that included a new China Mission Center, designed to bring together analysts, technology experts and agents who recruit spies into a single unit. Intelligence officials stress that the counterterrorism fight is hardly being ignored. Just a week ago it revealed a CIA strike in Kabul took out the head of Al Qaeda.  But days later, China staged large-scale military exercises and threatened to cut off contacts with the U.S. over House Speaker Nancy Pelosi's visit to Taiwan. The U.S. has long been alarmed by China's growing political and economic ambitions....
    CHINA may choose between options to take Taiwan which includes a 48-hour blitz or a slow blockade squeeze, diplomatic sources claim. Tensions are high after China deployed masses of military equipment to effectively blockade Taiwan during a string of war games. 5China conducted long-range live-fire drills in the Taiwan Strait on ThursdayCredit: Alamy 5China is conducting live fire drills 12 miles from Taiwan 5A Chinese aircraft carrying missiles flies close to Taiwan 5Taiwanese military personnel take part in a military exercise 5 If China decides to take Taiwan, it will plan to carry out "a lightning-fast 48-hour offensive" to leave the West scrambling to respond, diplomatic sources have told The Telegraph. The publication understands the tactic has been a lesson learned from Moscow's invasion after Western leaders took two days to respond to President Vladimir Putin's attack on Ukraine. It's thought the crucial window of time to act has been deduced from Russia's failure to take Kyiv and topple Volodymyr Zelensky's government. Diplomatic sources say President Xi believes Western "significant" support could have been handed to Ukraine during...
    Technology giant Apple have warned suppliers shipping from Taiwan to ensure that they abide by strict Chinese custom regulations – banning them from saying ‘Made in Taiwan’. The company has asked their suppliers to follow China’s long-standing rule that anything made in Taiwan has to be labeled as either ‘Taiwan, China’ or ‘Chinese Taipei’. Tensions have been rising within the US and China, after House Speaker Nancy Pelosi has visited Taiwan despite repeated warnings from the Chinese not to, claiming it is a ‘violation of the one-China principle.’ She touched down in Taipei earlier this week and was greeted by Foreign Minister Joseph Wu, before China's Ministry of Foreign Affairs immediately blasted the move, calling it a 'serious disregard of China's strong opposition.’ According to a report by Nikkei Asia, the visit ‘stoked fears of rising trade barriers,’ making Apple nervous about ‘possible disruptions’. The iPhone maker has now warned suppliers that the country has started enforcing their strict customs, so to ensure that they abide by them to prevent further issues. Apple bosses have reportedly been concerned that any...
    Dan Kitwood/Getty Images With China’s communist government still acting very prickly in the wake of Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi’s recent visit to Taiwan, Apple is urging its suppliers to make sure to label any shipments from Taiwan to China in strict compliance with the Chinese customs regulations regarding how the island is named. It’s a critical time for Apple, as it prepares to launch the next generation of iPhones this fall, and suppliers are currently assembling various components for the new smartphones. According to a report by Nikkei Asia, Pelosi’s visit “stoked fears of rising trade barriers,” making Apple nervous about “possible disruptions” if crucial shipments are delayed or even blocked in customs due to a failure to appease China’s labelling demands: Apple told suppliers on Friday that China has started strictly enforcing a long-standing rule that Taiwanese-made parts and components must be labeled as being made either in “Taiwan, China” or “Chinese Taipei,” sources familiar with the matter told Nikkei Asia, language that indicates the island is part of China… Using the phrase “Made in Taiwan” on...
    WHEN the two most powerful men on Earth talked last week, Chinese strongman Xi Jinping had a chilling warning for US President Joe Biden. Ruthless Xi calmly and coldly told him: “Those who play with fire will perish by it,” in a sinister swipe at American “provocations” over the disputed isle of Taiwan. 7Ruthless Xi calmly and coldly told President Biden: 'Those who play with fire will perish by it,' in a sinister swipe at American 'provocations' over the disputed isle of TaiwanCredit: Alamy 7The Taiwanese president is the resolute Tsai Ing-wenCredit: Alamy 7China and the USA are now locked in a stand-off over Taiwan which threatens to dwarf Russia’s Ukraine invasion and start World War Three. Just days later, the two superpowers are now locked in a stand-off which threatens to dwarf Russia’s Ukraine invasion and start World War Three. China claims the democratically run island state, just 100 miles off its coast, is its sovereign territory — despite US pledges to defend its right to stay free. Nancy Pelosi, the third most powerful political figure in America, has...
    House Speaker Nancy Pelosi departed Taiwan Wednesday after her controversial visit that infuriated the Chinese government – only to have the geopolitical tensions follow her to South Korea. Pelosi and her congressional delegation's next stop is Seoul, where she will meet her South Korean counterpart, National Assembly Speaker Kim Jin-pyo and other ruling party members on Thursday.  But South Korean President Yoon Suk-yeol won't be meeting her. Yoon is taking time off at home in Seoul.   An official from the presidential office told the South China Morning Post Yoon would not be greeting the high-profile US visitor, whose stature as a powerful Democratic leader and second in the line of succession infuriated Beijing and caused a diplomatic row. 'In the first place, there was no such a plan (for Yoon' meeting Pelosi) as the president's vacation schedule coincides with her visit here,' the official said.  House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and her 5-member congress delegation depart Taipei Songshan Airport to South Korea after Pelosi's visit within her Pacific tour in Taipei, Taiwan on August 3, 2022. The tensions over her visit are...
    Senate Minority leader Mitch McConnell has supported Speaker Nancy Pelosi's trip to Taiwan and slammed President Joe Biden and his team for voicing their opposition to the visit amid tensions with China.  'I believe she has every right to go, and it's been unseemly and counterproductive for President Biden and his aids to have publicly sought to deter her from doing so,' McConnell said on Tuesday.  While the Biden administration did not explicitly urge Pelosi to call off the visit, Biden has said it was not a 'good idea' as his team seeks to reassure Beijing the trip would not signal any change in U.S. policy on Taiwan.  Following her landing, McConnell praised the trip as he warned of China's aggression against Taiwan and the need to protect democracy.  'To hear [Biden]... complain that speaker Pelosi’s travel itinerary is provocative is utterly absurd,' McConnel added.   Senate Minority leader Mitch McConnell criticized President Joe Biden for not supporting Speaker Nancy Pelosi's trip to Taiwan on Tuesday  This is a developing story. 
    VIDEO1:0901:09House Speaker Pelosi to visit Taiwan tomorrow, according to reportsThe News with Shepard Smith WASHINGTON — As House Speaker Nancy Pelosi reportedly prepares to land in Taiwan on Tuesday evening for a long-rumored official visit, her trip has exposed a rare schism between the Biden White House and the most powerful Democrat in Congress. Officially, the Biden administration has been careful to avoid directly answering questions about whether it agrees with Pelosi's decision to make the trip. But unofficially, the White House and the Pentagon have made little secret of their opposition to such a visit, which comes at a time when U.S.-China relations are the poorest they've been in decades. In late July, Biden responded to a question about Pelosi's then-rumored stop in Taiwan by saying, "The military thinks it's not a good idea right now. But I don't know what the status of it is." For weeks, American officials from the president on down have tied themselves into knots trying to talk about Pelosi's choice to visit Taiwan, and stressing that it was her decision, and hers alone.Missing...
    US House of Representatives Speaker Nancy Pelosi is expected to visit Taiwan on her trip to Asia, despite warnings from China that its military 'will not sit idly by' if she does.  Senior Taiwanese government officiala and a US official both told CNN that the stop is on her trip, even though it is not on her public itinerary. The Taiwanese official said that she is expected to stay in Taiwan overnight, and the US official added that defense department officials were working on securing a plan to keep her safe, according to CNN.  China said on Monday that its military 'will not sit idly by' if she makes the visit.  The latest warning was issued during a Chinese foreign ministry briefing by pokesperson Zhao Lijian, who said that because of Pelosi's status as the 'No. 3 official of the US government', a visit to Taiwan, which China claims as its own, would 'lead to egregious political impact'. Pelosi kicked-off a tour of four Asian countries in the early hours of Monday morning in Singapore amid intense speculation that she may risk...
    It’s reasonable to conclude that the protection of the Pearl River Delta is crucial to the CCP preserving stability of the Guangdong region and China in general. Should these areas be compromised by China’s enemies, large swaths of the Chinese economy will become extremely vulnerable. Some of the leaked audio from the top-secret meeting confirmed that the invasion would be a massive operation. A speaker at the meeting said, “First, the mobilization tasks issued to our province by the eastern and southern war zones totaling 20 categories and 293 items, mainly 1,358 detachments of various types with a total of 140,000 personnel, 953 ships of various types, and 1653 units/sets of various unmanned equipment.” The leaked audio also confirmed that companies involved in the manufacture of military technologies, telecommunication companies, and satellite service companies located in China will all play a crucial role in supplying the PLA throughout the invasion of Taiwan. Many of America’s largest defense contractors have extensive ties to the PLA and CCP. The leaked audio confirms that the meeting was held to discuss...
    Biden on Monday attended a joint press conference with Japanese Prime Minister Fumio Kishida in Tokyo, Japan.Pool | Getty Images News | Getty Images U.S. President Joe Biden on Monday said he would be willing to use force to defend Taiwan, prompting thanks from the self-ruled island and sharp criticism from China. When asked at a joint press conference with Japanese Prime Minister Fumio Kishida whether the U.S. would be prepared to defend Taiwan if attacked, Biden replied: "Yes." "That's the commitment we made," Biden said. "We agree with a one-China policy. We've signed on to it and all the intended agreements made from there but the idea that it can be taken by force, just taken by force, is just not appropriate."TVWATCH LIVEWATCH IN THE APPUP NEXT | ETListen
    Reportedly, the U.S. is considering implementing similar packages of sanctions against China in the event that it moves forward with an invasion of Taiwan. Recent and repeated rhetoric from Chinese leadership indicates that it is not a matter of “if” but a matter of “when” China launches an invasion of Taiwan. A source close to the Chinese officials who met said, “No one site could think of a good solution to the problem. China’s banking system isn’t prepared for a freeze of its dollar assets or exclusion from the Swift messaging system as the US has done to Russia.” Reportedly, one idea proposed in the meeting was to force Chinese businesses that export to other nations to part ways with their holdings in U.S. dollars in exchange for Chinese renminbi. Other proposed solutions such as swamping U.S. dollar holdings to favor the Euro were not thought to be practical. Some of the Chinese leaders present doubted whether the U.S. even has the capacity to issue such sanctions on China’s economy. Andrew Collier, managing director of Orient Capital Research...
    Chinese officials are looking at ways to defend the country from economic attack if the West should look to sanction China in the same way it did Russia — stoking fears the nation is preparing for an invasion of Taiwan. China's regulators held an emergency meeting on April 22 between officials from China’s central bank, the finance ministry, domestic banks operating within China, and international lenders such as HSBC. The West's harsh economic sanctions on Russia prompted the emergency meeting, with the Ministry of Finance stating that President Xi’s administration had been put on alert by the surprise dollar freeze. Taiwan President Tsai Ing-wen (right) speaks to United States Senator Lindsey Graham (left) and other US officials during their visit inside the Presidential office in Taipei. China's regulators held an emergency meeting on April 22 between officials from China’s central bank, the finance ministry, domestic banks operating within China, and international lenders RELATED ARTICLES Previous 1 2 Next Chilling Anzac Day warning Australia must 'prepare for war'... Taiwan TV station apologises for 'causing public panic'... ...
    BANGKOK (AP) — With its ground troops forced to pull back in Ukraine and regroup, and its Black Sea flagship sunk, Russia’s military failings are mounting. No country is paying closer attention than China to how a smaller and outgunned force has badly bloodied what was thought to be one of the world’s most powerful armies. China, like Russia, has been ambitiously reforming its Soviet-style military and experts say leader Xi Jinping will be carefully parsing the weaknesses exposed by the invasion of Ukraine as they might apply to his own People’s Liberation Army and his designs on the self-governed island of Taiwan. “The big question Xi and the PLA leadership must be asking in light of Russian operations in Ukraine is whether a military that has undergone extensive reform and modernization will be able to execute operations that are far more complex than those Russia has undertaken during its invasion of Ukraine,” said M. Taylor Fravel, director of the security studies program at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Russia’s armed forces have undergone an extensive process of reform and...
    China is accelerating its construction on more than 100 missile silos that can house nuclear weapons capable of reaching the United States, a move that the country's leaders say is meant to deter American forces from intervening in a potential future conflict over Taiwan.  Although Beijing has accelerated its expansion of nuclear weaponry in recent months, the government claims its plan is to only maintain enough arsenal necessary to ensure the nation's security interests.  Estimates by intelligence analysts and private-sector firms put China's nuclear arsenal somewhere in the 'hundreds' - far less than either the U.S. or Russia, which hold more than 4,000 each.  Pentagon officials say that if China continues developing its technology at the current pace, it will have just over 1,000 warheads by 2030. Currently, Chinese military officials believe their nuclear weapons are too 'outdated' to act as an 'effective deterrent' against an American attack, according to the Wall Street Journal. 'China's inferior nuclear capability could only lead to growing U.S. pressure on China,' a source familiar with the plans told the newspaper. This acceleration has raised concerns among...
    In an address to the Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) in Orlando, Florida, “Mr Brexit” Nigel Farage said that Vladimir Putin had “nothing to fear” from Joe Biden, whom he described as the worst president in the history of the United States. Nigel Farage, the leading force behind the populist Brexit uprising that resulted in the United Kingdom leaving the European Union, said that a failure of leadership from President Joe Biden has resulted in Putin being emboldened enough to launch an invasion of Ukraine. Putin “had nothing to fear from the worst American president in the history of this nation,” Mr Farage said of 79-year-old Democrat Joe Biden. “I have no doubt that if Donald Trump had still been the president, that invasion of Ukraine would not have happened,” he added. “I’m not allowed to say ‘Let’s go Brandon’ because it’s too rude,” Farage joked before launching into a full-throated “Let’s go Brandon!” chant with the CPAC crowd. A majority of American voters believe that Putin would not have invaded Ukraine if Trump were still in office, according to...
    Hong Kong (CNN)China's stringent zero-Covid policy has allowed authorities to catch thousands of imported coronavirus cases. But, occasionally, it might help catch a fugitive too.A murder suspect who fled to China hours after allegedly gunning down a man in Taiwan on Monday is now "trapped" in hotel quarantine upon arrival in the coastal city of Xiamen -- setting himself up for an easy capture by authorities.Taiwanese law enforcement agents have sought help from their Chinese counterparts to return the suspected gunman to the island, Taiwan's Criminal Investigation Bureau (CIB) told CNN Thursday. Since the pandemic, China has imposed some of the strictest border restrictions in the world, with an aim to eliminate the virus from within its borders.Foreign visitors, from tourists to students, are largely banned from entering mainland China. Those few who are allowed in, as well as returning Chinese citizens, must undergo at least 14 days of centralized quarantine -- and that goes for fugitives too. China has built a 5,000-room quarantine center for overseas arrivals. It could be the first of manyRead MoreThe suspect, surnamed Huang, who...
    A bipartisan group of Congress members touring portions of East Asia spent part of Thanksgiving serving lunch to U.S. troops stationed in South Korea before jetting off to Taiwan - despite protests from the Chinese Embassy. Republican Rep. Nancy Mace of South Carolina was among the lawmakers serving vegetables, potatoes and turkey to some of the 28,000 American troops stationed in the country. 'Enjoyed serving our troops today,' Mace tweeted. 'Many of our soldiers haven’t been able to visit home or have their families visit them since the start of COVID. Incredibly important to give our men and women in uniform a heartfelt thanks.'   Democratic Rep. Mark Takano of California, chairman of the House Committee on Veterans' Affairs, was among the politicians who helped scoop food onto soldiers' plates and tossed a football with them. President Joe Biden also paid tribute to overseas troops on Thanksgiving while remaining in Nantucket for the holiday. Republican Rep. Nancy Mace (right) joined four Democrats in a tour of three east Asian countries, including South Korea, where she helped serve food to US troops...
    The White House has walked back a number of remarks President Biden made in a CNN town hall Thursday night.  A White House official said that the Biden administration is 'not actively pursuing the use of the National Guard on a federal level.'  'Requesting the use of the National Guard at the state level is under the purview of governors,' the official clarified, according to multiple news outlets.  'The answer is yes,' the president said, asked if he would send in the guard to alleviate supply chain issues that are leading to product shortages and rampant inflation. 'Absolutely, positively,' he added.  Asked if he would consider sending in the guard to drive trucks, the president said: 'Yes, if we can't increase the number of truckers.'  'The answer is yes,' the president said, asked if he would send in the guard to alleviate supply chain issues that are leading to product shortages and rampant inflation Cargo container trucks wait in line to enter AMP Terminals at the Port of Los Angeles, Oct. 20, A White House official said that the Biden...
    Republican voters pressed President Joe Biden on the border crisis and his commitment to curbing China’s military aggression at CNN’s town hall Tuesday. Biden reaffirmed America’s commitment to defend Taiwan should China invade. The Chinese military has grown increasingly bold in its stance toward Taiwan in recent weeks, sending a record-breaking 52 warplanes into Taiwan’s air defense zone in early October. “Militarily — China, Russia and the rest of the world knows — we have the most powerful military in the history of the world. Don’t worry about whether they’re gonna be more powerful,” Biden said. “But you do have to worry about whether they’re going to engage in activities that will put them in a position where they may make a serious mistake.” CNN Host Anderson Cooper then interjected, asking whether Biden would commit to defending Taiwan. (RELATED: US Military Says Chinese Attack On Taiwan Accelerating As Taiwan Threatens War ‘To The Very Last Day’) “Yes, we have a commitment to do that.” WATCH: Another member of the audience pressed Biden on why his agenda on immigration appears to...
    TAIPEI, Taiwan (AP) — An intensive summer language program hosted by Harvard University in Beijing will relocate to Taiwan in summer of 2022, as the U.S.-China relationship remains strained. The program is moving to Taipei and will kick off next summer with about 60 students who will take eight weeks of classes, National Taiwan University confirmed Wednesday. The decision was in part “due to a perceived lack of friendliness from the host institution” in Beijing, according to Harvard’s student paper the Crimson, which first reported the move. Every summer, according to the Crimson, the program “would typically host a small party to celebrate the Fourth of July, during which students and faculty would eat pizza and sing the national anthem.” But in 2019, the host university, Beijing Language and Culture University, said it could no longer host the event, Program Director Jennifer L. Liu told the paper. Liu also said logistical issues impacted the decision. She told the Crimson that “BLCU did not provide a single dorm for all the students, instead requiring the program split the students...
    Amid unprecedented aggression from communist China, Taiwan’s President Tsai Ing-wen said the country will not “bow down to pressure” amid calls for “reunification.” During a speech honoring the country’s founding on Sunday, Tsai (pictured) called for “maintaining the status quo” with China. “Our position on cross-strait relations remains the same: neither our goodwill nor our commitments will change,” she said. “We call for maintaining the status quo, and we will do our utmost to prevent the status quo from being unilaterally altered.” Taiwan’s President Tsai Ing-wen (L) and Vice President William Lai applaud during national day celebrations in front of the Presidential Palace in Taipei on October 10, 2021. (Photo by Sam Yeh / AFP) (Photo by SAM YEH/AFP via Getty Images) Though Tsai expressed hope for an easing of relations with China, she vowed that the “Taiwanese people will bow to pressure.” “We will continue to bolster our national defense and demonstrate our determination to defend ourselves in order to ensure that nobody can force Taiwan to take the path China has laid out for us,” she said. “This is...
    TAIWAN has vowed to arm itself with long-range missiles to defend against the “severe threat” from China amid World War Three fears. The pledge comes after the Chinese air force made more than 500 incursions into Taiwan’s air-defence identification zone so far in 2021, according to an official.     1China sent 19 fighter jets, including 12 J-16s, towards Taiwan on September 23, 2021, in a large display of forceCredit: AP China is rapidly developing its military systems to attack the island, Defence Minister Chiu Kuo-cheng warned on Monday. Taiwan thus needed to have long-range, accurate weapons to properly deter its bullying neighbour, he added. China treats the self-governing island democracy as a rebel region that must be reunited with the mainland - by force if necessary. Taiwan has already this month proposed extra defence spending of almost $9 billion over the next five years. This includes buying new missiles, as it has warned of an urgent need to upgrade weapons in the face of a "severe threat" from its giant neighbour. Chiu today told parliament that Taiwan needed to...
    A Taiwanese team taking part in the Le Mans 24-hour race was told to remove the island's national flag from its car and replace it with its Olympic version before competing.  The team's owner Morris Chen received a request from organisers to replace Taiwan's flag before the race started on Monday, according to Taiwan's Central News Agency. It came after China's Tencent decided not to livestream the event because a 'racing team from Taiwan, China, used the non-Olympic flag on their car hood', CNA quoted a message posted on Chinese social network Weibo as saying. A Taiwanese team taking part in the Le Mans 24-hour race was told to remove the island's national flag from its car and replace it with its Olympic version before competing Beijing views democratic Taiwan as its own territory and has vowed to one day seize it, by force if necessary. It is unwilling to accept any use of Taiwan or its official title, the Republic of China, on the world stage unless it lends the island international legitimacy. As a result, Taiwan...
    FEARS of World War Three have been reignited after China warned Taiwan it should be "trembling" as the US "won't protect" the island from invasion. With chaotic scenes erupting across Afghanistan amid a Taliban takeover after President Joe Biden decided to withdraw US troops after 20 years, Beijing has warned Taiwan "can't rely" on America in a crisis. 2China has warned Taiwan 'can't rely' on the US after flexing its military mightCredit: Alamy 2The warning comes after the US was accused of 'empty promises' after withdrawing troops from AfghanistanCredit: AFP Li Haidong, a professor at the Institute of International Relations of the China Foreign Affairs University, said he believes the US is set to "cast aside" Taiwan should Taipei push for independence. "The US' fleeing action is a warning to the Taiwan secessionists, or rather, a forecast," he told the Global Times. Meanwhile, Jin Canrong - associate dean of the School of International Studies at the Renmin University of China - accused the US of holding "empty promises". He told the outlet: "Those who have a clear mind should...
    Bill Clinton took two trips with Ghislaine Maxwell and Jeffrey Epstein - including one on the pedophile's private jet - that have not been previously disclosed. A new podcast reveals that the former President flew on Epstein's jet, which was dubbed the 'Lolita Express', in February 2005 while visiting Japan, Taiwan and China. Clinton also flew on a private jet owned by billionaire Ron Burkle with Maxwell as a passenger during a trip to India in November 2003. That visit was part of Clinton's work with the Clinton Foundation, his philanthropic initiative, to lower the cost of AIDS drugs. According to journalist Vicky Ward, Maxwell was part of the official Clinton party and even stayed at the same hotel as him. Ward reveals the details in her new podcast 'Chasing Ghislaine', which is available from Thursday on Audible Originals. A new podcast reveals that Bill Clinton flew on Jeffrey Epstein's private jet in February 2005 while visiting Japan, Taiwan and China. Pictured together in 1993   This is Jeffrey Epstein's infamous 'Lolita Express' - a private Boeing 727 airliner...
    Japanese Deputy Prime Minister Aso Taro suggested on Monday that his country’s defense forces might assist the United States in defending Taiwan in the event of a Chinese incursion, before seemingly tempering his remarks and calling for diplomatic efforts to deescalate tensions in the Pacific. “If a major incident happened, it would not be strange at all if it touches on a situation threatening survival,” Aso asserted, according to Nikkei Asia. “If that is the case, Japan and the U.S. must defend Taiwan together.” He further described the ongoing dispute between China and Taiwan as becoming “extremely intense.” Japan’s military forces are constitutionally limited to a strict role of self-defense, a provision of the 1947 constitution adopted in the wake of the Second World War. In 2015, however, then-Prime Minister Abe Shinzo oversaw an expansion of legitimate deployments of the Self-Defense Forces, which may permit Tokyo to flex its military might to defend a neighboring nation, should the aggressor in such a conflict prove a security threat to Japan. Aso later spoke to reporters and asserted his preference for a...
    Seven staff members at the Taipei Economic and Cultural Office (TECO) in Hong Kong returned to Taiwan on Sunday after they refused to sign a Hong Kong government-issued “One China” pledge negating Taiwanese sovereignty and were subsequently denied work visas by the Beijing-controlled city, the Taipei Times reported Monday. “Of the [TECO] office’s five division heads, only Economy Division Director Ni Po-chia remains, although his visa is to expire at the end of next month,” the Taipei Times reported June 21. “Since July 2018, the Hong Kong government has repeatedly set unreasonable political conditions whenever our employees applied for work visas, including requiring them to sign a pledge to observe the ‘one China’ policy,” Taiwan’s Mainland Affairs Council (MAC) said in a statement issued June 20. “This made it impossible for our employees to assume office or continue to stay in Hong Kong. As such, there would be an adjustment in the businesses handled by the Taipei Economic and Cultural Office [TECO] in Hong Kong, starting June 21,” the MAC wrote, referring to its recall of seven of the eight...
    A man holds Taiwanese flags as he joins others to attend a rally to mark Taiwan's National Day, in the Tsim Sha Tsui district in Hong Kong on October 10, 2019. Philip FONG/AFP via Getty Images Taiwan's government has recalled all but one of its officials working in its Hong Kong trade office. Hong Kong mandated that the Taiwanese staff sign a document acknowledging the "One China" principle for their visas to be renewed. The Taiwanese refused to sign the document because it's at odds with their government's foreign policy. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. A fresh diplomatic row has erupted, this time between Hong Kong and Taiwan.  The Taiwanese government recalled seven of its eight staff members stationed at its trade office in Hong Kong over the weekend, per a Guardian report. This is because the city's government is mandating that all staff members working at the Taipei Economic and Cultural Office (TECO) in Hong Kong must sign a document acknowledging their commitment to the "One China" policy. The Hong Kong government said the signing...
    Residents of Matsu island have spotted an uptick in the number of dredgers off the coast of Taiwan that are carving out sand from under them. Ann Wang/Reuters Residents on the Taiwanese islet of Matsu said they saw an armada of Chinese sand dredgers plying the coast. A Taiwanese politician called the use of sand dredgers a "gray zone" tactic meant to intimidate. A record number of aerial incursions by Chinese planes were also made into Taiwan's air space on Tuesday. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. China is ramping up its new method of exerting its control over Taiwan — with hundreds of sand dredgers stealing sand from the island's coastline. Residents living on the Taiwanese islet of Matsu, which is slightly over 5.5 miles from the Chinese mainland, spotted an armada of some 300 to 400 sand-dredging vessels converging off the coast, per a Nikkei report. Taiwan is separated from China by the highly militarized Taiwan Strait. The Chinese government has claimed Taiwan as a "renegade province" that is part of its territory, but the Taiwanese...
    F9 is “projected to finish its China run with $211 million — a big number but just a little more than half as much as ‘The Fate of the Furious’ earned in China in 2017,” reports the far-left Hollywood Reporter. Until F9 co-star John Cena opened his stupid mouth last week and squeaked out an apology to China’s dictators for accurately describing the country of Taiwan as a “country,” this insanely successful franchise, that is now 20-years-old, had astutely avoided politics. But now the franchise is marred by Cena’s craven spinelessness, and all for nothing. F9, the franchise’s latest installment, is smoking hot death at China’s box office. After two weekends in release, F9 fizzled in week two with a collapse of 85 percent. As of now, China’s generated just $136 million in box office and is expected to hit the finish line with just $211 million. By comparison, Furious 7 and The Fate of the Furious respectively earned massive Chinese grosses of $391 million and $393. THR is correct in saying there’s no way to know if “John Cena’s humiliating Taiwan/China gaff has had anything to do...
    China barred Taiwan from participating in the World Health Assembly to punish its elected government for “obstinately” resisting Beijing’s efforts to assert control over the island democracy, a senior Chinese diplomat acknowledged. “The Taiwan region's participation in the activities of international organizations, including [the World Health Organization], must be handled in accordance with the one-China principle,” Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman Zhao Lijian told reporters Monday. “China cannot agree to the Taiwan region's participation in this year's WHA.” Taiwanese officials have lobbied to return to the global health forum throughout the coronavirus pandemic, which emerged from neighboring mainland China. The communist regime maintains that Taipei’s participation in the forum would represent a step toward Taiwan’s recognition as an independent country, but Zhao put a finer point on the controversy when he acknowledged the years Taiwan was not excluded from the World Health Assembly. “Since the Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) came to power, it has placed its political agenda over the well-being of the people in the Taiwan region, obstinately adhered to the separatist position of ‘Taiwan independence,’ and refused to admit...
    The United States looked to nuclear strikes on China in 1958 to protect Taiwan from an invasion by Communist forces, classified documents reveal.  Military leaders also assumed that the Soviet Union would aid China and retaliate with nuclear weapons -a price they deemed worth paying to protect Taiwan, according to the document, first reported by The New York Times.  The documents were posted online by Daniel Ellsberg. The now 90-year-old is famous for his 1971 leak to US media of the Pentagon Papers, a top-secret study on the Vietnam war.   Ellsberg told the Times he copied the top-secret Taiwan crisis study in the early 1970s, and is releasing it as tensions mount between the United States and China over Taiwan. Former military analyst Ellsberg said: 'As the possibility of another nuclear crisis over Taiwan is being bandied about this very year, it seems very timely to me to encourage the public, Congress and the executive branch to pay attention to what I make available to them.'   He posted online the classified portion of a top-secret document on the crisis that had...
    FEARS of nuclear warfare have been sparked after China announced it plans on building a power plant capable of extracting uranium from the sea. According to The China Academy of Engineering Physics said construction work could begin as soon as 2026. 2China plans on being the world's biggest provider of nuclear power by 2030Credit: Getty The plant aims to extract tonnes of uranium, which is a radioactive metal capable of sustaining a nuclear fission reaction from the seawater. The material is believed to hold 1,000 times the amount found on land. China has reserves of around 170,000 tonnes, which is less than the amount of France. The country will need around 35,000 tonnes of uranium every year by 2035 if it's to keep up with its current reactor construction. China plans on being the world's biggest provider of nuclear power by 2030. "The nuclear industry is a hi-tech strategic industry, an important cornerstone of national security," said Cao Shudong, general manager of China National Nuclear Corporation. "Uranium resources play an important role in supporting the nuclear fuel cycle...
    A Chinese propaganda newspaper has encouraged Beijing to bomb Australia if Canberra supports US military action in protecting Taiwan.  Hu Xijin, the editor-in-chief of The Global Times, which is seen as Beijing's mouthpiece on foreign policy to the world, said China should retaliate with 'long-range strikes' if Australia gets involved in a potential military conflict over Taiwan.  'I suggest China make a plan to impose retaliatory punishment against Australia once it militarily interferes in the cross-Straits situation,' he wrote in an opinion piece.  'The plan should include long-range strikes on the military facilities and relevant key facilities on Australian soil if it really sends its troops to China's offshore areas and combats against the PLA (People's Liberation Army).' Mr Hu said it would be important for the Chinese government to send a strong message about the plan for retaliatory military action 'to deter the extreme forces of Australia' from 'committing irresponsible actions'.    He warned Australia 'they must know what disasters they would cause to their country' if they were 'bold enough to coordinate with the US to militarily interfere...
    Taiwan is considering a bill that would ban public displays of the communist Chinese flag as part of a set of reforms aimed at asserting Taiwanese sovereignty, including a passport redesign officials said on Tuesday had proven extremely popular. A bill recently proposed by a member of Taiwan’s anti-communist Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) — which opposes Chinese influence in Taiwan — would ban “raising, lowering, hanging, displaying, holding or brandishing a political or military flag of a hostile foreign power in public places. Those found guilty would be subject to fines of up to $1,782,” the Diplomat reported on April 24. The bill would target the public display of the five-star People’s Republic of China (PRC) flag in Taiwan and require an amendment to Taiwan’s National Security Act to “criminalize certain actions deemed hostile to the nation,” according to the Diplomat. DPP legislator Wang Ting-yu first proposed the amendment in October 2020 with “support from 28 DPP lawmakers and Taiwan Statebuilding Party Legislator Chen Po-wei,” the Taipei Times reported at the time. Taiwan’s Statebuilding Party supports Taiwanese independence. Taiwanese national security officials have...
    TAIPEI (Reuters) - Taiwan's de facto embassy in Myanmar has advised Taiwanese companies operating in the country to fly the island's flag and hang signs stating they are from Taiwan to avoid being confused with China, after Chinese-financed factories were set ablaze. China's embassy said many Chinese staff were injured and trapped in arson attacks on Sunday by unidentified assailants on garment factories in the Yangon suburb of Hlaingthaya, and that it had called on Myanmar to protect Chinese property and citizens. China is viewed as being supportive of the military junta that took power in Myanmar, overthrowing the elected government of Aung San Suu Kyi. Taiwan is home to a large Sino-Burmese population and there are close cultural and business links. Taiwan's Foreign Ministry said on Monday only one Taiwanese company was caught up in the violence, with 10 of its nationals trapped inside the premises though they were safe. It said Taiwan's representative office in the country had got in touch with Taiwanese firms after receiving reports of the attacks on Chinese-invested firms. The office "suggested Taiwanese businesspeople...
    The Conversation In Mike Pence, US evangelicals had their ’24-karat-gold’ man in the White House Mike Pence has remained one of the only constants in the often chaotic Trump administration.Variously described as “vanilla,” “steady” and loyal to the point of being “sycophantic,” he is, in the words of one profile, an “everyman’s man with Midwest humility and approachability,” and in another, a “61-year-old, soft-spoken, deeply religious man.”That humility and loyalty has been tested in recent days. “I hope Mike Pence comes through for us,” Trump told supporters at a rally on Monday, seemingly under the mistaken belief that Pence could overturn the election result. But presiding over the Electoral College vote count at a joint session of Congress on Wednesday, Pence broke with Trump’s wishes and confirmed Joe Biden as the next president, provoking the ire of Trump. Balancing the ticketThroughout the past four years, the vice president has offered a striking contrast to the mercurial, abrasive temperament of his commander in chief. Indeed, in his acceptance speech at the 2016 Republican National Convention, Pence joked that he’d been chosen...
    Taiwanese military strategists need to improve their ability to resist “any sort of amphibious invasion” from mainland China, according to President Trump’s national security adviser. “Taiwan needs to start looking at some asymmetric and anti-access area denial strategies,” Robert O’Brien said during a teleforum with the Aspen Institute. “And really fortify itself in a manner that would deter the Chinese from any sort of amphibious invasion or even a gray zone operation against them.” O’Brien’s exhortation comes just days after State Department officials alerted Congress to a plan to sell Taiwan a $2 billion package of coastal defense cruise missiles. That sale still has to go through a congressional review, but China’s saber-rattling in the Straits of Taiwan has stoked American worry that Beijing might seek to conquer the island by force. “I'm pretty worried,” said Elbridge Colby, a former Pentagon official who helped craft the Defense Department’s national defense strategy in 2017 and 2018. “It's a serious problem right now, and it could get worse in the next couple of years. It’s a near-term problem.” ...
    TAIPEI (Reuters) - The dispute over international organisations referring to Taiwan as Chinese has moved from wild bird conservation to climate change, after a global alliance of mayors began listing Taiwanese cities as belonging to China on its website. China has ramped up pressure on international groups and companies, no matter how small or obscure, to refer to democratic Taiwan as being part of China, to the anger of Taiwan's government and many of its people. Beijing views the island as merely a wayward Chinese province. This month a Taiwan bird conservation body said it had been expelled from a partnership with a British-based wildlife charity after they demanded the Taiwan group change their name and sign documents stating they did not support Taiwan's independence. Late on Saturday, the government of the southern Taiwanese city of Kaohsiung said the website of the Global Covenant of Mayors for Climate and Energy had begun listing Taiwan member cities like itself as part of China. On Sunday, Taiwan's government reacted with anger. "Taiwan is Taiwan. China is China. Taiwan is not a city...
    Hong Kong (CNN)For Ha Sze-yuen, the sea surrounding Hong Kong is more than just a backdrop for sunsets and beaches.The 73-year old views the ocean as his route to freedom - a means of escape from the oppression and poverty of communist China.On the night of April 16, 1975, Ha and a friend slipped past Chinese border guards and plunged their homemade, inflatable rubber dinghy into the dark water of Shenzhen Bay.They then started paddling toward the bright lights of Hong Kong, which at the time was still a British colony.Ha Sze-yuen escaped mainland China for Hong Kong in 1975, rowing across Shenzhen Bay in a small rubber dinghy. Ha said he had already been caught and jailed three times during previous failed attempts to swim across the water. After the third attempt, he said, guards beat him so badly his mother cried when she saw his wounds.Read More"I was fighting for my freedom," Ha said. "I was afraid, but compared to life in China the fear was nothing."Ha said he and his mother, a school teacher, were persecuted during...
    TAIPEI - U.S. Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar will visit Taiwan “in the coming days,” a move that has angered China, which considers the self-ruled island a part of the Chinese mainland.  In a statement released late Tuesday, the U.S. agency said Azar’s “historic visit will strengthen the U.S.-Taiwan partnership and enhance U.S.-Taiwan cooperation to combat the global COVID-19 pandemic.”  Azar praised Taiwan’s “remarkable success battling COVID-19 as a free and transparent democratic society.”  Azar will hold talks with Taiwan health experts about the island’s COVID-19 response and its role as a reliable global supplier of medical equipment and critical technology.  He held a rare telephone conference back in April with his Taiwan counterpart, Health Minister Chen Shih-chung.  Taiwan’s foreign ministry said Azar will also meet with President Tsai Ing-wen during his visit.    Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman Wang Wenbin told reporters in Beijing Wednesday that Taiwan was “the most important and sensitive issue in China-U.S. relations” and urged Washington to end all forms of official contact with the island to avoid damaging bilateral relations between the...
    TAIPEI (Reuters) - Taiwan's opening of an office to help people fleeing Hong Kong shows the government's determination to help people from the Chinese-run city and is an important milestone to supporting freedom there, a Taiwan government minister said on Wednesday. Chen Ming-tong, the head of Taiwan's China-policy making Mainland Affairs Council, made the comments at the opening of the office in Taipei. New security legislation imposed on Hong Kong by Beijing will punish crimes of secession, subversion, terrorism and collusion with foreign forces with up to life in prison, heralding a more authoritarian era for China's freest city. (Reporting by Yimou Lee; Writing by Ben Blanchard) Copyright 2020 Thomson Reuters.
    TAIPEI (Reuters) - Taiwan will ease its coronavirus border restrictions to allow in people from Hong Kong for humanitarian reasons, the government said on Wednesday, ahead of Taiwan's opening of an office to help people wanting to flee the Chinese-ruled city. Taiwan said earlier this month it would set up a dedicated office to help those thinking of leaving Hong Kong as Beijing tightens its grip on the former British colony, including planned new national security legislation. The new office begins operations on the sensitive date of July 1, the day Hong Kong returned to Chinese rule in 1997 with the promise of continued, wide-ranging freedoms under China's "one country, two systems" formula. Taiwan largely closed its borders in mid-March to prevent the spread of the coronavirus, meaning anyone who wished to come to the island from Hong Kong would have found it very difficult. In a statement, Taiwan's Central Epidemic Command Centre said that from Monday, Hong Kong people who wish to travel to Taiwan for "special humanitarian considerations" would be allowed to apply to be let in, though...
    PRAGUE (AP) — The speaker of the Czech Republic’s Senate announced Tuesday he will visit Taiwan despite warnings from China and a recommendation from his own government that he not take the trip. Milos Vystrcil said he would be accompanied by a business delegation on his visit, which is tentatively scheduled to begin Aug. 30. Vystrcil said he was also planning to meet Taiwan’s leaders, but didn’t immediately give details. Vystrcil’s predecessor in the post, Jaroslav Kubera, was planning to travel to Taiwan before he died in January. His plans angered pro-China Czech President Milos Zeman. A letter to Kubera from the Chinese Embassy in Prague warned him against going on the trip, saying the visit would have negatives consequences for future economic relations between China and the Czech Republic. The Czech Republic has established informal relations with Taiwan but recognizes the one-China principle — the notion that Taiwan belongs to Communist Party-ruled China. Vystrcil said China’s pressure, including a warning from the Chinese Embassy against congratulating Taiwan’s pro-independence President Tsai Ing-wen on her re-election, contributed to his decision...
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