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    During a report from Beijing on CNN International on Friday, CNN Beijing Bureau Chief Steven Jiang was surrounded by government officials who he said “were trying to stop us from going live” because “they don’t want foreign media coverage of anything related to their COVID strategy,” in light of the negative coverage of China’s coronavirus strategy in Shanghai. Jiang began the report by stating, “I’m actually surrounded by plainclothes agents here at this testing site.” Jiang added, “They were trying to stop us from going live here, even though we are perfectly fine in public, not really interfering with this testing site behind me.” And “We are obviously not interfering with their testing process. We are in a very — actually, a rather empty place here, a testing site. Again, a very confined area, not far from the office. So, I think, in general, they just consider this issue so sensitive they just don’t, in a way, want — they don’t want foreign media coverage of anything related to their COVID strategy, right now. Especially, I guess, with all the...
    China enlisted surgeons to execute prisoners by cutting out their hearts, new Australian research has revealed.   The Australian National University study, which examined thousands of medical papers from the communist nation, uncovered shocking secrets about China's clandestine organ harvesting trade. The research, published in the American Journal of Transplantation, found the certified causes of death did not align with the medical procedures listed in 56 hospitals across the country.  Instead, prisoners' hearts were harvested from their chests before they were brain dead to be given to transplant recipients.  Concerned human rights advocates said the new mounting evidence 'tells a terrible tale of murder and mutilation in China' and the stories coming out of the Chinese Communist Party are 'almost too dreadful to believe'. Australian researchers have shed light on China's clandestine organ harvesting trade in a landmark study. Pictured: Protesters perform a fake organ removal during a protest at Taipei in 2006  The study's authors - ANU PhD researcher Matthew Robertson and Israeli cardiac transplant surgeon Jacob Lavee — said their work is the first comprehensive study that 'illustrates the active role...
    A locked-down city in China has turfed 1,000 people out of their homes at midnight and carted them off to grim quarantine facilities, according to local reports. Xian's 13 million residents have been confined to their homes since December 23 and are banned from leaving even for food and essential supplies, having to rely on local officials to drop off care packages. The popular tourist hub, famed for its Terracotta Warriors, has reported 1,600 cases since December 9 - and although this may seem a small figure, Beijing is desperate to stamp out the virus ahead of the Winter Olympics next month. But its aggressive 'zero Covid' strategy is being tested to the limits by the new epicentre of Xian.    In the latest shocking measure, 30 busses turned up in the Mingde 8 Yingli neighborhood at just after midnight on January 1 and ordered all residents they must leave and go into quarantine. Health officials in full PPE stand beside busses and police cars in pictures uploaded to Chinese social media site Weibo from Xian
    Three Chinese-born girls who were given up for adoption and raised by different American parents discovered via at-home DNA tests that they were all cousins — and, after bonding over their shared ancestry, the trio traveled to China together in search of their birth parents. Their incredible story plays out in the upcoming documentary Found, which premieres on Netflix on October 20. The hour-and-a-half-long film follows Lily Bolka, Chloe Lipitz, and Sadie Mangelsdorf, who met as teens after doing 23andMe and in 2019 returned to their country of birth on a mission to meet the families that gave them up.  Reunited! Three Chinese-born girls who were given up for adoption and raised by different American parents discovered via at-home DNA tests that they were all cousins Journey: After bonding over their shared ancestry, the trio traveled to China together in search of their birth parents The stars: Lily, Chloe, and Sadie (left to right) are the subjects of a new documentary coming to Netflix After Lily, Chloe, and Sadie each did 23andMe, they found their shared ancestry and connected online   'It all...
    (CNN)Last week, a 47-year-old man stormed into a law firm in China's Wuhan city and shot dead a lawyer who he had "some disputes with," according to Chinese state media. He then stuffed his gun, just under 20 inches (50 centimeters) long, into a tennis racket bag and left.The fatal shooting shocked many in China, which has some of the world's strictest gun control laws -- so much so, that some people thought initial reports were about yet another American shooting."When my friend told me about the shooting, I thought it was the United States," one person wrote on the Chinese social media platform Weibo. Another user wrote, "Using a gun to kill people in China? Am I watching an American movie?"That disbelief widely reflects how rare gun crime is in China -- in contrast to it being a daily reality in the US.The two countries stand on opposite ends of the spectrum of gun control, with the right to bear arms legally protected and vehemently defended in one, and a near-total ban on civilian firearm ownership in the other.Read...
    General Mark Milley on Friday defended his calls to his Chinese counterpart during the final months of Donald Trump's presidency as 'perfectly within the duties and responsibilities' of his job as chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. Milley made his first public comments on revelations he called Gen. Li Zuocheng of the People's Liberation Army to reassure him the U.S. was not going to suddenly attack China.  The general was blasted by the former president and several conservatives for his conversations and accused of breaking the chain of command. Milley told reporters traveling with him the calls are 'routine' and were done 'to reassure both allies and adversaries in this case in order to ensure strategic stability.' He said he would discuss the matter in greater detail later, when he testifies before Congress later in September. Milley is traveling to Athens to participate in a NATO conference.  'I think it's best that I reserve my comments on the record until I do that in front of the lawmakers who have the lawful responsibility to oversee the U.S. military,' Milley said....
    Chinese staff at Canon can only enter the tech company's offices if they are smiling after AI cameras were installed to ensure workers were positive at work.  Employees must smile at the cameras if they also want to book conference rooms for meetings after the 'smile recognition' technology was installed.  The aim is to ensure that the staff, by having a grin on their face, will create a positive environment in the office and increase morale. Chinese staff at Canon can only enter the tech company's offices if they are smiling after AI cameras were installed to ensure workers were positive at work RELATED ARTICLES Previous 1 Next Dozens of dogs bound for slaughter at a dog meat festival in... Major plan to build a US standing force on Australia's... Share this article Share The workspace management system was installed last year by Canon Information Technology, the Chinese subsidiary of Japanese camera maker Canon, in the company's Beijing office, the Financial Times reports. There are also plans for the AI cameras to be...
    The Wuhan lab in China at the source of speculation about the origins of the COVID-19 pandemic kept live bats at the facility - despite a WHO investigator insisting they did not - according to a new report. The footage, which aired Sunday on Sky News Australia, was reportedly filmed inside the lab and showed a series of cages containing live bats. A coordinator for the group Drastic, which is independently crowd-sourcing ideas about the origins of the pandemic, provided the footage of the bats to Sky. The coordinator goes by the pseudonym of Billy Bostickson, for safety reasons, and has long insisted that bats were housed in the Wuhan laboratories. The footage of the bats, which Sky News' Sharri Markson insisted was from the Wuhan lab, contradicts assertions made by a member of the World Health Organization (WHO) team who visited the site in late January. Sky News Australia on Sunday aired footage which they said was given to them by activist group Drastic. They said the footage of bats was filmed inside the Wuhan lab. A member of the WHO...
    At least four State Department employees said in separate interviews that they repeatedly were 'warned' that an investigation into a possible COVID-19 leak from the Wuhan lab would 'open Pandora's Box;' and reveal that the U.S. funded gain-of-function research there.  It 'smelled like a cover-up,' Thomas DiNanno told Vanity Fair.  DiNanno, the former acting assistant secretary of the State Department's Bureau of Arms Control, Verification and Compliance, was one of four State Department officials who told Vanity Fair they wanted to investigate the possibility that COVID-19 spread after it escaped from the Wuhan lab.  The others were David Asher, David Feith and Miles Yu.  But they were muzzled by other State Department officials as well as the Bureau of International Security and Nonproliferation and even 'ostracized,' Yu told Vanity Fair. The lab leak was touted by then-President Donald Trump and other right-wing leaders, but was deemed impossible by a 'scientific consensus' in a letter signed by 27 scientists, published on February 19, 2020 in the medical journal The Lancet.   After that, the Wuhan lab theory was considered to be at best a conspiracy...
    Hong Kong (CNN)The men crouched inside the cave, their faces streaked with dust, occasionally flinching involuntarily at the explosions overhead, which seemed to shake the entire mountain. Outside was a vision of hell. Vast plumes of smoke and debris were thrown up into the air as US B-52 bombers and fighter jets let loose a seemingly endless barrage of missiles. The noise from the bombardment could be heard from miles away, a deep, hollow booming sound as each bomb struck. It was December 2001, and the target of the strikes was Osama bin Laden, orchestrator of the attacks on New York and Washington three months earlier. He was believed to be hiding out, along with a core of al Qaeda fighters, in Tora Bora, a cave complex south of the city of Jalalabad, in the mountains between Afghanistan and Pakistan. Whether Bin Laden was there at all remains disputed, but if he was, he managed to slip away, along with several other top al Qaeda leaders, avoiding both the aerial bombardment and US and Afghan troops on the ground. He...
    (CNN)When diseases have historically spread in the US, so too has discrimination and hate against Asian Americans.Asian Americans have been verbally harassed, spat on and attacked throughout the coronavirus pandemic. More than a century ago, something similar happened.During disease outbreaks in the 19th and 20th centuries, Chinese immigrants in San Francisco were depicted as harbingers of infection, placed under racist quarantines and denied access to health care.Just as Asian Americans have protested racism against them today, Chinese Americans in San Francisco at the time fought back, building their own hospital to provide the critical services that their local government had denied them.Their response is one of numerous historical examples of Asian American resistance in the face of anti-Asian racism -- and its legacy lives on today.Read MoreIt started with anti-Chinese sentiment in the 1800'sChinese immigrants began making their way to American shores in the mid-1800s, among thousands of people hoping to improve their economic fortunes during the California Gold Rush.Eventually, they would come to be exploited for cheap labor, working in industries such as farming, restaurants, laundry and most notably,...
    Secretary of Commerce Gina Raimondo gave former President Donald Trump credit for using tariffs in his trade war with China. Raimondo followed her swearing-in by giving an interview to MSNBC’s Stephanie Ruhle Thursday, during which she was asked how she plans to address China. Raimondo responded by calling out China’s conduct and outlining the Biden administration’s approach for engaging with them. After labeling Chinese telecommunications companies as “a threat to American economic and national security,” Raimondo listed “tariffs and countervailing duties” as some of America’s options for dealing with China. Ruhle noted that Trump tariffed steel and aluminum imports from China during his presidency, so she asked if the Biden administration intends to keep those in place. “The data shows that those tariffs have been effective,” Raimondo said. “And I think what President Biden has said is we’re going to have a whole-of-government review of all of these policies and decide what it makes sense to maintain.” Ruhle went further by asking if Raimondo intends to go further than Trump did as far as targeting Chinese businesses like Huawei. ...
    (CNN)A Chinese court made a rare move to calm public outrage this week over a controversial murder case involving a young woman killed by her husband and in-laws.The 22-year-old Chinese woman had only been married for six months when her husband and in-laws beat her to death, because she had been unable to conceive a child, according to state-run news agency Xinhua. The woman, identified by court documents only by her surname Fang, was from China's eastern Shandong province. She died on January 31, 2019, according to the Xinhua report. Yucheng People's Court in Shandong heard the woman's husband and in-laws abused her, denied her food, and left her outside in freezing temperatures in winter as a form of punishment. In January, they were found guilty of abuse, a charge applied when the alleged perpetrators are family members. It carries a maximum sentence of seven years in prison.Read MoreFang's husband and his parents were later sentenced to between two and three years in prison. The court had decided to grant a more lenient punishment because "each defendant was able to...
    Four CIA operatives died in a shipwreck off the coast of the Philippines in a tropical storm in 2008, it has been revealed, following a daring operation to try and spy on China's activity in the region. The story of how the four died has never before been told, Yahoo News reported. When they were declared missing, presumed dead, their relatives had no idea that they were spies. The men - Stephen Stanek, Michael Perich, Jamie McCormick and Daniel Meeks - were working for the CIA's Maritime Branch. Stephen Stanek was a CIA operative posing as a sailor for hire when he died in Sept 2008 Michael Perich was sent to dive with Stanek to the seabed to leave the listening device Their mission was to sail from Malaysia, and dive down to place a 'pod' disguised as a rock beneath the surface. The pod would monitor electronic signals of Chinese naval ships operating in the area. RELATED ARTICLES Previous 1 Next WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange says he'll give details of... Top CIA official...
    Despite being in high demand, North Korean leader Kim Jong Un has sent a massive shipment of surgical masks back to China because they may have been manufactured in South Korea, making them illegal, according to a report. Traders said they were surprised that the despot thumbed his nose at the personal protective equipment since goods smuggled in from across the border are sold openly in markets across North Korea, the Daily Express reported. Kim, who has become increasingly paranoid about Seoul’s influence on his regime, also has blamed the South for supporting a network of defectors whom he has accused of spreading propaganda in his secretive nation. A trader in the Chinese border city of Dandong said the masks had been kept in a North Korean warehouse for a month before being shipped back to China. “The Chinese trader received an order from the North Korean company to send high-quality masks even if they were a little expensive,” he told Radio Free Asia, according to the Express. “So the Chinese trader sent 15,000 KF94 masks, which are considered to...
    BEIJING (AP) — China warned Tuesday it will take countermeasures after the U.S. added four more Chinese media outlets to a list of organizations that should be considered “foreign missions” in the United States because of their ties to the government and ruling Communist Party. Foreign ministry spokesperson Zhao Lijian attacked the Trump administration’s move as “yet another example of the U.S.’s flagrant political suppression of the Chinese media,” saying it would interfere with their reporting on the U.S. and betray America’s commitment to freedom of the press. “We strongly urge the United States to abandon the Cold War mentality and ideological prejudice, and immediately stop and correct this wrong practice that serves no one’s interest. Otherwise China will have to make the necessary legitimate response,” Zhao said. The U.S. decision Monday to add the four organizations to the list, which already included five others, doesn’t directly impede their ability to conduct journalism but could force some to cut staff in the U.S. and is likely to further aggravate relations between the two countries. State Department officials...
    Three Chinese nationals were sentenced to prison after they illegally entered a restricted area at a US Navy base in Florida and took pictures, the Associated Press reported Friday. Chinese national Liao Lyuyou, 27, pleaded guilty to illegally entering the Naval Air Station Key West on Dec. 26 and taking photographs and video of property, according to the U.S. Attorney’s vOffice of the South District of Florida, the Associated Press reported. Lyuyou was sentenced to 12 months in prison. Jielun Zhang, 25, and Yuhao Wang, 24, illegally entered the same naval air station Jan. 4 and were sentenced to 12 months and 9 months in prison, respectively, for taking photographs of property. Additionally, all three were ordered to serve one year of probation. Liao was verbally warned not to enter the restricted area but did anyway, taking pictures of an annex and government buildings near sensitive military facilities, according to CNN. He circumvented a security fence that had multiple warnings on it and walked into restricted areas, later telling officials that he reads and understands English better than he can...
    BEIJING (AP) — Zhang Dan was among the first to respond to the call for help in China’s coronavirus epicenter. The 36-year-old nurse worked through grueling days, ministering to patients who needed assistance from breathing to merely eating. She struggled — but then, a little street dog helped her through. Zhang was among 42,600 medical workers brought from around China to bolster Wuhan’s overwhelmed medical system. Hospitals were crammed with patients and field clinics thrown up to handle the overflow. “I can’t save the world, but I can try my best with my tiny efforts to do what I can do to help,” Zhang said. Her parents and grandparents worried about her decision to volunteer — and she herself prepared for the worst. She purchased life insurance that would benefit her parents if she succumbed to the illness. Having no children, she figured her husband could start over if she died. Her husband having returned to his home province for the Lunar New Year holiday, Zhang’s mother moved into their apartment in the city of Changchun...
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