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    Eli Lilly and Company, which employs more than 10,000 people in the Hoosier state, says it'll 'be forced to plan for more employment growth outside of our home state.'  The Indiana-based pharmaceutical giant made the revelation in a statement on Saturday following the passing of a near-total ban on abortion in the state. Eli Lilly is the manufacturer of drugs such as Prozac and Cymbalta. On Friday, Indiana Gov. Eric Holcomb signed Senate Bill 1 into law making his state the first to institute an abortion ban since the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade.  The ban, which comes into effect on September 15, allows for abortions in the case of rape, incest, if the mother's life is in danger or if 'the fetus is diagnosed with a lethal fetal anomaly.'  Indiana Gov. Eric Holcomb said after signing the abortion ban: 'I am personally most proud of each Hoosier who came forward to courageously share their views in a debate that is unlikely to cease any time soon' Eli Lilly's headquarters are located in Indianapolis.  'Lilly recognizes that...
    by Max Keating   The U.S. economy added 528,000 jobs in June, according to Department of Labor (DOL) data released Friday, more than double economists’ projections of 250,000 new jobs. The unemployment rate edged down to 3.5%, according to the DOL’s report, which was also below economists’ predictions of 3.6%, according to The Wall Street Journal. The economy outperformed last month’s high job growth of 372,000, which had itself outpaced expectations, indicating that the Federal Reserve’s interest rate have not begun to cool off the economy. Job gains in July were reported across the economy, but were particularly high in the leisure and hospitality, professional and business services and health care sectors. The labor force participation rate of 62.1% remained below its February 2020 pre-pandemic level of 63.4%. Over the last four months the average monthly gain was 388,000, according to the report. Payroll employment rises by 528,000 in July; unemployment rate edges down to 3.5% https://t.co/1Y9cSWJUIB #JobsReport #BLSdata — BLS-Labor Statistics (@BLS_gov) August 5, 2022 The U.S. economy has posted consecutive quarters of negative GDP, which some consider to be, by definition, a recession, according to previous DCNF...
    Commuters and tourists exit a subway car May 26, 2022 in New York City.Robert Nickelsberg | Getty Images More Americans were working part-time and temporary jobs last month, which may herald future shifts in the shape of what today appears a robust jobs market. Hiring in July easily blew past expectations, suggesting a strong labor market despite other signs of economic weakness. But a jump in the number of workers in part-time positions for economic reasons — usually because of reduced hours, poor business conditions or because they can't find full-time work — hints at potential instability ahead. The Bureau of Labor Statistics on Friday reported the number of such workers, called "involuntary part-time workers," increased by a seasonally adjusted 303,000 in July, to 3.9 million. That follows a sharp decrease of 707,000 in June. The metric, which is volatile, is still below the 4.4 million involuntary part-time workers recorded in February 2020, before the Covid-19 pandemic upended the labor market. The number of full-time workers decreased 71,000 over the month, while part-time workers, both voluntary and involuntary, increased by...
    President Joe Biden celebrated the July jobs report — which surpassed even White House expectations — in a briefing where he highlighted the decreased federal deficit, calling it a welcome departure from the economic policies of former President Donald Trump. On Friday, the Bureau of Labor Statistics released data from July’s job market showing a gain of 528,000 jobs during the month. Many were stunned by the report, as economists had predicted that the U.S. economy would only gain 250,000 jobs in the July survey. In the speech, Biden addressed the public from isolation, as he continues to test positive for Covid-19, while wearing his signature aviators. “Almost 10 million jobs since I took office,” remarked Biden, “That is the fastest job growth in history.” The president added that the U.S. “matched the lowest unemployment rate in America in the last 50 years,” at only 3.5%. Biden continued to celebrate his administration’s economic victory: Today there are more people working in America than before the pandemic began. In fact, there are more people working in America than at any point in American history. You know, what...
    afbinternational.com AFB International, a global manufacturer of pet food ingredients, will invest more than $79 million in a new facility in Columbus, Georgia, creating more than 100 new jobs in the next five years. “Since taking office, I have been laser-focused on bringing opportunities to every corner of our state, and I am excited that a great company like AFB is answering that call and investing in the Columbus community,” said Governor Kemp. “Near Fort Benning, AFB will find a highly capable workforce ready to meet their needs. I look forward to seeing this project’s impact, including its impact on the many military and veteran residents who could fill these quality positions.” AFB develops, manufactures, and sells palatant ingredients to pet food companies worldwide. Palatants are ingredients that make pet foods, treats, and supplements taste great, ensuring pets enjoy their feeding occasions and get the vital nutrients they need. “AFB is excited to become part of the Columbus community,” said AFB International President Jared Lozo. “We are proud of the work we’ve done since...
    CNBC anchor Rick Santelli gushed over a July jobs report that more than doubled expectations, exclaiming “It is a WHOPPER!” Economists predicted that the economy would gain 250,00 jobs in the July survey, but at 8:30 on Friday morning, the actual report blew past that figure by more than twice that number, stunning Santelli. “And here we are waiting for the big July jobs numbers. And it is a whopper!” Santelli exclaimed. “528,000! 528,000, basically double the expectations! And 528,000 is the best number since February when we were over 700,000, revisions to the last two months are 28,000.” Santelli went on to run down more detailed numbers, including an unemployment rate that ticked down to 3.5 percent. From BLS: Total nonfarm payroll employment rose by 528,000 in July, and the unemployment rate edged down to 3.5 percent, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today. Job growth was widespread, led by gains in leisure and hospitality, professional and business services, and health care. Both total nonfarm employment and the unemployment rate have returned to their February 2020 pre-pandemic levels....
    An employee checks out a customer at Paulina Meat Market in the Lakeview neighborhood in Chicago, Illinois, June 28, 2022.Bianca Flowers | Reuters Employers likely added fewer jobs in July, but the monthly employment report is still expected to show a robust pace of hiring that should edge lower in coming months.  Economists expect 258,000 jobs were added, down from 372,000 in June, according to Dow Jones. Unemployment is expected to hold at 3.6% and wages are expected to rise by 0.3%. The jobs report is released Friday at 8:30 a.m. ET.  "I think it should be a right down the strike zone kind of report ," said Mark Zandi, chief economist of Moody's Analytics. "You've got more layoffs, initial claims are up and you have fewer hires because unfilled positions have come down. ... We were close to 400,000 [new jobs] last month, 500,000 the month before. The models say 225,000." The labor market is in a state of flux. Hiring is expected to slow as the Federal Reserve raises interest rates to cool inflation — and the economy....
    OAKLAND — Wheeling and dealing by three beer companies will trigger the shutdown of an Oakland beer distribution center and unleash job losses for more than 100 workers. An estimated 142 jobs will be eliminated in Oakland due to the wheeling and dealing among the three beer companies, according to an official WARN notice sent by Anheuser Busch to the state Employment Development Department. Anheuser Busch is selling its beer distribution operations in Oakland to Bay Area beer companies Markstein Sales Co. and Matagrano Inc., leading to the shutdown of the plant at 8380 Pardee Drive. “This transaction will result in the permanent closure of the facility,” Daniel Brill, president of AB One, a distribution unit of Anheuser Busch, wrote in the WARN letter to the EDD. “All employees at this location will have their employment ended at the Oakland facility.” The layoffs are expected to be permanent since the company intends to cease operations at the site, Brill warned. As of this week, the Bay Area distribution operations of Anheuser Busch will be parceled out to Markstein and Matagrano....
    On Wednesday, the Metropolitan Washington Airports Authority received the green light to add $250 million for phase two of the Silver Line project. While the Chairman of the Fairfax County Board of Supervisors understands the complexities involved in the project, he said Thursday that people are frustrated with the long wait. “The delays that we have had to date have not been, in my opinion, been justified. So any further delays will be met with a lot of discontent,” Chairman Jeff McKay told WTOP. More Local News More Transportation News More Metro News McKay is hopeful that officials will meet the fall opening plan for six new stations in Virginia, including at Dulles International Airport. “I want to make certain, this is absolutely the last payment related to the capital improvement of this project,” McKay said. “People have waited far too long for this.” Lynn Bowersox, Senior Vice President of the Silver Line Startup and Delivery, told WTOP that the project will mean new jobs and they’ve already started training new station managers. “In all, it’s several hundred...
    New York (CNN Business)Part-time work has become a lot less popular, both with job seekers and employers.The number of workers who are working part of the time for economic reasons -- because they can't find full-time jobs, or because their employer has cut back their hours -- hit a 20-year low of 3.6 million in June, according to data from the Labor Department. That's down 25% from June 2019, ahead of the pandemic. Those part-time workers for economic reasons, as the Labor Department classifies them, now make up just 2.2% of the overall US labor force, an all-time low in data that goes back to 1955.A big part of the reason is the incredibly tight labor market. Typically, there are twice as many unemployed people looking for work than there are job openings, which forces some job seekers to settle for a part-time job when they want a full-time position. Now it's roughly the exact opposite -- there are twice as many job openings as there are unemployed job seekers.Read MoreWhile many employers used to prefer the flexibility of having...
    In this article AMZNAn Amazon warehouse in Warrington, England.Nathan Stirk | Getty ImagesAmazon announced Friday it would create more than 4,000 permanent jobs in the U.K. in 2022, defying a wave of job cuts in the tech industry. The roles will include job functions in software development, product management, and engineering, as well as operational duties in fulfilment centres, sort centres and delivery stations. Additional staff will be added in a number of regions across the U.K., including Wakefield and Knowsley in northern England, where the firm is opening two new Amazon fulfilment centers. The hiring push will bring Amazon's permanent workforce in Britain to over 75,000, the company said. "We're continuing to invest in talent right across the U.K.," John Boumphrey, Amazon's U.K. country manager, said in a press release. "People join us not just for the wide variety of roles, great pay and benefits, but for the career development opportunities we provide." The company's U.K. hiring spree marks a contrast with other parts of the tech industry. The sector is reckoning with a reversal in fortunes lately amid...
    Nonfarm payrolls were expected to increase by 250,000 in June, according to Dow Jones estimates. This is breaking news. Please check back here for updates.TVWATCH LIVEWATCH IN THE APPUP NEXT | ETListen
    WASHINGTON (AP) — More Americans applied for unemployment benefits last week and while layoffs remain low, it was the fifth consecutive week that claims topped the 230,000 mark. Applications for jobless aid for the week ending July 2 rose to 235,000, up 4,000 from the previous week, the Labor Department reported Thursday. First-time applications generally track with the number of layoffs. Until early June, claims hadn’t eclipsed 220,000 since January and have often been below 200,000 this year. The four-week average for claims, which evens out some of the week-to-week volatility, inched up by 750 from the previous week, to 232,500. The total number of Americans collecting jobless benefits for the week ending June 25 rose by 51,000 from the previous week, to 1,375,000. That figure has hovered near 50-year lows for months. On Wednesday, the Labor Department reported that U.S. employers advertised fewer jobs in May amid signs that the economy is weakening, though the overall demand for workers remained strong. Employers posted 11.3 million job openings at the end of May, down from nearly 11.7 million...
    Senate Minority Whip John Thune (R-SD) is joining Democrats, as well as the big business lobby, in asking President Joe Biden for more legal immigration to the United States to fill American jobs. Even as the nation’s foreign-born population has hit record highs, Thune says the Biden administration is not importing enough H-2B foreign visa workers to fill blue-collar seasonal jobs in the U.S. Sinclair Broadcast Group reports: Senate Minority Whip John Thune, R-S.D., said he’s constantly hearing complaints from employers in his state who can’t find workers. He said he’d welcome more legal immigration. [Emphasis added] “I think there’s H-2Bs, for example, this time of the year. We need lots of them in South Dakota and we can never get enough from the administration,” Thune said. [Emphasis added] H-2Bs are visas that allow American employers to bring foreign nationals into the country for temporary nonagricultural jobs. Sen. Ben Cardin, D-Md., said his state needs more, too. [Emphasis added] Already, in May, Biden’s Department of Homeland Security (DHS) announced they would subsidize businesses by importing an additional 35,000 H-2B foreign visa...
    More Tennessee State Senators continue to speak out in favor of saving the jobs of Tennessee National Guard members who are due to be dismissed on June 30 due to their refusal to comply with the COVID-19 vaccination mandate. State Senate Majority Leader Jack Johnson (R-Franklin) and State Senator Ferrell Haile (R-Gallatin) have already spoken out. State Senator Kerry Roberts (R-Springfield) told The Tennessee Star, “I am adamantly opposed to firing anyone, Guardsmen or otherwise, for refusing the COVID-19 vaccine.” On the subject of whether or not he supports Governor Lee’s intervention or public comment, Roberts said, “Yes, and I encourage his intervention.” Roberts also supports the idea of Attorney General Slatery filing suit in favor of the Guardsmen and reiterated that he adamantly opposes any firings. State Senator Page Walley (R-Bolivar) said, “This assault on our Guardsmen is but one more example of the intentional assault on our democratic republic: Control the media, infiltrate the schools and government, warp the language of the prevailing culture, and dispirit and denigrate whomever resists. However, we Tennesseans will be among those who,...
    BRCC Side Hustles 2022 – motivations Infogram A Bankrate survey shows that gig workers — specifically millennials — need money from their side jobs more than they did in 2019. And they’re making a lot less than baby boomers who are freelancing for some extra cash. Of the 1,000 people surveyed, 41% say that they need the extra income to handle everyday living expenses — just before the pandemic, only 31% of people said they needed that money. More Business News Ted Rossman, a senior industry analyst for Bankrate, says the choice to avoid saving, cutting debts or vacations with extra income shows just how much people “simply need these funds.” “Unfortunately, due to high inflation and other financial burdens, more side hustlers are working a side job just to make ends meet,” Rossman said. Why hustle? Before COVID-19 swept across the globe, Alexandrea Ravenelle said that income stagnation was partially to blame after the Great Recession. Bankrate chief financial analyst Greg McBride says that hasn’t changed. “Between the ever-changing nature of jobs and the stagnant...
    The latest employment numbers came in better than expected, with experts saying the Federal Reserve will stay the course and continue to hike interest rates aggressively to tame inflation. The economy beat expectations and added 390,000 jobs last month. Additionally, the country’s unemployment rate remained at 3.6%, an ultra-low level that is just about where it was at right before the pandemic started to wreak havoc on the economy more than two years ago. May was the first month that has reflected both rate hikes the central bank has conducted, and the fact that payrolls came in higher than was forecast gives the Fed ammo to keep pushing rates ever higher, especially after several previous months of positive job gains. “The strong May figures will only encourage the Federal Reserve to stick to its course of more aggressive monetary tightening, as inflation remains near a 40-year high,” said Andrew Viteritti, the Economist Intelligence Unit’s commerce and regulation lead. AMERICAN BANKERS ASSOCIATION PREDICTS US WILL AVOID RECESSION THIS YEAR The last time inflation was this high,...
    Walmart is adding four new fulfillment centers to its existing capacity, a move that will bring more than 4,000 jobs and make next- or two-day shipping available to more Americans. The announcement comes at a time when consumers are relying on packages being shipped to their homes more than ever before. While online ordering has continued to increase over the years, the pandemic saw a huge surge in such orders as Americans stayed home during lockdowns and had essential items and other goods delivered to their doors. While coronavirus restrictions have eased, many consumers’ online ordering habits remain. Aside from a growth in online orders, Walmart and other retailers are trying to make sure that their shipping speed keeps pace with rival Amazon, which offers same-day, one-day and two-day delivery options for those who pay for its Prime membership. Walmart said Friday that its four next generation fulfillment centers will be built over the next three years. The centers, which feature robotics and machine learning, double the capacity and number of orders allowed to be fulfilled in a...
    FORD is hiring 6,200 employees at three of their midwestern US plants. The hiring spree will accelerate Ford’s development of new electric and gas-powered models. 2Ford has big plans to expand their manufacturing of new gas-powered and electric vehiclesCredit: Getty One of the legacy manufacturer’s new models is a seventh-generation gas-powered Mustang Coupe. 2023 Mustang engine powertrain options will include at least two Ford EcoBoost engines, Ford Authority reports. EcoBoost is Ford’s line of turbocharged, direct-injection petrol engines that specialize in optimizing power delivery and fuel economy. Last year’s 2022 Mustang offered a Turbocharged 2.3-liter four-cylinder EcoBoost engine with 310 horsepower and 350 lb.-ft. of torque. READ MORE ON FORD'HOLY GRAIL' 1972 Ford Capri - the only one of its kind - set to fetch £60k at auctionWHO’S DRIVING? Fully driverless cars now on the roads in US cities for the first time Ford will also raise production on its Transit commercial vans and F-150 Lightning electric pickups. Nearly 3,000 temporary factory employees will be made full-time hourly employees in addition to the 6,200 recently hired employees. Kumar Galhotra, president of the...
    A protester waves a sign that read unionize near the Country Club Plaza Starbucks store where dozens of Starbucks employees and union supporters protested alleged anti-union tactics by the company Thursday, March 3, 2022.Jill Toyoshiba | Tribune News Service | Getty Images From Starbucks to Amazon to Apple, the recent headlines show that the biggest companies in the world can't duck the union issue. But the issue isn't isolated to a few iconic companies operating in retail. While union membership remains at a multi-decade low, a CNBC survey finds that a majority (59%) of workers across the U.S. and across all sectors say they support increased unionization in their own workplaces. The recent CNBC|Momentive Workforce Survey reinforces recent findings from Pew Research Center and Gallup polls, which both show widespread support for labor unions among the public. And it does not break down into a clearly partisan political issue. While Democrats are about twice as likely as Republicans to have a positive view on unions, the CNBC survey finds bipartisan support, with 46% of Republicans in favor of increased unionization...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — The number of Americans applying for jobless aid ticked up slightly last week but the total number of Americans collecting benefits remained at its lowest level in more than five decades. Applications for unemployment benefits rose by 1,000 to 203,000 for the week ending May 7, the Labor Department reported Thursday. First-time applications generally track the number of layoffs. The four-week average for claims, which evens out some of the weekly ups and downs, rose 4,250 from the previous week to 192,750. The total number of Americans collecting jobless benefits for the week ending April 30 fell by 44,000 from the previous week to 1,343,000. That’s the fewest since January 3, 1970. American workers are enjoying historically strong job security two years after the coronavirus pandemic plunged the economy into a brief but devastating recession. Weekly applications for unemployment aid have been consistently below the pre-pandemic level of 225,000 for most of 2022, even as the overall economy contracted in the first quarter. Last week, the government reported America’s employers added 428,000 jobs in April, leaving...
    The nation’s security will be imperiled if American college graduates are not required to share their job opportunities with even more lower-wage foreign graduates, according to an investor-backed message to Congress. “The risks for American leadership are clear,” said the May 9 letter to the top four leaders in the House and Senate. “China is the most significant technological and geopolitical competitor our country has faced in recent times … Without [even more foreign graduates], it will be very hard for America to win,” said the signers, who are more than 40 advocates and former managers and leaders in the federal military, immigration, and science agencies. The letter was sent to Congress as it tries to combine different Senate and House bills into a bill that will fund U.S.-based technologies and factories to counter China’s high-tech sector. The letter asked Congress to let investors staff U.S.-funded facilities with an uncapped number of foreign workers with doctoral degrees from foreign and U.S. universities: The House version [of the bill] passed with a provision (80303) exempting from green card caps those with advanced...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — Friday’s jobs report for April provided mixed signals on the economic issue most on the minds of Americans: Chronically high inflation. On the one hand, the proportion of people either working or looking for work slipped in April after a string of increases. Having fewer people in the workforce means employers need to raise pay to try to fill a record-high number of open jobs. Companies typically then pass on those higher labor costs to consumers in the form of higher prices. On the other hand, average hourly pay increases slowed last month and have weakened over the past three months, a trend that could ease inflationary pressures. The offsetting trends come as the Federal Reserve has accelerated its fight against inflation, which has surged to a four-decade high. This week, the Fed raised its key interest rate by a half-percentage point — its most aggressive move since 2000 — and signaled further large rate hikes to come. Higher rates can slow borrowing and spending but also risk causing a recession. How inflation...
    Nonfarm payrolls were expected to increase by 400,000, according to Dow Jones estimates. This is breaking news. Please check back here for updates.TVWATCH LIVEWATCH IN THE APPUP NEXT | ETListen
    Nashville Record Pressing, LLC officials recently announced that the company will establish operations in Nashville, which will include its headquarters, manufacturing, distribution and back-office functions. [email protected], the U.S. entity of the worlds largest vinyl record manufacturer, will locate its headquarters, manufacturing and other operations in Davidson County. In total, the company will create more than 250 new jobs in Nashville. https://t.co/LUke6bGXC0 pic.twitter.com/1wQmrjr9EX — TNECD (@TNECD) April 19, 2022 “Our strong business climate, skilled workforce and quality of life ensure global companies can excel in Tennessee,” Governor Lee said in a statement. “I thank Nashville Record Pressing for investing in Davidson County and creating more opportunities for Tennesseans.” The company will invest $13.3 million and create 255 new jobs over the next five years at the company’s facility located at 520 Brick Church Park Drive, according to a press release by the Tennessee Department of Economic and Community Development (TNECD). Nashville Record Pressing is a wholly-owned subsidiary of Czech Republic-based GZ Media, according to the press release. GZ Media employs nearly 2,000 people in the Czech Republic and 500...
    A group of Apple employees have accused the big-tech giant of racism over its push for corporate workers to return to the office, saying that the shift back to an in-person model will make the company 'younger, whiter, [and] more male-dominated.' The employees, organized under the newly-formed group Apple Together, petitioned the company on Friday in an open letter after CEO Tim Cook told staffers that they would need to work from the office one day a week starting on April 11, two days per week after three weeks, and three days per week after May 23.  They wrote that the decision to bring employees back to the office was not motivated by a 'need to commune in person,' as Cook wrote in his letter to staff, but rather was driven by the company's 'fear of the future of work, fear of worker autonomy [and] fear of losing control.' Although Apple will 'likely always find people willing to work here,' the group wrote, the shift back to working in the office will 'change the makeup of [the company's workforce].'   'It...
    BOSTON (CBS) — Boston-based investment firm Fidelity says it is going on a hiring spree, just after making a major announcement about cryptocurrency. The company says it is creating more than 12,000 new jobs, nearly 70% of which would be customer-facing, by the end of September. That would put Fidelity on track to meet or potentially exceed its 2021 hiring levels. READ MORE: Patriots, New Bedford Police Team Up To Ease Some Traffic Stop Tension With Vouchers“The company’s growth also allows it to invest further in technology, through new digital platforms, and growing areas of customer interest, like cryptocurrency and direct indexing,” Fidelity said in a statement, adding that it’s also launching a training program “to expose associates to careers at Fidelity in cryptocurrency and blockchain work.” Fidelity said earlier this week that it will offer bitcoin as an investment option in its 401(k) plans. Its the first major retirement provider to offer cryptocurrency as an investment. The bitcoin option will only be offered to participants whose employers have elected to include it in their plans. Fideilty estimates that about...
    Here's a stunning fact: President Joe Biden created more jobs during his first year in office than any other president on record, and yet only 3 in 10 registered voters correctly believe the U.S. gained jobs in 2021. In fact, the U.S. economy added about 6.6 million jobs in Biden's first year. But according to new polling from the progressive consortium Navigator Research, while 30% of voters said the U.S. gained jobs, 17% said it lost as many jobs as it gained, 24% weren't sure, and 29% said the country lost jobs. In other words, 70% of voters either got it wrong or didn’t know. At the same time, Biden is 15 points underwater on his handling of the economy at 41% approve, 56% disapprove. The president’s overall job approval is 6 points underwater at 46% approve, 52% disapprove in the survey. Inflation remains a dominant concern for voters based on focus groups GBAO conducted in North Carolina, Wisconsin, and Nevada. More people report hearing about negative economic news than positive news, and many in the focus groups see positive economic indicators as being...
    One of the three contenders for the Republican nomination in Alabama’s U.S. Senate race told his business supporters that he wants more legal immigrants to prevent Americans from getting wage raises. “If there’s a shortage of labor, you’ve got to pay labor more to do the jobs that you need done,” business owner and U.S. Army veteran Mike Durant said in a video acquired by Breitbart News during a March 10 Zoom call with supporters at an Alabama consulting firm BMSS Inc. Durant complained to his business supporters that public pressure forced federal GOP legislators to block a business lobbying campaign in Congress to admit more legal immigrants by offering more green cards: Why would you not want more green cards available so that people can legally come into this country and work? I mean we need that. This country was built on immigration … It’s completely illogical, and it’s because every decision they’re making is based on politics and what’s going to play well to my [GOP] base, versus what’s right in this moment for the people that I represent....
    Stephen Moore is co-author of the Committee to Unleash Prosperity's Final Report Card on State Responses to Covid-19, which measured and compared how states handled the pandemic, based on three metrics: the economy, education, and mortality from the virus. These results have also been published by the National Bureau of Economic Research. It's been more than two years since the deadly coronavirus pandemic hit the United States, and public health officials are still wrestling with the appropriate responses, as the CDC reports that Covid cases are up 25% over last week. 'This is not going to be eradicated and it's not going to be eliminated,' said Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, on ABC's 'This Week' on Sunday. 'What's going to happen is that we're going to see that each individual is going to have to make their calculation of the amount of risk that they want to take in.' We couldn't agree more. Allow individuals and states to make the best decisions for themselves. America cannot return to lockdown policies – for...
    President Joe Biden’s deputies have a plan for dealing with the huge wave of young illegal migrants expected at the border once they lift the Title 42 epidemic barrier: Get more buses to deliver the migrants to jobs in U.S. cities. “Their plan is to move people into the country faster,” Sen. James Lankford (R-OK) said Wednesday. “That’s their whole plan,” he said: They’re now presenting their plan to us of what they’re going to do when they take Title 42 off … What they have worked on apparently for a year is a way to expedite people crossing the border and moving [them] into the interior at a faster rate … They talk about “How do we actually move people to the interior faster so they don’t get clogged up at the border and the images that all of you saw [on TV] last summer don’t occur again at the border with thousands and thousands of people?” “That is not a plan to help us with illegal immigration,” said Lankford, whose record on immigration and Oklahoma wages is weak....
    WASHINGTON (AP) — More Americans applied for unemployment benefits last week, but layoffs remain at historic lows. Jobless claims rose by 14,000 to 202,000 for the week ending March 26, the Labor Department reported Thursday. The previous week’s tally of 188,000 claims was the fewest since 1969. First-time applications for jobless aid generally track the pace of layoffs. The four-week average for claims, which compensates for weekly volatility, fell to 208,500 from 212,000 the previous week. In total, 1,307,000 Americans were collecting jobless aid for the week ending March 19, the fewest since December 1969. Employers added a robust 678,000 jobs in February, according to recent government data, the largest monthly total since July. The unemployment rate dropped to 3.8%, from 4% in January, extending a sharp decline in joblessness to its lowest level since before the pandemic erupted two years ago. The government reports March jobs data on Friday. Job openings hovered at a near-record level in February, little changed from the previous month, continuing a trend that Federal Reserve officials see as a driver of inflation. There were...
    Commuters arrive from Metro North Railroad trains in Grand Central Station in New York.Timothy A. Clary | AFP | Getty Images Companies added jobs at a solid pace in March, indicating that hiring is strong despite signs of a tightening labor market, payroll processing firm ADP reported Wednesday. Private payrolls expanded by 455,000 for the month, the firm said, about in line with the Dow Jones estimate of 450,000 though it was the lowest since August 2021. The total was slightly below the upwardly revised 486,000 in February, and brought ADP's first-quarter jobs count to 1.45 million. The report comes two days before the more closely watched nonfarm payrolls report, with the Bureau of Labor Statistics expected to show jobs growth of 490,000 for the month, according to the Dow Jones consensus estimate. The ADP and BLS numbers can differ widely, as they did in February when the payrolls firm's count was about 200,000 below the government's official tally. ADP's report for March indicated that hiring was spread evenly around sectors, with leisure and hospitality adding 166,000 to lead the...
    Pedestrians walk past a Now Hiring sign in Arlington, Virginia, on March 16, 2022.Stefani Reynolds | AFP | Getty Images An increasing number of Americans quit their jobs in February, while the gap between available positions and the unemployed grew even wider, the Bureau of Labor Statistics reported Tuesday. The Job Openings and Labor Turnover Survey showed that 4.35 million workers left in February, an increase of 94,000 from the previous month. It's also a slightly higher level as a percentage of the workforce, up to 2.9% from 2.8%. At the same time, there were 11.27 million openings in the month, down just slightly from January. However, with the total level of those counted as unemployed contracting further to 6.27 million, that left a record 5 million more openings than available workers. There were 1.8 jobs for every person unemployed. Education and health services had the highest level of job openings for the month, at 2.23 million, followed by professional and business services with 2.1 million and trade, transportation and utilities with 1.86 million. The quits level was off its...
    MIAMI (CBSMiami) – The pandemic forced millions of Americans to work from home, and even though corporations now have some employees coming back to the office, remote jobs are becoming more popular than ever. Amanda Miller can literally roll out of bed and start working. In 2020, her corporate office was shut down and she was sent home. READ MORE: Diversity On Corporate Boards Severely Lacking“I think like anybody, it was a bit of an adjustment,” Miller says. But she quickly adjusted to a life without commuting. “I was able to do all sorts of things I didn’t have the opportunity to do before, like, you know, volunteering at my kids’ school. I can do that regularly. Working from home, you have the opportunity to concentrate and be more focused in a way that you naturally can’t in an office when there’s noise,” Miller says. Miller works for Dropbox, one of several tech companies that’s moved to remote work. Eric Trickett, a vice president at the company, says every employee has the option of working remotely. He says the policy...
    Maryland Gov. Larry HoganLarry HoganMaryland delays governor's primary amid redistricting challenge States consider gas tax pauses as prices spike Democrats divided over proposal to suspend federal gas tax  MORE (R) announced an initiative this week to drop college degree requirements for thousands of state jobs.  At a news conference on Tuesday, Hogan said he will partner with the state’s Departments of Labor and Budget and Management to recruit and market roles for job seekers in their Skilled Through Alternative Routes (STARs) program.  Those eligible in the STAR initiative are 25 years of age or older, active in the labor force, have at least a high school diploma, and have developed their skills through alternative institutions such as community college, apprenticeships, military service, and employment.  According to the statement, 47 percent of the 2,869,000 workers in the state are considered STARs.  “Through these efforts we are launching today, we are ensuring that qualified, non-degree candidates are regularly being considered for these career-changing opportunities,” Hogan said at the news conference. “This is exactly the kind of bold, bipartisan solution we need to continue...
    Maryland announced it was reducing the four-year degree requirement Tuesday for thousands of state jobs. But not everyone is a fan of the idea. There has been pushback online, including from a union president who said the state was “de-skilling” those jobs. The criticisms are frustrating to organizations like [email protected], which works to help people who are skilled through alternative routes (aka “STARs”) work and earn to their potential. “It doesn’t de-skill the job, because you haven’t changed the skills,” said Bridgette Gray, the chief customer officer for [email protected] “The skills for the roles are not changing. The salaries are not changing. What’s changing is thinking about how you source talent. All you’re doing is opening up to talent that’s ready to go to work today but haven’t been able to access those jobs because they don’t have a four-year degree.” At the end of the day, Gray said, this is an equity issue. “Who is it actually impacting? It’s impacting people of color. Fifty-eight percent of Black workers in Maryland are STARs. Forty-six percent of Hispanic workers in Maryland...
    Pelosi then celebrated Biden for "breaking records" of job growth, an assertion that has been thoroughly debunked. While the government added more jobs in 2021 than any previous years, most of those jobs were simply people returning to the workforce after pandemic lockdowns ended. The economy remains at a net loss on jobs when compared to pre-pandemic levels in February 2020. 2022 Issues Conference: House Democratic Leadership Closing Press Conference 3.11.2022 youtu.be Is Pelosi correct?The Congressional Budget Office determined, in fact, that Biden's plan would add $367 billion to the national deficit over the next decade. However, the CBO score said that increased tax enforcement could bring in another $207 billion in tax revenue, leading to approximately $160 billion added to the deficit. The Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget agreed that after offsets, the BBB Act would add roughly $200 to the national deficit. Meanwhile, the Federal Reserve bank in San Francisco determined the American Rescue Plan, Biden's COVID-19 stimulus, is contributing to inflation, an analysis made before inflation reached unfortunate historic highs this year.
    A "Now Hiring" sign outside a King Soopers supermarket location in Louisville, Colorado, on Tuesday, Jan. 4, 2022.Chet Strange | Bloomberg | Getty Images Job openings outnumbered available workers by nearly 5 million in January, the latest sign of a historically tight employment picture, the Labor Department reported Wednesday. Total vacancies actually dipped a bit, falling to 11.26 million following a substantial upward adjustment in December's numbers, the Job Openings and Labor Turnover Survey showed. That still left job postings 4.75 million above the total counted as unemployed for the month. The total was more than the FactSet estimate of 10.9 million. Along with the slight decline in openings came a decrease in quits, or workers voluntarily leaving their jobs. The so-called Great Resignation ebbed for the month, with quits declining to 4.25 million, a drop of 3.4% and the lowest number since October. As a share of the labor force, the quits rate declined to 2.8% from 3% the previous two months. Federal Reserve officials watch the JOLTS report for signs of labor slack. With the jobless rate at...
    Sen. Tom Cotton (R-AR) says the Republican Party must be the party of less immigration and more labor protections, guided by the economic interests of working- and middle-class Americans. During a speech at the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library, Cotton detailed the future of the Republican Party, which he said must keep the mantra “America First” at its core across all issues facing American citizens. “Our economic policies should enrich the lives of Americans in this generation and the next,” Cotton said. Most significantly, Cotton called on Republicans to reject globalism in all its forms in favor of an ideology that seeks to protect Americans’ livelihoods, jobs, wages, and quality of life. “We must rebuild an economy that works for all citizens, especially the forgotten men and women left behind by decades of open borders, unfettered trade, and globalization,” Cotton said: That starts with a basic truth rejected by Democrats and, unfortunately, too many Republicans: we are a nation with an economy, not an economy with a nation. We are a people with principles, not a set of principles with a people....
    Billionaire Elon Musk has once again taken a dig at Joe Biden after the President lauded his competitors General Motors and Ford during the State of the Union Address on Tuesday night, but didn't mention Tesla. The president tweeted on Tuesday night that Ford is investing $11 billion and creating 11,000 jobs in the electric vehicle market, while GM is investing $7 billion and created 4,000 jobs. Musk replied by touting Tesla, saying his company has created over 50,000 jobs and has invested more than double of both General Motors and Ford combined. 'Ford is investing $11B to build electric vehicles—creating 11,000 jobs across the country. GM is making the largest investment in its history—$7B to build electric vehicles, creating 4,000 jobs in Michigan,' the president's Twitter account posted on Tuesday night. 'Tesla has created over 50,000 US jobs building electric vehicles & is investing more than double GM + Ford combined. [fyi to person controlling this twitter],' Elon Musk tweeted in response. Elon Musk fired back at President Joe Biden on Twitter after Biden lauded General Motors and Ford...
    President Joe Biden will tell Americans on Tuesday night that he has a 'better plan' to fight surging inflation that involved 'lowering costs and not wages,' according to an excerpt from his State of the Union speech. 'We have a choice. One way to fight inflation is to drive down wages and make Americans poorer. I have a better plan to fight inflation,' part of Biden's speech reads. 'Lower your costs, not your wages. Make more cars and semiconductors in America. More infrastructure and innovation in America.'  'More goods moving faster and cheaper in America. More jobs where you can earn a good living in America. And, instead of relying on foreign supply chains – let’s make it in America. 'Economists call it “increasing the productive capacity of our economy.” I call it building a better America. My plan to fight inflation will lower your costs and lower the deficit.' The price of consumer goods jumped an average of 7.5 percent in January, according to the most recently available data from the Labor Department, a rate not seen since 1980.  ...
    Aspen Aerogels, a technology leader in aerogel-based sustainability and electrification solutions, plans to construct an advanced manufacturing facility at Bulloch County’s Southern Gateway Commerce Park. Aspen intends to invest a minimum of $325 million and to create more than 250 advanced manufacturing jobs at their new site near Statesboro, where production is expected to begin in late 2023. “Aspen Aerogels has put their confidence in Georgia, our people, and the growing electric mobility sector in our state, and we are excited to add this American company to our rapidly expanding EV portfolio,” said Governor Kemp. “Every day, we are utilizing our many assets to bring jobs to hardworking Georgians in every corner of the Peach State, and this is just the latest to come to Bulloch County and southeast Georgia.” Combined with Aspen’s original East Providence, Rhode Island plant, the planned state-of-the-art facility in Georgia is designed to triple Aspen’s nameplate aerogel capacity in support of the Company’s thermal barrier expansion plans in the fast-growing electric vehicle (EV) market. Through the...
    The number of new applications for unemployment benefits rose by 23,000 last week to 248,000. Weekly jobless claims are seen as a proxy for layoffs and have been watched closely in recent weeks for indications about how the omicron variant of COVID-19 has been affecting the labor market. Apart from a small omicron jump, jobless claims have been in a steady decline over the last year. Around this time in February 2021, new claims were averaging more than 800,000 per week. STRONG JOBS REPORT SHOWS PUBLIC INCREASINGLY SHAKING OFF COVID-19 Job growth, meanwhile, has been strong. The economy shattered expectations last month and added 467,000 jobs, much more than economists anticipated. Additionally, November and December’s worse-than-forecast reports were revised up by a weighty 710,000 jobs. Still, the economy is still many jobs short of pre-pandemic levels, when unemployment sat at an ultra-low 3.5%. The current 4% unemployment rate is slightly up from December, although that is because of an increase in the country’s labor force participation rate. CLICK HERE TO READ MORE FROM THE...
    A group of Senate Republicans has joined Senate Democrats to demand President Joe Biden import more H-2B foreign visa workers to take working-class, blue-collar American jobs. On Monday, 17 Senate Republicans signed a letter with 17 Senate Democrats that urges Biden to “release the maximum allowable number of additional” H-2B foreign visa workers to inflate the labor market despite more than 12 million Americans remaining jobless, though all want full-time employment. The senators also asked Biden to speed up the process so U.S. employers could get foreign visa workers quicker into blue-collar American jobs, often in construction, landscaping, the tourism industry, and other occupations. “Without meaningful H-2B cap relief, many seasonal businesses will be forced to scale back operations, cancel or default on contracts, lay off full-time U.S. workers, and, in some cases, close operations completely,” the senators wrote. The 17 Republicans who signed the letter are: Kevin Cramer (R-ND) Mike Rounds (R-SD) Lindsey Graham (R-SC) James Risch (R-ID) Lisa Murkowski (R-AK) Roy Blunt (R-MO) Cynthia Lummis (R-WY) John Cornyn (R-TX) Mike Crapo (R-ID) John Thune (R-SD) Susan Collins...
    BAR HARBOR, Maine (CBS/AP) — Maine’s independent senator and a colleague from Montana want more staffing at America’s National Parks to keep up with increased attendance. Sens. Angus King of Maine and Steve Daines of Montana said visitation and workloads have increased in the parks system, but employment numbers have not kept up. They said park staffing has steadily declined over the course of the last decade. READ MORE: Dover-Sherborn High School Offering Grief Services After Senior Owen Bingham Killed In CrashCBS News reported last year that overcrowding prompted the launch of online reservation systems at popular parks like Maine’s Acadia National Park, Montana’s Glacier National Park, Colorado’s Rocky Mountain National Park and Zion Natural Park in Utah. For those parks that didn’t have reservation systems, visitors had trouble finding parking spaces and encountered hours-long wait times to enter and more litter on the trails. Park visitors crowd the summit of Cadillac Mountain, one of the most popular spots in Acadia National Park. (Staff photo by Ben McCanna/Portland Portland Press Herald via Getty Images) READ MORE: Who Has...
    More than 600 New York City officers will get out from behind their desks and into the streets this week as the city battles a surge in violent crime, with shooting incidents up nearly 30 percent compared to this time last year. A total of 658 cops assigned to non-patrol posts, like the department's press office, will be deployed as part of an 'enhanced deployment strategy.' The two-part plan will move 300 officers to the 4pm to 12am shift every night, according to two memos obtained by the New York Post, including one sent by Police Commissioner Keechant Sewell on Monday. The officers will be put on 'high visibility posts' based on crime trends. It also calls for individual precincts to move four officers into the streets every day. Overall crime is up 41.6 percent compared to this time last year, with shootings up nearly 30 percent and transit crimes, including notable subway pushing incidents, up 74 percent, according to the latest numbers from the NYPD.  Crime has gotten so bad that Reverend Al Sharpton addressed Mayor Eric Adams himself...
    He's at it again. Republican Sen. Ron Johnson, who probably shouldn’t be waiting by the phone for MENSA to call, just told his constituents in Wisconsin that he won’t fight for high-paying jobs for them because, “It’s not like we don’t have enough jobs here in Wisconsin.” Yep. He really said that. He’s not working to get Oshkosh Corp. to build U.S. Postal Service vehicles, creating about 1,000 jobs, because Wisconsin ... already has jobs. “The biggest problem we have in Wisconsin right now is employers not being able to find enough workers,” he said, sticking to the GOP narrative that President Joe Biden has destroyed everything because COVID, inflation, and the deficit. “I wouldn’t insert myself to demand that anything be manufactured here using federal funds in Wisconsin,” Johnson told Wisconsin reporters after an event in Wisconsin. “Obviously, I’m supportive of it. But in the end, I think when using federal tax dollars, you want to spend those in the most efficient way and if it’s more efficient, more effective to spend those in other states, I don’t have a real...
    AGAWAM (CBS) – Six Flags New England is hiring. The theme park says it’s looking to fill more than 3,000 part-time and seasonal jobs. They’re having a “Kick Off Hiring Event” at the park next weekend at the Human Resources building on Main Street in Agawam. The hours were announced Tuesday: • Friday, February 18 from 3 p.m. to 8 p.m. • Saturday, February 19 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. • Sunday, February 20 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. • Monday, February 21 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. (President’s Day) Several positions are open including ride operators, lifeguards, admissions, games, entertainment, retail and many more. Pay starts at $14.25 an hour with some positions paying $15 an hour. Six Flags New England opens for the season on Saturday, April 9. For more information, visit sixflags.com/jobs.
    A "now hiring" sign is posted in the window of a restaurant in Los Angeles, California on January 28, 2022.Frederic J. Brown | AFP | Getty Images The sudden slam to the economy from the omicron Covid variant could show up in January's employment report as the first big loss of jobs since late 2020. Economists have wide-ranging expectations for the report, expected Friday at 8:30 a.m. ET. Economists polled by Dow Jones call for a 150,000 gain in payrolls. However, many economists — like those at PNC, Jefferies, Morgan Stanley, Goldman Sachs and Wilmington Trust — expect big losses. "There's no question this is omicron. It's a pandemic and it's not without consequences," said Diane Swonk, chief economist at Grant Thornton. She noted the number of jobs lost could be especially high because many workers are not paid sick leave, and if they call out ill, they are not counted as working. PNC forecast the most job losses at 400,000. Other forecasts include a gain of as many as 250,000 jobs. The last time the monthly employment report was...