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    President Joe Biden had bold predictions for the economy if Congress passed the reconciliation bill announced Wednesday by moderate Democratic Sen. Joe Manchin and Senate Majority Chuck Schumer.  'My message to Congress is this: This is the bill you can pass to lower inflation, cut the deficit, reduce healthcare costs, tackle the climate change and promote energy security - all the time while reducing the burdens facing working class and middle class families,' Biden said.  'So pass it, pass it for the American people, pass it for America,' he added.  He called the package 'a big deal,' and walked through some of the provisions - a mix of healthcare savings measure, green energy initiatives, tax code changes and a deficit reduction push.  'This package will reduce the federal deficit by over $300 billion,' Biden touted.  President Joe Biden had bold predictions for the economy if Congress passed the reconciliation bill announced Wednesday by moderate Democratic Sen. Joe Manchin and Senate Majority Chuck Schumer Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer (left) and moderate Democratic Sen. Joe Manchin announced Wednesday they had come to...
    The Republican Study Committee (RSC) said on Tuesday that the House Democrats’ anti-China bill is riddled with woke and climate change provisions while lacking key provisions to prevent Chinese spying in the United States. House Democrats released late Tuesday night their bill designed to increase American competitiveness against China in advanced research and manufacturing. The Senate passed its version, championed by Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-NY) and Sen. Todd Young (R-IN), in June. That bill, the U.S. Innovation and Competition Act (USICA), was criticized by conservatives as a weak attempt to increase competitiveness against China. The House Democrat version, the America COMPETES Act, totals in at 2,900 pages and aims to boost manufacturing, especially in the semiconductor industry. It would also attempt to fix the broken supply chains unfolding under President Joe Biden’s administration. Lawmakers have increasingly looked to boost domestic semiconductor production after the coronavirus pandemic broke international supply chains and made it difficult to keep up with semiconductor production. The pivot to the anti-China legislation also serves as the latest gambit for Democrats to seize a win...
    House Democrats passed President Joe Biden’s nearly $2 trillion spending package Nov. 19 after months of high-stakes negotiations, but it faces an even rockier path through the 50-50 Senate before becoming law. Senators from Joe Manchin of West Virginia to Bernie Sanders of Vermont are already on-record opposing various provisions and are preparing to rework the House-passed bill as they see fit. “Ninety percent of the bill was written together,” House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said at a press conference shortly after the bill passed, adding that while “some minor changes” may occur, they would be “nothing major in my opinion.” Below are several policies that may likely fall victim to Senate Democrats, despite their House colleagues’ best efforts to make them law. House Democrats passed President Joe Biden’s nearly $2 trillion spending package Nov. 19 after months of high-stakes negotiations, but it faces an even rockier path through the 50-50 Senate before becoming law. Though the bill faces another vote-a-rama, which allows Republicans the opportunity to force unlimited, politically tricky votes on various amendments, this may prove to...
    (CNN)Several Senate Democrats expressed concerns Monday about Sen. Joe Manchin's refusal to support key climate change provisions in the sweeping spending and tax package backed by President Joe Biden, with some going as far as warning they may withdraw their support for the package if it significantly weakens the climate proposals."I can't support a bill that does not have a robust climate title," said Sen. Chris Murphy, a Connecticut Democrat. "There's a lot of different ways to get there. But I can't support a bill that doesn't make a meaningful down payment."The concerns, echoed by a range of Democratic lawmakers, come after Manchin has refused to budge from his months-long opposition to give $150 billion in new incentives to power plants to use cleaner-burning fuels in a bid to reduce greenhouse emissions up to 52% by 2030.Democrats are now looking at new alternatives, but it's unclear how they will achieve their goals -- while keeping progressives at bay and not prompting opposition from Manchin of West Virginia, who represents a coal-producing state and whose vote they need to pass a...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — As President Joe Biden visited one disaster site after another this summer — from California wildfires to hurricane-induced flooding in Louisiana and New York — he said climate change is “everybody’s crisis” and America must get serious about the “code red” danger posed by global warming. In many ways, the president is making up for lost time. Biden and Democrats are pursuing a sweeping $3.5 trillion federal overhaul that includes landmark measures to address climate change and reduce greenhouse gas emissions in what would be the most consequential environmental policies ever enacted, after years of fits and starts. Sidelined after the former administration withdrew from the landmark Paris climate accord — the 2015 global effort to confront climate change — the U.S. has returned to the arena, with Biden promising world leaders in April that the U.S. would cut carbon pollution in half by 2030. But following through on Biden’s climate goals depends in large part on passage of the Democratic package, and it will take the White House’s heft to close the deal between centrist...
    Liberal Democrats and climate change activists are vying to make big changes to the nation’s transit and power grid with infrastructure and social spending packages. But Republicans have blocked many of their proposals from a $1.2 trillion infrastructure bill that must pass with bipartisan support and are already warning that Democrats plan to advance “Green New Deal” policies that would cripple the economy and kill jobs. The House Republican Study Committee, which represents the largest faction of GOP lawmakers, issued a warning that the infrastructure package dedicates just $110 billion to fix the nation’s roads, bridges, and waterways. “The remaining $1 trillion are Green New Deal provisions,” Republican Study Committee Chairman Jim Banks, an Indiana Republican, warned. Among the provisions is a $66 billion allocation to expand rail, which Banks said is part of a plan to eliminate air travel that was touted in the Democrats’ 2019 Green New Deal proposal. Democrats, meanwhile, are searching for ways to add more green energy and climate provisions into a $3.5 trillion social spending package the party hopes...
    U.S. Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez said Thursday that progressives will "tank" the bipartisan infrastructure bill if Democrats don't also pass a spending package that includes provisions on climate change, jobs and other liberal priorities.  "House progressives are standing up. We will tank the bipartisan infrastructure bill unless we will also pass the reconciliation bill," the New York Democrat said during a virtual town hall, according to Bloomberg News.  In a late-night announcement Tuesday, Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer said the Budget Committee had reached an agreement to allot $3.5 trillion for the spending package that would complete President Biden’s infrastructure plan.  The congresswoman called the reconciliation package earlier this week an "enormous victory."  "This bill is absolutely a progressive victory," she said, according to NY1 in New York City. "If it wasn't for progressives in the House, we probably would be stuck with that tiny, pathetic bipartisan bill alone." Democrats plan to pass the bill using reconciliation, meaning they won’t need Republican votes and can bypass a potential filibuster, but House Speaker Nancy Pelosi can afford to lose only four Democratic votes, according to...
    During an interview aired on Thursday’s broadcast of MSNBC’s “The Last Word,” Senate Finance Committee Chair Ron Wyden (D-OR) stated that the tentative bipartisan deal on an infrastructure package is “a nonstarter” because the “biggest corporations, who got an enormous tax cut from Donald Trump in 2017 wouldn’t pay a single penny to use the roads and bridges and ports they depend on,” and the lack of climate change provisions in the deal. Wyden said, “They’ve talked to me, but I just don’t see it, Lawrence, and let me tell you why. First of all, the proposition that the country’s biggest corporations, who got an enormous tax cut from Donald Trump in 2017 wouldn’t pay a single penny to use the roads and bridges and ports they depend on, that is just a nonstarter. And, second, to take a complete pass on climate change, in other words, include nothing on climate change, is a complete nonstarter.” Wyden added that “it is pretty clear that the White House won’t accept it as well.” Follow Ian Hanchett on Twitter @IanHanchett
    Far-left Senate Democrats made their feelings known about not rubberstamping the infrastructure legislation if climate provisions are left out, as they feel the topic of climate change has recently faded from center stage. This comes as Democrats’ razor-thin majorities in both the House and Senate leave little room for error. Many of the Democrats have started to worry about climate change not being a part of the conversation during the infrastructure talks. Some have worried about sacrificing “what the scientific community says is necessary to stave off the worst consequences to claim a bipartisan victory,” Politico reports. At a climate change event, Sen. Martin Heinrich (D-NM) said: The White House and Democratic Congress need to hold strong on real, meaningful, bold, substantial climate provisions that President Biden proposed in his American Jobs Plan. …There is little appetite in our caucus for an infrastructure plan that ignores the greatest crisis, the most existential crisis that we face. Heinrich also tweeted, “An infrastructure package that goes light on climate and clean energy should not count on every Democratic vote.” Colorado’s Sen. Michael Bennet (D-CO) added to Heinrich’s tweet, writing,...
    It took time to comb through the almost 6,000 page legislation Congress approved to fund the government and provide relief for Americans from the coronavirus lockdown, but in the end those who believe climate change is an existential threat are happy about what lawmakers stuffed into the bill. USA Today reported that environmental activists “are touting the $2.3 trillion bill as a potential game-changer thanks to tax breaks for renewable energy sources, initiatives to promote carbon capture storage and a significant phasedown of hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) that are a key culprit to the planet’s warming.” And the bill, signed into law by President Donald Trump, reverses much of what the president had done to cut funding for federal climate change programs by adding millions of dollars for those kind of programs for 2021. “Passage of this bill represents real forward progress on climate change and clean energy,” Lindsey Griffith, federal policy director at the Clean Air Task Force, said. She called the package “the most significant U.S. federal climate legislation ever.” USA Today explained some of the content of the bill, which is written in legalistic jargon...
    Congress is poised to pass what supporters consider to be the most expansive package of provisions ever implemented to deal with climate change. The measure, the Energy Act of 2020, was included in the 5,593-page pandemic relief and government spending bill expected to be passed this week. It’s the product of years of work and difficult negotiations from interest groups and members of both parties. “This package demonstrates the progress that is possible when businesses, environmental groups, labor, and policymakers work together to find solutions on difficult issues,” said Marty Durbin, senior vice president of policy at the Chamber of Commerce, who hailed the package as the first significant energy bill since 2007 and the “biggest action Congress has ever taken to address climate change.” The package is headlined by a measure to phase down hydrofluorocarbons, or HFCs, a climate-warming refrigerant, by 85% by 2035, which would be one of the most significant emissions-reducing measures ever passed. It is the only major bill in recent memory that directly sets out reductions in a specific greenhouse gas. HFCs account for...
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