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    The wife of former Attorney General Eric Holder breached HIPAA-regulated protected health information held by her former Washington, D.C., women's health practice, according to a letter obtained by the Washington Examiner. Dr. Sharon D. Malone retained the regulated information of patients who received care from Foxhall OB/GYN Associates upon her departure from the practice as both an owner and employee at the end of 2020, according to a June 24 letter sent to a Foxhall patient. Malone then turned the patient information over to her new for-profit telehealth startup, Alloy, which then used the HIPAA information to send unsolicited emails to Foxhall patients. "We at Foxhall were not aware that Dr. Malone had retained the list, that she had turned over the list to Alloy, or that Alloy had sent emails to some of the patients on the list, until we received complaints from patients," the letter read. "Under no circumstances would Foxhall have agreed to or permitted Dr. Malone to retain the list, turn it over to any third party (including Alloy), or allow emails to be...
    A journalist reports near a crowd of abortion-rights activists in front of the U.S. Supreme Court after the Court announced a ruling in the Dobbs v Jackson Women's Health Organization case on June 24, 2022 in Washington, DC.Nathan Howard | Getty Images The Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade last month raised concerns that data collected by tech companies and clinics could be used to criminally charge people who seek abortions or experience pregnancy loss. Although the federal law known as the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act, or HIPAA, protects patient privacy, health-care providers can still be compelled to disclose patient data under special circumstances, such as a subpoena or a court order. There's also plenty of data that consumers generate in their everyday lives that would not be considered subject to HIPAA and could be used as evidence in court against people who allegedly sought abortions that violate state laws or against their providers. Legal experts note that search history, text messages, location data, and period-tracker apps could all potentially be used in court and in...
    Carrie Christian (pictured) is accused of tweeting a patient's preoperative notes ahead of surgery. The D.C. VA Medical Center employee allegedly shared a photo of a patient's preoperative anesthesia note for a penile implant surgery A Veteran Affairs hospital employee has been banned from accessing patient records after being accused of tweeting a patient's preoperative notes ahead of surgery.  In a now-deleted tweet, Carrie Christian, formerly Twitter user @CarrieeeeC, allegedly shared a photo of a patient's preoperative anesthesia note for a penile implant surgery. A '72[-year-old] male gets government-funded surgery,' Christian tweeted Monday along with an eggplant emoji.  Without specifically naming Christian, Veterans Affairs press secretary Terrence Hayes confirmed to the Washington Post on Thursday that the tweet was sent by an administrative officer in the D.C. VA Medical Center's anesthesia department who has since been banned from accessing patient records. He also confirmed that the department has launched an investigation into the incident.  'VA is aware of the incident and takes it very [seriously],' Hayes said.  'An investigation is underway and the employee has been removed from all access to Veteran...
    Getty A staff member walks past medical records at the Cornerstone Care Community Health Center of Rogersville March 21, 2017 in Rogersville, Pennsylvania. The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act’s Privacy Rule is a federal law prohibiting health care providers, businesses and the people working with them – including administrative staff, laboratories, pharmacies, health insurers and so on – from disclosing your health information without your permission. When people talk about HIPAA, they typically refer to the Privacy Rule provision established in 2003, which is just one part of a broader law initially passed by Congress in 1996. The Privacy Rule came into force after tennis star Arthur Ashe’s HIV status was publicly revealed and country music star Tammy Wynette’s health records were sold to tabloids. People were starting to worry about genetic privacy. And Congress recognized that the internet would make it easier for health care privacy breaches to occur. Why the HIPAA Privacy Rule Matters The HIPAA Privacy Rule gives you the right to control your health information disclosures so you can tell your health care...
    HIPAA has become a bit of a buzzword recently for people concerned about their vaccination status becoming public.  HANNITY: I BELIEVE IN THE SCIENCE OF VACCINATION HIPAA, the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996, was signed into law by President Bill Clinton in 1996. The statute’s main concern was not, in fact, privacy, but modernization of the flow of health care information.  One part of HIPAA does cover privacy. The Privacy Rule stipulates that so-called "protected health information" should not be disclosed without the individual’s consent by certain organizations, called "covered entities." These include health plans, health care providers, health care clearinghouses, and business associates. Business associates refers to "a person or organization, other than a member of a covered entity's workforce, that performs certain functions or activities on behalf of, or provides certain services to, a covered entity that involve the use or disclosure of individually identifiable health information." In other words, your doctor can’t release your medical records without your consent. It does not mean that you cannot be questioned about your vaccination status. AMERICAN AIRLINES...
    (CNN)On Tuesday, Georgia Republican Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene was asked a simple question. Her answer was, uh, revealing.Here's the question, asked of Greene by a reporter during a press availability in her office: "Have you yourself gotten vaccinated?"And now for her answer: "Your first question is a violation of my HIPAA rights. You see with HIPAA rights we don't have to reveal our medical records and that also includes our vaccine records."You can -- and should -- watch it for yourself here. Marjorie Taylor Greene, asked if she's been vaccinated, says the question is "a violation of my HIPAA rights." pic.twitter.com/RM3j48Tj6X— Andrew Solender (@AndrewSolender) July 20, 2021 Greene -- and stop me if you've heard this before, is simply wrong about HIPAA aka the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act. Read MorePassed in 1995, the law, at least in part, was aimed at assuring "that individuals' health information is properly protected while allowing the flow of health information needed to provide and promote high quality health care and to protect the public's health and well being," according to the Department...
    U.S. Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene (R-GA) on Facebook live Tuesday afternoon continued to spread false coronavirus and false vaccine information during a press conference purportedly held to discuss her temporary Twitter suspension. Greene was temporarily suspended Monday evening for spreading false coronavirus and false vaccine information. Her suspension was just 12 hours and concluded this morning. During the press conference one reporter asked the antisemitic QAnon-supporting congresswoman who repeatedly has used Nazi, Hitler, and Holocaust references if she has been vaccinated. Greene, a sitting member of Congress, falsely told the reporter they were violating her HIPAA rights. It is not a violation of HIPAA for a private individual or company to ask anyone their vaccination status. An individual's HIPAA rights are violated when healthcare providers, health insurance companies, or employers release private medical information without consent. Question: Have you yourself been vaccinated? Greene: Your first question is a violation of my HIPAA rights https://t.co/JuHDovV2mC — Acyn (@Acyn) 1626815448.0 From Your Site Articles
    MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) – As more workers head back to the office, some will have to share medical information with their employers. Is that a HIPAA violation? What health information can employers require from their workers? Good Question. HIPAA, which stands for the Health Insurance Portability Accountability Act, was passed in 1996. It was a federal law which created national standards for the protection of private patient health information being disclosed without the patient’s knowledge, including health care plans, health care clearing houses, as well as health care providers. Currently, there is no federal law that addresses the issue of employers requiring vaccination. But the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission issued guidance in May which says employers can mandate vaccines as long as they can prove it’s job-related. “Employers can mandate medical testing, which could include taking of temperatures, COVID testing if they determine that it is job-related and consistent with a business necessity,” said employment attorney Zaylor Stout. There are, however, two exceptions: medical disability – which is covered by the Americans with Disabilities Act – and religious beliefs. However, Stout said...
    (CBS4) – Colorado has dropped the statewide mask mandate for anyone who is fully vaccinated, leaving businesses to rely on the honor method for unmasked customers. CBS4 Medical Editor Dr. Dave Hnida addressed the legality of asking someone their vaccination status during his weekly question and answer session on CBSN Denver. Many people have a belief that HIPAA (Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act) prevents businesses from asking about vaccination status. Hnida explained why that is not the case. READ MORE: New Normal: Changes Coming To Offices Before Workers Return “Hospitals, clinics and doctors’ offices cannot give out your health information. Doctors, nurses, people who work in facilities cannot share you health health care information. Health insurance companies, health care clearing houses and so forth cannot share your health care information,” he explained. He cited an example of someone calling him as a doctor asking about his patient Jane Doe. As her doctor, he could not answer the question “Is Jane Doe vaccinated?” READ MORE: More Visits To High Country Cause New Stresses For Rescuers “But let’s say, you know...
    Julie Appleby - Victoria Knight October 13, 2020 10:48AM (UTC) This article originally appeared on Kaiser Health News. Within one day, President Donald Trump announced his COVID diagnosis and was admitted to Walter Reed National Military Medical Center for treatment. The flurry of events was stunning, confusing and triggered many questions. What was his prognosis? When was he last tested for COVID-19? What is his viral load? The answers were elusive. : Picture the scene on Oct. 5. White House physician Dr. Sean Conley, flanked by other members of Trump's medical team, met with reporters outside the hospital. But Conley would not disclose the results of the president's lung scans and other vital information, invoking a federal law he said allows him to selectively provide intel on the president's health. "There are HIPAA rules and regulations that restrict me in sharing certain things for his safety and his own health," he told the reporters. The law he's referring to, HIPAA, is the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996, which includes privacy protections designed to shield personal health...
    Washington — For the American people and members of the press hoping to glean a comprehensive run-down of President Trump's condition following his diagnosis with COVID-19, a five-letter acronym has been invoked by White House physician Dr. Sean Conley as a barrier to offering the full view that many crave. HIPAA, shorthand for the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act, has been mentioned repeatedly by Conley as he fields questions from the press about the president's health status, namely in response to questions about what scans of Mr. Trump's lungs revealed and when he last tested negative for the coronavirus. "There are HIPAA rules and regulations that restrict me in sharing certain things for his safety and his own health and reasons," Conley told reporters at Walter Reed on Monday when pressed about findings from the president's lung imaging. Get Breaking News Delivered to Your Inbox Asked about when Mr. Trump last tested negative and whether any of his lab tests were abnormal, Conley again leaned on the law.  "HIPAA kind of precludes me from going into too much...
    President Donald Trump had doctors and nonmedical staff at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center sign nondisclosure agreements after an unexpected visit last year, NBC News reports. Trump required staff at Walter Reed to sign NDAs after his surprise trip to the hospital on Nov. 16, 2019, according to four unnamed people with knowledge of the process. The reason for the president’s visit is still unknown, but he reportedly made the same requirement after his more recent visit for coronavirus treatment. "Any physician caring for the President is bound by patient physician confidentiality guaranteed under HIPAA [the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act], and Im not going to comment on internal procedures beyond that," White House deputy press secretary Judd Deere said in a statement. As NBC notes, HIPAA already prohibits people who provide medical services to anyone, be they the president or an average American, from disclosing that patient’s personal health information without their consent. "Ethically and legally you can ask for an NDA, but you dont need one," said Arthur Caplan, the head of the division of medical ethics at the...
    (CNN)Lots of questions have surrounded President Donald Trump's health after he announced last week that he had tested positive for coronavirus.And White House physician Sean Conley has been at the center of the storm, releasing confusing and limited information about Trump's condition and treatment. On Monday, Conley cited "HIPAA rules and regulations" as the reason why he couldn't share details on the President's lung imaging, which led to complaints that he was dodging difficult questions.Conley was referring to the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996, which protects patients from having their medical records disclosed without their consent. Exceptions include when the information is needed for treatment, payment or operations of the medical provider's office. Trump halted stimulus talks. Heres what it means for youHealth providers, including doctors and hospitals, as well as health insurers, including private plans, Medicare and Medicaid, are all subject to the privacy rule. However, several health privacy and ethics experts CNN consulted questioned whether Conley is bound by HIPAA rules, which apply only to providers who accept health insurance. Conley heads the White...
    By RICARDO ALONSO-ZALDIVAR, Associated Press WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump's doctor leaned on a federal health privacy law Monday to duck certain questions about the president's treatment for COVID-19, while readily sharing other details of his patient's condition. But a leading expert on the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act said a more likely reason for Dr. Sean Conley's selective disclosures appears to be Trump's comfort level in fully revealing his medical information. "That's a little head-scratcher," said Deven McGraw, a former career government lawyer who oversaw enforcement of the 1996 medical privacy statute. “It's quite possible the doctor sat down with the president and asked which information is OK to disclose.” At a press briefing at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, Conley, the White House physician, reported the president’s blood pressure — a little high at 134/78 — and respiration and heart rates, which were both in the normal ranges. But when reporters pressed for details on the results of lung scans and when Trump had last tested negative for COVID-19, the doctor demurred, citing HIPAA, as...
    WASHINGTON – President Donald Trump's doctor leaned on a federal health privacy law Monday to duck certain questions about the president's treatment for COVID-19, while readily sharing other details of his patient's condition. But a leading expert on the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act said a more likely reason for Dr. Sean Conley's selective disclosures appears to be Trump's comfort level in fully revealing his medical information. "That's a little head-scratcher," said Deven McGraw, a former career government lawyer who oversaw enforcement of the 1996 medical privacy statute. “It's quite possible the doctor sat down with the president and asked which information is OK to disclose.” At a press briefing at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, Conley, the White House physician, reported the president’s blood pressure — a little high at 134/78 — and respiration and heart rates, which were both in the normal ranges. But when reporters pressed for details on the results of lung scans and when Trump had last tested negative for COVID-19, the doctor demurred, citing HIPAA, as the law is commonly known....
    WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump’s doctor leaned on a federal health privacy law Monday to duck certain questions about the president’s treatment for COVID-19, while readily sharing other details of his patient’s condition. But a leading expert on the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act said a more likely reason for Dr. Sean Conley’s selective disclosures appears to be Trump’s comfort level in fully revealing his medical information. “That’s a little head-scratcher,” said Deven McGraw, a former career government lawyer who oversaw enforcement of the 1996 medical privacy statute. “It’s quite possible the doctor sat down with the president and asked which information is OK to disclose.” At a press briefing at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, Conley, the White House physician, reported the president’s blood pressure — a little high at 134/78 — and respiration and heart rates, which were both in the normal ranges. But when reporters pressed for details on the results of lung scans and when Trump had last tested negative for COVID-19, the doctor demurred, citing HIPAA, as the law is commonly...
    MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) — Hennepin Healthcare staff members have been accused of improperly viewing George Floyd’s medical records. Floyd’s family and legal team were sent a letter about a data breach of George Floyd’s confidential information at Hennepin Healthcare. The letter did not specify what information was accessed. Floyd’s family says the letter from the hospital stated a breach of data happened over multiple dates, and that the employees involved are “no longer with the organization.” The letter provided few details on how many employees were involved, and if they were terminated or voluntarily left the organization. Hennepin Healthcare issued the following statement: It is the practice of the Hennepin Healthcare Information Privacy Department to conduct privacy access audits. Access to the Hennepin Healthcare electronic medical record by our workforce is tracked and logged, which supports our auditing efforts. Any breach of patient confidentiality is taken seriously and thoroughly investigated. If it is determined that a violation has occurred, disciplinary action up to and including termination can be used.  Additionally, Hennepin Healthcare complies with federal information privacy regulations which require notification to...
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