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    An economist hired by attorneys for families of Sandy Hook victims testified Friday he assessed Alex Jones’ financial situation, and concluded he might be worth up to $270 million. Jones was ordered to pay the families $4.1 million in compensatory damages Thursday after he was found liable for defaming them. The InfoWars founder claimed for years the Sandy Hook massacre never occurred and the children murdered never existed and had been portrayed by “crisis actors.” The jury is currently considering how much Jones must pay in punitive damages. On Thursday, Jones posted a video on his website wherein he pleaded with his followers to buy his products and chip in to keep InfoWars afloat. On a video stream viewed by Mediaite, Jones said, “I admitted I was wrong [to spread false information about the Sandy Hook massacre]… I followed disinformation, but not on purpose. I apologized to the families.” Jones railed against the $4.1 million he owed, and said he feared a much larger sum was coming. “That’s more money than my company and I personally have,” he said. “We’re in...
    By JIM VERTUNO AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — Conspiracy theorist Alex Jones and his company Free Speech Systems are worth up to $270 million, an economist testified Friday to a jury trying to determine if Jones should have to pay punitive damages to the family of a 6-year-old killed in the 2012 Sandy Hook Elementary School shootings. The same jury ordered Jones to pay Neil Heslin and Scarlett Lewis $4.1 million in compensation for defamation. Jurors began considering additional punitive damages Friday as a separate issue. The parents want to punish Jones for a decade of pushing false hoax claims that they say led to a decade of trauma and abuse from the Infowars host’s followers. Bernard Pettingill, who was hired by the plaintiffs to study Jones’ net worth, said records show that Jones withdrew $62 million for himself in 2021, when default judgments were issued in lawsuits against him. “That number represents, in my opinion, a value of a net worth,” Pettingill said. “He’s got money put in a bank account somewhere.” The money that flows into Jones’ companies eventually...
    Alex Jones set up shell companies to move money after being held liable by default in a case involving families of the Sandy Hook victims last year, a witness said Friday. Bernard Pettingill, a witness for the Sandy Hook families and an economic consultant and former professor of economics at the Florida Institute of Technology, said Jones began moving $11,000 a day into shell companies in September 2021 after being held liable for the cases involving defamation surrounding the shooting. ALEX JONES ORDERED TO PAY $4.1 MILLION TO SANDY HOOK PARENTS IN DEFAMATION CASE Pettingill also testified that the net revenue of InfoWars, Jones's company, in 2021 was $64 million and downplayed the effect Jones's company being removed from several platforms, including Facebook, had on his income. The witness testified Jones and Free Speech Systems, InfoWars's parent company, have a net worth between $135 million and $270 million. Jones's company filed for bankruptcy last week. The revelations of Jones's finances came during one of the defamation trials brought against him by the parents of Sandy...
    Conservative conspiracy theorist Alex Jones begged his viewers to donate to him on Thursday after he was ordered to pay more than $4 million to the parents of a child killed in the Sandy Hook massacre, which he once claimed was a hoax, as an economist testifies in court that he and his company are worth $270 million. In a video posted Thursday to Infowars.com, Jones said the amount he's ordered to pay is 'more than my company has [and] more than I personally have,' claiming 'we are so broke.' Jones told viewers it's their responsibility to keep him and his company afloat, saying in the video 'if you don't fund us... we will shut down' and telling them 'it's your decision' whether Infowars shuts down. He added the company 'can barely keep the crew employed' due to their financial issues, but his website was found to have made over $800,000 a day during their peak in 2017, though Jones called that their best day ever.  Alex Jones released a video asking his viewers to help fund him, and said...
    The defamation trial of far-right conspiracy theorist Alex Jones continued on Friday as parents of a child murdered in the Sandy Hook massacre in 2012 seek punitive damages against Jones for calling the shooting a hoax. Scarlett Lewis and Neil Heslin, the parents of murdered 6-year-old Jesse Lewis, were awarded $4.1 million by a Texas jury on Thursday in compensatory damages. Lawyers for the parents put forensic economist Bernard Pettingill on the stand Friday morning to lay out the net worth and financial operation behind Alex Jones and Free Speech Systems LLC (FFS), the company behind his InfoWars conspiracy theory show. “Alex Jones was a revolutionary, a maverick,” Pettingill said on the stand, praising Jones as a “very successful guy.” “He did not ride a wave, he created a wave,” Pettingill said of Jones’s business model, which he praised as an innovative operation that harnessed the power of the internet and has gained scores of “rabid” fans that pour money into InfoWars buying all kinds of products from merchandise to vitamins. When confronted with the fact that Jones was banned...
    AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — A Texas jury on Thursday ordered conspiracy theorist Alex Jones to pay more than $4 million in compensatory damages to the parents of a 6-year-old boy who was killed in the Sandy Hook Elementary School massacre, marking the first time the Infowars host has been held financially liable for repeatedly claiming the deadliest school shooting in U.S. history was a hoax. The Austin jury must still decide how much the Infowars host must pay in punitive damages to Neil Heslin and Scarlett Lewis, whose son Jesse Lewis was among the 20 children and six educators who were killed in the 2012 attack in Newtown, Connecticut. The parents had sought at least $150 million in compensation for defamation and intentional infliction of emotional distress. Jones’ attorney asked the jury to limit damages to $8 — one dollar for each of the compensation charges they are considering — and Jones himself said any award over $2 million “would sink us.” It likely won’t be the last judgment against Jones over his claims that the attack was staged in...
    (CNN Business)The accountant now in charge of overseeing right-wing conspiracy theorist Alex Jones' company Free Speech Systems through its bankruptcy was questioned Wednesday by attorneys for families of Sandy Hook shooting victims over $62 million in funds Jones has drawn from the company over the years.Free Speech Systems, which runs Jones' conspiratorial outlet Infowars, filed for bankruptcy protection on Friday, amid proceedings in two states to determine how much Jones owes in damages to families of Sandy Hook victims over his false claims that the shooting was a hoax and they had not actually gone through the experience of losing a child in it. Marc Schwartz testified he signed a contract to take over as Chief Restructuring Officer for the company in June and now controls all bank accounts, payroll and hiring decisions. Schwartz testified that Jones withdrew about $62 million dollars from the company over 14 years, and testified that $30 million of those withdrawals was paid to the IRS. Schwartz also testified during the hearing, which ran for more than six hours, that Infowars received about $9 million...
    By JIM VERTUNO AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — The father of a 6-year-old boy killed in the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting testified Tuesday that conspiracy theorist Alex Jones made his life a “living hell” by pushing claims that the murders were a hoax involving actors aimed at increasing gun control. In more than an hour of emotional testimony during which he often fought back tears, Neil Heslin said he has endured online abuse, anonymous phone calls and harassment on the street. “What was said about me and Sandy Hook itself resonates around the world,” Heslin said. “As time went on, I truly realized how dangerous it was. … My life has been threatened. I fear for my life, I fear for my safety.” Heslin said his home and car have been shot at, and his attorneys said Monday that the family had an “encounter” in Austin after the trial began in the city and have been in isolation under security. Heslin and Scarlett Lewis, the parents of 6-year-old Jesse Lewis, have sued Jones and his media company Free Speech Systems...
    AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — The father of a 6-year-old killed in the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting said Tuesday that it was “cowardly” of Alex Jones to skip hearing his testimony in person about how Jones’ claims that the massacre was a hoax deeply affected his family. “What was said about me and Sandy Hook itself resonates around the world,” Neil Heslin testified Tuesday. “As time went on I truly realized how dangerous it was … My life has been threatened. I fear for my life, I fear for my safety.” Heslin and Scarlett Lewis, the parents of 6-year-old Jesse Lewis, have sued Jones and his media company Free Speech Systems over the harassment and threats they and other parents say they’ve endured for years while Jones and his Infowars website claimed the 2012 attack that killed 20 first-graders and six staffers at the Connecticut school was a hoax or faked. Heslin and Lewis are seeking at least $150 million in the case. “Today is very important to me and it’s been a long time coming … to face...
    AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — The parents of a Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting victim live with a complex form of post-traumatic stress disorder and a constant fear that followers of conspiracy theorist Alex Jones will kill them, a psychiatrist testified Monday at Jones’ defamation trial. Neil Heslin and Scarlett Lewis, parents of 6-year-old Jesse Lewis, have sued Jones and his media company Free Speech Systems over the harassment and threats they and other parents say they’ve endured for years while Jones and his Infowars website claimed the 2012 attack that killed 20 first graders and six school staffers was a hoax or faked. “The overwhelming cause of their pain is what Jones is doing,” said Roy Lubit, a forensic psychiatrist hired by the plaintiffs to review the trauma faced by the parents. The post-traumatic stress disorder the parents suffer is similar is not based on a single event, but by constant trauma, and is similar to that endured by soldiers in war zones or child abuse victims, Lubit said. Heslin and Scarlett Lewis are consumed not just with the...
    (CNN) — Right-wing conspiracy theorist Alex Jones’ primary company filed for bankruptcy protection on Friday, an unexpected move that comes as a trial is underway in Texas to determine how much in damages he will have to pay the families of two Sandy Hook victims. Jones’ decision to seek bankruptcy protection for his company, Free Speech Systems, which operates the right-wing conspiratorial outlet Infowars, also comes after he was found legally responsible in a separate defamation case in Connecticut. In that Connecticut case, a different group of families similarly sued Jones over false claims he made about the 2012 Sandy Hook shooting. Three smaller companies tied to Jones declared bankruptcy earlier this year, briefly pausing the cases in both Texas and Connecticut. But the families suing Jones dropped the three smaller companies from their lawsuits so that the cases could move forward against Jones and Free Speech Systems. Shortly after, the three companies exited bankruptcy protection. In a bizarre legal twist, Jones also filed a complaint Thursday against his own company in Connecticut, a move that could further delay proceedings...
    Briana Sanchez/Austin American-Statesman/AP, Pool Facts matter: Sign up for the free Mother Jones Daily newsletter. Support our nonprofit reporting. Subscribe to our print magazine.The parent company of Infowars, Alex Jones’ far-right conspiracy website, has filed for bankruptcy, Jones’ attorney said yesterday. The announcement comes amid two concurrent defamation lawsuits in which families of Sandy Hook school shooting victims are seeking damages from Jones, who repeatedly peddled the lie that the massacre was a “giant hoax” orchestrated by “crisis actors.” (He has since acknowledged that Sandy Hook actually happened, attributing his false claims to a “form of psychosis.”) Attorneys representing the families suing Jones told the Washington Post that they believed the bankruptcy declaration was a ploy for Jones to delay going to trial and avoid financial liability. (Jones’ lawyer has claimed the filing won’t stop the case from proceeding as planned.) Jones is currently embroiled in legal battles in Texas and Connecticut to determine how much he owes victims’ families. This isn’t the first time one of Jones’ businesses has filed for bankruptcy in recent months. In April, Infowars and two of Jones’ other...
    Elijah Nouvelage/Getty Images Alex Jones’ Free Speech Systems, the parent company of Infowars, filed for bankruptcy this week amid the right-wing conspiracy theorist’s defamation damages trial in Texas. Jones has faced multiple lawsuits from the families of victims of the 2012 Sandy Hook shooting over statements made on his program at the time. Jones entertained a conspiracy theory that the shooting never actually occurred, though he’s since said he believes the shooting did take place. Jones’ attorney Federico Andino Reynal announced the new bankruptcy filing late Friday as the first week of his client’s trial wrapped. The current trial is to determine the amount of damages Jones owes in a defamation suit he already lost. Jones has been defiant during the trial, even showing up to court at one point with his mouth duct-taped with the message “Save the 1st” written on it. There was also an Infowars logo. Jones’ attorney said the current bankruptcy filing will not affect the defamation trial, but this is not the first time a company tied to Jones has moved towards bankruptcy as he...
    New York (CNN Business)Right-wing conspiracy theorist Alex Jones' primary company filed for bankruptcy protection on Friday, an unexpected move that comes as a trial is underway in Texas to determine how much in damages he will have to pay the families of two Sandy Hook victims who sued and won a default judgment against him.Jones' decision to seek bankruptcy protection for his company, Free Speech Systems, which operates the right-wing conspiratorial outlet Infowars, also comes after he was found legally responsible in a separate defamation case in Connecticut. In that Connecticut case, a different group of families similarly sued Jones over false claims he made about the 2012 Sandy Hook shooting. Three smaller companies tied to Jones declared bankruptcy earlier this year, briefly pausing the cases in both Texas and Connecticut. But the families suing Jones dropped the three smaller companies from their lawsuits so that the cases could move forward against Jones and Free Speech Systems. Shortly after, the three companies exited bankruptcy protection. In a bizarre legal twist, Jones also filed a complaint Thursday against his own company...
    AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — Conspiracy theorist Alex Jones’ media company Free Speech Systems filed for bankruptcy on Friday, but his attorney said it should not disrupt the defamation damages trial underway in Texas that seeks to force Jones to pay $150 million or more to the family of one of the children killed in the 2012 Sandy Hook Elementary School attack. The trial in Austin, where Jones lives and Free Speech Systems is based, wrapped up its first week of testimony Friday and is expected to conclude next week. The bankruptcy filing was announced by Jones’ attorney Andino Reynal late in the day. Reynal and attorneys for the family suing Jones told Judge Maya Guerra Gamble that the bankruptcy filing would not halt the lawsuit. The company wants “to put this part of the odyssey behind us so that we have some numbers” set for damages, Reynal said. Details of the bankruptcy filing were not immediately available. It is not the first time a bankruptcy filing has come amid litigation against Jones by the Sandy Hook families....
    AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — A producer for conspiracy theorist Alex Jones’s media company tried to paint a sympathetic portrait of him Thursday as a jury decides how much in financial damages he should pay for his past claims that the 2012 shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary school was a hoax — a move that lawyers for parents of a child slain in the massacre immediately rebuked as hypocritical. Daria Karpova, a producer at Jones’ Austin, Texas-based Infowars website, testified that that the pressure of multiple lawsuits and trials has taken a toll on Jones. He’s been “stressed out” and can’t relax even while on vacation as he’s been constantly worried about his programs and money over the past four years since being sued for defamation. Karpova said some people believe Jones murdered the 20 first-graders killed in the massacre in Newtown, Connecticut, that left a total of 26 dead. A lawyer for the parents suing Jones for at least $150 million for the abuse they say they’ve suffered for years because of Jones’ false statements immediately jumped on the...
    Mother Jones illustration; Don Emmert/AFP/Getty; Drew Angerer/Getty Facts matter: Sign up for the free Mother Jones Daily newsletter. Support our nonprofit reporting. Subscribe to our print magazine.A fugitive Chinese mogul who has worked closely with Steve Bannon—and who is under federal investigation for fraud—spent hundreds of thousands of dollars to support efforts to overturn the 2020 election. Through a series of opaque financial transactions, a company controlled by the exiled businessman Guo Wengui spent more than $400,000 for hundreds of his supporters to take part in a November 14, 2020, rally in Washington promoting Donald Trump’s false claims of election fraud. The company also gave $100,000 to an organization run by prominent pro-Trump attorney Lin Wood—apparently to finance litigation that was aimed at reversing Joe Biden’s victory in Georgia. These payments are detailed in receipts, wire transfer records, and WhatsApp messages obtained by Mother Jones. Wood said in interviews that the $100,000 donation to his nonprofit, the Fightback Foundation, was arranged by Bannon, the former Trump adviser and influential right-wing media figure. According to Wood, Bannon claimed the money came from a...
    InfoWars conspiracy theorist Alex Jones could soon sue his own lawyers, as Jones and his company scramble to blame someone else for their legal failures in lawsuits over their lies about the Sandy Hook school shooting. Jones and InfoWars have consistently lost in courtrooms across the country to families of the school-shooting victims who have filed suits over Jones’s claims that the massacre was a false flag. Last year, judges in Connecticut and Texas took the unusual steps of ruling Jones and InfoWars in default over trial, effectively declaring that they had already lost the cases as punishment for their many failures to follow legal procedure. But the public shamings haven’t stopped InfoWars from floating the possibility that someone else is at fault for all their legal maladies. Namely, their frequently rotating members of their legal team. In a February deposition obtained by The Daily Beast, a representative of InfoWars’ parent company said the conspiracy-theory outlet was discussing the idea of suing Jones’s former lawyers for legal malpractice. “I did have concerns on behalf of the company regarding the company’s...
    Tesla has been removed from a widely-followed sustainability index over concerns about its lack of low carbon strategy, claims of racial discrimination and deaths involving its Autopilot technology. S&P Dow Jones Indices removed the electric carmaker from the S&P 500 ESG index on May 2, the company announced in a blog post Wednesday. The index measures the 'performance of securities meeting sustainability criteria.' 'ESG' stands for environmental, social and governance. The criteria is used by 'socially conscious' investors when deciding where to put their money, according to Investopedia.  Tesla remains on the regular S&P 500 index, which measures the largest companies in the US by market capitalization. The index provider cited various issues at Tesla that significantly lowered its ESG score, including racial discrimination claims, poor working conditions and its handling of a government investigation after crashes linked to its self-driving cars. The company's stock has fallen by 27 percent in the past month, after founder and CEO Elon Musk announced plans to buy Twitter. S&P Dow Jones Indices removed Tesla from the S&P 500 ESG index on May 2 after...
    (CBS4) – Some Colorado employers are stealing the wages of their workers and new research shows it’s hurting all of us. The Colorado Fiscal Institute says last year workers here lost nearly $730 million to wage theft. Meanwhile, the state lost about $45 million in tax revenue for roads, schools and other public services. The Fiscal Institute says Latinos are targeted most and women are more likely than men to be victims of wage theft. It says it’s most prevalent in the hospitality, retail and construction industries and the state’s lowest-paid workers are the ones at the highest risk of having their wages stolen. About 440 thousand low-wage workers in Colorado were victims of wage theft last year, according to the Fiscal Institute. Jhoana Garcia is one of them. She says a contractor strung her along for a month with promises she’d get paid while the single mom struggled to feed her kids. “Since I have kids I was looking for a way to sell burritos to earn money, to be able to feed them and pay my bills,” said...
    The Walt Disney Co. is the worst performing stock in the Dow Jones Industrial Average for the past year, plummeting 31 percent in the last 12 months. Of the 30 companies that comprise the Dow, Disney has seen its stock drop the most on a percentage basis, followed by 3M, which is down 25 percent, and Home Depot, down 23 percent. Disney is now the worst performing Dow stock over the past year — down 31.5%.$DIS pic.twitter.com/nLDcSUJLJP — Carl Quintanilla (@carlquintanilla) April 20, 2022 Disney shares were down more than 5 percent Wednesday as investors remained skittish on streaming entertainment companies following Netflix’s disastrous first quarter results. Disney+ subscription results recently disappointed Wall Street when the company reported quarterly results in November, causing the stock to tumble. The Mouse House also faces difficulties in Florida, where the state senate voted on Wednesday to pass a measure that would deprive Disney World in Orlando of its self-governing status. The bill now moves to the Florida House, which is expected to pass it and send it to the desk of Gov. Ron DeSantis (R),...
    (CNN)Millions of people are cranking up the heat as much of the Northeast US braces for a rare April blast of winter weather. The high demand sent natural gas futures soaring yesterday to levels unseen since 2008. Overall, natural gas is up by a staggering 113% since the end of last year. Here's what you need to know to Get Up to Speed and On with Your Day. (You can get "5 Things You Need to Know Today" delivered to your inbox daily. Sign up here.)1. UkraineThe battle for control over the Donbas region is currently underway, and the outcome may define Russian President Vladimir Putin's invasion after his forces suffered costly failures in Kyiv and across central and northern Ukraine. In eastern Ukraine, Russian forces have completed the regrouping of troops to launch an offensive to establish full control over the Donetsk and Luhansk regions, a Ukrainian defense ministry spokesperson said. Meanwhile, Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky said his forces need weapons quickly, pushing back against concerns from US and NATO officials that his military would need significant training before...
    Damian Lillard #0 of the Portland Trail Blazers speaks to fans during fan appreciation night before the game against the Utah Jazz at Moda Center on April 10, 2022 in Portland, Oregon.Abbie Parr | Getty Images Portland Trail Blazers star Damian Lillard said he wants to stay with the franchise that drafted him in 2012 and would use this offseason to get healthy and strengthen his game. While he's doing that, Lillard also plans to expand a new business venture. Lillard discussed his desire to stay in Portland when he spoke to CNBC on Monday about Move, a footwear insoles performance brand he co-founded with his business partner, Nate Jones. Move launched in December. It lured more than $100,000 in sales the first month through direct-to-consumer, and it projects $1 million in sales for 2022. Lillard said the consumer product is "tailored to sports and for athletes." He added Move wants to help basketball players avoid foot injuries such as plantar fasciitis, which he experienced earlier in his NBA career. "[Young athletes] need to wear this because the things...
    AUSTIN, Texas -- Alex Jones is facing a new lawsuit in Texas over accusations that the Infowars host hid millions of dollars in assets after families of Sandy Hook victims began taking him to court.Relatives of some of the 20 children and six educators killed in the 2012 Newtown, Connecticut, massacre have already won defamation lawsuits against Jones after he said the shootings never happened. The new lawsuit, which was filed Wednesday, comes as trials are set for this year over how much he should pay."After Alex Jones was sued for claiming the massacre at Sandy Hook Elementary was a hoax, the infamous conspiracy theorist conspired to divert his assets to shell companies owned by insiders like his parents, his children, and himself," reads the lawsuit, which was filed in Austin, Texas, by some of the Sandy Hook families.According to the lawsuit, Jones is accused of drawing about $18 million from his Infowars company over three years, starting in 2018 when the defamation lawsuits were filed. Jones is also accused of claiming a "dubious" $54 million debt around that time...
    AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — Alex Jones is facing a new lawsuit in Texas over accusations that the Infowars host hid millions of dollars in assets after families of Sandy Hook victims began taking him to court. Relatives of some of the 20 children and six educators killed in the 2012 Newtown, Connecticut, massacre have already won defamation lawsuits against Jones after he said the shootings never happened. The new lawsuit, which was filed Wednesday, comes as trials are set for this year over how much he should pay. “After Alex Jones was sued for claiming the massacre at Sandy Hook Elementary was a hoax, the infamous conspiracy theorist conspired to divert his assets to shell companies owned by insiders like his parents, his children, and himself,” reads the lawsuit, which was filed in Austin, Texas, by some of the Sandy Hook families. According to the lawsuit, Jones is accused of drawing about $18 million from his Infowars company over three years, starting in 2018 when the defamation lawsuits were filed. Jones is also accused of claiming a...
    Photo by Alex Jones Drew Angerer/Getty Images. Far-right conspiracy theorist Alex Jones reportedly transferred millions of dollars out of InfoWar’s accounts and into shell companies in an apparent gambit to avoid paying victims of the Sandy Hook massacre, who are suing him. Will Sommer reports that in a motion filed Wednesday the families suing Jones claim he has worked to hide InfoWars’ assets and deceptively made the company appear to be on the verge of bankruptcy. Jones is being sued for defamation by the families of some of the 20 children and 6 teachers killed in the 2021 school shooting after Jones claimed that the shooting had never happened and suggested it was a false flag operation. A judge recently found Jones liable for damages and a trial is set for August to determine how much he should pay the families The families’ motion, filed in Texas, alleges Jones has “doomsday prepped” his finances to avoid paying damages in the future. “On paper, InfoWars parent company Free Speech Systems seems to lose money every year,” Sommer writes in the Daily...
    InfoWars conspiracy theorist Alex Jones talks a lot about preparing for the apocalypse, selling his fans all manner of ways to stock their bunkers ahead of the end of the world. But now plaintiffs for Sandy Hook families suing Jones allege that he’s “doomsday prepped” his own business ahead of hefty legal judgments, illicitly moving money out of InfoWars into shell companies to avoid paying his victims. In a court motion filed Wednesday in Texas, the families claim that he has concealed InfoWars’ assets to make the company appear to be nearly bankrupt. The families were joined in the motion by another man suing Jones for falsely accusing him of carrying out the 2018 Parkland shooting. The filing was first posted online by Courthouse News. InfoWars didn’t respond to a request for comment. On paper, InfoWars parent company Free Speech Systems seems to lose money every year. Yet Jones has allegedly transferred significant amounts out of the company—financial transactions that often coincide with legal setbacks Jones has faced in the Sandy Hook cases. After the families sued him in...
    Warning: This story quotes several racist slurs allegedly directed at Black workers at Tesla’s California plant, according to a lawsuit filed against the company. A single mother was excited to land a job at Tesla. About three years in, she was fired, she said, after complaining that Black workers were frequently called the N-word on the assembly line. A former refinery worker couldn’t wait to get into green energy. She said she soon found herself and other Black workers assigned to the most arduous tasks in a corner of the factory co-workers called “the plantation.” An army veteran was promoted to a fleet manager job. He said he was fired after he complained his boss called him and two Black co-workers “monkeys.” In interviews with The Times, three Black former employees described how jobs at the pioneering automaker devolved into personal nightmares due to a pattern of rampant racism and harassment at Tesla’s Fremont, Calif., factory. Their accounts expand on allegations in a Feb. 9 lawsuit filed by the California Department of Fair Employment and Housing on behalf of more...
    Utility giant FirstEnergy Corp.’s former chief executive and a top official masterminded payments to public officials in an alleged $60 million bribery scheme to win a legislative bailout for two Ohio nuclear plants, attorneys representing investors in the utility said Wednesday. The two attorneys, under order from a federal judge to reveal the names, wrote in a court document that former FirstEnergy CEO Chuck Jones and senior vice president Michael Dowling were responsible for the company’s role. Both Jones and Dowling were fired by FirstEnergy in October 2020 for violating the company’s policies and code of conduct — three months after federal investigators arrested one of Ohio’s most powerful politicians in what has been called the biggest corruption scandal in state history. Although the firing of the two executives had implied the scheme was authorized at the highest levels of the company, this is the first time any FirstEnergy executives have been publicly linked to arranging the payments. “Discovery received would have shown at trial that two senior executives of FirstEnergy devised and orchestrated FirstEnergy’s payments to public...
    In this article JSDAJones Soda's cannabis offshoot, Mary JonesSource: Jones SodaMeet Mary Jones, the new brand from Jones Soda that will feature cannabis-infused sodas, gummies and syrups. It's a bold step for the publicly traded company, which is best known for its craft soda, but its relatively small size means it may feel it can take risks that larger rivals Coca-Cola and PepsiCo are shy to try. Cannabis is still federally illegal, and the drink giants are wary of crossing that line. The closest that Pepsi has come is its recent launch of a line of hemp-infused Rockstar energy drinks, although hemp seed has no dramatic effects when consumed. Alcohol companies have embraced cannabinoids to a greater degree. Corona brewer Constellation Brands owns a stake in cannabis company Canopy Growth, while Molson Coors sells CBD-infused drinks made through a joint venture. For 2021, Jones Soda reported revenue of $14.8 million, less than .04% of Coke's revenue for the full year. The company has a market value of $37.3 million and is trading at 55 cents a share. "We're a small...
    S&P Dow Jones Indices will remove any company headquartered or listed in Russia from its famed stock indexes following the country's invasion of Ukraine. Effective March 9, Russian firms will no longer be included in the Dow Jones Industrial average or benchmark S&P 500 index, the company behind the stock indexes said on Friday. A stock index tracks the performance of a basket of company share prices, and is used to represent and understand trends in the broader market.  Although stock indexes are regularly rebalanced, with companies being removed or added to reflect market trends, a ban on an entire nation's industry is exceedingly rare.  S&P DJI also said that it would strip Russia of its 'emerging market' status and reclassify it as a 'stand-alone' country.  S&P Dow Jones Indices will remove any company headquartered or listed in Russia from its famed stock indexes following the country's invasion of Ukraine The company's global equity indices are divided into three major country classifications -- developed, emerging, and frontier -- and countries do not fall into one of the three are considered...
    Traders on the floor of the NYSE, Jan. 26, 2022.Source: NYSE Nasdaq 100 and S&P 500 futures fell Wednesday night, as traders pored through the latest batch of corporate earnings, which included disappointing numbers from tech giant Meta Platforms. Futures tied to the Nasdaq 100 dropped 1.8%, and S&P 500 futures slid 0.7%. Dow Jones Industrial Average futures rose 68 points, or 0.2%, however. Shares of Facebook-parent Meta Platforms plunged more than 20% in after-hours trading after the company's quarterly profit fell short of expectations. The company also issued weaker-than-expected revenue guidance for the current quarter. "There was a lot to not like" from Meta's report, Metropolitan Capital Advisors CEO Karen Finerman told CNBC's "Fast Money." She noted that the company's revenue growth expectations were the "spookiest" part of the release. However, Finerman added that the move down seems a "little overdone." Other social media names, including Snap and Twitter, followed Facebook shares lower. Snap shares slid 17.4% after the bell, and Twitter dropped more than 8%. Spotify Technology, meanwhile, fell about 11% after the company's latest quarterly figures showed...
    Getty Kansas City Chiefs defensive tackle Chris Jones. When the Kansas City Chiefs beat the Buffalo Bills in overtime during the Divisional Round of the playoffs, Arrowhead Stadium was rocking. Fans gathered in the stands to celebrate one of the most exciting games that have taken place on an NFL field in recent memory. Even Chiefs defensive tackle Chris Jones joined in on the celebration. Jones, who is known for his high energy, hopped into the stands to celebrate with members of Chiefs Kingdom, downing a bottle of Michelob ULTRA to express his excitement for what had just taken place. GettyKansas City Chiefs defensive tackle Chris Jones. The latest Chiefs news straight to your inbox! Join the Heavy on Chiefs newsletter here! The fact that Jones was captured by photographers drinking a well-known beer caught the attention of Michelob ULTRA on Twitter. Both Jones and Michelob ULTRA also noticed there was one fan, in particular, that was captured in the viral photo that had a much different expression on her face compared to others around Jones.Julie...
    WESTMINSTER, Md. (WJZ) — Robert A. “Bobby” Jones, a firefighter and paramedic with the Reese & Community Volunteer Fire Company, died on Thursday after contracting COVID-19 while on the job, the company said. Jones contracted the virus in December “2hile performing his duties serving the citizens of Carroll County and died on Jan. 20, according to the fire company. READ MORE: With Cockburn Out, No. 17 Illinois Falls 81-65 To MarylandAccording a post from the company on Facebook, Jones started working as a firefighter in 1978, when he joined the Woodlawn Volunteer Fire Company. READ MORE: Maryland Weather: A Cold End To The Workweek, With A Winter Weather Advisory In Place For The Lower Eastern ShoreJones spent three decades with the Baltimore County Fire Department, retiring as a lieutenant in 2012. While working for the Reese company in Westminster, Jones served as a paramedic, firefighter, engineer, and shift supervisor. MORE NEWS: Members Of Safe Streets Plan To Honor DaShawn McGrier On SaturdayMembers of the fire company, along with firefighters and paramedics from other jurisdictions, on Friday morning helped transport Jones’...
    A career paramedic/firefighter in Carroll County has died as a result of COVID-19, according to officials. Robert A. “Bobby” Jones contracted COVID-19 while serving the citizens of Carroll County in December 2021. After multiple complications due to the virus he died of the illness on Jan. 20, the Carrol County Department of Fire & EMS said. Jones' death is the first in the Line of Duty Death for the Reese & Community Volunteer Fire Company, newly formed Carroll County Department of Fire & EMS, and IAFF Local 5184. Jones joined the Reese & Community Volunteer Fire Company in Westminster as a Paramedic in the late 1980’s working part-time until he became a full-time paramedic, firefighter, engineer, and shift supervisor. He is survived by his family which includes his mother, five siblings, stepdaughter, and grandson. Funeral arrangements have yet to be announced. You can visit the Reese Volunteer Fire Company website for more information.
    TIRANA, Albania (AP) — The Albanian government said Tuesday that it would hire a U.S. company to bolster its cybersecurity following a large leak last month. The country and Virginia-based Jones Group International signed a memorandum of understanding in the Albanian capital of Tirana “on strengthening security of the digital systems,” Prime Minister Edi Rama said. The Jones Group — headed by retired Gen. James L. Jones, former national security adviser and supreme allied commander in Europe — would first make a “full scanning of our systems to check how they are exposed to domestic and foreign attacks,” Infrastructure Minister Belinda Balluku said. It would then plan a strategy of how to install multilayer protective systems to prevent cyberattacks in a country where people can find more than 90% of their public administration services online. In December, the personal information of some 690,000 people, including identity card numbers and employment and salary data, was leaked from a government database of state and private employees. The data was shared widely through messaging apps. Four public and private officials were arrested,...
    Three employees at the candle factory that in Kentucky that was destroyed by tornadoes this past weekend will be suing the company, The Courier Journal reported. "We have identified six causes of action before, during and after the tornado at the Mayfield Consumer Products Plant," D.C.-based attorney Amos Jones told the newspaper. "We will be filing formally very soon." Jones did not specify what the causes of action are. At least eight of the 110 employees at the factory have been confirmed dead, with the company saying it is still verifying how many surviving employees have been accounted for. Since the factory's collapse, multiple workers have come forward saying they were not permitted to leave the factory even as weather conditions worsened and tornado sirens blared. Managers reportedly threatened to fire them if they went home. “People had questioned if they could leave or go home,” factory employee McKayla Emery told NBC News. Another employee at the factory, Haley Conder, said employees were initially not permitted to leave after the first siren due to safety concerns and they instead congregated in bathrooms and hallways. After the threat had appeared to clear,...
    TargetSmart is a data firm that works with major players in the Democratic Party, from the Democratic National Committee to state democratic parties. According to Mother Jones' David Corn, TargetSmart's owners and founders have another association: extremist far-right Republicans. Corn reports, "A Mother Jones investigation found that the owners and founders of TargetSmart also own a company that earns millions by helping to elect Republicans, including far-right GOP state legislators who have tried to overturn the 2020 election results, who were involved in the January 6 march on the U.S. Capitol that turned into a seditious riot, and who have been part of the Republican crusade to skew election laws against the Democrats. That is, the parent company of this vital Democratic data firm is profiting by aiding conservative and authoritarian political forces that seek to defeat the Democrats and progressives supported by TargetSmart." Corn describes TargetSmart as a "for-profit company that few Democratic voters, grassroots activists or cable news junkies have ever head of" but notes that it "provides crucial services to" the DNC and other major players in...
    BOSTON (CBS) — Mac Jones topped 300 yards for the first time of his young career on Sunday, en route to earning his third career victory. As the numbers start to accumulate for the Patriots’ rookie QB, he’s also managed to put himself in some rather exclusive company. READ MORE: Bill Belichick Offers Huge Praise To Justin HerbertJones is now just the fourth rookie in NFL history to throw for at least 225 yards and a touchdown in five straight games. The other QBs who have done that are Dak Prescott (2016), Justin Herbert (2020), and Deshaun Watson (2017). Prescott and Herbert both earned Rookie of the Year honors in their debut seasons. Jones has averaged 262 passing yards and 1.6 touchdowns per game since Week 3. READ MORE: The Jets Are Just Astoundingly Bad And Other Leftover Patriots ThoughtsJones also became just the third rookie quarterback to ever complete at least 170 passes in his first seven starts. With 174 completions, Jones joins Herbert (181) and Joe Burrow (195) in that department. MORE NEWS: Patriots Corner Jonathan Jones Reportedly...
    COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — Newly surfaced texts between then-FirstEnergy Corp. executives detail a series of favors delivered to the company by Ohio’s top utility regulator, a man under scrutiny in an ongoing federal corruption probe. Akron-based FirstEnergy’s friend on the inside in early 2020 was Sam Randazzo, chair of the Public Utilities Commission of Ohio. Randazzo resigned last November after an FBI search of his home and revelations that top FirstEnergy executives had approved paying him $4.3 million, weeks before his appointment as Ohio’s top utility regulator in 2019. The March 2020 texts between the two executives — who have since been fired — represent a new peek into the specifics of what Randazzo did on the company’s behalf. CEO Chuck Jones and senior vice president Dennis Chack said Randazzo’s help included “over ruling” utilities commission staff and commissioners on a revenue guarantee in a now-tainted 2019 energy bill. Randazzo also helped with “burning” an updated audit report on FirstEnergy charging its customers $456 million — charges later deemed improper by the state Supreme Court. The customer charges...
    Getty Images P eter Jones, CBE has joined the cast of “Shark Tank” as a recurring guest “Shark” for season 13 of the long-running ABC reality competition. He made his first appearance in the second episode of the season on October 15, 2021. He made a big splash in the episode by pushing the brother and sister team behind Long Wharf Supply Co. to restructure how they divided their business. Mike and Lauren Lamanga founded the sustainable apparel Long Wharf Supply Co. after being inspired by one of their father’s old fisherman’s sweaters. The siblings created the first fisherman’s style sweaters made from a blend of lambswool, recycled oyster shells, and recycled water bottles, ABC reported. Each sweater reseeds as many as 30 oysters. While the idea is ingenious, the way the company was set up was not. Lauren had absolutely no equity in the company despite being a partner and passionately presenting it to the Sharks with her brother. Jones asked Mike why he hadn’t given any equity in the company to his sister. As you can...
    American entertainment company Disney has announced that it will postpone the release of movies from Marvel Studios for several months and has postponed the release of the fifth episode of Indiana Jones with Harrison Ford for a year. Since the outbreak of the Covid 19 epidemic in the spring of 2020, the company has repeatedly changed the release schedule of its films to big budgets. The schedule, which was explored by fans around the world, was further updated by Disney on Monday, which delayed filming despite reopening theaters in the US, Europe or Asia this year. After all, the fifth installment release of the famous Indiana Jones series – the first episode directed by Steven Spielberg and directed by Harrison Ford and produced by George Lucas in 1981 – has been postponed for a year from July 29. 2022 to June 30, 2023. With the exception of this year’s 79 – year – old American star Harrison Ford, the new episode, which will be kept secret, will be directed by James Mongolt, especially Danish actors Mats Mickelson, German Thomas Gretchman,...
    Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY), a self-described Democratic Socialist, is now facing an ethics complaint after accepting a $35,000 ticket to attend the Met Gala 2021, a fundraiser for the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City held on Monday. Thomas Jones, founder of the American Accountability Foundation wrote in an ethics complaint that he believes the congresswoman, who represents parts of the Bronx and Queens, broke House rules by accepting “an impermissible gift.” “[W]hile the individual’s invitations may bear the name of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Museum has ceded control over the invitations to a for-profit company, specifically Condé Nast, and to its Chief Content Officer, Anna Wintour,” Jones wrote. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez at the 2021 Met Gala Celebrating In America: A Lexicon Of Fashion. (New York City) He wrote that “the New York Times outlines that the Met does not have control over who is invited to the event, but rather the for-profit company, is in control of who gets invited.” Ocasio-Cortez wore a $10,000 gown by New York designer Aurora Jones. The white gown featured the words in red, Tax...
    Fight disinformation. Get a daily recap of the facts that matter. Sign up for the free Mother Jones newsletter. On Labor Day yesterday, we ran a series of photographs from six regions of the country, each answering an underlying question as aspirational as it is achievable: What does it look like when people are their own bosses? You can see the answers here. It’s a striking portrait—commissioned by Mother Jones in collaboration with the Economic Hardship Reporting Project and Solutions Journalism Network—of how co-ops are returning power to workers in North Carolina, Alabama, Vermont, California, and other areas where labor rights is a paramount movement of civil rights. “It’s no wonder,” writes the author, Alissa Quart, “that people are drawn to a model that gives them back some power” in an era of “epic income inequality” and “corporate consolidation and union-busting” that reliably produce “unstable and episodic” work. The interest in co-ops marks a return to what one worker in the series calls making a “livelihood” rather than just earning a paycheck. To sustain a co-op, the portrait shows, is...
    BOSTON (CBS) — It’s looking like Mac Jones will have to wait a bit to take over as the starting quarterback of the New England Patriots. But that hasn’t stopped the rookie from inking his first endorsement deal. Jones has partnered with NOBULL, a Boston-based startup that makes athletic footwear and apparel. The company is closely associated with CrossFit and recently served as the title sponsor of the 2021 CrossFit games. Oddly enough, the company does not make cleats or other football gear, making the pairing somewhat surprising. But that was part of the allure for Jones. “NOBULL is different,” Jones said in a statement, via Bloomberg.com. “Combine that with the fact that they are a Boston-based company, the partnership felt serendipitous.” Jones announced the partnership with a video to his Instagram account on Monday. The video plays on his underdog status throughout his football career, and will certainly get Patriots fans fired up for the future. View this post on Instagram A post shared by Mac Jones (@macjones_10) “There’s always expectations,” the rookie quarterback says in...
    Richmond-based accessories company Sassy Jones landed a spot in the top 25 of Inc. 5000’s Fastest Growing Private Companies list. The company was founded in 2013 by Charis Jones, and its jewelry and accessories quickly gained attention in the retail space. Necklaces, earrings, bracelets, belts, scarves, handbags, lip gloss, fox fur vests and other clothing items are available on the website, as well as through HSN via a specially curated collection. Sassy Jones is ranked 24th overall, a 51-spot jump from last year. It is the second-ranked company in Virginia, behind Arlington-based Olympic Media, and first-overall in the Richmond region. To be considered for the list, companies must be based in the United States, privately held, for-profit, independently operated and founded and generating revenue by March 31, 2017. The minimum revenue required for 2017 is $100,000; the minimum for 2020 is $2 million. Companies were ranked according to percentage of revenue growth from 2017 to 2020,… Read the full story from the Washington Business Journal.
    CLEVELAND (AP) — One was a millionaire CEO of a large publicly traded utility looking for 11th-hour help to save two nuclear power plants that hung like millstones around the neck of his company’s bottom line. The other was a former legislator seeking to restore his political power after more than a decade on the sidelines. They shared similarities as well, both large men in size and personality, skilled at glad-handing and cajoling, and, when necessary, dealing with those who stood in their way. Today, they share tattered careers and future worries as prosecutors continue to investigate former FirstEnergy Corp. CEO Chuck Jones’ involvement in a $60 million bribery scheme secretly funded by the company to win a $1 billion legislative bailout for the plants and potentially hundreds of millions more in annual revenue guarantees for its three Ohio electric companies. Former House Speaker Larry Householder, who shepherded the bailout bill through the Legislature with FirstEnergy money, is now a political pariah facing a federal racketeering charge. Jones was fired in October along with two senior vice presidents. Householder...
    More On: nfl NFL star seems to diss vaccines after ‘pro-choice’ rant Patrick Mahomes rookie card sells for record price Lamar Jackson misses first day of training camp after positive COVID test Giants release veteran after awkward training camp meeting Tennessee Titans wide receiver Julio Jones and his former Atlanta Falcons teammate, Roddy White, are being sued over an alleged scheme to sell weed on the black market. Genetixs, a cannabis business, has filed a lawsuit in Calfornia on July 21 against a plethora of defendants, and Jones and White were among the names listed – along with White’s company, SLW Holdings. White’s company is one of the five businesses that comprise Genetixs. The company claims that the two players started an “illegal, black-market operation” out of their facilities, according to MarketWatch, and failed to report any such sales. The operation reportedly sold around $3 million per month of cannabis products. “The scope of said defendants’ theft, black-market sales, money laundering and diversion of assets and expenses without documentation or approval is staggering and has caused, and is causing,...
    NASHVILLE — Tennessee Titans wide receiver Julio Jones is facing allegations of illegally harvesting and selling millions of dollars of cannabis in California, according to court records. California-based cannabis company Genetixs filed the suit earlier this month against a handful of defendants including Jones, former Atlanta Falcons player Roddy White and White’s company, SLW Holdings — one of the five entities that comprise Genetixs. The complaint claims that the defendants failed to report cannabis sales since March, estimating that the defendants have harvested and sold $3 million worth of cannabis per month. “The scope of said defendants’ theft, black-market sales, money laundering, and diversion of assets and expenses without documentation or approval, is staggering and has caused, and is causing, Genetixs substantial and irreparable harm and damage,” the 26-page lawsuit states. An attorney representing Jones, White and SLW Holdings, described the allegations in the lawsuit as “conspiracy theories.” “The vague allegations against SLW Holdings LLC and its members Roddy White and Julio Jones are meritless,” attorney Rafe Emanuel told The Tennessean. “In May, SLW obtained...
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