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Yemen’s health:

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    Submit your letter to the editor via this form. Read more Letters to the Editor. House bill would ensure healthier school lunches We need to support the Healthy Future Students and Earth Pilot Act (HR 4108) that is being considered by the U.S. Congress. It will make a tremendous impact on the health of our children. It would provide a grant to eligible school districts to get the resources they need to serve more plant-based meal options. A recent analysis found that only 4% of entrees in California lunches are plant-based, and most of those were prepackaged nut butter and jelly sandwiches. There are so many newer options available now. Studies show that increasing the consumption of plant-based foods has substantial health benefits, including reducing the risk of diabetes, reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease, maintaining a healthy weight, and protecting against certain forms of cancer and other diseases. Those children who wish to eat plant-based meals should have that option every day. Let us support HR 4108 in every way possible. Subru Bhat Union City Surplus should be returned...
    CAIRO (AP) — For three days last month, Nasser joined hundreds of others jammed into emergency rooms in Yemen’s capital, Sanaa, searching for a hospital bed for his mother, who was struggling to breathe. By the time one became available, his mother was dead. But her death certainly won’t figure in the country’s coronavirus numbers. Officially, there have been only four virus cases and one death in Yemen’s north, according to the Houthi rebel authorities who control the capital and surrounding provinces. It’s not just a struggling health care system that’s to blame for the unaccounted for deaths. In interviews with The Associated Press, more than a dozen doctors, aid workers, Sanaa residents and relatives of those believed to have died from the virus said the Houthi authorities are approaching the pandemic with such outright denial that it threatens to further endanger the already vulnerable population. They say doctors are forced to falsify the cause of death on official papers, vaccines are seen with fear, and there are no limits or guidelines on public gatherings, much less funerals....
    CAIRO (Reuters) - The Saudi-led coalition fighting in Yemen said on Tuesday it had destroyed an explosive-laden boat before an imminent attack off the Yemeni port of Salif, Saudi state media reported. The coalition added that Yemen's Iran-aligned Houthi group "continue to threaten maritime traffic and international trade." (Reporting by Nayera Abdallah; Editing by Gareth Jones) Copyright 2021 Thomson Reuters. Tags: Iran, United Nations, Yemen, United States, Middle East, Saudi ArabiaGalleriesNewsCartoons on President Donald TrumpPhotosPhotos You Should See - March 2021PhotosPhotos: America's Pandemic TollNewsThe Week in Cartoons: March 15-19RecommendedHealthiest Communities Health NewsDoctors Debate Blood Thinners After C-SectionsHealthiest Communities Health NewsWho Are the COVID Long-Haulers?PhotosPortraits of Resilience Health NewsModerna Begins Vaccine Trial in KidsWorld ReportNorth Korea Issues Fiery Threat to BidenCoronavirus Bulletin Stay informed daily on the latest news and advice on COVID-19 from the editors at U.S. News & World Report.Sign UpSign in to manage your newsletters »You May Also LikeThe 10 Worst PresidentsNot all U.S. presidents are missed once they leave the White House.U.S. News StaffDec. 19, 2019Cartoons on President Donald TrumpMarch 10, 2021, at 2:27 p.m. Photos: Obama...
    SANAA, Yemen (AP) — Yemen deputy chief of Aden health office: Explosion at city’s airport as government plane landed killed 16, wounded 60. Copyright © 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.
    Arifullah Khan had just administered another polio vaccine when the gunfire blasted from the nearby hills. "It happened so suddenly. There was so much gunfire it felt like an explosion," he said, recalling details of the attack five years ago in Pakistan’s Bajaur tribal region near the Afghan border. A bullet shattered his thigh and he fell to the ground. His childhood friend and partner in the vaccination campaign, Ruhollah, lay bleeding on the ground in front of him. FILE - In this July 13, 2019, file photo, health workers wearing protective suits tend to an Ebola victim kept in an isolation tent in Beni, Democratic Republic of Congo. The task of vaccinating millions of people in poor and developing countries against COVID-19 faces monumental obstacles, and it's not just a problem of affording and obtaining doses. Rumors flew about the Ebola vaccines, including the idea they were meant to kill people, said Dr. Maurice Kakule, an Ebola survivor who worked in vaccination campaigns. Similar suspicions are spreading about the COVID-19 vaccine, he said. (AP Photo/Jerome Delay, File) ...
    The United Nations said Wednesday that critical aid had been cut at 300 health centres across war-ravaged Yemen due to a lack of funding, with lifesaving food handouts also reduced. Between April and August, more than a third of the UN’s major humanitarian programmes in Yemen had been reduced or shut down entirely, the UN said, warning of further drastic cuts “in coming weeks unless additional funding is received”. Lise Grande, the UN’s humanitarian coordinator for Yemen, said only $1 billion of the $3.2 billion needed had been received. “It’s an impossible situation,” Grande said. “This is the worst humanitarian crisis in the world, yet we don’t have the resources we need to save the people who are suffering and will die if we don’t help.” Yemen has been in left in ruins by six years of war and tens of thousands of people — mainly civilians — have been killed. The UN says over 24 million people — more than three-quarters of Yemen’s population — need aid and protection. “The consequences of under-funding are immediate, enormous and devastating,” Grande...
    HAJJAH (Reuters) - Ahmed Mansour and his colleagues worked eight months without pay in a health centre in a Yemeni displacement camp out of concern for their patients. But this month they closed its doors. "Enough is enough now, we can't go on," said administrative worker Mansour, who financially supports his and his deceased brother's family. His salary, while he was still paid, was around $180 a month. Across Yemen health, sanitation and nutrition services that keep millions from starvation and disease are gradually closing amid an acute funding shortage for the world's largest humanitarian crisis. The United Nations said last week 12 of its 38 major programmes have shut or scaled down, and between August and September 20 programmes face further reductions or closure. In the Mahraba displacement camp in Hajjah province, resident Fatehia Jaber keeps going back to check if their local clinic, a tent printed with the logo of U.N. children agency UNICEF, has re-opened. "My son is sick, short of breath ... We live in an unstable situation and want a working hospital," Jaber said from...
    CAIRO (AP) — A leading rights group Thursday accused secessionist Yemeni authorities of holding detainees at an overcrowded detention center in the country’s south, exposing them to “serious health risks” amid the coronavirus pandemic. Human Rights Watch said detainees at Aden’s informal detention facility of Bir Ahmed are denied gear such as masks, gloves and sanitizers as well as basic health care services. The facility is controlled by the Southern Transitional Council, a secessionist movement backed by the United Arab Emirates. A spokesman for the STC was not immediately available for comment. The UAE was a key member of the Saudi-led military coalition fighting Yemen’s Iran-backed Houthi rebels, until they announced they were withdrawing from the conflict in 2019. Since then, they have continued to exert influence through their Yemeni allies. The coalition has been waging war against the Houthis since 2015 on behalf of the U.N.-recognized government of President Abed Rabbo Mansour Hadi. The Saudi military involvement in neighboring Yemen came after Shiite Houthis overran the country’s north, including the capital Sanaa, forcing Hadi’s government to flee...
    The last of three large shipments of medical supplies landed in Yemen on Friday, organizers of the cargo flights said, following a joint initiative by the world organization and multinational corporations to boost the war-devastated country's health care system as it battles the coronavirus. The shipments represent a different path to humanitarian relief in Yemen as the U.N. faces a drastic shortage of funds for its operations, even with the virus surging across the Arab world's poorest country. “It’s very important that we as a private sector help the public health authorities in their work on the ground,” said Mohamed Nabil Hayel Saeed, a spokesman for the initiative. “The world must not forget Yemen at this time while they’re fighting the virus.” Friday's batch followed two earlier shipments from the joint initiative, on Wednesday and Thursday, that each had more than 14 tons of items, including ventilators, coronavirus test kits and personal protective equipment. A U.N. humanitarian appeal for Yemen this month fell $1 billion short of what aid agencies needed. Some 75% of U.N. programs for the country,...
    (CNN)Ghasan Saleh starts digging graves at the break of dawn to prepare for the dead bodies that will come in droves. Two men in white hazmat suits appear atop an approaching pickup truck. They hastily drop a corpse into a hole and cover it with dirt.The health workers come and go in near-silence. Fear of infection means there are no mourners for those suspected to have died from Covid-19.The cycle of digging and abrupt funerals continues under the blistering sun and suffocating humidity of Aden, the seat of power of the UN-recognized government in war-torn Yemen.The Al Radwan cemetery has quickly expanded over the past few months, with new graves creeping closer to the residential buildings that border it. "You can see my digging machine," says Saleh. "Just now I dug 20 graves."Local medical authorities say that death rates in Aden are soaring this year, despite a relative lull in a war that ravaged the place in previous years. The Al Radwan cemetery in Aden has rapidly expanded after a surge in Covid-related deaths. Read MoreIn the first half...
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