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    A protester waves a sign that read unionize near the Country Club Plaza Starbucks store where dozens of Starbucks employees and union supporters protested alleged anti-union tactics by the company Thursday, March 3, 2022.Jill Toyoshiba | Tribune News Service | Getty Images From Starbucks to Amazon to Apple, the recent headlines show that the biggest companies in the world can't duck the union issue. But the issue isn't isolated to a few iconic companies operating in retail. While union membership remains at a multi-decade low, a CNBC survey finds that a majority (59%) of workers across the U.S. and across all sectors say they support increased unionization in their own workplaces. The recent CNBC|Momentive Workforce Survey reinforces recent findings from Pew Research Center and Gallup polls, which both show widespread support for labor unions among the public. And it does not break down into a clearly partisan political issue. While Democrats are about twice as likely as Republicans to have a positive view on unions, the CNBC survey finds bipartisan support, with 46% of Republicans in favor of increased unionization...
    The number of Americans quitting their jobs remains near an all-time high as plentiful opportunities entice workers to seek out better pay and working conditions, new data show. In April, 4.4 million US workers voluntarily quit their jobs, a slight decline from the record high of 4.5 million set in March, according to a report on Wednesday from the Labor Department. Job openings dropped by 455,000 to 11.4 million in April from the prior month, but remained well above the total number of unemployed jobseekers in the country. With workers scarce, employers were reluctant to let go of staff, and layoffs and discharges dropped to a record low of 1.2 million, according to the monthly Job Openings and Labor Turnover (JOLTS) report. The number of Americans quitting their jobs remains near an all-time high as plentiful opportunities entice workers to seek out better pay and working conditions The latest data suggest that with demand for workers still white-hot, employers could continue to raise wages and help keep inflation uncomfortably high. Job openings declined somewhat in April from the record level of 11.855 million...
    New York (CNN)The number of workers being fired or laid off has hit the lowest point on record, the Labor Department reported Wednesday.The Job Openings and Labor Turnover Survey showed only 1.25 million people lost or quit their job in April, breaking the previous record low of 1.26 million recorded in December.With job openings still near record levels and nearly two openings for every unemployed job seeker, employers are desperate to hang on to the workers they have. This is a developing story. It will be updated.
    Moyo Studio | E+ | Getty Images The latest inflation read from the government, the core personal consumption expenditures price index, showed on Friday morning that prices may be starting to ease from record levels, but financial stress among workers amid the steepest inflation in four decades remains as high as ever. Two-thirds of American workers say their salaries are not keeping pace with inflation, and the percentage of employees considering quitting a job is at a four-year high, according to a new CNBC|Momentive Workforce Survey. Sixty-six percent of workers say inflation has outpaced any salary gains they've made in the past 12 months, while 19% say increases in their salary have about matched inflation and 13% say their salary has increased more than inflation.  As more American workers at multiple income levels give voice to a frustration that the economic data has been signaling throughout this year — that price gains continue to outpace wage gains — the squeeze is particularly high among middle-income workers. Those with incomes between $50,000 to $150,000 are more likely than high-income and...
    A top Microsoft executive has been accused of watching virtual reality pillow fight porn in front of his stunned colleagues and fondling female coworkers.  Alex Kipman, 44, of Seattle, has been described as one of Microsoft's 'golden boys' - but CEO Satya Nadella has vowed to end the firm's tolerance for 'talented jerks', and new allegations about Brazilian-born Kipman suggest his days could be numbered.  Microsoft has refused to confirm or deny the sordid allegations.   Several former and current employees have allegedly accused the innovation executive of getting away with inappropriate behavior, which reportedly includes inappropriately touching female coworkers and watching a 'VR porn' pillow fight in front of employees.  The sexual display was mirrored on nearby TV monitors for all the late-night employees to see. The VR video reported featured women dressed in skimpy outfits who were participating in a sexualized pillow fight, according to Insider. 'It was in the office, in front of women. Incredibly uncomfortable,' a source told Insider.  Virtual reality porn allows viewers to feel as if they're in a sex scene by donning special goggles.  Several employees...
    Employment openings exceeded the level of available workers by 5.6 million in March while a record number of people quit their jobs, the Labor Department reported Tuesday. The level of job postings hit 11.55 million for the month, also a fresh record, according to the Job Openings and Labor Turnover Survey. That was up 205,000 from February and representative of a jobs market still historically tight. At the same time, quits totaled 4.54 million, an increase of 152,000 from the previous month as the so-called Great Resignation continued. The pandemic era has seen opportunities for workers who feel confident enough to leave their current situations for better employment elsewhere. This is breaking news. Please check back here for updates.TVWATCH LIVEWATCH IN THE APPUP NEXT | ETListen
    In this article PFGBlackcat | E+ | Getty ImagesIf your employer's contributions to your 401(k) plan are a big part of your retirement planning, be sure you understand when that money will actually belong to you. Vesting schedules — the length of time you must be at an employer for its contributions to be 100% yours — can be up to six years. Nevertheless, company 401(k) plan matches are identified as important to reaching retirement goals by 62% of workers, according to research from Principal Financial Group. "Given most employers view 401(k) matches as part of total compensation, it is important that employees don't leave this money on the table without at least contributing enough to get the match," said Sri Reddy, senior vice president of retirement and income solutions at Principal Financial Group. Having a balanced investment portfolio ranked second (52%) in importance for reaching retirement goals, and getting financial advice or guidance was third (51%), in the Principal survey. Most 401(k) plans — 98% — make contributions to workers' retirement savings, according to the Plan Sponsor Council of...
    For months, the Valley Transportation Authority lacked a COVID vaccination requirement, even as the virus surged and every other Bay Area transit agency cracked down. But now that cases have plummeted, it is about to implement a tough policy that could lead to the firing of hundreds of unvaccinated employees. The latest tally provided by the VTA listed 379 employees — nearly 20% of the total workforce — without a single dose of the vaccine. Of these employees, 59 have received exemptions on medical and religious grounds. While some are expected to submit vaccination records this month, the rest face the possibility of losing their jobs in the coming weeks, a move that would exacerbate staffing shortages and could lead to cuts in light rail and bus service in Santa Clara County. The mandate, effective April 29, comes months after most Bay Area transit agencies wielded the threat of terminations to boost their own vaccination rates and protect anxious passengers. In the end, BART and Muni resorted to firing or forcing the early retirement of a combined 127 employees, a...
    Joe Rogan slammed employees of large Bay Area tech firms as woke 'activists' on his podcast Wednesday, labeling employees for companies such as Google as 'mentally ill' and 'lunatics who are running the asylum to a certain extent.' Speaking to Silicon Valley vet Antonio García Martínez, an ex-engineer at Apple and Facebook who was fired by the Mac maker after staffers petitioned to have him nixed over 'misogynistic' writings in his autobiographical book, in which he wrote 'women in the Valley are 'full of sh*t' and likened a former Indian coworker to a 'bored auto-rickshaw driver from Delhi.'   Rogan, 54, asked the seasoned tech specialist what it was like to work at the two tech giants.    'What is it like being in those companies?' Rogan asked his guest. 'Like whether it's Facebook or, you know, any sort of tech company.'  'For someone from the outside, we look at it and say: ‘How are those f**king places run?' Before Martinez, who previously served as a quantitative analyst at Goldman Sachs, could respond, Rogan recalled a conversation with a 'good friend' who worked in a management position...
    Conservative Disney employees are slamming their coworkers for creating an 'environment of fear' and calling on the entertainment company to remain 'politically neutral' in the face of protests against Florida's Don't Say Gay bill. 'The Walt Disney Company has come to be an increasingly uncomfortable place to work for those of us whose political and religious views are not explicitly progressive,' workers said in an unsigned letter published Monday.  'We watch quietly as our beliefs come under attack from our own employer, and we frequently see those who share our opinions condemned as villains by our own leadership.' They accuse their liberal colleagues of calling them 'bigots' and criticized CEO Bob Chapek's 'evolving response' after he walked back comments saying that corporate statements do nothing but divide a company and its customers. The letter was released a day before Disney workers staged walkouts in Los Angeles over the company's slow response to Florida's 'Parental Rights in Education' bill, which would ban classroom lessons on sexuality, gender identity and sexual orientation 'in a manner that is not age appropriate.'  On Wednesday, actress Raven-Symoné, 36,...
    Her first workday after handing out union cards at the Starbucks where she works, Laila Dalton found herself in a meeting with two managers. The managers had brought a list of complaints against Dalton, typed up the previous day. The managers said Dalton, 19, had “failed to fully meet performance expectations” of her job as a shift supervisor. Dalton offered a different account: she was the leading voice of a union effort at her Phoenix, Arizona, store. She is just one of multiple Starbucks workers across the country accusing the coffee chain of harassing its pro-union employees. “They’re just trying to make me quit at this point,” Dalton alleged to The Daily Beast. Spurred by pandemic-era working conditions, Starbucks employees across the country have moved to unionize their stores. They’re asking for better workplace safety, more transparency around pay and scheduling, more negotiating power in dealings with the coffee corporation. But some of those workers accuse Starbucks of retaliating against them, leading to a wave of firings, disciplinary write-ups, and work-hour reductions. Starbucks denies the allegations, while pro-union workers...
    A GARDENING expert says over half of his workers earn $100,000 for mowing lawns. Bryan Clayton, CEO of GreenPal, said for many lawncare vendors it's the perfect way to make extra money. 2A gardening expert says over half of his workforce earn $100,000 for mowing lawnsCredit: Getty GreenPal connects vendors to homeowners and the platform offers services such as gardening and lawn mowing. The company has around 9,500 vendors and 53 percent earn over $100,000 per year, Clayton revealed. He said lawn-care vendors tend to be part-time. Teachers are apparently known to use the app during the summer vacation. And students often work afternoons and weekends to bring in some more cash, GoBankingRates reveals. Read more on side hustlesGIVE ME CREDIT I made $100k in months with easy side hustle - a bad experience inspired meBREAD WINNER I've made $323,000 teaching people how to bake bread online - how you can too Clayton said: “It is the perfect way for them to make extra money.” The CEO revealed that vendors tend to make around $55 per hour mowing lawns....
    Shift workers have worse memory and slower mental speeds because their body clocks are out of whack, a study suggests. Switching from night to day shifts has long be linked to a plethora of serious health issues such as sleep disorders, heart disease, obesity and mood problems. It is believed to be caused by a disrupting the body's circadian rhythm, our internal clock that releases hormones encouraging us to sleep when it gets dark.  Now a new analysis by Austrian experts has found shift work could also be impacting brain function. Pooling together numerous studies on the subject, they found that in five out of six categories shift workers performed 'significantly worse' than their non-shift workers.  This included how they were less alert and had worse impulse control, which could raise the risk of workplace accidents and errors. Experts have suggested employers encourage workers to take nap breaks to ensure their mental functions are protected.  Shift work, where people work beyond the traditional 9 to 5, typically late into the night and early morning, is a quintessential part of modern...
    Rocker Neil Young urged Spotify employees to quit their jobs on Monday, lest their “souls” be eaten by guilt, he said. Two weeks after he demanded the company remove either podcaster Joe Rogan, or his music, Spotify is absent of the “Cinnamon Girl” singer’s catalogue. Numerous other artists, including Joni Mitchell and India Arie, have ditched Spotify over claims Rogan routines spreads Covid vaccine disinformation on The Joe Rogan Experience. Over the weekend, a super cut video of Rogan using the N-word over the years in various “contexts” went viral online — leading to an immense backlash against Spotify and an apology from Rogan. Still, CEO Daniel Ek made clear in a statement to his employees that, although he is “deeply sorry” for how the controversy has affected them, Spotify won’t be dropping the show. He also pledged to spend $100 million helping artists from “historically marginalized groups.” That statement and gesture did not, however, assuage Young’s intense feelings about Spotify. On Monday, the 76-year-old attacked “misinformation,” some of the country’s biggest banks and appealed to Spotify employees to...
    New York (CNN Business)Last year was a historic year for American jobs. A record number of workers quit their jobs while US employers had more positions to fill than ever before.In December, 4.3 million Americans quit their jobs, down slightly from the record 4.5 million quits in November, the Bureau of Labor Statistics reported Friday.While millions of workers left jobs for cash incentives, better pay or better benefits, people also left the labor market to care for their children or elderly relatives during the pandemic. Meanwhile, older workers retired early either because they could or because age discrimination forced them out of the labor market.Job openings stood at 10.9 million, compared with the data series high of 11.1 million recorded in July.This is a developing story. It will be updated
    Nearly 9 million people called out sick with COVID-19 in the early part of January, a staggering number and a blow to businesses already grappling with a labor shortage.  The Census Bureau's Household Pulse Survey released Wednesday showed 8.8 million people reported not being at work because of coronavirus-related reasons between December 29 and January 10.  That was well up from the 3 million who called out sick from December 1 to December 13, before the Omicron wave struck. It wasn't clear from the survey how many of the workers were ill with symptoms, or isolating due to close contacts or positive tests. Meanwhile, layoffs increased last week as Omicron battered businesses and delayed economic recovery, with new jobless claims increasing 55,000 to 286,000, the highest level since mid-July.  Layoffs increased last week as Omicron battered businesses and delayed economic recovery, with new jobless claims increasing 55,000 to 286,000 People walk past a closed business shop in Miami, Florida on January 12, 2022 RELATED ARTICLES Previous 1 Next Jen Psaki refuses to speculate WHEN the US...
    It's not everyday that a worker goes out of their way to make the whole office smile, but when it happens it's a true joy.  Now, people from around the world have shared the best examples of comical goings on in the workplace - with the very best collated in a gallery by Bored Panda.    One good humoured grocery store worker changed his own name tag to 'Kale' afterbeing bombarded with requests for the leafy vegetable, while another made  a resident spider a part of the office. Elsewhere, some builders zipped themselves into a three-way jacket, and a group of co workers pranked another making him think a pickle was a cactus.  Here, FEMAIL shares some of the best examples... What better way to salt the roads of St Louis by attaching the king of salt himself on the back of the machine? Well if it isn't the most famous face of 2020... and this doctor's office certainly knows how to get their patients' attention Herman is quite possibly the best, and most productive office worker ever to exist. He...
    A new survey found that nearly one-quarter of workers in the United States plan to find a new job this year. ResumeBuilders.com said in a report on Monday, Jan. 3, that it surveyed 1,250 American adults who are currently employed, and found that 23 percent plan to find a new job in 2022. Nine percent of those respondents also said they had already secured a new job. The survey found the turnover will be the highest among the following fields: Retail Food and hospitality Education Office and administrative support The website reported that 31 percent of retail workers and 26 percent of food and hospitality workers who responded said they plan to find new jobs. “These areas have been hit the hardest with burnout and staff shortages during the pandemic,” Career strategist and professional resume writer Carolyn Kleiman said. “This means extra work for those who show up, which leads to more burnout.” Read the full report here.
    "A farmworker transports grapes on Oct. 4, 2021, in the Kern County town of Lamont, California, where record heat has fuelled drought and wildfires." The previous administration used its final weeks of power to push through a final slew of anti-immigrant policies, including an “unconscionable” move freezing the wages for thousands of seasonal farmworkers for two years. It was a plan to financially benefit farmers while screwing over the kind of workers that very same administration had declared “essential” amid the novel coronavirus pandemic. But because of successful litigation launched by farmworker advocacy groups, these seasonal laborers will get their raises, The Fresno Bee reports. “The wage increase was in jeopardy because of a wage freeze proposed under former President Donald Trump that aimed to help farmers, many of whom lost profit and laid fallow their land due to the impact of the shutdowns in early 2020,” the report said. “Farmworker advocates sued the Department of Agriculture over the proposed wage freeze and secured an injunction to stop the ruling.” It was cruel enough that undocumented farmworkers were deemed essential but were then shut out...
    Labor activists hold a rally in support of raising the minimum wage to $15 an hour on the National Mall on May 19, 2021 in Washington, DC.Kevin Dietsch | Getty Images California's largest businesses will be required to pay workers a minimum of $15 an hour in January. It's a milestone fast-food workers have been trying to achieve since 2012. But anti-poverty activists aren't satisfied. Citing the state's high cost of living and rising inflation, they are pushing for more. Activist and investor Joe Sanberg is financing the attempt to gather enough signatures in California to get a ballot initiative in front of voters for the November election. Sanberg, who has talked about potentially running for president, wants the state's minimum wage to hit $18 an hour for all businesses by 2026. "We were a leader in pushing for a $15 minimum wage, but now we have to move the ball forward and farther. It's overdue for $18," Sanberg told the Los Angeles Times. Next year, 26 U.S. states and Washington will raise their minimum wages, but only California and...
    Home goods giant Williams-Sonoma has fired scores of remote workers in a series of brutal conference calls more than a month before they expected their seasonal jobs to end, DailyMail.com can reveal. In conference calls this week, the company fired remote employees who had worked for the upscale retailer and its subsidiary brands Pottery Barn and West Elm, according to one of the fired staffers, who asked not to be named.  'It's awful, people are devastated,' said the fired worker, a mother of two in Tampa, Florida who had worked as a furniture associate. 'I'm a single parent, I can no longer afford Christmas.'  A spokeswoman for Williams-Sonoma insisted that the terminations took place in 'small group meetings' of roughly 10 to 15 over the phone because all the seasonal workers involved were remote. The fired worker disputed this, telling DailyMail.com that there were more than 100 people on the conference call where she learned her fate, and sharing shocking video in which the line could be heard erupting in outrage.   Messages on an internal message board show Williams-Sonoma workers...
    With just a few days to Christmas, a significant gift is headed to millions of Minnesotans that will play out in different ways in the coming months. The money comes from a largest-ever Minnesota budget surplus of $7.7 billion combined with the state’s existing $2.4 billion budget reserve plus $1.1 billion in unspent federal COVID-19 relief money and $250 million more of federal dollars from the as yet unspent “pandemic bonus.” If you consider the 5.7 million of us and divide it by the available money, some of which is already dedicated to COVID relief causes, it amounts to over $2,000 per person. That’s a significant, though indirect, bump for holiday shoppers to appreciate. Analysts explain that higher-than-expected tax collections, an improved outlook for personal and corporate income, increased consumer spending and corporate profits over the next two years play into the calculation. Article continues after advertisement IHS Markit, an economic forecasting firm, predicts that average wages and salaries in Minnesota will grow at 8.5 percent for 2021 and 7.3 percent in 2022. By 2023, that state economy will likely...
    Workers at the Kentucky candle factory that was destroyed in a deadly tornado said supervisors threatened employees that they would be fired if they left their shifts early, NBC News reported.  In an interview, Mayfield Consumer Products (MCP) factory employee McKayla Emery said her colleagues first asked to leave the facility after the tornado sirens sounded outside the factory on Friday.  Workers stated that they asked managers to let them take shelter at their own homes as word of the upcoming storm spread, but managers rebuffed their requests, according to NBC News.  Emery noted she overheard managers telling four employees standing near her that “if you leave, you’re more than likely to be fired.”  “People had questioned if they could leave or go home,” Emery said.  Some workers left their shifts regardless of repercussions, fearing for their safety, the report said. Other employees congregated in bathrooms and inside hallways even before the tornado hit, with several still asking to go home after the immediate danger had passed, NBC News reported.  MCP Employee Haley Conder said team leaders told her they wouldn’t let...
    More than half of Americans who lost their jobs in the pandemic and remain unemployed are not interested in returning to work, according to a new survey suggesting that the dire national labor shortage is likely to persist. The poll published on Thursday by the US Chamber of Commerce found that 53 percent of Americans who became unemployed during the pandemic say they are not active or only somewhat active in looking for work.  Fifty-six percent say they can get by for more than six months before it becomes essential to return to full time work, with 11 percent saying it will be more than a year before it is necessary to return to work, and 15 percent saying it will never be essential.  No detail was given on whether this cohort was comprised of retirees, or how they'll manage to survive without a job.   The poll is a troubling signal amid a worker shortage that is exacerbating supply chain issues and spurring inflation, with businesses across the country struggling to fill millions of open positions. As of September, the number...
    IT HAS been a story of claims and counter-claims. Of “thousands” of construction deaths. Or, as the Qatari authorities insist, less than a handful. 5The 68,000-seater Lusail Stadium will host the World Cup final in Qatar next yearCredit: Richard Pelham / The Sun 5At its peak, 7,600 migrant workers helped to construct the stunning groundCredit: Richard Pelham / The Sun What is absolutely clear is that the desert heat is not far from intolerable, even after the worst of the summer. It is also unquestioned that the apartment blocks for the 36,000 migrant workers from across the globe who have built the towering monuments to football’s self-regard are spartan. But while appearances can be deceptive, workers can be hand-picked, stories may not always be quite what they seem, smiles and body language are tell-tale signs of reality. And although life in the worker compounds of Doha is not, by any means, a bundle of fun, nor is it forced labour. Zia Ur Rehman, 34, in his ninth year working in Qatar and fourth on the hallmark Lusail Iconic Stadium, admitted:...
              moreby Harry Wilmerding   A record 4.4 million people quit their jobs in September, and job openings remained near a record high as labor shortages continue throughout the country. Roughly 3.0% of U.S. workers left their jobs in September, a jump from August, when 4.3 million people left the workforce, according to a Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) report released Friday. The number of job openings remained near its August level of 10.4 million. Experts believe the record-setting job departures resulted partially from workers wanting more desirable jobs with better pay, more convenient hours and improved benefits and working conditions, according to The Washington Post.  Delta variant cases surged in September, causing some to hesitate to return to in-person work. “The vast majority of the quitting we’ve seen in 2021 has been job switching,” Nick Bunker, an economist at Indeed, told The Wall Street Journal. “Industries that usually hire people out of work may have shifted their approach toward poaching.” The U.S. economy recorded an increase of 531,000 jobs in October, and unemployment fell by 0.2%, BLS announced on Nov. 5. Additionally, inflation surged to its highest level in 30 years Wednesday,...
    A record 4.4 million people quit their jobs in September, and job openings remained near a record high as labor shortages continue throughout the country. Roughly 3.0% of U.S. workers left their jobs in September, a jump from August, when 4.3 million people left the workforce, according to a Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) report released Friday. The number of job openings remained near its August level of 10.4 million. BREAKING: Workers quit their jobs at highest rates on record in September. Data just out shows 3.0 quits rate.https://t.co/0ReYdFPjqt #JOLTS — Mike Dorning (@MikeDorning) November 12, 2021 Experts believe the record-setting job departures resulted partially from workers wanting more desirable jobs with better pay, more convenient hours and improved benefits and working conditions, according to The Washington Post.  Delta variant cases surged in September, causing some to hesitate to return to in-person work. (RELATED: Home Prices Soar In Third Quarter As Housing Market Remains Hot) “The vast majority of the quitting we’ve seen in 2021 has been job switching,” Nick Bunker, an economist at Indeed, told The Wall Street Journal. “Industries...
    Just eight per cent of Manhattan white collar workers are back in their offices five days a week, according to a new survey, which also found that 22 per cent of Wall Street firms are planning to reduce their workforces in New York City in the next five years. The worrying figures and prediction comes amid a surge in violent crime and an uptick in firms moving employees to Texas and Florida. Wall Street firms account for the highest share of any industry planning to cut their NYC workforces with 13% of all other companies also poised to do the same, according to a Wednesday report from the Partnership for New York City, which surveyed the city's major employers over a 10-day period last month. Just 28 per cent of the city's 1 million office workers are back in their offices on an average weekday, according to the survey. While eight per cent of Manhattan workers are back in person five days a week, a little over half – or 54 per cent – are still working from home full...
                      by Bethany Blankley  More than a third of U.S. workers who have not been vaccinated for COVID-19 say they will quit their jobs if their employer requires them to take a weekly test or get the shots as a condition of employment, the Kaiser Family Foundation reports. The data come from the foundation’s COVID-19 Vaccine Monitor, an ongoing research project that tracks the public’s attitudes and experiences with COVID-19 vaccinations. It combines surveys and qualitative research, as well as public opinion on vaccine confidence and acceptance, information needs, messages and other criteria. “Across the country, more and more business, universities, and state and local governments are instituting COVID-19 vaccination requirements,” the report states. It refers to an executive order issued by President Joe Biden requiring most federal government employees and contractors to be vaccinated, for private employers with 100 or more employees to either require their workers to provide proof of vaccination or regular COVID-19 testing, and California Gov. Gavin Newsom’s vaccine mandate for all students once the vaccine is fully...
    More than a third of U.S. workers—36%—now say their employer is requiring all of its employees to be vaccinated if they don't qualify for a medical exemption, according to a Gallup tracking poll. That number has quadrupled since July, when just 9% of workers said their employers were requiring them to get vaccinated. Another 39% say their employer is encouraging them to get vaccinated without making it a requirement. That number has declined from 62% in July as more employers began implementing mandates. Since May, about a quarter of U.S. employees have consistently said their employer has no vaccine policy. In September, President Joe Biden began pressing companies with more than 100 employees to either require vaccinations or routine testing of their workforce. At the same time, Biden signed orders requiring all federal workers and contractors to get vaccinated, with opt-outs for medical and religious reasons. Corporate America has largely embraced the president's vaccine mandates while bucking the efforts of GOP governors to imperil Biden's lifesaving vaccine policy.  Vaccine mandates have also been shown to be highly effective at...
    Two teachers, a teaching assistant and a cafeteria manager — all were opposed to the COVID-19 vaccination mandate for Los Angeles school employees. One remains teaching, but lost a beloved position; another was fired outright. An employee who won an exemption is out of work anyway. And yet another gave in to a jab at the last minute, but only because of a family crisis. Their anti-vaccine views are outliers among some 73,000 colleagues, 95% of whom have had at least one shot. But Jamal Y. Speakes Sr., Hovik Saponghian, Angela Karapetyan and Nadine Jackson paid a price for holding to personal beliefs in the face of public-health policy mandates and experts who cite strong evidence that COVID-19 vaccines are safe and effective. The Los Angeles Unified School District was among the first school systems in the nation to require employees to be vaccinated. The Oct. 15 deadline prompted a last-minute surge among thousands who were hesitant. No vaccine meant no entry onto a campus — and likely no job. Similar vaccination deadlines — and decisions — are approaching...
    At least five per cent of Americans have chosen to quit their jobs rather than get the COVID-19 vaccine as part of their workplace mandates, a new poll has found.   The Kaiser Family Foundation (KFF) polled 1,519 adults from October 14 to October 24 on vaccination trends, from getting their children vaccinated to asking if they'd leave their job over vaccine mandates.  The KFF reported that five per cent of unvaccinated adults polled have left their jobs due to a vaccine mandate.  The study also found that 37 per cent of unvaccinated adults - who account for said they would leave their job if their employer required a vaccine or weekly testing.  The figure increases to 72 percent if weekly testing is not an option.    Early last month, the Biden Administration announced a plan to direct the Department of Labor to enforce all businesses with over 100 employees to get vaccinated or tested weekly.  Five per cent of unvaccinated adults polled said they have already left their jobs due to vaccine mandates, while 37 per cent said they would leave if their...
    People shout slogans against the government as they arrive to the City Hall in protest of COVID-19 vaccine mandate in New York City, October 25, 2021.Eduardo Munoz | Reuters Five percent of unvaccinated adults say they have left a job due to a vaccine mandate, according to a survey released Thursday by the Kaiser Family Foundation.  This early read on whether workers will actually quit their jobs over mandates comes as more employers are requiring shots. One-quarter of workers surveyed by KFF in October said their employer has required them to get vaccinated, up from 9% in June and 19% last month.  President Joe Biden announced in September a mandate for businesses with 100 or more employees to ensure workers are vaccinated against Covid or tested weekly for the virus. The mandate, which is currently still under review, is estimated to cover roughly two-thirds of the private-sector workforce once it's implemented. The Kaiser survey only asked whether people have quit over a vaccine requirement, not a vaccine requirement with a testing option. More than a third of unvaccinated workers said they would quit...
    More than a quarter of New York City's 55,000-member police force could get sent home without pay if they don't comply with the mayor's order to get vaccinated against COVID-19 by Friday's deadline.  NYPD Commissioner Dermot Shea is trying to sway officers - some of the most vaccine-hesitant workers in city government - to comply with last week's order by Mayor Bill de Blasio. About 73 percent of NYPD workers have at least one shot, which means that as many as 27 percent of police employees could be placed on unpaid leave starting Monday, when the mandate takes effect, if they don't get vaccinated by 5pm Friday.  Mayor de Blasio says he feels 'ready' to handle a dramatic drop-off in the number of officers even as violent crime continues to plague the city, but it remains unclear how the department would keep enough officers on the street. More than a quarter of the NYPD's employees could be put on unpaid leave starting Monday All city employees have until Friday at 5pm to get at least one dose of a COVID-19...
    LOS ANGELES (CBSLA) – Municipal employees for the city of Los Angeles who refuse to get vaccinated against COVID-19 will likely lose their jobs, Mayor Eric Garcetti implied Wednesday. A vaccination clinic in Los Angeles, Calif., on Sept. 22, 2021. (Getty Images) In a statement, Garcetti said any city employee who refused to get vaccinated against COVID-19 by Dec. 18 “should be prepared to lose their job.” This came one day after a proposal was submitted to the L.A. City Council to extend the deadline by which city employees must provide proof of vaccination to Dec. 18. Wednesday had marked the initial deadline. “The city’s employee vaccine mandate is critical to protecting the health and safety of our workforce and the Angelenos we serve,” the mayor said in a statement. “Employees must be vaccinated by December 18, and we are putting a rigorous testing program into place in the meantime. Let me be clear: Any employee who refuses to be vaccinated by this date should be prepared to lose their job.” Last month, city records showed that nearly 11% of...
    Faced with getting a COVID-19 vaccine or losing their jobs, thousands of hesitant Los Angeles school-district employees opted for a last-minute jab, allowing them to access schools and offices on Monday and resulting in 99% compliance among classroom teachers and 97% of all employees. The high compliance rate — which includes those with an approved medical or religious exemption — fended off the need for a longer-term contingency plan that officials launched Monday in case the final vaccination rates were lower: Thousands of supervisors and staff from central and regional offices were deployed to campuses and classrooms. Some supervised classrooms or filled in for missing custodians and food-service workers. Police officers worked overtime. Los Angeles — widely viewed as a national leader in COVID-19 safety measures — was among the first major school districts in the nation to issue an ultimatum to all employees amid the summer Delta surge: Get vaccinated or lose your job. The mandate came with the risk of serious disruption in the nation’s second-largest school district, already struggling to fill a high number of teacher...
    It appears that American workers are, at long last, weighing in on the asymmetric relationship between labor and capital in this country. Nearly 3% of the American workforce quit their jobs in August, according to data released Tuesday by the U.S. Department of Labor. The rise in the number of Americans abandoning their jobs can be attributed to two factors: the continued spread of the delta variant of the COVID-19 virus in August and its impact on employers, and the increasing opportunities available to workers for better pay and working conditions in other jobs. As reported by Eli Rosenberg, writing for The Washington Post: The number of people quitting their jobs has surged to record highs, pushed by a combination of factors that include Americans sensing ample opportunity and better pay elsewhere. Some 4.3 million people quit jobs in August, according to the monthly survey — about 2.9 percent of the workforce, according to new data released Tuesday from the Department of Labor. Those numbers are up from the previous records set in April and nearly matched in July, of...
    Maureen Hurst thought that when she left her job, after more than 40 years working in healthcare, it would be to step into retirement. Instead, last week, the registered nurse of 42 years found herself unceremoniously shoved into the abyss – fired via email after working the last 22 years at the SUNY Research Foundation, Stony Brook, New York. It was a brief exchange: was she going to comply with the state mandate and get the Covid-19 vaccine? She responded that she was not. She was fired. Hurst, 59, is one of thousands of Americans prepared to go to the mat rather than comply with the sweeping vaccine mandates announced by the White House last month. Faced with the prospect of having the shot or losing their livelihood, these so-called 'refuseniks' have opted for the latter, going to bat, and in some cases going to court, in a concerted push-back against a mandate that, they argue, is unlawful, unnecessary and unsafe. In New York, registered nurse Maureen Hurst (left) was fired last week from the SUNY Research Foundation in Stony...
    DENVER (CBS4)– The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment says it will begin enforcing the state’s vaccine mandate for all health care workers starting Friday. It’s estimated that 7,500 nursing home workers alone are unvaccinated. (credit: CBS) The current mandate states all workers must have their first shot or a religious or medical waiver by Sept. 30. READ MORE: Father Michael J. O'Brien Facing Allegations Of Sexual Abuse At St. Mary Catholic Church In AspenThe Colorado Health Care Association, which represents 90% of nursing homes, and the Colorado Hospital Association, say they were assured the state would not take punitive action until the end of October, when the second vaccine is required. But the Health Department issued a statement Wednesday that led some to panic stating, “Facilities that are not compliant with the rule are breaking the law and employees who do not get the shot are choosing to fire themselves.” Both the hospital and nursing home associations warned, if they have to start firing employees, it will endanger patients’ safety. They’re already dealing with staff shortages....
    More than nine in ten hospital and nursing home staff in New York State are now vaccinated with at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine. At least 60,000 hospital workers received their first doses in the last month, leading up to the state's vaccine mandate for healthcare workers, which took effect Monday. In both hospitals and nursing homes, 92 percent of staffers are now vaccinated, while 89 percent of staff in New York State's adult care facilities are vaccinated. But 36,000 hospital staff members - and thousands more employees in nursing home home and adult care facilities - may be out of work soon if they don't comply with the mandate. Governor Kathy Hochul has prepared for a potential staff shortage by expanding eligibility for providing Covid-related services in the state. The governor is prepared to call in the National Guard if needed, she said. More than 90% of hospital and nursing home staff in New York are now vaccinated. Pictured: Theresa Clarke, Nurse Manager at Mount Sinai South Nassau hospital, was the first staffer from her facility to get...
    by Jack J. Barry, University of Florida; Ann Christiano, University of Florida, and Annie Neimand, University of Florida Are workplace vaccine mandates prompting some employees to quit rather than get a shot? A hospital in Lowville, New York, for example, had to shut down its maternity ward when dozens of staffers left their jobs rather than get vaccinated. At least 125 employees at Indiana University Health resigned after refusing to take the vaccine. And several surveys have shown that as many as half of unvaccinated workers insist they would leave their jobs if forced to get the shot, which has raised alarms among some that more mandates could lead to an exodus of workers in many industries. But how many will actually follow through? Strong wordsIn June 2021, we conducted a nationwide survey, funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, that gave us a sample of 1,036 people who mirrored the diverse makeup of the U.S. We plan to publish the survey in October. We asked respondents to tell us what they would do if “vaccines were required" by...
    Most of us have experienced an overbearing boss at some stage in our working life, but it seems that some managers really let the power trip of being in charge go to their heads.   From a manager texting at 3am to ask an employee to come in the next morning to a note warning workers to 'stop crying' before returning to the shop floor, social media users from across the globe have revealed signs and messages from bosses nobody wants to work for.  Among the other workplace snaps, which were collated in an online gallery by Nature World Today, was an office note forbidding employees from 'stealing' water.  In another photograph, a sign dictated that all male employees should sit down while using the toilet.  No time for tears! A gallery collated by Nature World Today shows what some people have to put up with in workplaces around the world when there's an overbearing boss in charge  RELATED ARTICLES Previous 1 Next Real works of art! Lady Amelia Windsor and Lady Kitty... Princess Margaret's diamond...
    "No one likes these people. Biden is incompetent. Harris is MIA. Their underlings are running things," one commenter wrote. "Ask Democrats a simple question: 'Is America safer and better off than we were 1 YEAR ago?' Not 4 years ago. 1 year. It's taken less than 9 months for this administration to screw things up worse than anyone could have imagined." "I'm surprised there was no hearse in the procession," another commenter quipped. "After all, he's a walking cadaver." "Middle fingers would have enhanced it even more," another commenter said. "You guys (and gals) ROCK!" another commenter exclaimed. "This administration is filled with cretins." "Thank you for helping! God bless you all!" another commenter wrote. "We stand with you turning our backs on Biden and his gang!" "This is what happens when you let a magic box decide. You get a crash dummy for a president," another commenter offered. (H/T: Western Journal)
    Labor Day is "an annual celebration of the social and economic achievements of American workers." There is one industry that is far from celebrated. It provides income to many people who would otherwise have difficulty finding meaningful work. It gives leisure and emotional connections to many. I am talking about the sex work industry and prostitution specifically. Good information on the economics of sex work is hard to come by. However, according to a highly cited study by the Urban Institute, the industry is quite lucrative. Among eight major sex work markets studied in 2007, it estimated that sex work produced $290 million in Atlanta on the high end and $40 million in Denver on the low end. Unfortunately, those who stand to gain the most from this industry — women, racial and sexual minorities, and the poor — must work under the threat of police intimidation, abuse and exploitation. Sex worker rights groups such as the Network of Sex Work Projects (NSWP) have been attempting to engage the broader public on this issue for quite some time. A big...
    LABOR DAY may be a nightmare for millions of Americans who could lose their weekly $300 in extra unemployment benefits if the federal government doesn’t step in to prevent them from sunsetting. On Sept. 6, as many as 7.5 million unemployed citizens who lost their jobs as a result of the Covid-19 pandemic will stop receiving the temporary bonus unemployment insurance benefits. 4On Sept. 6, as many as 7.5 million unemployed citizens who lost their jobs as a result of the Covid-19 pandemic are set to stop receiving the temporary bonus unemployment insurance benefitsCredit: Getty Altogether, three temporary programs, Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA), Federal Pandemic Unemployment Compensation (FPUC) and Pandemic Extended Unemployment Compensation (PEUC) have dispersed about $800billion in aid to needy families throughout the pandemic, according to The Century Foundation.  PROGRAMS ON CHOPPING BLOCK Each program was aimed to tend to those who experienced various inequities.  The PUA gave certain workers extra support who wouldn’t normally qualify for unemployment, for instance, freelancers, self-employed and independent contractors. The FPUC helped supplement the unemployment benefits amount offered by states amounting...
    (CNN)Google staffers could see pay cuts if they choose to work remotely and live in areas with lower costs of living than their former offices. The company has released an internal calculator for staff which was seen by Reuters, showing the pay cuts employees can expect based on where they live. Other tech companies have also reduced the salaries of employees working from home in more affordable areas, according to the report. Kara Alaimo For example, a Google employee working remotely in Lake Tahoe would, according to Reuters, take a 25% pay cut for not working in San Francisco, even though the cost of living in some places in Tahoe are nearly as expensive. The Reuters article also points out that a staffer working remotely from Stamford, Connecticut, would take a 15% pay cut for not working in the New York City office."Our compensation packages have always been determined by location, and we always pay at the top of the local market based on where an employee works from," a Google spokesperson told CNN. But it's outrageous that a...
    From ripping open bread bags in the middle to spitting across keyboard, workers have revealed some of their colleagues' worst habits in the office. Professionals from around the world shared images online proving why some people are just not meant to work with others. In a gallery collated by Bored Panda, one worker shows a celebration cake which has had square pieces cut out of it in various different places without any organised approach. Another photograph shows an ice cube tray with just one frozen square left in it, while a third captures an office kitchen with every cupboard door left open.  Right down the middle! One worker was left less than impressed with how their colleague ripped open the bread In a gallery collated by Bored Panda, one worker shows a celebration cake which has had square pieces cut out of it in various different places without any organised approach (above) An employee who shared the above image admitted he was left furious after noticing his coworker had spat across his keyboard Posting the above snap,...
    Hundreds of Afghani aid workers who risked their lives to help Australian soldiers for two decades will be left to face the Taliban alone. Local workers and their family members have been rejected from a special visa program, despite their efforts in Australian-funded 'hearts and minds' projects.  One aid worker was sent a letter on behalf of Foreign Minister Marise Payne that made clear he would not be receiving the Locally Engaged Employee Visa.   Hundreds of Afghani aid workers who risked their lives to help Australian soldiers for two decades will be left to face the Taliban alone  One aid worker received a letter on June 21 on behalf of Foreign Minister Marise Payne (pictured) that made clear he would not be receiving the Locally Engaged Employee Visa The letter obtained by The Australian made it clear the man - who is in hiding with his wife and five children - would not be considered because he was employed by a subcontractor.  'The Australian Minister for Foreign Affairs and Trade has considered your application,' the letter reads. 'Unfortunately,...
    San Francisco city workers will be required to be vaccinated against the coronavirus when a vaccine receives full federal approval. The policy covering 35,000 municipal workers may be the first by any city or county in the U.S. Employees who refuse to get vaccinated and don't get an exemption could be fired, according to the policy posted to the city government's website. The three COVID-19 vaccines currently available in the U.S. are being dispensed under emergency authorization by the Food and Drug Administration. The City of San Francisco is requiring all 35,000 of its employees to be vaccinated against Covid-19 or risk losing their jobs. Workers who don’t comply could be fired. Pictured, people stand in line at the mass vaccination site at San Francisco's Moscone Convention Center in February A game between San Francisco Giants and the Oakland Athletics at Oracle Park on Friday, urging people to get vaccinated They are expected to receive full approval in several months. San Francisco city employees will then have 10 weeks to get their shots. San Francisco, a...
    NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) — There are signs of hope on the road to reopening. A new survey finds more office workers than originally thought are expected to be back in the city this fall. Lunchtime on Park Avenue in Midtown actually looked lively on Tuesday. Men and women in business attire walked the streets, many working in office buildings. Some who spoke to CBS2’s Andrea Grymes said they were thrilled to be back in the Big Apple. READ MORE: New York City Council Mulling Bill That Would Allow Restaurant Surcharges To Continue After Pandemic Ends “I love it! It’s great to get out of the house,” Midtown office worker Harry Grand said. READ MORE: When Will Office Workers Return To Manhattan? ‘It May Never Reach The Same Level,’ Says One Expert It’s not nearly back to pre-pandemic levels, but is slowly moving in the right direction, said Kathryn Wylde of the Partnership for New York City. “Now, at least we have a forward momentum that we have not had for the past 15 months,” Wylde said. COVID VACCINE New York...
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