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    A scathing letter from John Lennon to Sir Paul McCartney is going up for auction and is expected to fetch up to $30,000. The late Beatles legend sent furious a typewritten letter to his bandmate, 80, in response to an interview Paul did in the now-defunct music magazine Melody Maker in November 1971, in which he complained about the financial matters regarding the band's split.  And the letter gives a stark insight into the pair's deteriorating relationship following the Beatles' break-up over a year previously, with John - who was shot dead aged 40 in 1980 - ranting that Paul 's***t all over us in public', reports TMZ. Angry: A scathing letter from John Lennon to Sir Paul McCartney is going up for auction and is expected to fetch up to $30,000 (pictured in 1971) The three-page letter, which John urged Melody Maker editor Richard Williams to publish, is to be sold by Gotta Have Rock and Roll and is anticipated to make five figures. The note sees the Imagine hitmaker lash out at Paul and accuse him of being ungrateful for...
    Washington (CNN)US intelligence officials are skeptical that any change in Russian public opinion against the Kremlin's war in Ukraine -- even a dramatic one -- would have an effect in persuading Russian President Vladimir Putin to end the conflict, according to multiple sources familiar with the latest intelligence. Officials also doubt that the war, which many strategists believe has been an unmitigated disaster for Russia's military, is likely to lead to the removal of Putin from power, at least in the short term.That assessment reflects the extent to which officials believe Putin has cemented his control over Russia during his more than two decades in power. Although intelligence officials believe Putin is keenly sensitive to small shifts in public opinion, his ability to crack down on protests and control the media still helps insulate him against any significant popular uprising -- leaving him free to prosecute the war on his own terms.Putin is intimately involved in the day-to-day management of the conflict, according to three sources familiar with US and western intelligence, who told CNN that Putin directly participates in...
    A member of Russia's parliament called for reparations from the United States on Sunday -- including the return of historic settlements in Alaska and California -- over the west's vast economic sanctions. The Kremlin has been flooding the airwaves of its state-run channels with pro-war propaganda that paints a vastly different portrait to reality and shields the Russian people from the horrors of Vladimir Putin's bloody invasion of Ukraine, the Daily Beast first reported. Moscow's TV pundits and show hosts have also begun endorsing the idea of publicly hanging Ukrainians who are standing against Russia -- something the Kremlin has reportedly already mulled, according to Bloomberg.  Putin's 'spin doctor,' Duma member Oleg Matveychev, appeared on Russian state news on Sunday, outlining a series of demands for both Washington and Kyiv 'after Ukraine’s demilitarization is completed.' It comes as Russian and Ukrainian officials meet for another round of peace talks Tuesday.   'We should be thinking about reparations from the damage that was caused by the sanctions and the war itself, because that too costs money and we should get it back,' Matveychev...
    Binance, the massive cryptocurrency exchange founded in China, is taking a $200 million stake in the entity seeking to acquire Forbes, the US news publisher that previously accused Binance of attempting to 'intentionally deceive regulators'. A source familiar with the matter told DailyMail.com that Binance is plowing the cash into Magnum Opus Acquisition, the blank-check firm seed-funded by the Chinese government, after half of the original investors dropped out of the deal. A spokesman for Binance on Thursday confirmed the $200 million investment, which would give it roughly a 25 percent stake in Forbes. CNBC first reported the investment.  Forbes, the 'business bible' famous for its lists such as the 30 Under 30 and rankings of the richest Americans, booked revenue of $165 million in the first nine months of 2021, and averaged 59 million monthly US visitors to its website for the year.  Binance was founded in China by Changpeng Zhao, now the world's richest crypto billionaire, but is currently registered in the Cayman Islands.  Handling some $10 billion in crypto transactions per day, the company is currently banned in the UK...
    Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor said it's a 'misconception' for the public to believe that the law is clear when the high court is deciding a case, and said that she and her colleagues worry about their public perception.  Though the court's direct mandate is to interpret the law, Obama-appointed Sotomayor said that 'The reality is, there isn't a clear answer.' 'Most people think of the law as black and white, that there's an answer,' Sotomayor said during 'Live with Kelly and Ryan,' one of two morning TV hits to promote her new children's book.  'Most of the time when the Supreme Court takes cases, it's because the courts below that are disagreeing about the answer,' she added.  'By the time the case comes to the Supreme Court, or to any court, actually — the courts below us or even the Supreme Court — it's because the answer's unclear. And that can be unsatisfying to people. They don't understand why the judges are disagreeing. They don't understand why it's so hard.'  Sotomayor was making the morning TV rounds to promote...
    New York subway rider says officers pushed him after he asked they wear masks Army hiring criminal investigators to improve case work A former campaign volunteer for state Sen. Dennis Bradley, who is under indictment on allegations he tried to cheat Connecticut’s public campaign-financing system, has pleaded guilty to federal charges she sought to defraud the fund, prosecutors said Wednesday. Load Error Tina Manus waived her right to be indicted and pleaded guilty Tuesday in U.S. District Court in Bridgeport, said Leonard C. Boyle, acting U.S. attorney for the District of Connecticut, and David Sundberg, special FBI agent in charge in New Haven. She pleaded guilty to one count of conspiracy to commit wire fraud, which carries a maximum prison term of 20 years. The conspiracy charge is related to her role in trying to obtain public money for the 2018 campaign of state Sen. Dennis Bradley Jr., prosecutors say. Bradley, a Bridgeport Democrat, and his campaign treasurer, Jessica Martinez, were indicted in May on federal charges they conspired to cheat the state’s public campaign-financing system of about...
    A former Food and Drug Administration boss has called on the US government to deploy spies to probe overseas public health crises in a bid to quickly identify any future pandemics.    Dr. Scott Gottlieb, also told CNBC on Monday that he believes the American public lost trust in its health agencies, including the Centers for Disease Control, over their cumbersome initial response to the COVID outbreak in early 2020. He conceded that while sending spies to monitor potential health threats could lead to all doctors being tarred as potential government secret agents while working abroad, such a measure is necessary to formulate a more nimble response to any future global health crisis.   He also called for a boost in funding to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention to better monitor other countries and address inequities in health care.  Gottlieb, who sits on the board at Pfizer, said that these changes would drastically improve the country's capability to combat another public health crisis, with China accused of lying about the origins of COVID, and frustrating other governments' attempts to pinpoint its...
    By HEATHER HOLLINGSWORTH and JOSH FUNK The COVID-19 curve in the U.S. is rising again after months of decline, with the number of new cases per day doubling over the past three weeks, driven by the fast-spreading delta variant, lagging vaccination rates and Fourth of July gatherings. Confirmed infections climbed to an average of about 23,600 a day on Monday, up from 11,300 on June 23, according to Johns Hopkins University data. And all but two states — Maine and South Dakota — reported that case numbers have gone up over the past two weeks. “It is certainly no coincidence that we are looking at exactly the time that we would expect cases to be occurring after the July Fourth weekend,” said Dr. Bill Powderly, co-director of the infectious-disease division at Washington University’s School of Medicine in St. Louis. At the same time, parts of the country are running up against deep vaccine resistance, while the highly contagious mutant version of the coronavirus that was first detected in India is accounting for an ever-larger share of infections. Nationally, 55.6% of...
    One of the first American flags to bear a 45th star representing Utah has been brought back to the state’s capital after the family that had treasured the piece of history for decades decided to donate it to the government, according to a report.  Jan Benson and his family earlier this month turned the 125-year-old flag over to the Utah State Capitol, where it will be displayed for the public to enjoy, KSL.com news' Carter Williams reported. "I’ve always felt that this flag didn’t really belong to my family. Even though we were custodians of it, it belongs to the public," Jan Benson told the news site. "And we’ve been trying to find that organization that would be able to do that, and make it available to the public. Through a series of people, good luck and prayers, we have found that organization." UTAH HIGH SCHOOL SOFTBALL STAR MAKES INCREDIBLE CATCH BY JUMPING OVER FENCE DURING STATE CHAMPIONSHIP VideoUtah was named America’s 45th state on Jan. 4, 1896. The relic is said to have been the first 45-star flag flown...
    A U.S. Space Force commanding officer was fired from his post on Friday after expressing concern on a podcast that Marxist ideologies are becoming prevalent in the U.S. military. Lt Col. Matthew Lohmeier, commander of 11th Space Warning Squadron at Buckley Air Force Base, Colo., was relieved from duty over a “loss of trust and confidence in his ability to lead,” a Space Force spokesperson told Military.com. “This decision was based on public comments made by Lt. Col. Lohmeier in a recent podcast. Lt. Gen. Whiting has initiated a Command Directed Investigation on whether these comments constituted prohibited partisan political activity,” the spokesperson added. A US Space Force Commander was just relieved of command for speaking out against Critical Race Theory He felt so strongly about how it is ruining our military, he wrote a book about it Space Operations Command has now placed him under investigation https://t.co/TWo9yvoqEF pic.twitter.com/X9YlG0HCkm — Jack Posobiec (@JackPosobiec) May 16, 2021 Lohmeier earlier this month self-published a book titled “Irresistible Revolution: Marxism’s Goal of Conquest & the Unmaking of the American Military,” which is...
    Russia's ambassador to the United States returned to Moscow on Sunday after being recalled for emergency consultations amid rising tensions with Washington following President Joe Biden's comments that he believed his Russian counterpart, Vladimir Putin, was a killer.    Biden's remark in a TV interview earlier in the week in turn prompted a terse quip from Vladimir Putin who wished the U.S. president "good health" and said that people tend to refer to others as they really see themselves.    The Biden interview came on the heels of the release of a report by the U.S. Office of the Director of National Intelligence that concluded Putin had "authorized, and a range of Russian government organizations conducted, influence operations aimed at denigrating President Biden’s candidacy and the Democratic Party, supporting former President [Donald] Trump, undermining public confidence in the electoral process and exacerbating sociopolitical divisions in the United States."    The Kremlin immediately denied the findings of the report, saying they were "absolutely unfounded."    Ambassador Anatoly Antonov landed at Moscow's Sheremetyevo airport early on March 21, Russian news agencies reported,...
    WASHINGTON -- Investigators have identified more than 200 suspects in their probe of the January 6 attack at the U.S. Capitol and arrested more than 100 individuals, FBI Director Chris Wray said Thursday in his first public appearance since the riot."We know who you are if you're out there, and FBI agents are coming to find you," he said during an inauguration security briefing at Federal Emergency Management Agency headquarters in Washington with Vice President Mike Pence.Wray's comments come as federal investigators are chasing thousands of leads in twin efforts to prosecute people involved in last week's attack on the U.S. Capitol and to try to prevent feared follow-up attacks in Washington and around the country.The challenge, FBI and Justice Department officials say, is "unprecedented" and Wray addressed the duality of the current situation in his comments Thursday by speaking directly to those who may be considering taking part in violent acts going forward."My advice to people who might be inclined to follow in the footsteps of those who engaged in the kind of activity we saw last week is...
    London (CNN)When the United Kingdom became the first Western nation to approve a Covid-19 vaccine earlier this week, the news was greeted with praise from some health officials across the pond. But there was one notable exception.Dr. Anthony Fauci, America's top infectious disease expert and perhaps one of the world's most recognizable scientists, suggested that UK regulators had not scrutinized the data on the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine as carefully as their US counterparts, and that the British approval had been "rushed.""We have the gold standard of a regulatory approach with the [Food and Drug Administration]. The UK did not do it as carefully and they got a couple of days ahead," Fauci told Fox News on Wednesday.Fauci's comments were the opening salvo in a verbal jousting match between US and UK officials that experts said risked undermining public confidence in the safety of vaccines.By Thursday evening, Fauci had apologized on British television for his earlier comments.Read More"There really has been a misunderstanding, and for that, I'm sorry and I apologize for that. I do have great faith in both the scientific...
    WASHINGTON - The United States on Thursday imposed sanctions on Chinese officials, including a member of the country's powerful Politburo, accusing them of serious human rights abuses against the Uighur Muslim minority, a move likely to further ratchet up tensions between Washington and Beijing.   The sanctions that include the Xinjiang region's Communist Party Secretary Chen Quanguo and the Xinjiang Public Security Bureau were announced amid already-high tensions between Washington and Beijing over China's handling of the coronavirus pandemic and its tightened grip on Hong Kong.   "The United States calls upon the world to stand against the CCP’s acts against its own minority communities in Xinjiang, including mass arbitrary detention, forced labor, religious persecution, and forced birth control and sterilization," a White House official said.   The Chinese embassy in Washington did not immediately respond to a request for comment.   However, China denies mistreatment of the minority group and says the camps provide vocational training and are needed to fight extremism.   The sanctions are imposed under the Global Magnitsky Act, a federal law that allows the...
    Counselor to the president Kellyanne Conway, on "Fox & Friends" Wednesday, seemed to back states that are rolling back their coronavirus reopenings as cases surge –­ in some places threatening hospital capacity –­ and supported general safety measures, like masks, advocated by public health experts. The comments from Conway, one of President Trump's closest advisers, come as more top Republicans, including Vice President Pence, begin openly supporting mask-wearing and other measures as a way to ensure the U.S. doesn't backslide in its coronavirus response. President Trump has yet to openly do the same while he pushes for a fast reopening of the country. "We need to have priorities in our states and in this nation. Do you want to open the bars now, or do you want to open the schools and the day care centers in a few short weeks? I vote for the latter," Conway said. VideoCORONAVIRUS LEADS ARIZONA GOVERNOR TO CLOSE BARS, CLUBS, GYMS FOR 30 DAYS As of Wednesday morning, 17 states are delaying or pausing their reopening plans, with some reclosing establishments like bars and gyms, and others requiring masks in public...
    Jessica Corbett June 24, 2020 5:27PM (UTC) This article originally appeared at Common Dreams. It is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 License. Feel free to republish and share widely. A report about 12 U.S. cities published Tuesday in the Guardian sheds light on a water affordability crisis in the midst of the coronavirus pandemic, which has forced millions of Americans out of work, underscoring the importance of universal access to water and sanitation and provoking demands for both a moratorium on utility shutoffs and broader reforms. Across all the cities studied, the total cost of water and sewage rose by an average of 80% between 2010 and 2018, according to an analysis commissioned by the newspaper and conducted by economist and utilities expert Roger Colton. : From city to city, during that period, water bills rose by between 27% and 154%, Colton found. That spike, the Guardian noted, has come as "federal aid to public water utilities, which serve around 87% of people, has plummeted while maintenance, environmental and health threats, climate shocks, and other expenditures have skyrocketed." The research reveals that "more people are in trouble, and the...
    President Donald Trump has ordered the firing of a federal prosecutor who refused to resign after learning of his pending removal by a press release.  Attorney General Bill Barr said on Saturday that Trump ordered the removal of Geoffrey S. Berman, United States attorney for the Southern District of New York, after he had refused to step down on Friday night.  Berman had taken on high-profile investigations, including charging Jeffrey Epstein with sex trafficking. He also prosecuted Trump's former lawyer Michael Cohen and charged two Rudy Giuliani associates during a campaign finance investigation. On Friday night, Berman forcefully denied that he was resigning, after a late-night Justice Department press release announced his resignation and replacement. Attorney General Bill Barr said on Saturday that Trump ordered the removal of Geoffrey S. Berman (above), United States attorney for the Southern District of New York In a letter to Berman, Barr said he had 'chosen public spectacle over public service.' 'Because you have declared that you have no intention of resigning, I have asked the President to remove you as of today, and...
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