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    DENVER (CBS4) – For the first time in more than a year, Coloradans are making plans for a maskless holiday. CBS4 Medical Editor Dr. Dave Hnida explained what we need to do to stay safe over Memorial Day weekend during his weekly question and answer session on CBSN Denver. “First off, I am very pleased about the fact that we have such effective vaccinations and it changes everything,” Hnida said. READ MORE: Interstate 70 Rockfall Mitigation Could Cause Traffic Delays Up To 30 Minutes Near Dumont Last year, the advice was not to have get-togethers and if people did, the number of people should be limited and food and utensils should not be shared. The situation is obviously very different this year, but Hnida said there are still some safety considerations. READ MORE: Should You Invest In Dogecoin? Expert Suggests Keeping Away From Controversial Cryptocurrency Market “When you consider the fact that there are outdoor activities (coming up) which are much lower risk, that’s great and that’s a really positive at this point in time. Then when we get to...
    Yahoo Spain Originals You put your babies’ lives at risk to take a selfie with an elephant at the zoo A 25-year-old man has starred in a more than reckless episode by sneaking into the area designated for elephants at the San Diego Zoo, in the United States, to take a photo in front of them. Worst of all is that the individual was carrying his two-year-old daughter in his arms at the time of the events, which has led to his arrest. This can be seen in a video provided by the park itself in which the father appears with his baby invading the enclosure of the pachyderms after having jumped the fences, one of them electrified. Judging from his attitude, he does not seem to be very aware that he is putting the little girl’s life and his own at risk. It also doesn’t seem to take into account that elephants are territorial animals that can react violently if threatened until one of them suddenly starts up and approaches them from behind. Initially, the man was not aware...
    MORE mutant Covid strains risk being introduced to the UK as mandatory quarantine hotels could be delayed for weeks. Officials warned the new measures - to force arrivals from high-risk countries to isolate - have been hit by logistical problems. 5Quarantine hotels could be delayed for weeksCredit: Splash News A lack of available hotels to accommodate all arrivals and authorities needed to run them may prevent them from starting sooner. The new entry requirements, which will affect arrivals from 33 countries on the high-risk list, were announced last month to reduce the spread of foreign Covid strains, including the South African variant. However, 11 rogue cases of the variant not linked to travel have been confirmed in the UK, leading to more than 350,000 across eight English postcodes from Surrey to Merseyside to be tested in the next two weeks. In total, 105 cases of the South African strain have been found in Britain since late December. The new quarantine hotels which were suggested to be introduced by February 8, could now be February 15, according to the Mail Online....
    A region of the brain linked with risk-taking has been identified by scientists, who say it could explain why some people are more likely to smoke and drink. A team of neurologists from the University of Zurich found major functional and anatomical distinctions among those who are likely to smoke, use alcohol or drugs, speed, or have many sexual partners when compared to more cautious people. For the study the Swiss team examined 25,000 people and found a direct relationship between differences in brain anatomy and propensity to take risks. Distinct characteristics were found in regions of the brain responsible for controlling happy hormones like dopamine, memory storage and in managing self-control.  They say understanding what prompts people to engage in risky behaviours is important due to the health and economic consequences linked to these activities.  A team of neurologists from the University of Zurich found major functional and anatomical distinctions among those who are likely to smoke, use alcohol or drugs, speed, or have many sexual partners when compared to more cautious people Around 50 per cent of British...
    Joe Biden will no longer take the train to Washington D.C. for his swearing-in, a change in plans that comes amid heightened security at the Capitol and reports of threats to his inauguration ceremony. The decision was made this week, CNN reported. Biden was scheduled to leave from his namesake train station in Wilmington, Del., on Tuesday for the 90 minute ride to the nation's capitol.  But there were concerns about his arrival at Union Station in Washington D.C., which is only blocks from Capitol Hill. Security has increased around the complex after last week's MAGA riot that left five people dead, a trail of destruction throughout the building and resulted in President Donald Trump being impeached a second time - this time for betraying his oath of office by inciting the mob.  The decision was likely a difficult one. Biden is known for his love of trains. During his decades-long Senate career, he commuted on Amtrak almost daily from Wilmington to Washington D.C. to be home for his sons after his first wife and young daughter died in a car...
    BOSTON (CBS) – Fifteen more Massachusetts cities and towns have been forced to take a step back in their reopening because of a rise in coronavirus cases. Starting Monday, the 15 communities moving from Step 2 of Phase 3 back to Step 1 are Abington, Berkley, Canton, East Longmeadow, Fairhaven, Fall River, Hanover, Hanson, Hingham, Marshfield, Milford, Pembroke, Rockland, Wakefield and Weymouth. All have been in the high-risk red zone for three consecutive weeks, according to the Department of Public Health. That means businesses like roller skating rinks, trampoline parks, laser tag and escape rooms must close. Gyms, libraries, museums and arcades have to reduce capacity from 50-percent to 40-percent. Outdoor gatherings, as well as outdoor theater and performance venues, are now limited to 50 people. Last week, 13 other cities and towns rolled back their reopening : Acushnet, Brockton, Chelmsford, Holyoke, Hudson, Kingston, Leicester, Malden, Plymouth, Randolph, Waltham, Webster and Woburn. Overall, 121 cities and towns are now deemed high-risk by the state.
    Tylenol may not just stop aches and fevers, it may actually make you more prone to taking risks, according to a study published in the journal Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience. “Acetaminophen seems to make people feel less negative emotion when they consider risky activities – they just don’t feel as scared,” co-author of the study Baldwin Way, an associate professor of psychology at The Ohio State University, said in a press release. The researchers studied 189 college students who took 1,000 mg of acetaminophen (the active ingredient in Tylenol), which is the recommended dose for a headache, or a placebo that looked similar to Tylenol. Participants were then asked how risky certain activities — such as bungee jumping, starting a new career in your mid-30’s, participating in a skydiving class and walking home in an unsafe area of town while alone at night — would be rated on a scale of one to seven. The study revealed that those who took acetaminophen rated those activities as less risky than the placebo group. The risk-taking effects from acetaminophen were...
    Tylenol may not just stop aches and fevers, it may actually make you more prone to taking risks, according to a study published in the journal Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience. “Acetaminophen seems to make people feel less negative emotion when they consider risky activities – they just don’t feel as scared,” co-author of the study Baldwin Way, an associate professor of psychology at The Ohio State University, said in a press release. The researchers studied 189 college students who took 1,000 mg of acetaminophen (the active ingredient in Tylenol), which is the recommended dose for a headache, or a placebo that looked similar to Tylenol. Participants were then asked how risky certain activities -- such as bungee jumping, starting a new career in your mid-30’s, participating in a skydiving class and walking home in an unsafe area of town while alone at night -- would be rated on a scale of one to seven. Study showed that those participants who took acetaminophen rated certain activities like bungee jumping as less risky compared to the rankings given by the placebo group. (iStock)...
    Millions of healthy people should be prescribed blood pressure lowering medication because the pills can prevent heart attacks later in life, a major study has claimed. In the biggest study of its kind, Oxford University researchers found lowering levels even from a healthy starting point slashed the risk of heart disease and strokes years down the line. Currently, treatment is only given to people with extremely high blood pressure, known medically as ‘hypertension’. It means about a million Britons are prescribed the cheap pills - which cost between  28p and £1 a day - every year. Oxford scientists claimed this threshold prevents millions of people who could benefit from the drugs from accessing them and are now calling for a complete overhaul to the way they are prescribed. Doctors should look at a person’s overall risk of heart disease, including weight, exercise levels and family medical history – instead of solely relying on blood pressure levels, they say. Cholestrerol-lowering drugs known as statins are already prescribed in this way and anyone with a 10 per cent chance of future heart...
    Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg speaks at Georgetown University in a 'Conversation on Free Expression" in Washington, DC on October 17, 2019.Andrew Caballero-Reynolds | AFP | Getty Images Some advertisers that rely heavily on Facebook but want to join the recent advertising boycott are faced with a dilemma: Do they risk hurting business in the near term, or risk losing customers who might punish them for not participating in the long term? With hundreds of businesses joining a boycott of Facebook ads (and some taking it a step further by pausing spending on all social media), some have speculated why some companies have yet to press pause. Others have taken a more cynical view, saying that joining the boycott is simply providing cover for broader marketing cost-cutting associated with the coronavirus pandemic.  But Facebook is a massively efficient channel for many businesses, and experts say cutting out the platform can be a major sacrifice, especially those that rely on it to bring in new customers.  Dashlane chief marketing officer Joy Howard last week wrote in a blog post about the password manager company's...
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