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    This company is trying to revive the woolly mammoth species, which went extinct around 4,000 years ago. Although it won’t be the exact species, the scientists plan to genetically engineer thousands of these animals that can roam the Arctic to help combat climate change. Source: FOX 13 Tampa Bay/Youtube The company, Colossal Biosciences, is a start-up that wants to resurrect an animal that resembles the woolly mammoth by creating a genetically engineered Asian elephant that is cold resistant and has the biological traits of the extinct species. The lead behind the science is renowned geneticist George Church who also leads synthetic biology research efforts at Harvard University’s Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering. Church’s long-time dream of bringing back the woolly mammoth began when he teamed up with tech entrepreneur Ben Lamm to create Colossal Biosciences. Although it will be difficult to create a hybrid elephant with traits from a wooly mammoth, Church told Newsweek that they plan to use advanced gene editing technology. Asian elephants are the closest living relative of the woolly mammoth, sharing around 99.6 percent...
    Miners in Canada discovered a frozen mummified baby mammoth during one of their excavations for gold near Klondike, a city in Yukon, last week, according to the provincial government. Miners with Treadstone Mining made the discovery, which is considered the most complete mummified woolly mammoth found in North America and features skin and hair, according to a news release. ANCIENT INCA TOMB DISCOVERED IN HOME IN PERU'S CAPITAL Elders in the Trʼondek Hwechʼin First Nation band that has lived in Yukon for a thousand years named the female baby mammoth "Nun cho ga," which means “big baby animal” in the Han language. "This is as a remarkable recovery for our First Nation, and we look forward to collaborating with the Yukon government on the next steps in the process for moving forward with these remains in a way that honours our traditions, culture, and laws," Trʼondëk Hwëchʼin Chief Roberta Joseph said in the release. "We are committed to respectfully handling Nun cho ga as she has chosen now to reveal herself to all of us."...
    (CNN)They were looking for gold in the permafrost of Canada's Klondike. Instead, they discovered what Canadian experts say is the most complete mummified woolly mammoth found in North America.Miners working in the Klondike gold fields discovered the frozen baby woolly mammoth on Tuesday in Trʼondëk Hwëchʼin traditional territory, according to a news release from the Yukon government. Elders from the Trʼondëk Hwëchʼin, a First Nations group that has lived along the Yukon River for millennia, named the mammoth calf Nun cho ga, which means "big baby animal" in the Hän language. Worker discovers wooly mammoth tooth at Iowa construction siteTr'ondëk Hwëch'in Chief Roberta Joseph called the discovery a "remarkable recovery for our First Nation" in the release. "We look forward to collaborating with the Yukon government on the next steps in the process for moving forward with these remains in a way that honours our traditions, culture, and laws. We are thankful for the Elders who have been guiding us so far and the name they provided," Joseph said.Read MoreThe baby is female and likely died during the ice age...
    A very well-preserved young mammoth has been found in the Yukon of Canada. To date, this is the complete model found in North America. An extraordinary and historic discovery made by chance by a gold digger in Yukon last June. On National Tribal Day in Canada on June 21, 2021, a miner working near Eureka Creek, south of Dawson City, found the body of a baby uncle while digging in Permafrost. While digging, a young Canadian man from the Trʼondëk Hwëchʼin tribe struck the creature with his shovel. The ancient researcher who certified this discovery was Grand Jazzula, who was hastily summoned by the Treadstone Mining Company that hired the young man. A year later the Yukon government unveiled the discovery. In a press release issued on Friday . “As a Ice Age ancient scientist, one of my lifelong dreams was to meet a real woolly uncle face to face (Mammudas Primigenius) This dream has come true today. ” Jazzula replied. According to him, the 1m40 long mammoth, nicknamed “Nan Cho Ka” by the natives, died 35,000 to 40,000 years...
    BONES of a woolly mammoth from 10,000 years ago have been found in a cave under a castle. Archaeologists will now carry out a further excavation of the prehistoric limestone cavern. 5Bones of a woolly mammoth from 10,000 years ago have been found in a cave under Pembroke Castle in WalesCredit: WNS 5Archaeologists will now carry out a further excavation of the prehistoric limestone cavernCredit: WNS 5Archaeologists hope to find further evidence of how the site was used by early humans and animals in the Ice AgeCredit: WNS They hope to find further evidence of how the site was used by early humans and animals in the Ice Age. The hollow — called Wogan Cavern — is beneath Pembroke Castle, west Wales. The fort, on the Pembroke river, was built in 1093 and rebuilt a century later. The first Tudor king, Henry VII, was born there in 1457. Scientists say a preliminary search of the cave last year found reindeer and a woolly mammoth’s bones — showing it was likely an important place for the Mesolithic period. Dig co-lead...
    A University of Virginia researcher trekking in the remote Yukon area of Alaska stumbled across an enormous woolly mammoth tusk protruding from dirt of the Koyukuk River bank last week. 'You can almost touch the #pleistocene,' UVA Environmental Humanities research specialist Adrienne Ghaly posted with a photo of the ancient tooth stuck in the river muck near the town of Coldfoot. She said that the University of Alaska Fairbanks had first discovered the massive fossil - mammoths went extinct approximately 10,000 years ago - a year or two ago and had fastened it to the river bank with ropes.  University researchers also trained a camera on the tusk to watch it remotely. University of Virginia researcher Adrienne Ghaly snapped this photo of a wooly mammoth tusk (circled) found on the Koyukuk River near Coldfoot, Alaska 'You can almost touch the #pleistocene,' Andrienne Ghaly posted with a photo of the ancient tooth stuck in the river muck near the town of Coldfoot University of Alaska researchers have lashed a woolly mammoth tusk to the bank of the Koyukuk River with ropes so...
    An Iowa construction worker made a 'once in a lifetime' discovery when he found a massive wooly mammoth tooth while working on a community college site [DATE], crediting his two sons and their love of dinosaurs for giving him the knowledge to identify the fossil.  Father-of-two Justin Blauwet made a 'once-in-a-lifetime' discovery on March 4 while performing construction observation on a lift station project for DGR Engineering on property owned by Northwest Iowa Community College in Sheldon, DNG said in a news release.  Blauwet spotted the 11.2-pound woolly mammoth tooth laying on the ground, clearly exposed during excavation and said he was able to identify the tooth because of his interest in fossils and pre-historic animals The woolly mammoth roamed the icy tundra of Europe and North America for 140,000 years, disappearing at the end of the Pleistocene period, 10,000 years ago. They are one of the best understood prehistoric animals known to science because their remains are often not fossilized but frozen and preserved. Justin Blauwet (pictured) made a 'once-in-a-lifetime' discovery while performing construction observation on a lift station project for DGR Engineering...
    THE DODO could be brought back to life hundreds of years after going extinct thanks to a DNA breakthrough. Scientists have managed to sequence the entire genome of the flightless bird for the first time, meaning it could one day be cloned. 2Dodo went extinct in the 17th centuryCredit: AFP Experts could edit DNA from a pigeon to include dodo DNA, as the two have quite similar genetics. 3ft-tall Dodos once roamed Mauritius but were completely wiped out in the 17th century. The possibility of their return was raised after Professor Beth Shapiro revealed that she was planning to share the complete DNA of a specimen soon, the Telegraph reports. However, speaking during a Royal Society of Medicine webinar she warned that bringing back the extinct bird would not be easy. Read more science storiesANCIENT KILLER Mysterious beast that hunted RHINOS prowled California 40million years agoROCKY HORROR Ancient Japanese 'killing stone' said to contain a demon has CRACKED open "Mammals are simpler," she explained. "If I have a cell and it’s living in a dish in the lab and I...
    Technology firm Colossal Biosciences is working to resurrect the long-extinct woolly mammoth using preserved DNA from frozen fossils - and the Dallas-based company just got a mammoth-sized investment to match its sky-high ambitions. Colossal launched last September with $15 million in seed funding, but has since raised another $60 million from a group of star-studded venture capitalists, including Paris Hilton and billionaire 'Jurassic World' producer Thomas Tull. George Church, co-founder of Colossal Biosciences and a Harvard University geneticist, likened mammoths to the ‘cuddle version of a velociraptor.’ ‘They’re vegetarian, they’re not threatening,’ he said in a call announcing the funding round attended by Fortune. “I’m all in on mammoths,” co-Founder Ben Lamm said in the same virtual meeting, sitting in front of a bookshelf lined with a number of models of the prehistoric creature. Technology firm Colossal Biosciences seeks to create modern versions of the extinct woolly mammoth. Above are its founders Ben Lamm (left) and George Church (right) Colossal recently raised $75 million from a star-studded slate of investors that includes Paris Hilton and billionaire 'Jurassic World' producer Thomas Tull...
    Researchers have found woolly mammoths could have survived for thousands of years longer in Europe and Asia - and could potentially still exist today - if not for humans. A study led by University of Adelaide and University of Copenhagen has debunked a popular theory that climate change decimated the mammoth's population in Eurasia before humans finished them off. Instead they found while climate had an impact, humans fast tracked the woolly mammoth's extinction by up to 4000 years in some regions. 'We are not saying climate change had no role, we are saying humans had a more important role than what was once first thought,' the study's lead author, Associate Professor Damien Fordham said. The study said while it was a popular theory that climate change may have eventually killed off woolly mammoths (pictured) even without humans, their data suggested otherwise 'We know that humans exploited woolly mammoths for meat, skins, bones and ivory. 'However, until now it has been difficult to disentangle the exact roles that climate warming and human hunting had on its extinction.' Assoc Prof Fordham...
    (CNN)Mammoths and other giant creatures of the Ice Age such as woolly rhinos survived longer than scientists thought, coexisting with humans for tens of thousands years before they vanished for good. That's according to the results of an ambitious 10-year research project that analyzed DNA from hundreds of soil samples across the Arctic. The scientists involved in the project collected 535 samples of permafrost and sediment from frozen lakes, often in extremely cold locations from across Siberia, Alaska, Canada and Scandinavia, in 73 locations where the remains of mammoths have been found.Analysis of DNA contained in the soil showed that mammoths were living in mainland Siberia 3,900 years ago -- after the Great Pyramid of Giza was built in Egypt and the megaliths of Stonehenge were erected. Most woolly mammoths were previously thought to have died off about 10,000 years ago, except for a very tiny population that survived on remote islands off Siberia. Mammoth Steppe was a unique ecosystem that hosted a number of large grazing animals. Woolly rhinos, the researchers said, were still roaming around the Arctic 9,800...
    WOOLLY mammoths were killed off by climate change and not humans, according to research. Global warming happened so fast that vegetation disappeared and they starved to death. 2The Woolly Mammoth was wiped out by climate change 4,000 years agoCredit: Getty - Contributor The giant Ice Age herbivore's demise around 4,000 years ago has been debated for centuries. Until now, prehistoric hunters had been the main suspects. The cousins of today's elephants lived alongside early humans and were a regular staple of their diet. The skeletons of the hairy animals were used to build shelters, harpoons were carved from their giant tusks, and artwork featuring them is daubed on cave walls. Analysis of plant and animal remains, including urine, faeces and skin cells, now reveals that our ancestors were not responsible for the mammoth's demise. The animals became extinct because when the icebergs melted, it became too wet for them to survive because the vegetation they ate was wiped out. Most read in ScienceExclusiveTALKING WITH DINOSAURS Dinosaurs loved to gather for a gossip 200m years ago, study findsNORSE HOLIDAY Viking settlers...
    IT MAY seem like the plot of a science fiction film but some scientists think it will be possible to bring ancient animals back to life. To clone an animal, scientists need almost entirely intact DNA, which means some ancient creatures are more likely to be resurrected than others. 5 5Woolly rhinos could potentially be 'resurrected' one dayCredit: Getty - Contributor Woolly Mammoth The woolly mammoth genome has been sequenced thanks to well-preserved specimens found in permafrost in Siberia. Entrepreneur Ben Lamm and Harvard geneticist George Church have created a new gene-editing company called Colossal that plans to bring the woolly mammoth back to life. This would involve splicing woolly mammoth DNA with that of a modern Asian elephant and then creating an embryo which could be grown in an artificial womb or a surrogate elephant. The resulting creature would be a hybrid-woolly mammoth but should have all the fuzzy features of the ancient creature. Most read in NewsDEADLINE NEAR Government faces SHUTDOWN in days as bill blocked ahead of Thursday deadlineDOG WILL HUNT Dog the Bounty Hunter reveals where he thinks Brian...
    toggle audio on and off change volume download audio WTOP's Jason Fraley previews 'Monologue Madness' (Part 1) Get ready for actors to duke it out in a March Madness-style tournament bracket. “Monologue Madness” hits Woolly Mammoth Theatre this coming Monday at 7 p.m. “This is the ninth year,” Producer Edward Daniels told WTOP. “We’re very excited to be back, especially coming out of COVID to give our actors a chance to get back in the audition room and back on stage. … We’re showcasing the open call audition process, so an audience gets to see what happens before they see their favorite actor on film or on stage.” The tournament will feature 32 actors selected from 200 auditions last weekend. “We put them in a single-elimination bracket and they’ve got one minute to perform their best monologue,” Daniels said. “The rounds are different genres: comedy, drama, classical.” What types of monologues do the contestants typically perform? “The range is very vast,” Daniels said. “We have actors come in presenting theater monologues from plays, we have actors who have transformed...
    Many believe that our future lies in space, where people will one day live in the entire solar system. Armed with knowledge, some scientists want to bring back ancient animals. The question arises, which we know very well from Jurassic Park: Do you want to do something if you can? Space exploration has now led to technology that defines our daily lives. What can we learn from the possible success or failure of reviving living things? It’s a subtle balance – and as we’ve learned, life finds its way. Back to the future The Scientific efforts to revive woolly manure, Which disappeared 4,000 years ago, has now gained 15 million. A team of geneticists led by George Church at Harvard Medical School imagines a giant figure Again, strolling in the natural environment. The goal is to use genetic engineering to create a living hybrid of elephant and mammoth that look like wool mammoth. Proponents of the project hope the monsters can help restore the Arctic tundra ecosystem and protect the endangered Asian elephant, a close relative of the woolly...
    (CNN)We live in a time bookended by extremes.Many believe our future is in space, where one day humans will live across the solar system.Looking back, we see evidence of a wild planet where giant creatures once roamed, only to fall in the face of natural disasters that shaped the Earth we know today. Armed with the know-how, some scientists want to bring back ancient animals. It begs the question we know all too well from "Jurassic Park": Should you do something just because you can? Exploring space has led to technology that now defines our everyday life. What might we learn from the potential success or failure of resurrecting a species?Read MoreIt's a delicate balance -- and as we've also learned, life finds a way.Back to the futureA new biosciences and genetics company, Colossal, has raised $15 million to bring back the woolly mammoth from extinction. This model mammoth is on display in France.The scientific efforts to resurrect the woolly mammoth, which went extinct 4,000 years ago, just got a $15 million boost.A group of geneticists led by Harvard Medical...
    At the time, scientists were learning how to reconstruct the genes of extinct organisms based on DNA fragments derived from fossils. Identify the genetic differences that distinguish ancient organisms from their modern relatives, and begin to look at how these differences in DNA led to differences in their bodies. Dr. Church, who discovered methods for studying and modifying DNA, wondered if it could effectively revive endangered species by rewriting the genes of a living relative. Since there is a common ancestor to Asian elephants and mummies that lived about six million years ago, Dr. Churchill thought that the elephant genome could create something that looks and acts like a mammoth. In addition to scientific interest, he said, wool mummies can help the environment. Today, the tundra in Siberia and North America warms up as animals graze rapidly and release carbon dioxide. “The answer is theoretically,” Dr. Church argued. Algae today are dominated by tundra. But when the mummies were woolly, they were mostly grass. Some scientists have argued that woolly mummies are environmental engineers who maintain lawns by breaking down...
    SAN JOSE, Calif. (KGO) -- Using technology created by a Bay Area scientist, CRISPR start-up Colossal wants to bring back the woolly mammoth.The project already has $15 million in funding and the technology may actually be there to make it happen.RELATED: Prehistoric bones found during pool construction in Las VegasLong before the Shark Tank or Tower Hall were in San Jose, another giant stood tall.In 2005, Roger Castillo was walking his dog along the Guadalupe River when he made a mammoth discovery.It turned out to be the remains 10,000-year-old Columbian Mammoth.This discovery showed the largest of the Mammoth species once roamed Silicon Valley.The Children's Discovery Museum took the fossil remains and recreated what the mammoth, aptly named Lupe, would look like.RELATED: Researchers now have an estimate for just how many T. rex once roamed EarthModels in museums are about as close as humans can get to the giant beasts nowadays. But that may change soon."This feels very, very big to us, so I cannot imagine what that would be like," Children's Discovery Museum of San Jose Executive Director Marilee Jennings...
    A new biotechnology company is aiming to genetically resurrect the woolly mammoth by 2027. Colossal, which launched on Monday, has received $15 million in initial funding for the project. On its website, the company discussed the issue of extinction and its goal to "develop a de-extinction library of animals as well as housing genetic DNA/embryos from endangered animals." BABY SMOOTH-HOUND SHARK COULD BE FIRST CONFIRMED CASE OF ASEXUAL REPRODUCTION IN SPECIES "This process will slow the long-term impacts of human induced loss of biodiversity and give threatened species a buffer against outright extinction as numbers dwindle," the site read.  "The results from our lab will directly address issues related to loss in biodiversity and overall species counts resulting from the human-accelerated degradation of land, sea and air. Ultimately, the aim is to reverse this damage by reintroducing critical animal and plant species that played active roles in the preservation of some of Earth’s most climate-beneficial ecosystems. Many of which have all but vanished entirely today," Colossal added. The company cited 10 "core truths" as reasons for reviving the furry, tusked animal,...
    As the woolly giants disappeared from the face of the earth thousands of years later, scientists have embarked on an ambitious project to return these animals to the Arctic tundra. The possibility of recreating the giants and returning them to the wild has been discussed – sometimes seriously – for more than a decade, but on Monday researchers announced new funds that they believe could make their dream come true. The hike was raised by Ben Lam, a technology and software entrepreneur and George Church, a professor of genetics at Harvard Medical School, with $ 15 million raised by the biological science and genetics company Colossus. … The study shows that the woolly mammoth traveled long enough to orbit the earth twice Additional information Scientists initially thought of creating a hybrid of elephant and mammoth, creating embryos in a laboratory that carries mammoth DNA. The starting point of the project is to take skin cells from endangered Asian elephants and reproduce them into versatile stem cells that carry mammoth DNA. Specific genes for mammoth fur, fat insulating layers and other...
    (CNN)Bringing extinct creatures back to life is the lifeblood of science fiction. At its most tantalizing, think Jurassic Park and its stable of dinosaurs.Advances in genetics, however, are making resurrecting lost animals a tangible prospect. Scientists have already cloned endangered animals and can sequence DNA extracted from the bones and carcasses of long-dead, extinct animals.Geneticists, led by Harvard Medical School's George Church, aim to bring the woolly mammoth, which disappeared 4,000 years ago, back to life, imagining a future where the tusked ice age giant is restored to its natural habitat.The efforts got a major boost on Monday with the announcement of a $15 million investment.Proponents say bringing back the mammoth in an altered form could help restore the fragile Arctic tundra ecosystem, combat the climate crisis, and preserve the endangered Asian elephant, to whom the woolly mammoth is most closely related. However, it's a bold plan fraught with ethical issues. Read MoreThe goal isn't to clone a mammoth -- the DNA that scientists have managed to extract from woolly mammoth remains frozen in permafrost is far too fragmented and...
    SCIENTISTS are aiming to bring back woolly mammoths to the Arctic, ten thousand years after they became extinct. The possibility of recreating the giant beasts has been studied for years.  1Scientists aim to create a 'a cold-resistant elephant, but it is going to look and behave like a mammoth'Credit: Alamy Now researchers have fresh funding which they think can make it a reality.  The boost comes from £11million raised by the bioscience and genetics company Colossal, co-founded by entrepreneur Ben Lamm, and George Church, a professor of genetics at Harvard Medical School in the US. They want to create a hybrid by making embryos in the laboratory by putting skin cells from Asian elephants into stem cells with mammoth DNA.  The genomes are taken from animals recovered from the permafrost. Embryos would be carried by a surrogate mother. Prof Church said: “Our goal is to make a cold-resistant elephant, but it is going to look and behave like a mammoth. Most read in NewsSTORM WATCH Flash flood warning & hurricane watch for Texas & Louisiana as huge storm nearsSCHOOL...
    Woolly mammoths could be brought back from extinction within six years in the form of elephant–mammoth hybrids, a new scientific project has claimed. Having once lived across much of Europe, North America and northern Asia, the iconic Ice Age species went into a terminal decline some 10,000 years ago. The demise of the creatures — which could grow to some 11–12 feet tall and weigh up to 6 tonnes — has been linked to warming climates and hunting by our ancestors. Now, a US-based bioscience and genetics company, Colossal, has succeeded in raising $15 million (£10.8 million) in funding to bring back this prehistoric giant. The program — not the first to imagine mammoth 'de-extinction' — is being pitched as a way to help conserve Asian elephants by tweaking them to suit life in the Arctic.  The team also claimed that introducing the hybrids into the Arctic steppe might help restore the degraded habitat and fight some of the impacts of climate change. In particular, they argued, the elephant–mammoth mixes would knock down trees, thereby helping to restore Arctic grasslands — which keeps...
    Ben Lamm (L) and George Church.Photo courtesy Colossal A little more than two years ago, serial tech entrepreneur Ben Lamm reached out to renowned Harvard geneticist George Church. The two met in Boston, at Church's lab, and that fruitful conversation was the catalyst for the start-up Colossal, which is announcing its existence Monday. The start-up's goal is ambitious and a little bit crazy: It aims to create a new type of animal similar to the extinct woolly mammoth by genetically engineering endangered Asian elephants to withstand Arctic temperatures. The project has been kicking around for years, but nobody had ever given it enough funding to get it off the ground. "We had about $100,000 over the last 15 years, which is way, way less than any other project in my lab, but not through lack of enthusiasm," Church told CNBC. "It is by far the favorite story. We've never done a press release on it in all those years. It just comes up naturally in conversation." Church, the Robert Winthrop Professor of Genetics at Harvard Medical School and a faculty...
    MEXICO CITY The woolly mammoth it could walk the equivalent of two loops of the earth in just 28 years of life, reported researchers who tracked the footsteps of one of these great walkers. The finding, published Thursday in the prestigious journal Science, could help clarify hypotheses about the extinction of the animal, whose teeth were bigger than a human fist. Mexicans discover fossil of a new species of prehistoric fish In all popular culture, for example in the cartoon “Ice Age,” there are mammoths that move around a lot, “said Clement Bataille, an assistant professor at the University of Ottawa and one of the study’s lead authors. But it was unclear why mammoths traveled such long distances“Since such a large animal uses a lot of energy to move around,” he told .. The researchers were astonished with the results: the mammoths studied probably walked about 70,000 kilometers, and did not remain solely on the Alaskan plains, as expected. We see that they traveled all over Alaska, an immense territory, “said Bataille. It was really a surprise. “ – Reading...
    More On: fossils Weird ‘living fossil’ fish lives 100 years, pregnant for 5 Park ranger discovers 400-lb. ‘monster salmon,’ more in prehistoric fossil trove New species of crested dinosaur identified in Mexico ‘Tree’-like dinosaur multiplied in size during prosperous years It was a mammoth discovery! Crews rerouting a gas line in the city of Corvallis, Ore., uncovered the 12,000-year-old tusk of a woolly mammoth beneath the roadway. “Whenever doing this type of work, our crews are very careful to keep any eye out for any type of materials they may find while working that could be fragile or historic,” a spokeswoman for NW Natural, the gas company doing the work, told the Corvallis Gazette-Times. “As is our protocol, we stopped work immediately.” The excavation work was being done for the city government, part of a project on water lines and storm drains in the area. The company contacted Corvallis officials, who brought in Oregon State University’s Loren Davis, an anthropology professor who researches archaeological sites from western North America that date from the Pleistocene era, more than 12,000 years...
    Woolly mammoths roamed what is now New England 12,800 years ago and a new study suggests they shared the landscape with the first humans who arrived in the region some 10,500 years ago. A team from Dartmouth College used radiocarbon dating on a rib fragment from the Mount Holly mammoth uncovered in Vermont in 1848, showing the extinct herbivores overlapped with the arrival of the first humans in the Northeast. Previous research has uncovered evidence of these massive animals living in the Midwest, humans hunted and buried them in bogs, but this is the first indication of the two coexisting in the Northeast. The team explains that the Mount Holly mammoth was one of the last known living in the Northeast and although the findings show an overlap between it and humans, this does not confirm humans saw the animals or had anything to do with their extinction. Woolly mammoths roamed what is now New England 12,800 years ago and a new study suggests they shared the landscape with the first humans who arrived in the region some 10,500...
    PREHISTORIC humans may have been responsible for the extinction of the Woolly Mammoth after all, according to research. Simulations suggest that a combination of hunting by hungry humans and dramatic climate change killed off the mighty beasts 4,000 years ago. 2Woolly mammoth would not have died out 4,000 years ago were it not for the presence of humans, according to researchCredit: Getty - Contributor Previously, scientists have suggested that extreme weather or genetic disease may have driven the demise of the species. According to new research from experts in Australia, mammoths would not have died out when they did if it were not for humans. "In the absence of humans, we would expect woolly mammoths would have persisted for an extra 4,000 years in some areas," Dr Damien Fordham at the University of Adelaide in South Australia told New Scientist. The models also suggested that mammoths survived longer in several locations across Eurasia than was previously believed. 2The huge beasts were once common across North America and SiberiaCredit: Getty Images - Getty "People should be sending out expeditions to find...
    Scientists have made one mammoth discovery – literally. The oldest DNA ever sequenced – more than 1 million years – has been extracted from three mammoth teeth that had been excavated from Siberian permafrost in the 1970s and have revealed a previously unknown kind of mammoth, according to findings first published by Nature. The mammoth DNA shatters the previous record from a horse that lived between 560,000 and 780,000 years ago. SEA MONSTER WITH LONG SNOUT AND INTERLOCKING TEETH DISCOVERED  Ludovic Orlando, a researcher with the Centre for Anthropobiology and Genomics of Toulouse, who co-led the research that yielded the previous record, said he had been waiting for it to be broken since 2013. "I’m pleased to lose this record, because it was a heavy one," he said. DNA degrades into shorter fragments over time making sequencing the more than 1 million-year-old teeth a bit of a puzzle, but permafrost helps preserve the genetic data, Nature reported. The scientists also used the genetic code from a modern African elephant to fill in the information gaps. Love Dalén, an evolutionary geneticist...
    WASHINGTON – Scientists have recovered the oldest DNA on record, extracting it from the molars of mammoths that roamed northeastern Siberia up to 1.2 million years ago in research that broadens the horizons for understanding extinct species. The researchers said on Wednesday they had recovered and sequenced DNA from the remains of three individual mammoths – elephant cousins that were among the large mammals that dominated Ice Age landscapes – entombed in permafrost conditions conducive to preservation of ancient genetic material. While the remains were discovered starting in the 1970s, new scientific methods were needed to extract the DNA. The oldest of the three, discovered near the Krestovka river, was approximately 1.2 million years old. Another, from near the Adycha river, was approximately 1 to 1.2 million years old. The third, from near the Chukochya river, was roughly 700,000 years old. “This is by a wide margin the oldest DNA ever recovered,” said evolutionary geneticist Love Dalén of the Centre for Palaeogenetics in Sweden, who led the research published in the journal Nature. Scientists said on Oct. 20 that they...
    The world's oldest DNA is 1.2 million years old and comes from a previously unknown genetic lineage of mammoth, called the Krestovka mammoth, a new study reveals.   Researchers analysed genomes from three ancient mammoths, using DNA recovered from mammoth teeth buried in Siberian permafrost.  One genome dated back 1.2 million years and has been named the Krestovka mammoth based on the Russian locality where it was found.  Krestovka mammoth diverged from other Siberian mammoths more than two million years ago and is an ancestor of the famous woolly mammoth, the experts reveal. The other two, also named after their locality, are Adycha (1.1 million years old) and  Chukochya (700,000 years old). The oldest previously sequenced DNA dates from 780,000 to 560,000 years ago.  The illustration represents a reconstruction of the steppe mammoths that preceded the woolly mammoth, based on the genetic knowledge from the Adycha mammoth HOW OLD ARE THE MAMMOTH TEETH? Two different ageing methods were used, giving different results.  Geological methods - Krestovka: 1.2 million years old - Adycha: 1.1 million years old, - Chukochya: 700,000 million years old...
    (CNN)A tooth from a mammoth that roamed the Siberian steppe more than a million years ago has yielded the world's oldest DNA sequence. It's the first time that DNA has been recovered from animal remains more than a million years old. Previously, the most ancient DNA sample was from a horse that lived between 560,000 and 780,000 years ago. The information recovered from this giant of the Ice Age reveals how mammoths evolved and adapted to life in a cold climate. It also may show a previously unknown species of mammoth. The illustration represents a reconstruction of the steppe mammoths that preceded the woolly mammoth, based on new genetic knowledge. Illustration: Beth Zaiken/Centre for Palaeogenetics"This DNA is incredibly old. The samples are a thousand times older than Viking remains and even pre-date the existence of humans and Neanderthals," said Love Dalen, a professor of evolutionary genetics at the Centre for Palaeogenetics in Stockholm. An international team of researchers was able to isolate DNA from molars from three separate mammoths collected from the Siberian permafrost in the 1970s. They dated the...
    Researchers have recovered the oldest DNA ever found, dating back more than one million years. The achievement marks a milestone in DNA research and shows scientists now have the tools to probe even further back in history than once thought possible. The DNA comes from the molars of three mammoth specimens from the Early and Middle Pleistocene period from northeast Siberia, according to a study published Wednesday in the journal Nature. The main goal of the research endeavor was to sequence genomes from before and after the origin and evolution of two other branches of the mammoth family tree, woolly and Columbian mammoths. Based on the locations of the samples, preserved in permafrost and discovered in the 1970s, they have been named Krestovka, Adycha and Chukochya. The Krestovka mammoth is approximately 1.65 million years old and Adycha is about 1.34 million years old. Chukochya, at about 0.87 million years old, is believed to be one of the earliest known woolly mammoths, the scientists said. Until now, the oldest DNA ever recovered belonged to a horse, dating from 780,000 to...
    MOSCOW -- A well-preserved Ice Age woolly rhino with many of its internal organs still intact has been recovered from permafrost in Russia's extreme north.Russian media reported Wednesday that the carcass was revealed by melting permafrost in Yakutia in August. Scientists are waiting for ice roads in the Arctic region to become passable to deliver it to a lab for studies next month.It's among the best-preserved specimens of the Ice Age animal found to date. The carcass has most of its soft tissues still intact, including part of the intestines, thick hair and a lump of fat. Its horn was found next to it.Recent years have seen major discoveries of mammoths, woolly rhinos, Ice Age foal, and cave lion cubs as the permafrost increasingly melts across vast areas of Siberia because of global warming.Yakutia 24 TV quoted Valery Plotnikov, a paleontologist with the regional branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, as saying the woolly rhino was likely 3 or 4-years-old when it died.Plotnikov said the young rhino likely drowned.Scientists dated the carcass as anywhere from 20,000 to 50,000-years-old. More...
    Most theaters in D.C. closed their doors in March with no idea when they will reopen. And given social distancing guidelines, only one thing is certain: “There’s no going back to what it was before,” said Maria Manuela Goyanes, the artistic director of Woolly Mammoth Theatre Company. In a conversation about the future of theater hosted by the Mosaic Theater Company, Goyanes said the company is used to scheduling a complete season of shows, with a finely tuned calendar. That’s something they can’t do for the 2020-2021 season. “The only way to announce it was without dates, which is, like, so antithetical to what we usually do. The show has an opening night, usually. It has a closing night,” she said. But in 2020, unique times call for unique measures. In this case, Marketing Director Timmy Metzner has already been toying with an idea that seemed perfect for the pandemic world. “He came up with this idea of the golden ticket,” Goyanes said, “You get the Woolly experience, digital or otherwise, whenever you want, however you want, as many times...
    Reindeer herders found part of the animal’s skull, lower jaw, several ribs, and a foot fragment with the tendons still intact. This extraordinary conservation has been possible thanks to permafrost, now experiencing a worrying thaw for the planet.
    MOSCOW (Reuters) - Russian scientists are poring over the stunningly well-preserved bones of an adult woolly mammoth that roamed the earth at least 10,000 years ago, after local inhabitants discovered its remains in the shallows of a north Siberian lake. Part of its skull, several ribs and foreleg bones, some with soft tissue still attached to them, were retrieved from Russia's remote Yamal peninsula above the Arctic circle on July 23. Scientists are still searching the site for other bones. Similar finds in Russia's vast Siberian region have happened with increasing regularity as climate change warming the Arctic at a faster pace than the rest of the world has thawed the ground in some areas long locked in permafrost. Scientists circulated images in December of a prehistoric puppy, thought to be 18,000 years old, that was found in the permafrost region of Russia's Far East in 2018. The mammoth remains are at least 10,000 years old, although researchers don't yet know exactly when it walked the earth or how old it was when it died, said Dmitry Frolov, director of the...
    Scientists in Russia are working to retrieve the skeleton of a woolly mammoth from a lake in northern Siberia after the remains were found by local reindeer herders earlier this week. Russian television footage released Friday showed the scientists looking for fragments of the skeleton along the shallows of Pechevalavato Lake in the Yamalo-Nenets autonomous region, the Associated Press reported. An initial excavation revealed part of the mammoth’s skull, the lower jaw, several ribs and part of a foot. Teenage woolly mammoth with soft tissues intact found on Yamal peninsula. Scientific expedition on way to retrieve remains of Ice Age giant https://t.co/37oOe9leHv pic.twitter.com/3JQdQ0XjPo — The Siberian Times (@siberian_times) July 22, 2020 Stanislav Vanuito, head of the nearby Seyakha village, was in touch with the scientists and stated that reindeer herders have recently seen more fragments of mammoth bones around the village, The Siberian Times reported. The scientists were flown to the town of Salekhard to detail the remains and a second expedition is expected to do a full retrieval. “According to the first information we have, the whole skeleton...
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