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    SAN JOSE – The Sharks are going to be without Nikolai Knyzhov for the foreseeable future as the defenseman’s lower-body injury, which has kept him off the ice since the start of training camp, has not responded well to rehabilitation. Knyzhov was skating on his own late last week, but Sharks coach Bob Boughner said the defenseman’s progression has stalled and that he was flying out Wednesday to visit a specialist. The Sharks had recently considered Knyzhov week-to-week and were hoping he could join the team on its upcoming five-game road trip to continue to rehabilitate. But Boughner said Sunday the possibility also existed that Knyzhov would not travel at all. Knyzhov, 23, was the Sharks’ top rookie from last season as he played in all 56 games, had 10 points, averaged 16:26 of ice time per game, and became Erik Karlsson’s defense partner. It is not immediately clear who would play with Karlsson on Saturday when the Sharks host the Winnipeg Jets in their regular-season opener. Rookie Santeri Hatakka played with Karlsson on Saturday...
    SMITHTOWN, N.Y. (CBSNewYork) — Community leaders in two Long Island hamlets signed a letter to Gov. Kathy Hochul on Tuesday, pleading for action on their infrastructure plan. They say their Suffolk County downtowns are dead without help. READ MORE: Mayoral Hopefuls Sliwa, Adams Come Out Against De Blasio's Plan To Overhaul NYC's Gifted And Talented ProgramThe former Kings Park Psychiatric Center, deemed a liability and unattractive nuisance, may soon be the cornerstone of a clean water initiative that could rid 78% of the nitrogen being flushed into the adjacent Nissequogue River. The Steinmueller family owns a landscaping company on the banks of the river. “The most important thing is the environment … I’m a very green landscaper, so it’s my passion,” the business owner told CBS2’s Jennifer McLogan. And the passion of dozens of civic leaders who gathered at Smithtown Town Hall. “A victory is in sight. This is truly an historic day,” Smithtown Supervisor Ed Wehrheim said. Led by Wehrheim, a letter was signed and sent to the governor, pleading for action on their stalled sewer plan to save...
    CHICAGO (CBS) — With a coalition of aldermen preparing to formally introduce a civilian police oversight plan Mayor Lori Lightfoot vehemently opposes tomorrow, the mayor said she will finally introducing her own plan next week, after months of delays. The City Council Public Safety Committee is scheduled to meet Friday afternoon, when supporters of a proposal to create an 11-member civilian police oversight commission will formally introduce their proposed ordinance. No vote will be held, but sponsors will be given the opportunity to discuss the latest version of their plan. READ MORE: Mayor Lori Lightfoot Brushes Off FOP No-Confidence Vote Against Her, CPD Supt. David Brown, First Deputy Eric Carter Lightfoot has voiced opposition to that ordinance, in part over a dispute about whether the board or the mayor would have the final say in policy disputes between the board and the department. According to published reports, the proposal – endorsed by the council’s Black, Latino, and Progressive caucuses, if not necessarily every alderman in those groups – would give the civilian oversight board final say in policy disputes unless...
    CHICAGO (CBS) — After months of delays, aldermen appear poised to vote on an ordinance that would require the city to create a public database of closed Chicago Police Department misconduct files dating as far back as 1994. Ald. Scott Waguespack (32nd), who chairs the City Council Finance Committee, introduced the proposal last September to require the Inspector General’s office to create “a user friendly, publicly accessible and searchable digital repository” of CPD’s closed misconduct complaints. READ MORE: Chicago Weather: Cooler Than Normal The proposal from Waguespack and Public Safety Committee Chair Ald. Chris Taliaferro (29th) came after a proposal to settle a lawsuit that sought to force the city to release more than 50 years’ worth of CPD misconduct records stalled in City Council. The CPD misconduct database ordinance has gone nowhere for months, but is now scheduled for a hearing by  the Finance and Public Safety committees on Friday, after undergoing a major re-write. The original proposal would have required the Inspector General’s office to make all closed CPD misconduct files available on the database, but did not...
    A Nassau County judge imposed a $131 million judgment against a city in Long Island for continually stalling a development project since 1989, new court papers show. “The events giving rise to this case took place in 1989, the year that the Berlin wall fell,” Supreme Court Justice Jack Libert said in his ruling from Monday. “The wall lasted for 28 years. Litigation related to this matter has lasted for 31 years so far,” Libert said. Prolific developer Sinclair Haberman — who owns between 20 and 30 buildings and manages roughly 700 apartments — has been fighting in court for decades over the halted construction of four residential condo towers totaling 432 units in the City of Long Beach, according to the ruling. Haberman’s late father initiated the 350 Shore Road project asking Long Beach for a zoning variance in the 1980s. The city granted the variance and the first tower was built by 1987. But, the last three towers were never constructed as the project was delayed by changes in the city zoning laws and other reasons. The...
    EAST MEADOW, N.Y. (CBSNewYork) — On Long Island, ramped-up COVID vaccine efforts are underway, including a new vaccination center. This comes a day after Gov. Andrew Cuomo publicly criticized the Nassau University Medical Center for a stalled rollout, but the hospital says the governor has it wrong. NUMC emergency room nurse Gabrielle Desir, of Baldwin, was the first at the hospital to receive the second dose of the Pfizer vaccine Tuesday. “I feel good and safe to be taking care of the patients,” she said. She took pictures to send to her proud family. “A husband and two boys. They’re happy, emotional,” Desir said. CORONAVIRUS PANDEMIC Ask CBS2’s Dr. Max Your Vaccine Questions COVID Vaccine FAQ From CDC Find A New York City Testing Site Near You Check NYC Testing Wait Times Explanation Of N.Y.’s Yellow, Orange, Red Zones (.pdf) Resources: Help With Unemployment, Hunger, Mental Health & More Remote Learning Tools For Students And Parents At Home Complete Coronavirus Coverage NUMC is under fire from the governor for a slow rollout. “We don’t mind the push...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. long-term mortgage rates declined this week to record low levels for the 15th time this year against the backdrop of an economy ravaged by the pandemic. Mortgage finance giant Freddie Mac said Thursday that the average rate on the 30-year fixed-rate home loan fell to 2.67% from 2.71% last week. A year ago, the benchmark rate stood at 3.73%. The average rate on 15-year fixed-rate loans eased to 2.21% from 2.26%. The housing market continues as a rare bright spot in the stalled U.S. economy, as home-loan rates have trended downward through most of this year. That has bolstered demand from would-be homebuyers or people looking to refinance existing mortgages. Home sales have stalled, however, as the lack of available homes for purchase continues to stifle house hunters. Copyright 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed. Tags: Associated Press, infectious diseases, real estate, personal finance, mortgages, economy, business, health, coronavirus, lung disease
    WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. long-term mortgage rates declined this week to record low levels for the 15th time this year against the backdrop of an economy ravaged by the pandemic. Mortgage finance giant Freddie Mac said Thursday that the average rate on the 30-year fixed-rate home loan fell to 2.67% from 2.71% last week. A year ago, the benchmark rate stood at 3.73%. The average rate on 15-year fixed-rate loans eased to 2.21% from 2.26%. The housing market continues as a rare bright spot in the stalled U.S. economy, as home-loan rates have trended downward through most of this year. That has bolstered demand from would-be homebuyers or people looking to refinance existing mortgages. Home sales have stalled, however, as the lack of available homes for purchase continues to stifle house hunters. Copyright © 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.
    The Chinese coronavirus pandemic has once again delayed the long-awaited death penalty trial of the self-professed 9/11 mastermind and his four co-conspirators held at the U.S. military prison in Guantánamo Bay, Cuba, the judge handling the cases revealed recently. Justice remains elusive nearly two decades after the jihadis executed the attack that left about 3,000 people dead and over 6,000 injured, marking the deadliest assault on U.S. soil. U.S. officials charged the late Osama bin Laden’s close ally Khalid Sheikh Mohammed (KSM) alongside his nephew, Ammar al-Baluchi, accused hijacking trainer Walid bin Attash, facilitator Ramzi bin al-Shibh, and al-Qaeda money man Mustafa al-Hawsawi with war crimes punishable by death for allegedly helping 19 hijackers carry out the heinous attack. “Our client, this nation, deserves a reckoning,” prosecutor Edward Ryan reportedly told the court last July in pushing for a trial. Nevertheless, the Chinese coronavirus has pushed the trial back even further following repeated delays throughout the years. According to military commission documents, the judge handling the case since August, Army Col. Douglas Watkins, said last month: In response to the Pandemic, the Commanders of...
    BRUNSWICK, Ga. (AP) — The coronavirus pandemic has stalled plans to build a Georgia city's convention center that has been on the drawing board for nearly two decades. Brunswick Mayor Cornell Harvey acknowledged that the center planned since 2001 won't be built before his time in office ends in 18 months, The Brunswick News reported. City officials delayed plans in June to build the convention center because of the financial debt it could create amid the economic havoc of the coronavirus outbreak. Some of the money allocated for the center has been sent to a small business loan program to help struggling businesses during the pandemic. Business owners who receive loans have two years to repay them. Copyright 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed. Tags: Georgia
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