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    Share this: Democrats’ first attempt at responding to the back-to-back mass shootings in Buffalo, New York, and Uvalde, Texas, failed in the Senate as Republicans blocked a domestic terrorism bill that would have opened debate on difficult questions surrounding hate crimes and gun safety. Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., tried to nudge Republicans into taking up a domestic terrorism bill that had cleared the House quickly last week after mass shootings at a grocery store in Buffalo and a church in Southern California targeting people of color. He said it could become the basis for negotiation. But the Thursday vote failed along party lines, raising fresh doubts about the possibility of robust debate, let alone eventual compromise, on gun safety measures. The final vote was 47-47, short of the 60 needed to take up the bill. All Republicans voted against it.
    “The bill is so important because the mass shooting in Buffalo was an act of domestic terrorism. We need to call it what it is, domestic terrorism. It was terrorism that fed off the poison of conspiracy theories like white replacement theory,” Schumer said in a floor speech ahead of the vote, according to The Hill. The legislation would create two new offices in the Justice Department and Department of Homeland Security specifically assigned to combat domestic terrorism. It would also set up a task force to address white supremacy in the U.S. military. Each new agency would be required to submit a report every six months examining "the domestic terrorism threat posed by White supremacists and neo-Nazis, including White supremacist and neo-Nazi infiltration of Federal, State, and local law enforcement agencies and the uniformed service," CBS News reports. Paul accused these proposed offices of being the "thought police of the military" and said Democrats know the bill has no chance of ever becoming law. "It's a dumb Washington talking-points memo masquerading as legislation," Paul said. "But...
    Republican senators have blocked movement on a bill Democrats say would equip law enforcement agencies with more resources to combat domestic terrorism and white supremacy in the military. The bill failed to secure the 60 votes necessary to open debate, with the final tally coming to 47-47. Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer changed his vote to be against the measure so that he could introduce it to the floor again in the future. GOP SAYS DOMESTIC TERRORISM PREVENTION BILL LATEST PUSH TO EXPAND THE SURVEILLANCE STATE The GOP rallied against the measure, which passed the House along party lines last week, out of concern that it would cast too wide a net as to what qualifies as "extremism" and argued that federal agencies already have the authority and resources to combat domestic terrorism. It was brought to the floor in the House last week after a gunman apparently motivated by white supremacist views killed 11 people in a predominately black neighborhood in Buffalo, New York. It took on greater urgency in the Senate after 21 people,...
    WASHINGTON -- Democrats' first attempt at responding to the back-to-back mass shootings in Buffalo and Uvalde, Texas, failed in the Senate Thursday as Republicans blocked a domestic terrorism bill that would have opened debate on difficult questions surrounding hate crimes and gun safety.Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y. tried to nudge Republicans into taking up a domestic terrorism bill that had cleared the House quickly last week after mass shootings at a grocery store in Buffalo, New York, and a church in Southern California targeting people of color. He said it could become the basis for negotiation.But the vote failed along party lines, raising fresh doubts about the possibility of robust debate, let alone eventual compromise, on gun safety measures. The final vote was 47-47, short of the 60 needed to take up the bill. All Republicans voted against it."None of us are under any illusions this will be easy," Schumer said ahead of the vote.Rejection of the bill brought into sharp relief the prevalence of mass shootings in the United States, with the Senate in the unusual position of...
    Senate Republicans refused to let the chamber even debate the Domestic Terrorism Prevention Act.   Senate Republicans blocked consideration of a bill on Thursday that would have made it easier for the federal government to prevent and respond to domestic terrorism. All 48 Democratic senators present voted in favor of cloture on a motion to begin debate on the Domestic Terrorism Prevention Act. At the end of voting, Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer switched his yes vote to no to give himself the option of forcing a vote to reconsider in the future, and the final tally was 47-47, short of the 60 votes required to stop a Republican filibuster. The bill would mobilize federal agencies to examine domestic terrorism threats, improve interagency communication on potential attacks, and create new offices in the Department of Homeland Security, Justice Department, and Federal Bureau of Investigation to "monitor, analyze, investigate, and prosecute domestic terrorism." A nearly identical version of the bill passed in the Democratic-controlled House in September 2020 with bipartisan supermajority support, but was one of hundreds of bills to die...
    By Farnoush Amiri | Associated Press WASHINGTON — Democrats’ first attempt at responding to the back-to-back mass shootings in Buffalo and Uvalde, Texas, failed in the Senate Thursday as Republicans blocked a domestic terrorism bill that would have opened debate on difficult questions surrounding hate crimes and gun safety. Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y. tried to nudge Republicans into taking up a domestic terrorism bill that had cleared the House quickly last week after mass shootings at a grocery store in Buffalo, New York, and a church in Southern California targeting people of color. He said it could become the basis for negotiation. But the vote failed along party lines, raising fresh doubts about the possibility of robust debate, let alone eventual compromise, on gun safety measures. The final vote was 47-47, short of the 60 needed to take up the bill. All Republicans voted against it. “None of us are under any illusions this will be easy,” Schumer said ahead of the vote. Rejection of the bill brought into sharp relief the prevalence of mass shootings in the...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — Senate GOP blocks domestic terrorism bill that would have opened debate on gun measures after Texas school shooting. Copyright © 2022 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.
    Family members look on during the funeral service for retired Buffalo Police officer Aaron Salter, Jr, a security guard who was shot dead in the attack by an avowed white supremacist at TOPS supermarket, in Buffalo, New York, May 25, 2022.Jeffrey T. Barnes | Reuters The U.S. Senate on Thursday will hold a procedural vote to advance a domestic terrorism bill the House passed earlier this month to respond to a mass shooting in Buffalo, N.Y. But opposition from Republicans is all but certain to doom the legislation. The racist rampage by an 18-year-old on May 14 left 10 people dead in a predominantly Black neighborhood in Buffalo. The Democratic-held House responded days later with a measure that would specifically try to reduce racist violence. The bill before the Senate, known as the Domestic Terrorism Prevention Act, would create three new offices in the F.B.I, as well as in the Departments of Justice and Homeland Security, to track and examine cases of potential domestic terrorism. Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, a Democrat from New York, pleaded with his...
    Washington (CNN)The Senate will take a key vote on Thursday in an attempt to advance a bill designed to combat domestic terrorism. The vote comes as lawmakers are under intense pressure to take action in the wake of multiple recent episodes of horrific gun violence.The bill passed the House last week following a tragic mass shooting at a supermarket in a predominately Black neighborhood in Buffalo, New York. It is not expected to advance in the Senate, however, due to GOP opposition.Republicans have pushed back against the bill put forward by Democrats, describing it as partisan and unnecessary. At least 10 Senate Republicans would need to vote with Democrats to overcome the 60-vote threshold imposed by the filibuster -- and that is not expected to happen.Only one Republican -- Rep. Adam Kinzinger of Illinois -- voted for the measure when the Democrat-led House approved it after the Buffalo supermarket shooting. The Justice Department is investigating that shooting as a hate crime and "an act of racially-motivated violent extremism."The nation was rocked by another devastating mass shooting on Tuesday when an...
    by Eric Lendrum   Republicans in the United States Senate appear united in opposition to a recently-passed bill that allegedly aims to combat “domestic terrorism” in the United States, which was passed in the aftermath of the Buffalo massacre. According to The Hill, Republicans have called out the bill’s blatant partisanship, with Democrats immediately blaming Republicans for the shooting before introducing the bill as a mostly symbolic gesture. “It’s like the disinformation board on steroids,” said Senator Josh Hawley (R-Mo.). “Another way to look at is the Patriot Act for American citizens.” “I’m completely opposed to this idea that we would be giving the federal government and federal law enforcement power and authority to surveil Americans, to engage in any kind of monitoring of speech that is directed toward censorship,” Hawley continued. “I think it’s extremely frightening and I can’t believe they haven’t learned their lesson from the disinformation board debacle.” Hawley was referencing a recent failed initiative by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) to create its own “disinformation governance board,” through which the federal government would target and...
    Connecticut’s two U.S. senators, both Democrats, are urging passage of a bill that they say will help prevent incidents similar to the recent Buffalo mass shooting, though it actually narrows rather than expands federal anti-terrorism concerns.  At a press conference on Friday, senior Sen. Richard Blumenthal called the Domestic Terrorism Prevention Act of 2022 a “chance to take a stand and an opportunity to send a message to the hate mongers that enough is enough.” His junior colleague, Chris Murphy, stood with him, noting the measure would dedicate personnel in all of the federal Justice Department’s field offices toward “tracking and addressing hate crimes.”  Democrats in the U.S. House of Representatives first proposed the legislation in January 2021. In so doing, they purported to aim for heightened focus on the threat of white supremacism to Americans’ safety. But the measure actually addresses “domestic terrorism” in a way that critics worry would shield Islamist terrorists and other violent extremists from proper federal scrutiny.  The current legal definition of domestic terrorism refers to actions that endanger human life, violate U.S. criminal laws...
    Senate Republican Minority Whip John Thune of South Dakota immediately poured cold water on a just-passed House bill to help fight rising domestic terrorism, in the wake of his past weekend’s massacre of ten Black people in Buffalo by a self-avowed white nationalist and antisemite and a California church shooting deemed a “politically motivated hate incident” by local law enforcement. The House bill passed with all Democrats and just one Republican voting for it. 203 Republicans voted against the legislation that would establish new offices across three federal agencies to help identify and combat domestic terrorism. Three of the Republicans who voted against the legislation are original co-sponsors of the bill, and many who voted for a very similar bill two years ago voted against this bill Wednesday. The final tally was 222-203. CNN’s Manu Raju reports Senator Thune, the second-most-powerful Senate Republican, is “skeptical the domestic terrorism bill that passed the House will get 10 GOP senators,” which it would need to pass, assuming all 50 Democrats vote for it. He noted that it was a ‘pretty party-line vote.’...
    Two hundred and three Republicans voted against the Domestic Terrorism Prevention Act. In the wake of the shooting by a white man in a Buffalo, New York, supermarket on May 14 that left 10 people dead, all of them Black, the U.S. House of Representatives on Wednesday passed the Domestic Terrorism Prevention Act on Wednesday. The House voted 222-203 to pass the bill, sponsored by Rep. Brad Schneider (D-IL), which would create new offices within the Justice Department, Department of Homeland Security, and Federal Bureau of Investigation to "monitor, analyze, investigate, and prosecute domestic terrorism." The legislation directs the offices to share potential risks and take steps to prevent future attacks. The bill has now advanced to the Senate, where Democrats will try to bring it to a vote as soon as next week. Even though the bill had bipartisan support when it was first introduced earlier this year, only one House Republican, Rep. Adam Kinzinger of Illinois, voted in favor on Wednesday. Aside from four GOP members who did not vote, all other House Republicans voted against it, including...
    The Domestic Terrorism Prevention Act is the latest iteration of a Democratic push to enlarge the federal government's surveillance powers, according to Republican naysayers. The House recently passed the bill along party lines. It became a legislative priority after a gunman who espoused white supremacist views killed 10 people and injured three at a supermarket in a predominantly black neighborhood of Buffalo, New York. Though both parties condemned the atrocity in the strongest possible terms, most of the GOP refused to support the Democratic effort to direct more government resources toward preventing this kind of domestic terrorism. The act was introduced in January 2021 following the Jan. 6 Capitol riot. It would create offices to combat domestic terrorism in the FBI, the Department of Justice, and the Department of Homeland Security, which would give biannual reports about the state of domestic extremism in the United States. Additionally, the bill would create a “task force to analyze and combat White supremacist and neo-Nazi infiltration of the uniformed services and federal law enforcement agencies.” As for budget, the bill specifies...
    WASHINGTON -- The House passed legislation late Wednesday night that would bolster federal resources to prevent domestic terrorism in response to the racist mass shooting in Buffalo, New York.The 222-203, nearly party-line vote was an answer to the growing pressure Congress faces to address gun violence and white supremacist attacks - a crisis that escalated following two mass shootings over the weekend. Rep. Adam Kinzinger, R-Ill., a member of the congressional committee investigating the attack on the U.S. Capitol, was the lone Republican to vote in favor of the measure.But the legislative effort by Democrats is not new. The House passed a similar measure in 2020 only to have it languish in the Senate. And since lawmakers lack the support in the Senate to move forward with any sort of gun-control legislation they see as necessary to stop mass shootings, Democrats are instead putting their efforts into a broader federal focus on domestic terrorism.RELATED: 10 killed in Buffalo, NY shooting at supermarket police call hate crime"We in Congress can't stop the likes of (Fox News host) Tucker Carlson from spewing...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — The House passed legislation late Wednesday night that would bolster federal resources to prevent domestic terrorism in response to the racist mass shooting in Buffalo, New York. The 222-203, nearly party-line vote was an answer to the growing pressure Congress faces to address gun violence and white supremacist attacks — a crisis that escalated following two mass shootings over the weekend. Rep. Adam Kinzinger, R-Ill., a member of the congressional committee investigating the attack on the U.S. Capitol, was the lone Republican to vote in favor of the measure. But the legislative effort by Democrats is not new. The House passed a similar measure in 2020 only to have it languish in the Senate. And since lawmakers lack the support in the Senate to move forward with any sort of gun-control legislation they see as necessary to stop mass shootings, Democrats are instead putting their efforts into a broader federal focus on domestic terrorism. “We in Congress can’t stop the likes of (Fox News host) Tucker Carlson from spewing hateful, dangerous replacement theory ideology across the airwaves....
    WASHINGTON (AP) — The House moved toward swift passage Wednesday of legislation that would devote more federal resources to preventing domestic terrorism in response to the racist mass shooting in Buffalo, New York. The legislative effort is not new, as the House passed a similar measure in 2020 only to have it languish in the Senate. But lacking support in the Senate to move ahead with the gun-control legislation that they say is necessary to stop mass shootings, Democrats are instead pushing for a broader federal focus on domestic terrorism. “We in Congress can’t stop the likes of (Fox News host) Tucker Carlson from spewing hateful, dangerous replacement theory ideology across the airwaves. Congress hasn’t been able to ban the sale of assault weapons. The Domestic Terrorism Prevention Act is what Congress can do this week to try to prevent future Buffalo shootings,” Rep. Brad Schneider, D-Ill., who first introduced the measure in 2017, said on the House floor Wednesday. The measure seeks to prevent another attack like the one that took place in Buffalo on Saturday when...
    (CNN)The House of Representatives is expected to vote Wednesday on a bill aimed at preventing domestic terrorism and combating the threat of violent extremism by White supremacists.The vote comes in the wake of a horrific mass shooting over the weekend at a supermarket in a predominantely Black neighborhood in Buffalo, New York, that killed 10 people and wounded three others. The Justice Department is investigating the shooting as a hate crime and "an act of racially-motivated violent extremism." The bill the House will take up -- the Domestic Terrorism Prevention Act of 2022 -- is sponsored by Democratic Rep. Brad Schneider of Illinois. It has three Republican cosponsors: Reps. Brian Fitzpatrick of Pennsylvania, Don Bacon of Nebraska and Fred Upton of Michigan. It's not yet clear how much additional Republican support it may be able to get when it comes to a vote on the House floor.Once the bill passes the Democratic-controlled House as expected, it would next go to the Senate for consideration, where its fate is uncertain. Read MoreThe bill would set up offices specifically focused on domestic...
    Following the racially motivated shooting in Buffalo this weekend, House Democrats are trying to revive a bill aimed at combatting domestic terrorism and to do so they are seeking the support of Rep. Ilhan Omar, who once called the legislation “horrible.” Saturday’s mass shooting, which resulted in shooting of 13 people and the deaths of 10, has put pressure on Omar and other progressives who were concerned about the anti-terrorism’s bill reach. Ten of the people who were shot in a Buffalo grocery store  by 18-year-old Payton Gendron, who is white, were Black, and authorities say his rampage was fueled by racial animus. With Speaker Nancy Pelosi determined to win House approval of the Domestic Terrorism Prevention Act this week, talks began Monday with recalcitrant Democrats like Omar, who represents Minnesota’s 5th Congressional District. “Negotiations are ongoing,” said Omar spokesman Jeremy Slevin. “The congresswoman had concerns about an earlier iteration of the bill, but is working to improve the legislation in the hopes her concerns can be resolved.” Article continues after advertisement Pelosi told reporters the Domestic Terrorism Prevention Act...
    Thirty-five Senate Democrats have introduced legislation to ban “assault weapons” including popular AR-15-style semi-automatic rifles, citing concern about “domestic terrorism” following the Jan. 6 Capitol riot. Lead sponsor Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) enlisted a majority of her Democratic colleagues as co-sponsors of the “Assault Weapons Ban of 2021.” “To be clear, this bill saves lives. When it was in place from 1994-2004, gun massacres declined by 37 percent compared with the decade before. After the ban expired, the number of massacres rose by 183 percent,” Feinstein said in a statement. “We’re now seeing a rise in domestic terrorism, and military-style assault weapons are increasingly becoming the guns of choice for these dangerous groups.” Democrats frequently use the term “domestic terrorism” to refer to the actions of groups associated with a mob of President Donald Trump supporters who fought police to break into the Capitol and disrupt certification of President Biden’s election victory. Sens. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) and Richard Blumenthal (D-Conn.) hold a news conference in the Capitol on Oct. 4, 2017.CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Imag The bill, introduced...
    More On: guns Man shot and killed his own brother in fight over body wash, cops say Schumer pledges vote on firearm background checks bills NYC lawyer fighting to get gun permit back after NYPD takes away his heat ‘Queen of Guns’ opens up about rape ordeal as she urges women to pack heat Thirty-five Senate Democrats have introduced legislation to ban “assault weapons” including popular AR-15-style semiautomatic rifles, citing concern about “domestic terrorism” following the Jan. 6 Capitol riot. Lead sponsor Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) enlisted a majority of her Democratic colleagues as co-sponsors of the “Assault Weapons Ban of 2021.” “To be clear, this bill saves lives. When it was in place from 1994-2004, gun massacres declined by 37 percent compared with the decade before. After the ban expired, the number of massacres rose by 183 percent,” Feinstein said in a statement. “We’re now seeing a rise in domestic terrorism, and military-style assault weapons are increasingly becoming the guns of choice for these dangerous groups.” Democrats frequently use the term “domestic terrorism” to refer to the...
    Montana lawmakers are discussing a bill that would mark Antifa as domestic terrorists. Antifa often organize violent street actions in Portland, Seattle, Minneapolis, and other American cities in the name of racial justice. Now, lawmakers in Montana are considering legislation that would designate them as terrorists. The Associated Press (AP) reported on the development:  The intent of the measure is to “send a message that we as a state won’t tolerate a group like this coming into our state,” bill sponsor Rep. Braxton Mitchell, R-Columbia Falls, told members of the Montana House Judiciary Committee during a Tuesday hearing. Opponents of the bill said during the hearing that it would be inappropriate to designate antifa as a domestic terrorism group while ignoring other groups accused of domestic violence. Those include groups that participated in the attack on the U.S. Capitol last month. Mitchell said the intention of the measure is to target antifa, but the bill also calls on the U.S. President, the U.S. Congress and the Montana governor “to combat the spread of all forms of domestic terrorism, including white supremacist...
    By IRIS SAMUELS, Associated Press/Report for America HELENA, Mont. (AP) — Montana lawmakers are considering a bill that would designate antifa as a domestic terrorism group, despite no evidence of antifa activities in the state. The intent of the measure is to “send a message that we as a state won’t tolerate a group like this coming into our state," bill sponsor Rep. Braxton Mitchell, R-Columbia Falls, told members of the Montana House Judiciary Committee during a Tuesday hearing. Short for “anti-fascists,” antifa is not a single organization but rather an umbrella term for far-left leaning militant groups that confront or resist neo-Nazis and white supremacists at demonstrations. Opponents of the bill said during the hearing that it would be inappropriate to designate antifa as a domestic terrorism group while ignoring other groups accused of domestic violence. Those include groups that participated in the attack on the U.S. Capitol last month. Mitchell said the intention of the measure is to target antifa, but the bill also calls on the U.S. President, the U.S. Congress and the Montana governor “to combat...
    Former Democratic Hawaii Rep. Tulsi Gabbard issued a stark warning Friday about the proposed bill to combat domestic terrorism. Gabbard joined “Fox News Primetime” to discuss the legislation with host Brian Kilmeade, and she made it clear that she was concerned the legislation could be used to undermine civil liberties. (RELATED: ‘Crumbs’: Tulsi Gabbard Borrows A Line From Pelosi To Torch ‘Slap In The Face’ Stimulus) WATCH: Kilmeade introduced Gabbard, who had just stepped away from her congressional seat two weeks earlier, and asked, “Are you surprised they’re pushing forward with this extra surveillance on would-be domestic terror?” “It’s so dangerous as you guys have been talking about, this is an issue that all Democrats, Republicans, independents, Libertarians should be extremely concerned about, especially because we don’t have to guess about where this goes or how this ends,” Gabbard began, saying that former CIA Director John Brennan was already making comments that worried her. “When you have people like former CIA Director John Brennan openly talking about how he’s spoken with or heard from appointees and nominees in the...
    Rep. Josh Gottheimer introduced legislation that would double the maximum sentence for the crime of insurrection from 10 to 20 years in light of the violence that gripped the Capitol on Jan. 6. The New Jersey Democrat announced his bill, the Stopping Domestic Terrorists Act, on Friday. “What happened on January 6th at the Capitol — while members like myself were told to duck under chairs in the House Gallery as a violent mob broke down the doors of the House Chambers — was a violent extremist attack on our democracy. We can never let that happen again,” Gottheimer said. Gottheimer is also pushing a bipartisan effort for the Biden administration to increase resources for preventing terrorism and homegrown violent extremism. He, along with Republican Rep. Brian Fitzpatrick of Pennsylvania, co-authored a letter to President Biden urging “comprehensive action” to address domestic terrorism. In the letter, the congressmen urged the administration to increase grants to nongovernmental organizations working to combat radicalization and violent extremism, a national strategy focused on countering white supremacist extremism and domestic terrorism,...
    Tucker Carlson fired back at “creepy little demagogue” Rep. Brad Schneider (D-IL), after the congressman called out the Fox host in defense of his domestic terrorism crackdown bill. During his Thursday night show, Carlson responded at length to a tweet from Schneider, who shared a clip from the Fox host’s Wednesday night show. In the wake of the violent, Capitol insurrection that resulted in the death of five people, including one police officer, Schneider hit back at Carlson for opposing increased monitoring of violent, domestic extremists, clearly suggesting the Fox host wasn’t concerned about the deaths. Do I want to see increased monitoring on the types of violent, extremist domestic terrorists that attacked the Capitol, leaving five people dead, including a police officer? Absolutely. The real question is why is @TuckerCarlson okay with their deaths? pic.twitter.com/nY6zd4BTxp — Rep. Brad Schneider (@RepSchneider) January 21, 2021 “On January 6th, there was political violence on the capital and we opposed that,” Carlson said in response. “One thing that we oppose every bit as much is the destruction of civil liberties that make this America, make this...
    135 civil rights organizations signed an open letter to Congress on Tuesday urging them not to expand terrorism-related authority.  The letter, signed on behalf of the Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights, says that white nationalism and far-right militia violence must be addressed without causing further harm to communities that are already "disproportionately impacted by the criminal-legal system." FILE: Supporters of President Donald Trump scale the west wall of the the U.S. Capitol in Washington.  (AP) The signatories noted that the Department of Justice (DOJ) and the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) already have the resources to go after "white supremacist violence" as well as "hate crimes, organized crime, and violent crimes." The solution, they said, is not to create more laws to prosecute domestic terrorism, but to use the laws already on the books more effectively. "The failure to confront and hold accountable white nationalist violence is not a question of not having appropriate tools to employ, but a failure to use those on hand," they said. BIDEN MAKES APPEAL TO TRUMP SUPPORTERS IN...
    Democrats are divided over a new domestic terrorism bill that would establish new government offices to monitor suspicious activities within the country and combat terrorism, with a specific focus on White nationalists and neo-Nazis. President-elect Joe Biden is making a domestic terrorism bill a priority, the Wall Street Journal reported in November, and Sen. Dick Durbin, D-Ill., who sponsored such a bill in 2019, plans to reintroduce it after the new administration takes office. The bill has generated discussion since violent protesters stormed the Capitol building on Wednesday in protest of the certification of Biden’s election victory. FBI POSTS NEW PHOTOS OF DC PIPE BOMB SUSPECT ALONG WITH $50G REWARD "A Biden administration will … work for a domestic terrorism law that respects free speech and civil liberties, while making the same commitment to root out domestic terrorism as we have to stopping international terrorism," Biden's campaign website says. The 2019 bill calls for establishing offices in the Justice Department, FBI and Department of Homeland Security that would "analyze and monitor domestic terrorist activity." While it focuses on terrorism from right-wing extremists,...
    The attack on Capitol Hill by President Trump's supporters has sparked renewed interest in a Democratic-backed bill to increase the ability of the federal government to conduct surveillance on the far Right. The Domestic Terrorism Prevention Act, first passed by the House in September of last year, would create "dedicated domestic terrorism offices within the Department of Homeland Security, the Department of Justice, and the Federal Bureau of Investigation to analyze and monitor domestic terrorist activity and require the Federal Government to take steps to prevent domestic terrorism," according to the bill's language. First introduced by Democratic Rep. Brad Schneider of Illinois, the bill gained support from Senate Democrats, including Dick Durbin of Illinois, who introduced the bill in the upper chamber, and Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota. "While not the only threat, it is one that is the most fluid and prominent one and has recently expanded to the targeting to a wider array of public officials that include Republicans and law enforcement," said Brian Levin, director of the Center for the Study of Hate and...
    CHICAGO (WLS) -- Senator Dick Durbin will reintroduce the Domestic Terrorism Prevention Act in the wake of the Capitol Hill attack.The bill passed the House last fall but did not make it past the senate when it was blocked by Senate Republican Leader Mitch McConnell, but Senator Durbin hopes the senate will reconsider the bill in light of Wednesday's attack.RELATED: Former US presidents call chaos on Capitol Hill a 'national tragedy'Senator Durbin held a virtual news conference to discuss domestic terrorism and the need for new leadership at the Department of Justice. He is a senior member of the Senate Judiciary Committee.For years, Senator Durbin expressed concerns about the threat of right-wing extremism and crafted the bill with Congressman Brad Schneider.
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