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    (CNN)The critically endangered California condor has been absent from Northern California redwood forests for over a century -- until Tuesday, when the Yurok Tribe and Redwood National and State Parks reintroduced two birds to the woodland area, the culmination of a 15-year reintroduction project.California condors have been out of Northern California's redwoods since 1892, according to a statement from the Yurok Tribe, California's largest Native American tribe.There are only around 200 adult California condors left in the wild, according to the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN). Of these, only 93 have produced offspring. "For countless generations, the Yurok people have upheld a sacred responsibility to maintain balance in the natural world. Condor reintroduction is a real life manifestation of our cultural commitment to restore and protect the planet for future generations," Joseph L. James, chairman of the Yurok Tribe, said in the statement. "On behalf of the Yurok Tribe, I would like to thank all of the individuals, agencies and organizations that helped us prepare to welcome prey-go-neesh condor back to our homeland," he said, using the...
    REDWOOD NATIONAL PARK, Calif. (AP) — The endangered California condor returned to soar the skies over the state’s far northern coast redwood forests on Tuesday for the first time in more than a century. Two captive-bred birds were released from a pen in Redwood National Park, about an hour’s drive south of the Oregon border, under a project aimed at restoring the giant vultures to their historic habitat in the Pacific Northwest. READ MORE: 'This Was Clearly Gang-Related': 1 Suspect In Downtown Sacramento Shooting Still At Large, Murder Charges AnnouncedThe two male condors were moved into staging area at late morning and a remotely controlled gate was opened. After a few minutes of warily eyeing the opening, the birds stepped one by one through the opening, spread their giant wings and took off. “They just jumped up and took flight off into the distance,” Tiana Williams-Claussen, wildlife director for the region’s Yurok tribe, said in a webcast. Condors were last spotted in the park area around 1892, authorities said. The California condor is the largest native North American bird, with a wingspan...
    A plan to return federally endangered California condors to a rugged and remote stretch of Northern California coastline and redwood forests is taking shape on Yurok tribal lands where the Klamath River meets the Pacific Ocean. The tribe believes the condor is a sacred animal, and it says annual releases of four to six captive-bred condors starting later this month are part of its “obligation to bring balance to the world.” That’s because in the absence of large carnivores such as grizzly bears, condors will do the lion’s share of removing decaying carcasses from the ecosystem. “We’ve been working toward these releases for 14 years,” said Tiana Williams-Claussen, a tribal member and wildlife biologist with the Yurok condor program. “Now, the condor is coming home.” Meanwhile, a very different scenario is unfolding in Southern California, where federal wildlife authorities are taking the controversial step of helping smooth the regulatory path for a growing number of wind energy companies seeking permission to breed additional condors in captivity so they can replace any birds killed by spinning turbine blades. The Klamath River...
    Wildlife Nation with Jeff Corwin is a show that's teamed up with Defenders of Wildlife to travel coast to coast exploring and doing their part to help save North America's endangered species."Basically every episode is an adventure that is just filled with special moments and surprises," said Jeff Corwin, wildlife biologist and host of Wildlife Nation. "Our mission is to explore, discover and share our incredible natural heritage. This is a way to escape. This is meaningful escape. We have this beautiful national backyard, which we all share together."This weekend the team takes an in-depth look at the California condors and the challenges the magnificent birds face, such as lead poisoning. Corwin tells the incredible story of how the condors, who have been on the US endangered species list since 1967, are being saved. The birds have a long way to go, but it is a story of hope. From elephant seals to sparrows and bears, Wildlife Nation is on a mission to help raise awareness and inspire people to get involved in protecting endangered animals.For more information, visit: defenders.org/defenders.org/our-work/wildlife-nation...
    The California condor is a majestic icon of the natural world in the southwestern United States. With a wingspan of up to 9.5 feet and a characteristic bald and colorful head, Gmynogyps californianus, is a unique and recognizable character that reigns as North America’s largest flying bird. They can live to be 60 years old in the wild and spend their entire lives in monogamous relationships. Scavengers by nature, condors rely on their impeccable eyesight to spot deceased prey from up to 15,000 feet in the air. They usually prefer to dine on carcasses of sheep, deer, cattle and even marine mammals if they live near the coast. By consuming prey that is already deceased, condors hold an important role by keeping decaying flesh from stinking up the ecosystem. Sadly, California condor numbers have declined drastically over the last few decades, and their original habitat has shrunk to a nearly unrecognizable size. We cannot be too certain of historical populations of the birds, but we do know that there were only 22 known individuals in the world by 1982, and...
    The Ventana Wildlife Society’s livestreams are usually trained on condors — birds with 9-foot wingspans, decades-long lifespans and critically endangered populations. But when the Dolan Fire blazed through the Big Sur Condor Sanctuary in August 2020, flames and fumes filled the feeds. Helpless watchers viewed in horror as the wildfire barrelled through one of the few condor havens left in California. “Our worst nightmare was kind of being realized: This thing’s gonna burn right to the heart of our sanctuary in the middle of the night,” said Joe Burnett, manager of the society’s condor recovery program. That night left nine condors and two fledglings dead; another adult died later due to extensive burns. The fire also destroyed the society’s bunkhouse and release pen in the sanctuary. Upon returning to the campus, society Executive Director Kelly Sorenson said it was hard to look at. “There was just ash everywhere. Big, giant, mature trees were dead and hanging over the roads, which were in terrible condition,” he said. “It was a mess.” But more than a year after the Dolan Fire decimated...
    Life in the midst of a pandemic offers precious little to celebrate, but the California condor success story should warm all of our hearts. America’s largest birds — their wingspan stretches to nine feet, two feet wider than bald eagles — were so close to extinction that they were placed on the federal endangered species list in 1967. In the 1980s, three out of four condors in the wild were either dead or dying from lead poisoning. Eventually, only 22 remained. Today, there are 504 California condors with 329 flying in the wild. If you happen to spot one — think turkey vultures on steroids — and have binoculars to read the tag number under their wings, you can find the name, age and history of the bird at condorspotter.com Biologists are working to extend the release of condors to Redwood National Park in Northern California, expanding the range of the species from the Baja Peninsula to the Oregon border. If successful, it will mark the first time that condors have hovered over the Klamath River and the region’s majestic...
    (CNN)First, California condors nearly went extinct from poaching, lead poisoning and habitat destruction. Then the California wildfires last summer threatened to devastate their recovering wild population.Now, hope is on the horizon as the critically endangered species has added nine eggs to their numbers since January 15. The most recent egg came on February 7.Laid at the Oregon Zoo's Jonsson Center for Wildlife Conservation, the eggs are a much-needed boost for the species' survival. Nine eggs over the span of a month are the largest amount the condor breeding season has seen in the center's 18-year history.Dr. Kelly Flaminio, who oversees the Oregon Zoo condor recovery efforts, told CNN these eggs are a promising first step in rebuilding condor populations on the West coast. Read More"I can't stress enough how important each individual is in this program," Flaminio said. "It's not only about increasing the number of birds we have total, it's about increasing the number of birds we can get into the wild that reach breeding age so we can have more breeding happening in the wild. That's the key...
    EFE Latam Videos Experts take samples of the more than 30 condors found dead in Bolivia La Paz, Feb 8 (EFE) .- A group of veterinarians and biologists traveled to southern Bolivia on Monday to take samples of the more than 30 condors that were found dead in a ravine in the Tarija region, to determine the causes exact details of the death of these animals. National and regional authorities have been in the area since the morning, which is also protected by the Police, the departmental governor of Tarija, Adrián Oliva, informed the media. The area must remain protected because samples must be “collected” and “an inspection made by the competent authority” to identify the cause of death of the condors, he said. “Today (Monday) a group of biologists and veterinarians will arrive to work to collect samples and identify what happened on the spot,” Oliva explained. According to preliminary information, some 35 condors, 17 females and 18 males, have died in the place, but there are also other animals that also died, including a goat and some dogs,...
    California condors disappeared from Sequioa National Park 50 years ago, never to be seen again – until now. Park officials announced the return of the majestic scavenger after spotting nearly a dozen in the area on May 28. The bird has been roaming North America for thousands of years, but is now critically endangered due to lead poising – the creatures ingest bullet fragments while feeding on carcasses of hunted animals. Sequioa National Park has been closed since March up until last month due to the coronavirus pandemic, but some speculate the lack of visitors may have played a part in the condors return. California condors disappeared from Sequioa National Park 50 years ago, never to be seen again – until now. Park officials announced the return of the majestic scavenger after spotting nearly a dozen in the area on May 28 (pictured) California condors are the largest land animal in North America, with a 9.5-foot wingspan and weighing up to 31 pounds. It once flourished across the US from California to Florida and even in Western Canada and...
    California condors were recently seen soaring through Sequoia National Park for the first time in nearly 50 years. The giant endangered bird, the largest in North America, was known to nest inside massive sequoia trees before its near-extinction in the 1980s. Officials from the Pacific Southwest Region of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) said at least six condors were observed near the Giant Forest and Moro Rock, a popular hiking destination in the park, in late May. Photos of the birds show two of them gliding through the air and resting on a metal railing. The USFWS Pacific Southwest Region recently captured several California Condors soaring through Sequoia National Park. Wilson Garver/NPS "Condors were consistently seen throughout the parks until the late 1970s. Observations became increasingly rare throughout the latter portion of the century as the population declined," Tyler Coleman, a wildlife biologist with Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks, said in a statement to CBS News on Wednesday.  Get Breaking News Delivered to Your Inbox The Santa Barbara Zoo, using GPS to track the condor population...
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