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    The D.C. Memo is a weekly recap of Washington political news, journalism, and opinion, delivered with an eye toward what matters for Minnesota. Sign up to get it in your inbox every Thursday. WASHINGTON – To Prince’s upbeat “Let’s Go Crazy,” a delegation of Minnesota’s top DLF leaders strutted into a hearing Thursday that will help determine if their state wins the honor of hosting an early presidential primary in 2024, maybe even the first in the nation. The gambit was appreciated by the more than three dozen members of the Democratic National Committee’s rules and bylaws panel who will recommend to the full DNC which states should go first in that presidential contest. A shakeup of the current lineup – Iowa, New Hampshire, South Carolina and Nevada – is expected. There is plenty of competition for those early primary slots. Minnesota’s delegation, composed of DFL Chairman Ken Martin, Lt. Gov. Peggy Flanagan, state Attorney General Keith Ellison, Secretary of State Steve Simon and Rep. Angie Craig, D-2nd, were ready for questions about the state’s diversity. Iowa’s lack of...
    WASHINGTON – Fourth District Rep. Betty McCollum (D) is just one of the targets of a revolt by young, progressives against their party’s elders; a revolt that has resulted both in surprising upsets and resounding failures. McCollum, is favored to win re-election, but she has never faced a political rival with so much campaign cash. Coupled with political skills honed as a community activist and a grassroots network that helped her raise campaign cash, Amane Badhasso is a challenger that can’t be dismissed lightly. Badhasso, 32, is an Ethiopean refugee who came to Minnesota as a child after living in a with her family in a camp in Nairobi, Kenya. An ethnic Oromo, Badhasso is part of a group of progressive candidates who have crashed this year’s Democratic primaries hoping to unseat incumbents and push the party to the left. Most of the progressive challengers target more centrist Democrats, like Rep. Henry Cuellar, D-Texas, whose slim primary victory over Jessica Cisneros is threatened by a recount. But Badhasso is challenging one of the most progressive members of the U.S. House...
    With a possible — and notable — exception, the chairs of the Minnesota DFL and Republican parties are getting exactly what they’ve been dreaming of for the 2022 election: There will be no contested primaries for statewide executive offices. Gov. Tim Walz and Lt. Gov. Peggy Flanagan, Attorney General Keith Ellison, Secretary of State Steve Simon and Auditor Julie Blaha will face token opposition at best in the Aug. 9 DFL primary. And in what was a much-more-difficult task — given that Republicans have no incumbents — the Minnesota GOP has also so far succeeded in keeping their convention-endorsed candidates free from opponents, though that could change. Despite GOP leadership spending the last two weeks discouraging either from running, former Hennepin County Sheriff Rich Stanek or former attorney general nominee Doug Wardlow may file for governor and attorney general, respectively, by 5 p.m. Tuesday, when the election filing period closes. The GOP’s endorsed candidates are Scott Jensen for governor, Jim Schultz for attorney general, Kim Crockett for secretary of state and Ryan Wilson for auditor.  A primary function of...
    In 11 days, Minnesota Congressional District 1 primary voters will pick the Republican and Democrat they want to see on the ballot in the August 9 special election to succeed Rep. Jim Hagedorn, who died in February. In the absence of independent polling, we don’t have a great picture of who voters support in either the DFL or the GOP primary, to be held May 24. For now, one picture we do have is fundraising. A pre-election Federal Election Commission report deadline Thursday covers campaign activities between April 1 and May 4, and gives us the first picture into candidate finances we’ve had since first quarter filings, released mid-April. Article continues after advertisement The Republican side When it comes to the special election, Aug. 9, Congress-watchers don’t expect the race to be particularly competitive: The Cook Political report deems the district “likely Republican,” and Sabato’s Crystal Ball puts it in “Safe Republican” territory. That means whoever wins the GOP primary has a good shot at winning the Aug. 9 special election and becoming a member of Congress. Raising and spending...
    Why might Democratic office holders be interested in temporary elimination of federal and state gasoline taxes? An ad released this week by the National Republican Campaign Committee offers some explanation. Aimed at 10 incumbent Democratic U.S. House members who represent battleground districts, the spot attempts to tie the lawmakers to President Biden and rising prices. “The blame for record-high gas prices lies solely at the feet of Joe Biden and House Democrats,” U.S. Rep. Tom Emmer, a Minnesota Republican and chair of the campaign committee, said in a statement announcing the ads.  Among those targeted is U.S. Rep. Angie Craig, who represents Minnesota’s 2nd Congressional District. Whether gas prices are a record depends on how comparisons are made and how inflation is accounted for, but it’s true that they’re higher than they have been in a decade and a half. The cost had already been rising when the Russian invasion of Ukraine put further pressure on prices. Article continues after advertisement In Minnesota, imposing a gasoline tax holiday, especially over the summer vacation driving season, could cut per-gallon prices by 47...
    Call this one How A Bill Doesn’t Become A Law (but becomes a campaign mailer instead). It’s about how motions are made and bills are voted on with no intention of them passing. It’s how minority parties, which are usually excluded from decision making, can use the rules and procedures to embarrass the majority. And it’s how yes or no votes are meant not to legislate but to campaign — to prepare for the upcoming election by providing fodder for the mailers and social media ads that deliver messages to voters. Article continues after advertisement A battleground tactic Tuesday, during the first reading of bills in the Minnesota House, Minority Leader Kurt Daudt made a motion that halted what is usually a ministerial function. Normally bills are “read” and then assigned to committees for hearings. Instead, Daudt moved to have one bill, House File 4060, brought to the floor for immediate consideration. “There is a bill that was introduced in today’s introductions that I think can’t wait,” Daudt, R-Crown, told the House. “We need to take it up right now.”...
    Will Tuesday’s announcement of the third-party candidacy of Cory Hepola matter in the 2022 race for governor of Minnesota? The state DFL party seems to think so. Even before the former TV news reporter and radio talk show host declared, state DFL Chair Ken Martin released a critique of the campaign, saying Hepola is a spoiler that will help Republicans win the job in November. “The current field of Republican candidates for governor is the most extreme that Minnesota has seen in decades, making Hepola’s spoiler campaign even more irresponsible,” said Martin in that statement. “A vote for Cory Hepola is a vote to help the GOP cut taxes for the rich, defund public schools, and force their anti-choice agenda on Minnesotans.” Martin doesn’t have to think Hepola and the fledgling Forward Party of Minnesota will get enough votes to win. He just has to worry that he’ll get enough votes. “Three out of the last four Minnesota gubernatorial elections have been decided by single digits — and two of them were decided by one percent or less,” Martin said....
    Minnesota environmentalists are applauding the Biden administration’s recent action cancelling certain federal leases for the proposed Twin Metals copper nickel mine in Northeastern Minnesota. Twin Metals opponents maintain that the mine will seriously degrade the nearby Boundary Waters Canoe Area (BWCA) wilderness.  But given the vocal support for mining in communities near the BWCA, political fallout from the lease cancellations could impact this year’s midterm elections. That was the case nearly 50 years ago, when an environmental victory for Boundary Waters advocates roiled Minnesota politics during another midterm election year.  In 1978, Congress adopted landmark legislation strengthening wilderness protection for the million-acre BWCA. In the U.S. House, the wilderness legislation was sponsored by Minnesota’s 5th District Rep. Don Fraser, an avid environmentalist. In 1976, Fraser had signed on as chief author of the BWCA bill drafted by several environmental groups, including the Friends of the Boundary Waters and Sierra Club. The legislation was opposed by the Boundary Waters Conservation Alliance, a coalition that brought together loggers, resort owners and sportsman who felt threatened by the push for BWCA wilderness...
    It is a storied legislative technique, praised when your side uses it, condemned when the other side does. Known as linkage, it’s when an issue one party wants is tied to a sometimes-unrelated issue the other party wants. As the 2022 Minnesota Legislature reaches its second week, two issues have been subject to that strategy: restoring the state unemployment trust fund and increasing the amount of money set aside for frontline worker bonus checks. The two issues do have some things in common. Both are tied to the pandemic-induced recession. Both are expensive. And both have a deadline. But there is no reason, other than political leverage — and habit — that requires them to be put into a single bill or passed in sequence. Backers of an effort to replenish the unemployment insurance fund point to statements from the Department of Employment and Economic Development (DEED), the state agency that runs unemployment insurance in Minnesota, that large increases in monthly premiums will fall on state employers if something isn’t passed by March 15. Article continues after advertisement “This bill...
    For years, DFL state Rep. Paul Marquart of Dilworth has defied political headwinds, winning a House seat in northwest Minnesota that often picked Republicans for president and governor — by a wide margin. But Marquart’s winning streak is coming to a close. On Wednesday, he announced he will not run for re-election in 2022, finishing his 11 terms in the House, which followed 11 years as Dilworth mayor and two on the city’s council. The 65-year-old high school social studies teacher, who also chairs the House’s powerful Taxes Committee, said his decision wasn’t because he felt like his district would be too difficult to win in 2022 — or because Democrats might lose their House majority in what could be a good election cycle for Republicans. Marquart said he and his family decided in the summer of 2020 he wouldn’t run again. He joins a dozen other state lawmakers retiring ahead of 2022. But as one of few DFLers representing a Greater Minnesota district where Republicans have political strength, Marquart’s departure from the Legislature is significant, and it could play...
    Here are six things we know — or think we know — about the just-completed regular session of the Minnesota Legislature and what we can guess about the pending special session next month. It ended pretty much as leaders predicted it would When asked about the apparent futility of two parties with such different positions ever agreeing on different policy issues, the leaders always mentioned 2019. That was the last time a budget session was held with a divided Legislature and a first-term governor and everything more or less worked out. At the start of the 2021  session, DFL House Speaker Melissa Hortman said: “It might look and feel different, but hopefully the result will be the same.” Article continues after advertisement So far, it has been. In the waning days of the regular session, Hortman, Gov. Tim Walz and Senate Majority Leader Paul Gazelka did what they did two years ago. They reached an agreement on the big spending issues and set the conference committees to work on the details. MinnPost photo by Tom OlmscheidGov. Tim Walz, with budget...
    When state Sen. Tom Bakk of Cook became an independent in 2020 after nearly three decades with the DFL party, Republicans who control the Minnesota Senate rewarded the change by putting him in charge of writing what’s known at the Capitol as a bonding bill — a package of publicly-funded construction projects. Exactly what the results will be this year from Bakk’s political shift remains more or less a mystery, however. The former Senate DFL leader has outlined his vision for a construction budget, but with two weeks to go in a 2021 legislative session that ends May 17, Bakk’s bonding committee has met just twice and hasn’t passed any proposals. Meanwhile, in the House, the DFL majority has held more than two dozen hearings and released a $1 billion plan that pumps hundreds of millions of dollars into recovery for Twin Cities businesses damaged in riots after police killed George Floyd. But the Democratic proposal has not attracted any Republican support, something it needs, since general obligation bonds must be approved by three-fifths majorities of both the House and...
    MinnPost photo by Tom OlmscheidHouse Speaker Melissa Hortman: “So what seems possible now is not necessarily what will look possible at the end of session, when we’re trying to find common ground.”For Minnesota’s DFL lawmakers, when it comes to Republican opposition to tax hikes proposed this year, the response has been: What about 2019? That year, Republicans were set against tax hikes at a time when the state had more than a $1 billion budget surplus and a healthy rainy day savings account. This year, the surplus is $1.6 billion, the rainy day fund is unchanged and the federal government is sending the state billions in American Rescue Act money.  Those numbers have appeared to further arm Republican leaders — especially those who control the state Senate — to stand against the tax hikes that have been proposed by Gov. Tim Walz and passed by the DFL-controlled House. Yet when confronted with GOP statements of opposition, DFLers point back to 2019. Walz had two tax proposals that year: a 20 cent per gallon gasoline tax hike for transportation projects; and...
    The year 2020 will always be divided between its pre-COVID and post-COVID weeks. For Minnesota state government, that dividing line came March 13, when Gov. Tim Walz declared a peacetime state of emergency and made “recommendations” about large gatherings, hand washing and social distancing. On that day, there were 14 confirmed infections in Minnesota. But as much as COVID-19 and the murder of George Floyd dominated government and politics in 2020, there were other stories that seemed important at the time — and will likely return to prominence after the pandemic is over. Here are five. Article continues after advertisement A five-year probation cap Criminal justice reformers in Minnesota have often pointed to the fact that while the state has sentencing guidelines, it has a decentralized system that permits the length of probation — known as supervised release in Minnesota — to vary county by county and often by judge. That led to perhaps unintended results: Minnesota has some of the nation’s shortest average prison sentences while having some of the nation’s longest probationary periods. Because significant civil rights —...
    MinnPost photo by Peter CallaghanDemocrats will hold the House and the governor’s office; Republicans will hold the Senate.It is a disconnect in Minnesota election results that makes some people suspicious: Minnesota has consistently given its statewide vote to DFL candidates while at the same time giving Republicans control of one or both chambers of the Legislature. In many states, such results are evidence of gerrymandering: the practice of drawing often comically-shaped districts to give advantage to one party; that it doesn’t seem right that a party can win more votes statewide but not control both, and sometimes neither, of the chambers of the Legislature. Often the evidence that something potentially sinister is afoot comes from next door: In 2018, Wisconsin Democrats won a majority of the statewide vote and swept statewide offices. And yet Republicans saw the size of their state House delegation reduced by just a single seat, going from 64 to 63 seats (of 99 total). In fact, because of the way the state’s legislative districts are drawn, as the Brennan Center for Justice has written, “Republicans are a...
    Minnesota Republicans ousted another group of rural Democrats in the 2020 election, widening an existing geographic divide between the parties. But the GOP victories in outstate Minnesota also had a lesser noticed side effect: fracturing DFL leadership on farm policy.  MinnPost photo by Walker OrensteinRep. Collin PetersonThe defeat of U.S. Rep. Collin Peterson, who chairs the federal House Agriculture Committee, was the most high-profile example. But the DFL also lost state Rep. Jeanne Poppe of Austin, who chairs the Minnesota House Agriculture and Food Finance and Policy Division, and the party has likely lost state Rep. Jeff Brand of St. Peter, who is vice chairman of that committee.  At the Legislature, the shakeup raises questions about the future of agriculture policy in a DFL party that is increasingly made up of lawmakers from the Twin Cities metro area. It has also left Democrats like Poppe frustrated over the party’s inability to gain traction in Greater Minnesota and a campaign she said had little to do with her record  — or with agriculture. Article continues after advertisement A record that didn’t...
    Votes were still being counted in Minnesota on Thursday, but major races have largely been decided across the state. After a 2016 election in which Trump and Republicans surged across Greater Minnesota, here’s what we learned from outstate voters in 2020. Trump improved his performance in Greater Minnesota, but so did Biden The Trump campaign’s steady focus on winning more rural areas of Minnesota paid dividends in many ways for Republicans, as Trump won 94,955 more votes in 2020 than he did in 2016 outside of the Twin Cities metro area. Still, Biden improved on Clinton’s vote count by more than 104,897. Biden also appears to have won five counties that Trump won in 2016: Clay, Blue Earth, Winona and Nicollet. A similar story played out in Wisconsin, where Trump increased his vote share of some rural counties while slipping in others. Article continues after advertisement Tim Lindberg, a political science professor at the University of Minnesota Morris, said it was a strong showing in more rural areas for the president. That’s especially true considering population growth outside of liberal-leaning...
    MinnPost photo by Peter CallaghanThe state Senate now appears to be beyond the DFL’s reach.It was one of the top three 2020 election goals for the DFL, and millions of dollars were raised and spent to accomplish it: to take control of the Minnesota Senate from Republicans and create a Democratic governing trifecta: governor-House-Senate. The party’s other two goals — to continue its dominance in delivering the state for the Democratic presidential candidate and re-electing U.S. Sen. Tina Smith — were met. But the state Senate now appears to be beyond the DFL’s reach. For two more years, Minnesota likely will have the distinction of having the only divided Legislature in America. Despite being happy with the recruitment of challengers, despite out-fundraising the GOP and its interest groups two-to-one, and despite attracting attention from national activists, the DFL will remain in the Senate minority. The margin could be a single seat. The 2021 Legislature is now likely to convene with a 34-33 GOP majority or a 35-32 majority, the same advantage Republicans had when this election began. The House DFL...
    Nearly $1.6 million. That’s the amount of money that’s been spent by outside groups on a single race in Minnesota Senate District 34, centered on Maple Grove, where Republican incumbent Warren Limmer is facing a challenge by DFLer Bonnie Westlin. Not including the candidate’s own spending, Westlin has benefited from just over $1 million in spending by independent expenditure groups, while Limmer has benefited from $565,000. The money has gone heavily toward direct mail, cable ads, digital ads and social media. Based on reports filed this week with the state Campaign Finance Board, a total of $24 million in independent expenditures has been spent on Minnesota legislative races through Oct. 19, the cutoff for this final pre-election report. Of that, state Senate races have accounted for two-thirds of total spending, with groups affiliated with the DFL accounting for two-thirds of that money. That reflects a recent trend of Democrats having a more-successful fundraising apparatus and the 2020 focus on Minnesota’s upper legislative chamber, where Republicans have a 35-32 majority. The charts for this story try to use spending to show...
    Every state likes to be the center of attention, none more so than Minnesota. And for much of 2020, Minnesota was considered, and considered itself, a presidential battleground. But in the final week of the 2020 campaign, the polling average lead for Democrat Joe Biden is 7.9 percent, and University of Minnesota assistant professor of media law Chris Terry reports that the Trump campaign canceled another $750,000 in ads this week. (While there is $225,000 worth of new purchases, the cancellations continue a trend of reducing the Trump’s campaign’s ad buy.) That doesn’t mean that Minnesota has to slink to the background, like states that are so dominated by one party or the other that elections seldom if ever change partisan control. There’s still the Minnesota state Senate — and redistricting.  Legislatures elected this year will decide what congressional and legislative districts look like for the next decade, at least in the 34 states where commissions have not been given the task of drawing the political map.  Article continues after advertisement With a two-seat advantage in the Senate, the GOP’s...
    Sign up here to get our daily updates on coronavirus in Minnesota delivered straight to your inbox each afternoon. And go here to see all of MinnPost’s COVID-19 coverage. It doesn’t get the attention of dramatic TV ads or negative campaign mail, but increasingly the work of going door-to-door to mobilize voters can make the difference between a political campaign winning or losing. Partisans from both sides have said the neighborhood canvassing by the DFL and its allies like Planned Parenthood and gun safety advocates in 2018 greatly boosted turnout in battleground districts, especially those in the suburbs of the Twin Cities. But then came 2020, with a pandemic that restricts what volunteers and paid staffers can — and are willing — to do. The canvassing shifted to phones via calls and text messages. But while precautions around COVID-19 has changed the so-called ground game, it hasn’t eliminated it. “None of us have ever waged a campaign or run a party during a pandemic,” said state DFL Chair Ken Martin. “In many ways we’re sort of building a plane as...
    On paper, there aren’t many reasons that Minnesota’s political parties should be spending a lot of time and money on the state Senate race in District 34, a rematch from 2016 that saw the incumbent win by a 20 percent margin in a place where Donald Trump also won that year.  The district, which covers the northwest Twin Cities suburbs of Maple Grove, Osseo, Dayton and Rogers, has long been reliably Republican, with Sen. Warren Limmer winning there in 1995, 1996, 2000, 2002, 2006, 2010, 2012 and 2016. In 2016, he beat DFL nominee Bonnie Westlin, who’s running again this year, by nearly 10,000 votes. But the 34th has become one of a handful of highly targeted districts that DFLers want to flip and Republicans need to defend. And along with a handful of other Senate races, the race there has become a proxy war over broader themes: control of the Senate, control of post-census redistricting, gun safety, criminal justice reform, policing and even recreational marijuana legalization, with much of the money being raised and spent in the race coming...
    With all 201 seats in the Minnesota House and Senate on the ballot this year — and with upcoming redistricting making control of the Legislature even more important — the campaign to control the state Legislature should be dominating the 2020 election. It’s not, however, and for one reason: Donald Trump. As much as the parties would like the election to be about local candidates and local issues, many are drafting in the wake of the presidential election. When asked at the kickoff of the House DFL campaign how “Trumpy” she thought the races would be, House Speaker Melissa Hortman replied: “We are hoping 2020 is just as Trumpy an election as 2018 was for our team.” The reference was to the election that allowed Hortman’s DFL to sweep the suburbs and reverse a large GOP majority, handing her control of the House by winning 75 of the chamber's 134 seats. This year, Hortman’s job is to defend what the DFL calls their majority makers: those first-year lawmakers who won in 2018, many in close elections. Most of the battlegrounds...
    The most recent reports filed by Minnesota political committees reveal that the biggest spenders so far in the 2020 election are familiar names. For Republicans, it’s groups associated with business; for the DFL, it’s organized labor. Minnesota campaign finance law results in a complex web of entities that spend on political campaigns. Some are independent expenditure (IE) groups, a classification that came out of the U.S. Supreme Court’s Citizens United decision: They can accept corporate contributions but can’t work directly with campaigns. Other groups, including party committees, are called political funds (PF) and can both launch independent campaigns and work directly with candidates. Many of the groups give money to each other — and sometimes give money back again  — making following the money even more challenging. The most recent reports, filed last week, show activity — both money raised and spent — through Sept. 15. While that covers the Minnesota primary, it does not capture most spending for the general election. That information won’t be known until Oct. 26, when a pre-general election report is due, and that will...
    Sign up here to get our daily updates on coronavirus in Minnesota delivered straight to your inbox each afternoon. And go here to see all of MinnPost’s COVID-19 coverage. They weren’t dueling press conferences exactly, though they were sequential. At midday Wednesday, DFL Chair Ken Martin held a media event to accuse the state GOP and its chairwoman Jennifer Carnahan of flouting social distancing guidelines and rules meant to halt the spread of COVID-19. It included a PowerPoint presentation with multiple photos of Carnahan along with GOP candidates campaigning indoors, sans masks and without maintaining space between themselves and other people. Skepticism of the threats from the virus and objections to governmental restrictions has a clear partisan tint, both in Minnesota and around the country, and masklessness has become a common feature of GOP events.  Not long after, Carnahan held her own event, during which she accused the DFL and its candidates of not condemning — and therefore encouraging — the rioting and looting that returned to Minneapolis last week, a message that mirrors national and state ads sponsored by...
    A year ago, when the Minnesota secretary of state said he would provide presidential primary voter lists to all of the state’s major political parties, state DFL chair Ken Martin was worried. Martin thought the lists should be distributed so that the only the DFL would receive the DFL list and only the GOP would receive the GOP list. By Secretary of State Steve Simon’s reading, however, every major party — including the state’s two newest major parties, Legal Marijuana Now and Grassroots-Legalize Cannabis — would receive the lists, valuable data that include the names of voters of both parties and which party they favored. Ken MartinAt the time, Martin worried that the pro-marijuana legalization parties would use the lists to solicit DFL votes for the new parties. Now, however, DFLers think it just as likely that Republicans will do something else: make pitches to DFLers in tight state Senate races — not for Republicans, but on behalf of candidates from the marijuana parties as a way of siphoning off potential Democratic voters.  In at least four swing Senate races...
    Sign up here to get our daily updates on coronavirus in Minnesota delivered straight to your inbox each afternoon. And go here to see all of MinnPost’s COVID-19 coverage. Minnesota has to have a primary election that will end August 11, give or take a day or two. It’s in the state legal code, and the consent decree. But that doesn’t mean that candidates and political parties are obligated to make it exciting. In many cases, the opposite is true, with the DFL and the GOP trying to make their own endorsement process more important than the primary. Candidates seeking endorsements are urged to drop out if they don’t win that prize.  Some do. Many don’t. When they don’t — or when the parties weren’t able to agree on an endorsement — there are contested primaries. In 2020, a couple of those races will offer some real intrigue, including two congressional primaries — the Republican primary in the 7th Congressional District and the DFL primary in the 5th Congressional District. There’s also a handful of legislative races pitting incumbents against...
    MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) — Minnesota Democrats are urging their local Republican counterparts to condemn President Donald Trump’s tweet Thursday suggesting the November election should be delayed. In a statement, DFL Party Chairman Ken Martin called for elected Republicans in Minnesota to denounce the president’s “dangerous and anti-democratic move.” Earlier Thursday morning, Trump questioned whether the November election should be postponed due to concerns over widespread voter fraud, particularly in regard to universal mail-in voting. In a series of tweets, the president claimed that universal mail-in voting could be easily influenced by foreign governments. With Universal Mail-In Voting (not Absentee Voting, which is good), 2020 will be the most INACCURATE & FRAUDULENT Election in history. It will be a great embarrassment to the USA. Delay the Election until people can properly, securely and safely vote??? — Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) July 30, 2020 In his statement, Martin pointed out that Trump’s tweets come as the country’s COVID-19 death count has surpassed 150,000 and the nation’s economy suffered the largest quarterly economic drop since the Eisenhower administration. Legally,...
    The Minnesota Democratic-Farmer-Labor Party has postponed part of its 2020 virtual convention scheduled for this weekend in light of George Floyd’s death on Monday. In a Friday news release, DFL Chairman Ken Martin said postponing the convention is “the only appropriate course of action given the grief and anger gripping much of our state and nation.” Floyd died Monday night after Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin knelt on his neck for several minutes and Floyd said he couldn’t breathe. Chauvin was arrested and charged with murder on Friday. After Floyd’s death, thousands have protested throughout the Twin Cities — some peaceful and some resulting in stealing and arson fires. With Minnesota in unrest, Martin said, “Now is not the time for a partisan political rally.” The convention was slated to run Saturday morning through Sunday afternoon, with speaking appearances by former Vice President Joe Biden, Minnesota’s Democratic cRelated Articles What happened Thursday night? Walz says Minneapolis knew police station might fall hours earlier. Wisconsin agrees to broad mailing of absentee applications ‘Shocked and horrified’: Walz, Ellison, Flanagan pledge justice for...
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